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Sample records for oligopeptide transporter suppress

  1. Substrates of the human oligopeptide transporter hPEPT2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongxin; Lu, Kui

    2015-08-01

    Oligopeptide transporters serve important functions in nutrition and pharmacology. In particular, these transporters help maintain the homeostasis of peptides. The peptide-transporter PEPT2 is a high-affinity and low-capacity type oligopeptide transporter from the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family. PEPT2 has recently received attention because of its potential application in targeted drug delivery. PEPT2 is widely distributed in kidney, central nervous system, and lung of organisms. In general, all dipeptides, tripeptides, and peptide-like drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors could be mediated and transported as a substrate of PEPT2. The design of many extant drugs and prodrugs is based on the substrate structure of PEPT2 to accelerate absorption via peptide transporters. Thus, this paper summarizes the substrate features of PEPT2 to promote the rational design of drugs and prodrugs that target peptide transporters. PMID:26355221

  2. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. PMID:27216463

  3. A novel fungal family of oligopeptide transporters identified by functional metatranscriptomics of soil eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Coralie; Vallon, Laurent; Zimmermann, Sabine; Haider, Muhammad Z; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie; Luis, Patricia; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Functional environmental genomics has the potential to identify novel biological functions that the systematic sequencing of microbial genomes or environmental DNA may fail to uncover. We targeted the functions expressed by soil eukaryotes using a metatranscriptomic approach based on the use of soil-extracted polyadenylated messenger RNA to construct environmental complementary DNA expression libraries. Functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in di/tripeptide uptake identified a novel family of oligopeptide transporters expressed by fungi. This family has a patchy distribution in the Basidiomycota and Ascomycota and is present in the genome of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain. High throughput phenotyping of yeast mutants expressing two environmental transporters showed that they both displayed broad substrate specificity and could transport more than 60–80 dipeptides. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes one environmental transporter induced currents upon dipeptide addition, suggesting proton-coupled co-transport of dipeptides. This transporter was also able to transport specifically cysteine. Deletion of the two copies of the corresponding gene family members in the genome of the wine yeast strain severely reduced the number of dipeptides that it could assimilate. These results demonstrate that these genes are functional and can be used by fungi to efficiently scavenge the numerous, low concentration, oligopeptides continuously generated in soils by proteolysis. PMID:21654847

  4. Characterization of oligopeptide transporter (PepT1) in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Yi; Feng, Junchang; Lu, Shuangqing; Zhao, Qiong; Zhang, Jianshe

    2013-03-01

    The oligopeptide transporter (PepT1) is located on the brush-border membrane of the intestinal epithelium, and plays an important role in dipeptide and tripeptide absorptions from protein digestion. In this study, we cloned the PepT1 cDNA from grass carp and characterized its expression profile in response to dietary protein and feed additives (sodium butyrate) treatments. The PepT1 gene encodes a protein of 714 amino acids with high sequence similarity with other vertebrate homologues. Expression analysis revealed highest levels of PepT1 mRNA expression in the foregut of grass carp. In addition, PepT1 mRNA expression exhibited diurnal variation in all three bowel segments of intestine with lower levels of expression in daytime than nighttime. During embryonic development, PepT1 showed a dynamic pattern of expression reaching maximal levels of expression in the gastrula stage and minimal levels in the organ stage. The PepT1 expression showed constant levels from 14 to 34 day post-hatch. To determine whether fish diet of different protein contents may have any effect on PepT1 expression, we extended our research to dietary regulation of PepT1 expression. We found that dietary protein levels had a significant effect on PepT1 gene expression. In addition, PepT1 mRNA levels were higher after feeding with fish meal than with soybean meal. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo sodium butyrate treatments increased PepT1 expression in the intestine of grass carp. The results demonstrate for the first time that PepT1 mRNA expression is regulated in a temporal and spatial pattern during development, and dietary protein and feed additives had a significant effects on PepT1 gene expression in grass carp.

  5. Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) family expression in human nasal epithelium and their drug transport potential.

    PubMed

    Agu, Remigius; Cowley, Elizabeth; Shao, Di; Macdonald, Christopher; Kirkpatrick, David; Renton, Ken; Massoud, Emad

    2011-06-01

    The molecular and functional expression of peptide transporters (PEPT1 and PEPT2, PHT1, PHT2) in human nasal epithelium was investigated. Quantitative/reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR/RT-PCR), Western blotting and indirect immuno-histochemistry were used to investigate the functional gene and protein expression for the transporters. Uptake and transport studies were performed using metabolically stable peptides [β-alanyl-L-lysyl-Nε-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarin-3-acetic acid (β-Ala-Lys-AMCA) and β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine)]. The effects of concentration, temperature, polarity, competing peptides, and inhibitors on peptide uptake and transport were investigated. PCR products corresponding to PEPT1 (150 bp), PEPT2 (127 bp), PHT1 (110 bp) and PHT2 (198 bp) were detected. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the functional expression of PEPT1 and PEPT2 genes. The uptake of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was concentration-dependent and saturable (Vmax =4.1 ( 0.07 μmol/min/mg protein, Km = 0.6 ( 0.07 μM). The optimal pH for intracellular accumulation of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was 6.5. Whereas dipeptides and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) significantly inhibited peptide uptake and transport, L-Phe had no effect on peptide transport. The permeation of β-alanyl-L-histidine was concentration-, direction-, and temperature-dependent. The uptake, permeation, qPCR/RT-PCR and protein expression data showed that the human nasal epithelium functionally expresses proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters.

  6. The identification of oppA gene homologues as part of the oligopeptide transport system in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Wium, Martha; Botes, Annelise; Bellstedt, Dirk U

    2015-03-01

    The lack of an annotated oppA gene as part of many oligopeptide permease (opp) operons has questioned the necessity of the oligopeptide-binding domain (OppA) as a part of the Opp transport system in mycoplasmas. This study investigated the occurrence of an oppA gene as part of the oppBCDF operon in 42 mycoplasma genomes. Except for hemoplasma, all mycoplasmas were found to possess one or more copies of the oppBCDF operon and with the help of similarity searches their oppA genes could be identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined OppABCDF amino acid sequences allowed them to be grouped into three types. Each type has a unique set of conserved motifs, which are likely to reflect substrate preference and adaption strategies. Our approach allowed the identification of oppA gene homologues for all mycoplasma opp operons and thereby provides a method for re-evaluating the current annotation of oppA genes in mycoplasma genomes. PMID:25528211

  7. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide.

  8. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide. PMID:25261786

  9. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112 †

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10−6, similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >109 cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  10. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  11. ABC and SLC transporter expression and proton oligopeptide transporter (POT) mediated permeation across the human blood--brain barrier cell line, hCMEC/D3 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Carl, Stephen M; Lindley, David J; Das, Debanjan; Couraud, Pierre O; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio; Mowery, Stephanie A; Knipp, Gregory T

    2010-08-01

    Initial studies indicate that the newly developed hCMEC/D3 cell line may prove to be a useful model for studying the physiology of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium. The purpose of this study was to assess the mRNA expression of several ABC and SLC transporters, with an emphasis on the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter superfamily (POT) transporters in this immortalized BBB cell model. The transport kinetics of POT-substrates was also evaluated. The hCMEC/D3 cell line was maintained in a modified EGM-2 medium in collagenated culture flasks and passaged every 3-4 days at approximately 85%-95% confluence. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of a variety of ABC and SLC transporters was evaluated using qRT-PCR arrays, while additional qRT-PCR primers were designed to assess the expression of POT members. The transport kinetics of mannitol and urea were utilized to quantitatively estimate the intercellular pore radius, while POT substrate transport was also determined to assess the suitability of the cell model from a drug screening perspective. Optimization of the cell line was attempted by culturing with on laminin and fibronectin enhanced collagen and in the presence of excess Ca(2+). hCMEC/D3 cells express both hPHT1 and hPHT2, while little to no expression of either hPepT1 or hPepT2 was observed. The relative expression of other ABC and SLC transporters is discussed. While POT substrate transport does suggest suitability for BBB drug permeation screening, the relative intercellular pore radius was estimated at 19 A, significantly larger than that approximated in vivo. Culturing with extracellular matrix proteins did not alter mannitol permeability. These studies characterized this relevant human hCMEC/D3 BBB cell line with respect to both the relative mRNA expression of various ABC and SLC transporters and its potential utility as an in vitro screening tool for brain permeation. Additional studies are required to adequately determine the potential

  12. Teleost fish models in membrane transport research: the PEPT1(SLC15A1) H+–oligopeptide transporter as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro; Barca, Amilcare; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    Human genes for passive, ion-coupled transporters and exchangers are included in the so-called solute carrier (SLC) gene series, to date consisting of 52 families and 398 genes. Teleost fish genes for SLC proteins have also been described in the last two decades, and catalogued in preliminary SLC-like form in 50 families and at least 338 genes after systematic GenBank database mining (December 2010–March 2011). When the kinetic properties of the expressed proteins are studied in detail, teleost fish SLC transporters always reveal extraordinary ‘molecular diversity’ with respect to the mammalian counterparts, which reflects peculiar adaptation of the protein to the physiology of the species and/or to the environment where the species lives. In the case of the H+–oligopeptide transporter PEPT1(SLC15A1), comparative analysis of diverse teleost fish orthologs has shown that the protein may exhibit very eccentric properties in terms of pH dependence (e.g. the adaptation of zebrafish PEPT1 to alkaline pH), temperature dependence (e.g. the adaptation of icefish PEPT1 to sub-zero temperatures) and/or substrate specificity (e.g. the species-specificity of PEPT1 for the uptake of l-lysine-containing peptides). The revelation of such peculiarities is providing new contributions to the discussion on PEPT1 in both basic (e.g. molecular structure–function analyses) and applied research (e.g. optimizing diets to enhance growth of commercially valuable fish). PMID:23981715

  13. Towards a structural understanding of drug and peptide transport within the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon

    2011-10-01

    One of the principal aims of modern drug design is the targeted delivery of drugs within the body, such as to the central nervous system, combined with their exclusion from the liver and kidneys, which break down foreign molecules and subsequently eliminate them. Many of the commonly prescribed drugs are transported into cells and across the plasma membrane via endogenous membrane transporters, whose principal roles are the uptake of essential nutrients for metabolism. In many cases, such drug transport is serendipitous as they are simply mistaken as 'natural' compounds. Many of these transporters could, however, be targeted more efficiently, improving drug absorption, distribution and retention. The molecular details of these drug-transporter interactions, however, are at best poorly understood, in large part through the absence of any high-resolution structural information. To address this issue, we recently determined the structure of a prokaryotic peptide transporter, PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis, which shares a high degree of sequence similarity and functional characteristics with the human PepT1 and PepT2 proteins. PepT1 and PepT2 contribute significantly to the oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of a number of important drug families, including antibiotics, antivirals and anticancer agents. The crystal structure of PepTSo provides the first high-resolution model of a drug importer and provides the starting point for understanding drug and peptide transport within the human body.

  14. Glutathione Utilization by Candida albicans Requires a Functional Glutathione Degradation (DUG) Pathway and OPT7, an Unusual Member of the Oligopeptide Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prashant Ramesh; Thakur, Anil; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Paul, Sanjoy; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans lacks the ability to survive within its mammalian host in the absence of endogenous glutathione biosynthesis. To examine the ability of this yeast to utilize exogenous glutathione, we exploited the organic sulfur auxotrophy of C. albicans met15Δ strains. We observed that glutathione is utilized efficiently by the alternative pathway of glutathione degradation (DUG pathway). The major oligopeptide transporters OPT1–OPT5 of C. albicans that were most similar to the known yeast glutathione transporters were not found to contribute to glutathione transport to any significant extent. A genomic library approach to identify the glutathione transporter of C. albicans yielded OPT7 as the primary glutathione transporter. Biochemical studies on OPT7 using radiolabeled GSH uptake revealed a Km of 205 μm, indicating that it was a high affinity glutathione transporter. OPT7 is unusual in several aspects. It is the most remote member to known yeast glutathione transporters, lacks the two highly conserved cysteines in the family that are known to be crucial in trafficking, and also has the ability to take up tripeptides. The transporter was regulated by sulfur sources in the medium. OPT7 orthologues were prevalent among many pathogenic yeasts and fungi and formed a distinct cluster quite remote from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGT1 glutathione transporter cluster. In vivo experiments using a systemic model of candidiasis failed to detect expression of OPT7 in vivo, and strains disrupted either in the degradation (dug3Δ) or transport (opt7Δ) of glutathione failed to show a defect in virulence. PMID:21994941

  15. Meat proteins had different effects on oligopeptide transporter PEPT1 in the small intestine of young rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Li, Chunbao; Song, Shangxin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-12-01

    The peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) in the apical membrane of enterocytes is the central mechanism for regulating the absorption of di- and tripeptides. Dietary proteins may affect PEPT1 abundance and peptide absorption. The present study aimed to characterize changes in PEPT1 mRNA and PEPT1 protein levels in the duodenum and jejunum of young rats after 7-day diet intervention with casein (reference), soy, beef, pork, chicken and fish proteins and further evaluate the impact on the epithelial absorption capacity. RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that: (1) PEPT1 protein level in duodenum was higher (p < 0.05) for soy protein group than that for casein group. However, no difference was observed in jejunal PEPT1 protein level between any two diet groups (p > 0.05). The soy protein group had lower crypt depth and higher V/C ratio in the jejunum (p < 0.05). (2) PEPT1 mRNA levels were lower (p < 0.05) in rat duodenum and jejunum in pork, chicken and fish protein groups, whose trend was contrary to the results of jejunual histological observation with lower crypt depth, greater villus height and higher V/C ratio. In conclusion, different meat proteins alter distinct PEPT1 expression level and absorption capacity as reflected by gut morphology in small intestine.

  16. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  17. Dynamics of an antibiotic oligopeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middendorf, H. D.; Alves, N.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Gomes, P.; Bastos, M.

    2006-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight spectra were measured for an H 2O-hydrated and a nominally dry sample of a 15-residue antibacterial oligopeptide from 99 to 271 K. Proton mobilities, quasielastic broadenings, and changes in low-frequency inelastic intensities characterise the evolution of the peptide energy landscape as a function of momentum transfer and temperature.

  18. TcOPT3, a Member of Oligopeptide Transporters from the Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens, Is a Novel Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi Ting; Ming, Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Yan, Jing Ying; Xu, Zheng Yu; Li, Gui Xin; Xu, Chun Yan; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Thlaspi caerulescens is a natural selected heavy metal hyperaccumulator that can not only tolerate but also accumulate extremely high levels of heavy metals in the shoots. Thus, to identify the transportors involved in metal long-distance transportation is very important for understanding the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation in this hyperaccumulator. Methodology/Principal Findings We cloned and characterized a novel gene TcOPT3 of OPT family from T. caerulescens. TcOPT3 was pronouncedly expressed in aerial parts, including stem and leaf. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that TcOPT3 expressed in the plant vascular systems, especially in the pericycle cells that may be involved in the long-distance transportation. The expression of TcOPT3 was highly induced by iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiency, especially in the stem and leaf. Sub-cellular localization showed that TcOPT3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Furthermore, heterogonous expression of TcOPT3 by mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) complementation experiments demonstrated that TcOPT3 could transport Fe2+ and Zn2+. Moreover, expression of TcOPT3 in yeast increased metal (Fe, Zn, Cu and Cd) accumulation and resulted in an increased sensitivity to cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Conclusions Our data demonstrated that TcOPT3 might encode an Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu influx transporter with broad-substrate. This is the first report showing that TcOPT3 may be involved in metal long-distance transportation and contribute to the heavy metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:22761683

  19. Divergent developmental expression and function of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters PepT2 and PhT1 in regional brain slices of mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Xie, Yehua; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the developmental gene and protein expression of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs: peptide transporter, PepT1 and PepT2; peptide-histidine transporter, PhT1 and PhT2) in different regions of rodent brain, and the age-dependent uptake of a POT substrate, glycylsarcosine (GlySar), in brain slices. Slices were obtained from cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of wildtype and PepT2 null mice, and from rats at different ages. Gene and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. Brain slice uptakes of radiolabeled glycylsarcosine were determined in the absence and presence of excess unlabeled glycylsarcosine or l-histidine, the latter being an inhibitor of PhT1/2 but not PepT1/2. As PepT2 and PhT1 transcripts were abundantly expressed in all three regions of mouse brain, little to no expression was observed for PepT1 and PhT2. PhT1 protein was present in brain regions of adult but not neonatal mice and expression levels increased with age in rats. Glycylsarcosine uptake, inhibition and transporter dominance did not show regional brain or species differences. However, there were clear age-related differences in functional activity, with PepT2 dominating in neonatal mice and rats, and PhT1 dominating in adult rodents. These developmental changes may markedly impact the neural activity of both endogenous and exogenous (drug) peptides/mimetics. Developmental gene and protein expression of peptide transporters was evaluated in various regions of rodent brain, along with age-dependent uptake of dipeptide. We found marked changes in protein expression and functional activity of PhT1 and PepT2, the former predominating in adult and the latter in neonate. These developmental changes may markedly impact the neural activity of endogenous and exogenous peptides/mimetics.

  20. Synthesis of analogs of L-valacyclovir and determination of their substrate activity for the oligopeptide transporter in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Friedrichsen, Gerda Marie; Chen, Weiqing; Begtrup, Mikael; Lee, Chao-Pin; Smith, Philip L; Borchardt, Ronald T

    2002-07-01

    L-Valacyclovir, a prodrug of acyclovir, is a substrate for the peptide transporter (PepT1) in the intestinal mucosa, which accounts for its higher than expected oral bioavailability. The substrate activity of L-valacyclovir for PepT1 is surprising, particularly when one considers that the molecule has the structural features of a nucleoside rather than a peptide. In an attempt to better understand the structure-transport relationships (STR) for the interactions of L-valacyclovir with PepT1, analogs of this molecule with structural changes in the guanine moiety were synthesized and their substrate activity for PepT1 in Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined. The analogs synthesized include those that had the guanine moiety of L-valacyclovir substituted with purine, benzimidazole, and 7-azaindole. All three analogs (purine, benzimidazole, and 7-azaindole) exhibited affinity for PepT1 in binding studies, but only the purine analog (as the L-valine ester) showed PepT1-associated transcellular transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The benzimidazole and 7-azaindole analogs (as their L-valine esters) were rapidly metabolized by esterase when applied to the apical surface of Caco-2 cells, which probably explains their low penetration as the intact prodrugs via PepT1.

  1. A toolbox of oligopeptide-modified polymers for tailored elastomers.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Liang, Su; Schweizer, Thomas; Balog, Sandor; Mionić, Marijana; Snellings, Ruben; Cugnoni, Joël; Michaud, Véronique; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are constructed from limited sets of building blocks but exhibit extraordinary and versatile properties, because hierarchical structure formation lets them employ identical supramolecular motifs for different purposes. Here we exert a similar degree of structural control in synthetic supramolecular elastomers and thus tailor them for a broad range of thermomechanical properties. We show that oligopeptide-terminated polymers selectively self-assemble into small aggregates or nanofibrils, depending on the length of the oligopeptides. This process is self-sorting if differently long oligopeptides are combined so that different nanostructures coexist in bulk mixtures. Blends of polymers with oligopeptides matching in length furnish reinforced elastomers that exhibit shear moduli one order of magnitude higher than the parent polymers. By contrast, novel interpenetrating supramolecular networks that display excellent vibration damping properties are obtained from blends comprising non-matching oligopeptides or unmodified polymers. Hence, blends of oligopeptide-modified polymers constitute a toolbox for tailored elastomers with versatile properties. PMID:25198134

  2. In Silico Approach towards Designing Virtual Oligopeptides for HRSV

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ruchi; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel

    2014-01-01

    HRSV (human respiratory syncytial virus) is a serious cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Designing inhibitors from the proteins involved in virus replication and infection process provides target for new therapeutic treatments. In the present study, in silico docking was performed using motavizumab as a template to design motavizumab derived oligopeptides for developing novel anti-HRSV agents. Additional simulations were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the oligopeptides and confirmed the hypothesis that the designed oligopeptide is highly flexible and capable of assuming stable confirmation. Our study demonstrated the best specific interaction of GEKKLVEAPKS oligopeptide for glycoprotein strain A among various screened oligopeptides. Encouraged by the results, we expect that the proposed scheme will provide rational choices for antibody reengineering which is useful for systematically identifying the possible ways to improve efficacy of existing antibody drugs. PMID:25525622

  3. In silico approach towards designing virtual oligopeptides for HRSV.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ruchi; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel

    2014-01-01

    HRSV (human respiratory syncytial virus) is a serious cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Designing inhibitors from the proteins involved in virus replication and infection process provides target for new therapeutic treatments. In the present study, in silico docking was performed using motavizumab as a template to design motavizumab derived oligopeptides for developing novel anti-HRSV agents. Additional simulations were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the oligopeptides and confirmed the hypothesis that the designed oligopeptide is highly flexible and capable of assuming stable confirmation. Our study demonstrated the best specific interaction of GEKKLVEAPKS oligopeptide for glycoprotein strain A among various screened oligopeptides. Encouraged by the results, we expect that the proposed scheme will provide rational choices for antibody reengineering which is useful for systematically identifying the possible ways to improve efficacy of existing antibody drugs. PMID:25525622

  4. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    PubMed

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions.

  5. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  6. Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, N.; Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2013-12-15

    Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

  7. Formation of oligopeptides in high yield under simple programmable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marc; Surman, Andrew J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Suárez-Marina, Irene; Hosni, Zied; Lee, Michael P.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Many high-yielding reactions for forming peptide bonds have been developed but these are complex, requiring activated amino-acid precursors and heterogeneous supports. Herein we demonstrate the programmable one-pot dehydration–hydration condensation of amino acids forming oligopeptide chains in around 50% yield. A digital recursive reactor system was developed to investigate this process, performing these reactions with control over parameters such as temperature, number of cycles, cycle duration, initial monomer concentration and initial pH. Glycine oligopeptides up to 20 amino acids long were formed with very high monomer-to-oligomer conversion, and the majority of these products comprised three amino acid residues or more. Having established the formation of glycine homo-oligopeptides, we then demonstrated the co-condensation of glycine with eight other amino acids (Ala, Asp, Glu, His, Lys, Pro, Thr and Val), incorporating a range of side-chain functionality. PMID:26442968

  8. [Theory study on glycine linear oligopeptide vibrational spectrum frequency shift].

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-Peng; Li, Xin; Yang, Meng-Shi; Chen, Liang; Xu, Can; Chu, Xiu-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    By using the density functional theory, glycine linear oligopeptide of different lengths was geometrically optimized on the 6-31G (d) basis set level, their growth processes were simulated, and the average binding energy and vibration frequency were calculated with geometry. The results showed that the average binding energies tend to change in a regular pattern and stabilize with the number of residues increasing; With the oligopeptide chain bond length analysis it was found that the chain to the radial direction there is a opposite trend for chain and radial direction, which is anisotropic. It was found by the IR spectrum analysis that red shifts and blue shifts occur respectively when the same group of peptide bond vibrate, which is anisotropic; These phenomena originate from that quasi one-dimensional nanostructures lead to the anisotropy of the bond length; the induced effects, coupling effects and hydrogen bonding etc. between the same groups lead to the vibration frequency red shifts and blue shifts. The authors conclude that the growth of glycine linear oligopeptide is conducive to stability of the structure, and the authors infer that the oligopeptide has the tendency of self-assembled growth; Through the conformation and spectrum, the authors infer that there is a size effect in physical and chemical properties. The physical and chemical properties of peptide chain end group are extremely stable and unaffected by the impact of the oligopeptide chain length The results are significant to measuring the length and the number of residue of peptide, and to manufacturing the special features oligopeptide chain.

  9. Sample pretreatment techniques for oligopeptide analysis from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Poliwoda, Anna; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2009-02-01

    The analysis of oligopeptides in samples of food, tissues, and body fluids attracts considerable attention. The complexity of such samples requires efficient sample preparation (i.e., concentration and cleanup) procedures to remove interfering endogenous compounds and inorganic or organic salts. The methods of sample pretreatment that enable effective and selective isolation and/or preconcentration of oligopeptides from complex sample matrices have been reviewed. In each case, examples of application were presented and discussed, taking into account selectivity, enrichment, method automation, cleanup, and environmental aspects of the developed methods.

  10. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered... Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1911 Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered... Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1911 Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered... Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1911 Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a...

  13. Effects of phenylalanine and threonine oligopeptides on milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M M; Wu, Y M; Liu, H Y; Liu, J X

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe) and threonine (Thr) oligopeptides on αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Primary mammary epithelial cells were obtained from Holstein dairy cows and incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 medium (DMEM/F12) containing lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids). Free Phe (117 μg/ml) was substituted partly with peptide-bound Phe (phenylalanylphenylalanine, phenylalanyl threonine, threonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanine) in the experimental media. After incubation with experimental medium, cells were collected for gene expression analysis and medium was collected for milk protein or amino acid determination. The results showed that peptide-bound Phe at 10% (11.7 μg/ml) significantly enhanced αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis as compared with equivalent amount of free Phe. When 10% Phe was replaced by phenylalanylphenylalanine, the disappearance of most essential amino acids increased significantly, and gene expression of peptide transporter 2 and some amino acid transporters was significantly enhanced. These results indicate that the Phe and Thr oligopeptides are important for milk protein synthesis, and peptide-bound amino acids could be utilised more efficiently in milk protein synthesis than the equivalent amount of free amino acids.

  14. Two-fold odd-even effect in self-assembled nanowires from oligopeptide-polymer-substituted perylene bisimides.

    PubMed

    Marty, Roman; Nigon, Robin; Leite, Deborah; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-03-12

    Organic nanowires are important building blocks for nanoscopic organic electronic devices. In order to ensure efficient charge transport through such nanowires, it is important to understand in detail the molecular parameters that guide self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules into one-dimensional stacks with optimal constructive π-π overlap. Here, we investigated the subtle relationship between molecular structure and supramolecular arrangement of the chromophores in self-assembled nanowires prepared from perylene bisimides with oligopeptide-polymer side chains. We observed a "two-fold" odd-even effect in circular dichroism spectra of these derivatives, depending on both the number of l-alanine units in the oligopeptide segments and length of the alkylene spacer between chromophore and oligopeptide substituents. Our results indicate that there is a complex interplay between the translation of molecular chirality into supramolecular helicity and the molecules' inherent propensity for well-defined one-dimensional aggregation into β-sheet-like superstructures in the presence of a central chromophore. Strong excitonic coupling as expressed by the appearance of hypsochromically and bathochromically shifted UV-vis absorptions and strong CD signals was systematically observed for molecules with an odd number of l-alanines in the side chains. The latter derivatives gave rise to nanowires with a significantly higher electron mobility. Our results, hence, provide an important design rule for self-assembled organic nanowires.

  15. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment and fuel transportation units. 75.1911 Section 75.1911 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose... transportation units. (1) The system shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment and fuel transportation units. 75.1911 Section 75.1911 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose... transportation units. (1) The system shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications...

  17. Oligopeptides as biomarkers of cyanobacterial subpopulations. Toward an understanding of their biological role.

    PubMed

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-06-23

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria.

  18. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  19. Regulation of intracellular pH during H+-coupled oligopeptide absorption in enterocytes from guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Suzuki, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms for regulating the intracellular pH (pHi) level during oligopeptide absorption were investigated in the enterocytes from guinea-pig ileum by identifying the acid-base transporters responsible for extruding H+ that enters the cell through the H+-oligopeptide cotransporter. The pHi level was measured by microfluorometry in an isolated villus tip loaded with the pH-sensitive fluoroprobe 2′7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). The oligopeptide-induced increment in the short-circuit current (Isc) was determined in a mucosal sheet in Ussing chambers. A CO2/HCO3−-buffered solution was used. The superfusion of glycylglycine (Gly-Gly, l0 mM) caused a decrease in pHi level, which returned to the basal level after removing Gly-Gly. This pHi recovery was strongly dependent on extracellular Na+. Amiloride partially inhibited the pHi recovery rate with an IC50 value of 41 μM, the maximum inhibition being approximately 70%. In the presence of amiloride at its maximum concentration (0.3 mM), the addition of 0.6 mM DIDS caused a further decrease, but did not abolish the pHi recovery rate. In the absence of CO2 and HCO3−, the pHi recovery was almost completely abolished by 0.3 mM amiloride. The intracellular H+ accumulation induced by 0.3 mM amiloride or by 0.6 mM DIDS, as estimated from the pHi decrease and buffer capacity, was significantly greater during Gly-Gly superfusion than under resting conditions. The increase in Isc induced by luminal glycylproline was attenuated by either removing serosal Na+ or by adding 0.5 mM amiloride or 0.6 mM DIDS to the serosal side. We conclude that both Na+-dependent, amiloride-sensitive acid extrusion, probably by the Na+-H+ exchanger, and Na+- and HCO3−-dependent, DIDS-sensitive acid extrusion, possibly by the Na+-HCO3− cotransporter, are involved in extruding H+ that enters cells by the H+-oligopeptide cotransport. It is proposed that these acid extrusion (or base loading) mechanisms are present

  20. Chemical interference with iron transport systems to suppress bacterial growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics.

  1. Chemical Interference with Iron Transport Systems to Suppress Bacterial Growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics. PMID:25170896

  2. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3.

    PubMed

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S; Gomez, S Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D; Daniels, Dierdra A; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B; Benedito, Vagner A; Udvardi, Michael K; Harrison, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant.

  3. Suppression of epithelial ion transport transcripts during pneumococcal acute otitis media in the rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Ha-Sheng; Doyle, William J; Swarts, J Douglas; Hebda, Patricia A

    2002-07-01

    Until recently, it was not feasible to conduct genome-wide screening for gene transcript variations that play key roles in the pathogenesis of otitis media. In this study microarray technology was used to profile differential gene expression patterns from rat middle ear mucosa at 12 and 48 h after Streptococcus pneumoniae challenge. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed for independent verification of the microarray results. Three ion transport mRNAs were simultaneously suppressed more than 4-fold at 12 h in bacteria-challenged ears, including Na,K-ATPase alpha I subunit (SPATPa1), sodium channel beta 2 subunit (SCNB2) and sodium-hydrogen exchange protein isoform 2 subunit (NHE2). At 48 h after infection, the mRNA levels of SCNB2 and NHE2 had decreased 7- and 10-fold, respectively, whereas the relatively abundant SPATPa1 transcript showed recovery. The downregulation of Na(+)-transporting transcripts suggests a reduced number of epithelial cells and transporting proteins and/or the dysfunction of sodium transporters secondary to the bacterial infection. These changes can disrupt the coupling of the apical Na + entry and basolateral Na + extrusion, deplete the electrochemical Na+ transmembrane gradient, disrupt the intracellular osmotic equilibrium and lead to intracellular acidification and the accumulation of excess sodium, water and other organic and inorganic molecules in the middle ear cavity. Any or all of these changes may contribute to the initiation and persistence of middle ear mucosa inflammation and effusion during an episode of bacterial acute otitis media.

  4. Mechanistic study for immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV-activated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lian Hao; Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV activated surfaces decorated with N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilyl chloride (DMOAP). Our result shows that cysteine group, regardless of its position in the oligopeptide, is essential for successful immobilization of oligopeptide on the UV-activated surface. A possible reaction mechanism is nucleophilic addition of thiolates to surface aldehyde groups generated during UV activation. By using this technique, we are able to incorporate anchoring points into oligopeptides through cysteine residues. Furthermore, immobilized oligopeptides on the UV-activated surface is very stable even under harsh washing conditions. Finally, we show that an HPQ-containing oligopeptide can be immobilized on the UV-activated surface, but the final surface density and its ability to bind streptavidin are affected by the position of cysteine and HPQ. An oligopeptide with a cysteine at the N-terminus and a HPQ motif at the C-terminus gives the highest binding signal in the streptavidin-binding assay. This result is potentially useful for the development of functional oligopeptide microarrays for detecting target protein molecules.

  5. Suppression of population transport and control of exciton distributions by entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Schlawin, Frank; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Fingerhut, Benjamin P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Entangled photons provide an important tool for secure quantum communication, computing and lithography. Low intensity requirements for multi-photon processes make them idealy suited for minimizing damage in imaging applications. Here we show how their unique temporal and spectral features may be used in nonlinear spectroscopy to reveal properties of multiexcitons in chromophore aggregates. Simulations demostrate that they provide unique control tools for two-exciton states in the bacterial reaction centre of Blastochloris viridis. Population transport in the intermediate single-exciton manifold may be suppressed by the absorption of photon pairs with short entanglement time, thus allowing the manipulation of the distribution of two-exciton states. The quantum nature of the light is essential for achieving this degree of control, which cannot be reproduced by stochastic or chirped light. Classical light is fundamentally limited by the frequency-time uncertainty, whereas entangled photons have independent temporal and spectral characteristics not subjected to this uncertainty.

  6. A novel anti-inflammatory oligopeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, R R; Rico, G; Giménez, J A

    2001-02-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor (MLIF), a heat-stable oligopeptide found in the supernatant fluid of Entamoeba histolytica axenic cultures was isolated by ultra-filtration, gel-sieve chromatography and high powered liquid chromatography (HPLC), and its primary structure (Met-Gln-Cys-Asn-Ser) established by Edman sequencing and mass-spectrometry (MS). A synthetic peptide had the same selective anti-inflammatory features as the native material in comparable concentrations: in vitro inhibition of the locomotion in human peripheral blood monocytes, and of the respiratory burst in the same cells and in human neutrophil polymorphonuclear leucocytes; and in vivo depression of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene in guinea pigs. This oligopeptide is apparently synthesized by the ameba as suggested by [(35)S]-Cys and Met incorporation, probably as part of a larger molecule, from which it is cleaved by proteolysis. The full sequence was not found in the 431 available E. histolytica protein sequences. The factor may contribute to the unexpected paucity of the late inflammatory reaction found in advanced invasive amebiasis and, perhaps in consequence, to the regeneration without scarring (restitutio ad integrum) of the affected organs that is observed following successful treatment of this disease

  7. Mining gut microbiome oligopeptides by functional metaproteome display

    PubMed Central

    Zantow, Jonas; Just, Sarah; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Kisling, Sigrid; Dübel, Stefan; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infections, autoimmune diseases, and chronic inflammatory disorders are associated with systemic antibody responses from the host immune system. Disease-specific antibodies can be important serum biomarkers, but the identification of antigens associated with specific immune reactions is challenging, in particular if complex communities of microorganisms are involved in the disease progression. Despite promising new diagnostic opportunities, the discovery of these serological markers becomes more difficult with increasing complexity of microbial communities. In the present work, we used a metagenomic M13 phage display approach to select immunogenic oligopeptides from the gut microbiome of transgenic mice suffering from chronic ileitis. We constructed three individual metaproteome phage display libraries with a library size of approximately 107 clones each. Using serum antibodies, we selected and validated three oligopeptides that induced specific antibody responses in the mouse model. This proof-of-concept study provides the first successful application of functional metaproteome display for the study of protein-protein interactions and the discovery of potential disease biomarkers. PMID:27703179

  8. Modulation of Biointeractions by Electrically Switchable Oligopeptide Surfaces: Structural Requirements and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Chun L; Wang, Xingyong; Lashkor, Minhaj; Cantini, Eleonora; Rawson, Frankie J; Iqbal, Parvez; Preece, Jon A; Ma, Jing; Mendes, Paula M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic behavior of switchable surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of controllable and tailor-made surface materials. Herein, electrically switchable mixed self-assembled monolayers based on oligopeptides have been investigated in order to elucidate their conformational mechanism and structural requirements for the regulation of biomolecular interactions between proteins and ligands appended to the end of surface tethered oligopeptides. The interaction of the neutravidin protein to a surface appended biotin ligand was chosen as a model system. All the considerable experimental data, taken together with detailed computational work, support a switching mechanism in which biomolecular interactions are controlled by conformational changes between fully extended (“ON” state) and collapsed (“OFF” state) oligopeptide conformer structures. In the fully extended conformation, the biotin appended to the oligopeptide is largely free from steric factors allowing it to efficiently bind to the neutravidin from solution. While under a collapsed conformation, the ligand presented at the surface is partially embedded in the second component of the mixed SAM, and thus sterically shielded and inaccessible for neutravidin binding. Steric hindrances aroused from the neighboring surface-confined oligopeptide chains exert a great influence over the conformational behaviour of the oligopeptides, and as a consequence, over the switching efficiency. Our results also highlight the role of oligopeptide length in controlling binding switching efficiency. This study lays the foundation for designing and constructing dynamic surface materials with novel biological functions and capabilities, enabling their utilization in a wide variety of biological and medical applications. PMID:25793154

  9. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  10. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan. PMID:26613433

  11. Longan seed extract reduces hyperuricemia via modulating urate transporters and suppressing xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chien-Wei; Lee, Ying-Chung; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Fu, Hua-Wen; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia causes gouty arthritis, kidney disease, heart disease, and other diseases. Xanthine oxidase (XOD) and urate transporters play important roles in urate homeostasis. Numerous plants have been identified as XOD inhibitors. Longan seeds are known to contain high levels of polyphenols such as corilagin, gallic acid and ellagic acid. We examined the effect of longan seed extract on XOD inhibition and urate transporters GLUT1 and GLUT9 using both in vitro and in vivo assays. The results showed that dried longan seed extract (LSE) and its active components inhibited XOD dose-dependently in vitro. LSE inhibited uric acid production and XOD activity in normal liver cells (clone-9 cells) and was not cytotoxic under the concentration of 200 μg/ml. For the in vivo study, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given intraperitoneally for thirty minutes with or without allopurinol (a XOD inhibitor, 3.5 mg/kg) or LSE (80 mg/kg) and then injected intraperitioneally with 250 mg/kg of oxonic acid and 300 mg/kg of hypoxanthine intragastrically. LSE was able to reduce serum uric acid level and XOD activity in hyperuricemic rats. However, LSE or allopurinol did not inhibit the liver XOD activities. On the other hand, GLUT1 protein was suppressed in kidney and GLUT9 was induced in liver from experimental rats and LSE or allopurinol decreased GLUT9 but increased GLUT1 protein level in the liver and kidney, respectively. These results confirmed the claimed effect of longan seeds on gout and other complications and suggested that its urate reducing effect might be due to modulation of urate transporters and inhibition of circulating xanthine oxidase.

  12. MicroRNA delivery with osmotic polysorbitol-based transporter suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Moon, Myoeng-Ju; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are short oligonucleotides of endogenous origin involved in post-transcriptional regulation and are altered in disease, making them potential therapeutic targets. miRNA replacement is necessary in cells with downregulated miRNAs levels in response to disease. miRNA 145 is a novel tumor suppressor gene involved in cell suppression, invasion and migration of cancer cells; it is downregulated in most cancers. Delivery of therapeutic miRNA using nanoparticles enhances the chances of successful delivery and expression of genes at the target site. We evaluated polysorbitol-mediated transporter (PSMT) in the cellular delivery of miRNA 145. The polysorbitol backbone possesses osmotic properties and leads to enhanced cellular uptake. PSMT delivers genes into cells by a caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway. Caveolae expression is usually altered in transformed cancer cells. Physicochemical characterization, and the transfection efficiency and transgene expression capability of PSMT/reporter plasmid DNA nanoparticles, were determined. GFP-tagged miRNA 145 delivery with PSMT was confirmed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The functional effects of miRNA 145 delivered with PSMT were analyzed by confocal microscopy, as well as in apoptosis, proliferation and wound healing assays. Finally, the expression of an miRNA 145 target protein, c-myc, was determined by Western blotting after intracellular delivery of PSMT/miRNA 145 nanoparticle (NP).

  13. Oligopeptide-heavy metal interaction monitoring by hybrid gold nanoparticle based assay.

    PubMed

    Politi, Jane; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Iodice, Mario; de Stefano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Phytochelatins are small peptides that can be found in several organisms, which use these oligopeptides to handle heavy metal elements. Here, we report a method for monitoring interactions between lead(ii) ions in aqueous solutions and phytochelatin 6 oligopeptide bioconjugated onto pegylated gold nanorods (PEG-AuNrs). This study is the first step towards a high sensitive label free optical biosensor to quantify heavy metal pollution in water. PMID:25360445

  14. Expression of the Oligopeptide Permease Operon of Moraxella catarrhalis Is Regulated by Temperature and Nutrient Availability

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Together, these two conditions contribute to enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. The oligopeptide permease (opp) ABC transport system is a nutritional virulence factor important for the utilization of peptides. The substrate binding protein OppA, which binds peptides for uptake, is a potential vaccine antigen, but little was known about the regulation of gene expression. The five opp genes oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA are in the same open reading frame. Sequence analysis predicted two promoters, one located upstream of oppB and one within the intergenic region between oppF and oppA. We have characterized the gene cluster as an operon with two functional promoters and show that cold shock at 26°C for ≤0.5 h and the presence of a peptide substrate increase gene transcript levels. Additionally, the putative promoter upstream of oppA contributes to the transcription of oppA but is not influenced by the same environmental cues as the promoter upstream of oppB. We conclude that temperature and nutrient availability contribute to the regulation of the Opp system, which is an important nutritional virulence factor in M. catarrhalis. PMID:26099587

  15. Suppressing glucose transporter gene expression in schistosomes impairs parasite feeding and decreases survival in the mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Simoes, Mariana; Faghiri, Zahra; Ndegwa, David; Oliveira, Guilherme; Shoemaker, Charles B; Skelly, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Adult schistosomes live in the host's bloodstream where they import nutrients such as glucose across their body surface (the tegument). The parasite tegument is an unusual structure since it is enclosed not by the typical one but by two closely apposed lipid bilayers. Within the tegument two glucose importing proteins have been identified; these are schistosome glucose transporter (SGTP) 1 and 4. SGTP4 is present in the host interactive, apical tegumental membranes, while SGTP1 is found in the tegumental basal membrane (as well as in internal tissues). The SGTPs act by facilitated diffusion. To examine the importance of these proteins for the parasites, RNAi was employed to knock down expression of both SGTP genes in the schistosomula and adult worm life stages. Both qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis confirmed successful gene suppression. It was found that SGTP1 or SGTP4-suppressed parasites exhibit an impaired ability to import glucose compared to control worms. In addition, parasites with both SGTP1 and SGTP4 simultaneously suppressed showed a further reduction in capacity to import glucose compared to parasites with a single suppressed SGTP gene. Despite this debility, all suppressed parasites exhibited no phenotypic distinction compared to controls when cultured in rich medium. Following prolonged incubation in glucose-depleted medium however, significantly fewer SGTP-suppressed parasites survived. Finally, SGTP-suppressed parasites showed decreased viability in vivo following infection of experimental animals. These findings provide direct evidence for the importance of SGTP1 and SGTP4 for schistosomes in importing exogenous glucose and show that these proteins are important for normal parasite development in the mammalian host.

  16. Diversity and evolution of oligopeptide permease systems in staphylococcal species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongliang; Pi, Borui; Yu, Meihong; Wang, Yanfei; Ruan, Zhi; Feng, Ye; Yu, Yunsong

    2014-07-01

    Several oligopeptide permease (Opp) systems have been found in staphylococcal species, including Opp1-4, Opp3' and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)-encoded Opp system (ACME-Opp). They confer upon bacteria the increasing fitness, but their evolutionary histories remain unclear. In this work, we performed a genome-wide identification of Opp systems in staphylococcal species. Novel Opp systems were identified, including the duplicate of Opp4 in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and the ACME-Opp-like systems in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all of the identified Opp systems were derived from Opp3 system by operon duplication during species divergence, while lateral gene transfer might also confer to the dissemination of Opp in staphylococci. In addition, we proposed an improved theory on evolution of ACME: the Opp and arginine-deiminase systems were firstly transferred from Staphylococcus haemolyticus to Staphylococcus epidermidis independently; in S. epidermidis they were assembled together and then transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24793159

  17. Self-organization of oligopeptides obtained on dissolution of feather keratins in superheated water.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Rastogi, Sanjay; Terry, Ann E; Popescu, Crisan

    2007-03-01

    Keratins are self-organized proteins that are abundantly available in wool, feather, human hair, etc., making them a potential cheap feedstock for the modification of amino acids. This paper explores the hydrolysis of keratin in water under specific pressure-temperature conditions where the hydrolysis through scission of the protein chain yields oligopeptides. Here we report for the first time that, under appropriate conditions, these oligopeptides self-assemble into a hierarchical architecture, the process being followed in time by optical microscopy. Birefringent needle-like crystals are observed which tend to nucleate heterogeneously. When given sufficient time, these needles become tens of microns in length and act as further nuclei, developing a highly repetitive structure of several hundreds of microns in size. Micro-focus X-ray diffraction studies supported by in situ microscopy reveal that these needles have a crystal structure similar to that of the native protein, although better organized along the ab-plane. Spectroscopic studies on these structures show crystalline bands that disappear above 150 degrees C, coinciding with an endothermic peak in DSC. Amino acid analysis shows that the self-assembled birefringent entities are indeed oligopeptides, consisting of sequences of approximately 40 amino acids. The proposed ecofriendly route provides an effective route for obtaining oligopeptides that can be used as important building blocks for the synthesis of a range of novel polymers. The oligopeptides obtained from the sustainable source can be used as important building blocks for the synthesis of a range of novel polymers.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus NorD, a Putative Efflux Pump Coregulated with the Opp1 Oligopeptide Permease, Contributes Selectively to Fitness In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yanpeng; Fu, Yingmei; Lee, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus readily infects humans, causing infections from mild superficial skin infections to lethal bacteremia and endocarditis. Transporters produced by S. aureus allow the pathogen to adapt to a variety of settings, including survival at sites of infection and in the presence of antibiotics. The native functions of many transporters are unknown, but their potential dual contribution to fitness and antimicrobial resistance highlights their importance in staphylococcal infections. Here, we show that S. aureus NorD, a newly recognized efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, contributes to fitness in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. In community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain MW2, norD was selectively upregulated 36-fold at the infection site relative to growth in vitro, and the norD mutant demonstrated significant fitness impairment in abscesses, with fitness 20- to 40-fold lower than that of the parent MW2 strain. Plasmid-encoded NorD could complement the fitness defect of the MW2 norD mutant. Chromosomal norD expression is polycistronic with the upstream oligopeptide permease genes (opp1ABCDF), which encode an ABC oligopeptide transporter. Both norD and opp1 were upregulated in abscesses and iron-restricted culture medium and negatively regulated by Fur, but only NorD contributed to fitness in the murine abscess model. PMID:23042988

  19. Counting basic sites in oligopeptides via gas-phase ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    Cations derived from oligopeptides ranging from laminin fragment (5 residues) to {beta}-lactoglobulin (162 residues) have been subjected to gas-phase ion/molecule reactions with hydroiodic acid. The sum of the ion charge state and the maximum number of molecules of hydroiodic acid that attach to the ion is equal to the total number of lysines, arginines, histidines, and N-termini consisting of a primary amine for ions derived from all 21 oligopeptides studied. These results suggest that ion/molecule reactions can provide useful information regarding oligopeptide basic site number, which might be used as a criterion for searching protein data bases instead of, or in conjunction with, use of proteolytic digestion or gas-phase ion dissociation procedures. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) in Xanthomonas species.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Tavares, Milene B; Suzuki, Celso F; Pimenta, Daniel C; Angeli, Claudia B; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferreira, Luis C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2010-04-01

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA) of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp), in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia). Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis. PMID:21637492

  1. Synthetic human chorionic gonadotropin-related oligopeptides impair early innate immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes in Mice.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Marten; Dik, Willem A; Kap, Yolanda S; Dillon, Marilyn J; Benner, Robbert; Leenen, Pieter J M; Khan, Nisar A; Drevets, Douglas A

    2010-04-01

    Background. Synthetic human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-related oligopeptides are potent inhibitors of pathogenic inflammatory responses induced by in vivo lipopolysaccharide exposure or hemorrhagic shock-induced injury. In this study, we tested whether hCG-related oligopeptide treatment similarly altered inflammatory responses and innate host defenses in mice during experimental Listeria monocytogenes infection. Methods. Mice were infected with L. monocytogenes and treated with hCG-related oligopeptides (LQGV, VLPALP, or AQGV) or phosphate-buffered saline. Subsequently, mice were analyzed for bacterial loads, cytokine and chemokine responses, and inflammatory cell infiltrates in target organs. Results. Oligopeptide administration increased bacterial numbers in the spleen and liver at 6 h after infection. Simultaneously, CXCL1/KC and CCL2/MCP-1 plasma levels as well as neutrophil numbers in the spleen, blood, and peritoneal cavity decreased. In contrast, at 18 h after infection, systemic tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12 p70, interleukin 6, and interferon gamma levels increased statistically significantly in oligopeptide-treated mice compared with controls, which correlated with increased bacterial numbers. Conclusion. These data show that treatment with hCG-related oligopeptides (LQGV, VLPALP, and AQGV) inhibits early innate immune activation by reducing initial chemokine secretion following infection. This leads to bacterial overgrowth with subsequent enhanced systemic inflammation. Our data underscore the importance of early innate immune activation and suggest a role for hCG-derived oligopeptides at the placenta that increases the risk of L. monocytogenes infections.

  2. One-step formation of oligopeptide-like molecules from Glu and Asp in hydrothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Shimahashi, Masanori

    2008-05-01

    Biopolymer accumulation in the absence of enzymes is an essential step for the chemical evolution of primitive life-like systems, and successful simulation experiments of prebiotic biopolymer formation have suggested that oligopeptides could have formed near submarine hydrothermal vent environments on primitive earth. However, the yield and length of oligopeptides -- typically limited to 6-mers -- seems to be inadequate. One reason is the rapid formation of diketopiperazines (DKPs) from dipeptides. In this study, using a hydrothermal microflow reactor, we show that the one-step synthesis of oligopeptide-like molecules of length up to 20-mers proceeds from Glu and Asp. Yields of up to 0.17-0.57% were obtained in an acidic solution within 183 s at 250-310 degrees C, as evaluated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) analysis and different types of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. The present study indicates that Glu and Asp may have played important roles in the chemical evolution of oligopeptide-like molecules in hydrothermal vent environments on primitive earth. PMID:18253712

  3. Separation of chiral nanotubes with an opposite handedness by chiral oligopeptide adsorption: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-12-18

    The separation of enantiomeric chiral nanotubes that can form non-covalent complexes with an unlike stability upon adsorption of chiral molecules is a process of potential interest in different fields and applications. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we report in this paper a theoretical study of the adsorption and denaturation of an oligopeptide formed by 16 chiral amino acids having a helical structure in the native state on both the inner and the outer surface of the chiral (10, 20) and (20, 10) single-walled carbon nanotubes having an opposite handedness, and of the armchair (16, 16) nanotube with a similar diameter for comparison. In the final adsorbed state, the oligopeptide loses in all cases its native helical conformation, assuming elongated geometries that maximize its contact with the surface through all the 16 amino acids. We find that the complexes formed by the two chiral nanotubes and the chosen oligopeptide have a strongly unlike stability both when adsorption takes place on the outer convex surface of the nanotube, and when it occurs on the inner concave surface. Thus, our molecular simulations indicate that separation of chiral, enantiomeric carbon nanotubes for instance by chromatographic methods can indeed be carried out using oligopeptides of a sufficient length.

  4. Molecular characterization of a laminin-derived oligopeptide with implications in biomimetic applications.

    PubMed

    Makohliso, S A; Melchionna, S

    2001-02-15

    The molecular properties of the laminin-derived oligopeptide, H-CDPGYIGSR-NH2, have been investigated with the aid of a tandem computer simulation/experimental approach. The simulation studies placed a particular emphasis on studying the oligopeptide in aqueous media, as well as in a grafted or immobilized state. The simulations revealed the presence of a stable double hydrogen bond between arginine (R) and aspartic acid (D) residues. The mutation of the terminal arginine with lysine, another hydrophilic and positively charged amino acid, resulted in a drastic structural change, thus suggesting a major role of the terminal arginine residue in the overall oligopeptide's conformation and, hence, its bioactivity. In addition, the involvement of the aspartic acid residue in overall peptide structural stabilization also illustrates a previously undetermined role for this region (i.e. CDPG) of the oligopeptide. A subsequent in vitro experiment demonstrated a significant loss of bioactivity upon mutating the terminal residue from arginine to lysine, thereby corroborating the overall findings of the computational model. PMID:11254207

  5. Influence of fermentation level and geographical origin on cocoa bean oligopeptide pattern.

    PubMed

    Caligiani, Augusta; Marseglia, Angela; Prandi, Barbara; Palla, Gerardo; Sforza, Stefano

    2016-11-15

    Peptides and amino acids generated during cocoa bean fermentation are the most important precursors for the development of cocoa aroma, however cocoa oligopeptide fraction is under-investigated. In this study, we perform a deep investigation of the presence of oligopeptides in unfermented, under fermented, and well-fermented cocoa beans from all of the main producing countries, with the aim to obtain a better definition of cocoa quality and a deeper comprehension of biochemical changes occurring during fermentation. Oligopeptides were determined by UPLC/ESI-MS and 35 low-molecular weight peptides were identified and subjected to semi-quantitative analysis. Results showed that fermented cocoas can be differentiated from unfermented cocoas by their possession of a higher total amount of oligopeptides and a lower ratio of vicilin to 21kDa cocoa seed albumin peptides. A variability in the peptide pattern was observed also among well-fermented cocoa samples of different geographical origin, suggesting diversified proteolytic activities. PMID:27283652

  6. Multiple photosynthetic reaction centres using zinc porphyrinic oligopeptide-fulleropyrrolidine supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Saito, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kei; Troiani, Vincent; Qiu, Hongjin; Gadde, Suresh; D'Souza, Francis; Solladié, Nathalie

    2011-10-14

    Multiple charge-separation sites have successfully been constructed using supramolecular complexes of multiporphyrinic oligopeptides [P(ZnP)(n), n = 2, 4, 8] with fulleropyrrolidine bearing a pyridine or imidazole coordinating ligand, which are organized by utilizing π-π interaction in addition to the coordination bond. PMID:21897983

  7. Suppression of glymphatic fluid transport in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiguo; Achariyar, Thiyagarajan M; Li, Baoman; Liao, Yonghong; Mestre, Humberto; Hitomi, Emi; Regan, Sean; Kasper, Tristan; Peng, Sisi; Ding, Fengfei; Benveniste, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken; Deane, Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Glymphatic transport, defined as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) peri-arterial inflow into brain, and interstitial fluid (ISF) clearance, is reduced in the aging brain. However, it is unclear whether glymphatic transport affects the distribution of soluble Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In wild type mice, we show that Aβ40 (fluorescently labeled Aβ40 or unlabeled Aβ40), was distributed from CSF to brain, via the peri-arterial space, and associated with neurons. In contrast, Aβ42 was mostly restricted to the peri-arterial space due mainly to its greater propensity to oligomerize when compared to Aβ40. Interestingly, pretreatment with Aβ40 in the CSF, but not Aβ42, reduced CSF transport into brain. In APP/PS1 mice, a model of AD, with and without extensive amyloid-β deposits, glymphatic transport was reduced, due to the accumulation of toxic Aβ species, such as soluble oligomers. CSF-derived Aβ40 co-localizes with existing endogenous vascular and parenchymal amyloid-β plaques, and thus, may contribute to the progression of both cerebral amyloid angiopathy and parenchymal Aβ accumulation. Importantly, glymphatic failure preceded significant amyloid-β deposits, and thus, may be an early biomarker of AD. By extension, restoring glymphatic inflow and ISF clearance are potential therapeutic targets to slow the onset and progression of AD. PMID:27234656

  8. Efficacy of an amphipathic oligopeptide to shuttle and release a cis-acting DNA decoy into human cells.

    PubMed

    Citti, L; Rovero, P; Colombo, M G; Mariani, L; Poliseno, L; Rainaldi, G

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the ability of an amphipathic oligopeptide to carry a synthetic dsDNA oligonucleotide inside human cells. The oligonucleotide was designed as a decoy binding site for the transcriptional activator of the methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. The complex oligopeptide and decoy were administered to MCF10A exponentially growing cells, and the uptake was monitored by flow cytometry. After a 1-h exposure, almost all of the MCF10A cells were fluorescent, indicating that all of the cells had been transfected. By increasing the time, the fluorescence intensity per cell rapidly increased to a plateau at the 8-h time point. RT-PCR analysis of the MGMT gene was used as the molecular readout of the intracellular activity of the DNA decoy. MCF10A cells transfected with the oligopeptide/decoy complex showed a strong reduction in MGMT mRNA. Here, we discuss the advantages of using amphipathic oligopeptides as carriers of short DNA sequences.

  9. Deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc6a14 suppresses tumour growth in spontaneous mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-01

    SLC6A14 mediates Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled concentrative uptake of a broad-spectrum of amino acids. It is expressed at low levels in many tissues but up-regulated in certain cancers. Pharmacological blockade of SLC6A14 causes amino acid starvation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells and suppresses their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this transporter in breast cancer by deleting Slc6a14 in mice and monitoring the consequences of this deletion in models of spontaneous breast cancer (Polyoma middle T oncogene-transgenic mouse and mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu-transgenic mouse). Slc6a14-knockout mice are viable, fertile and phenotypically normal. The plasma amino acids were similar in wild-type and knockout mice and there were no major compensatory changes in the expression of other amino acid transporter mRNAs. There was also no change in mammary gland development in the knockout mouse. However, when crossed with PyMT-Tg mice or MMTV/Neu (mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu)-Tg mice, the development and progression of breast cancer were markedly decreased on Slc6a14(-/-) background. Analysis of transcriptomes in tumour tissues from wild-type mice and Slc6a14-null mice indicated no compensatory changes in the expression of any other amino acid transporter mRNA. However, the tumours from the null mice showed evidence of amino acid starvation, decreased mTOR signalling and decreased cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SLC6A14 is critical for the maintenance of amino acid nutrition and optimal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling in ER+ breast cancer and that the transporter is a potential target for development of a novel class of anti-cancer drugs targeting amino acid nutrition in tumour cells.

  10. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  11. Assessing the Indirect Photochemical Transformation of Dissolved Combined Amino Acids through the Use of Systematically Designed Histidine-Containing Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Lundeen, Rachel A; Sander, Michael; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-11-01

    Photooxidation is an important abiotic transformation pathway for amino acids (AAs) in sunlit waters. Although dissolved free AAs are well studied, the photooxidation of dissolved combined AAs (DCAAs) remains poorly investigated. This study is a systematic investigation of the effect of neighboring photostable AA residues (i.e., aliphatic, cationic, anionic, or aromatic residues) on the environmental indirect photochemical transformation of histidine (His) in His-containing oligopeptides. The pKa values of His residues in the studied oligopeptides were found to be between 4.3 and 8.1. Accordingly, the phototransformation rate constants of the His-containing oligopeptides were highly pH-dependent in an environmentally relevant pH range with higher reactivity for neutral His than for the protonated species. The photostable AA residues significantly modulated the photoreactivity of oligopeptides either through altering the accessibility of His to photochemically produced oxidants or through shifting the pKa values of His residues. In addition, the influence of neighboring photostable AA residues on the sorption-enhanced phototransformation of oligopeptides in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was assessed. The constituent photostable AA residues promoted sorption of His-containing oligopeptides to CDOM macromolecules through electrostatic attraction, hydrophobic effects, and/or low-barrier hydrogen bonds, and subsequently increased the apparent phototransformation rate constants by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. Local Turbulence Suppression and Flow Shear Dynamics During qmin-Triggered Internal Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Austin, M. E.; Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.

    2007-11-01

    Turbulence is observed to transiently decrease locally during the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) following the appearance of low-order rational qmin surfaces in negative central shear discharges on DIII-D. Simultaneously, increased poloidal flow shear is observed. To further study this phenomenon, localized 2D density fluctuation measurements of turbulence and turbulence flow were obtained over 0.3 < r/a < 0.7 via the high-sensitivity beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Both the reduction in fluctuations and the poloidal velocity shear are found to propagate radially outward at about 1 m/s. Initial observations suggest that these effects follow the q=2 surface. Related GYRO simulations suggest transient zonal flows form near the q=2 surface to trigger these ITBs. High-frequency poloidal velocity measurements will be used to examine this mechanism.

  13. S-nitrosophytochelatins: investigation of the bioactivity of an oligopeptide nitric oxide delivery system.

    PubMed

    Heikal, Lamia; Aaronson, Philip I; Ferro, Albert; Nandi, Manasi; Martin, Gary P; Dailey, Lea Ann

    2011-06-13

    This study investigates the in vitro bioactivity of S-nitrosophytochelatins (SNOPCs), oligopeptide analogues of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and their mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO) delivery. SNOPCs were more potent than GSNO in inhibiting platelet aggregation and stimulating vasorelaxation. Their potency was related to the number of S-nitrosated moieties per mole compound. Transnitrosation reactions with cell membrane surface components were shown to be the primary mode of NO delivery to intracellular targets for SNOPCs, while delivery via γ-glutamyl transpeptidase was unique to GSNO. Due to rapid NO release, larger SNOPCs elicited a more transitory effect compared to smaller compounds. The duration of effect was influenced by compound molecular weight, NO release kinetics, ability to undergo transnitrosation, and incubation time with tissues. In summary, a new oligopeptide NO delivery system based on SNOPCs was shown to be biologically active and can be used to investigate the mechanisms of NO delivery to intracellular targets.

  14. Strong suppression of near-surface thermal transport by metal-assisted chemical etching of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Joseph; Cahill, David

    2013-03-01

    Recently, we reported that the thermal conductivity of Si nanowire arrays roughened by metal-assisted chemical etching (MAC-etch) is strongly correlated to both the magnitude of the roughness and a broadening of the one-phonon Raman linewidth. We hypothesized that microstructural disorder induced by the etching chemistry leads to changes in the Raman linewidth and reduced thermal conductivity. Here, we simplify the study of such effects by chemically roughening Si wafers instead of nanowires. We have studied the effects of various roughening procedures on the near-surface thermal transport properties using time-domain thermoreflectance. We find that the thermal conductance of the near-surface region is systematically reduced by the MAC-etch process, despite the expectation that pristine roughened surfaces should have increased conductance due to enhanced surface area. In addition, highly roughened surfaces show strong picosecond acoustic echoes with reflection coefficient indicative of a soft interface. These features are consistent with the presence of strong disorder or nanoporosity in the near-surface region created by the MAC-etch process.

  15. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  16. Synthetic oligopeptide substrates: their diagnostic application in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and other pathologic states

    SciTech Connect

    Huseby, R.M.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    This review article with 522 references, focuses on the use of synthetic oligopepide substrates to measure the activity of proteoytic enzymes in human physiology and pathology. A classification of proteinases based on their mechanism of action is presented. The application of these synthetic oligopeptide substrates to understand the disorders of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system is reviewed. Intracellular functioning proteinases were also assessed in relation to certain pathologies where their abnormal activity is recognized.

  17. Inclusion of Cu nano-cluster 1D arrays inside a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide via co-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ruiying; Li, Fei; Yang, Chunpeng; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside.A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside. Electronic

  18. Molecular characterization of group A streptococcal (GAS) oligopeptide permease (opp) and its effect on cysteine protease production.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Pohl, B; Woischnik, M; Körner, C; Schmidt, K H; Rozdzinski, E; Leonard, B A

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial oligopeptide permeases are membrane-associated complexes of five proteins belonging to the ABC-transporter family, which have been found to be involved in obtaining nutrients, cell-wall metabolism, competence, and adherence to host cells. A lambda library of the strain CS101 group A streptococcal (GAS) genome was used to sequence 10,192 bp containing the five genes oppA to oppF of the GAS opp operon. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 50-84% homology to pneumococcal AmiA to AmiF sequences. The operon organization of the five genes was confirmed by transcriptional analysis and an additional shorter oppA transcript was detected. Insertional inactivation was used to create serotype M49 strains which did not express either the oppA gene or the ATPase genes, oppD and oppF. The mutation in oppA confirmed that the additional shorter oppA transcript originated from the opp operon and was probably due to an intra-operon transcription terminator site located downstream of oppA. While growth kinetics, binding of serum proteins, and attachment to eukaryotic cells were unaffected, the oppD/F mutants showed reduced production of the cysteine protease, SpeB, and a change in the pattern of secreted proteins. Thus, the GAS opp operon appears to contribute to both protease production and export/processing of secreted proteins.

  19. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments. PMID:21671764

  20. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel arrays for differentiating oligopeptide fragments and on-chip protease assays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingdi; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2016-03-15

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel is permeable to biomolecules, but its permeability depends on the molecular weight of monomers and the concentration of monomer solutions. In this study, we show that PEG hydrogel made from 20% to 30% of PEG700 monomer is permeable to amino acids yet impermeable to oligopeptides. Because of its unique permeability, the gel can be used to detect protease by separating amino acids from oligopeptides when proteases cleave the oligopeptides and release amino acids. Based on this principle, an UV crosslinked gel array is fabricated on a chip for simultaneous detection of protease in up to 40 samples with only 1 µl of volume required for each sample. As a proof of concept, the on-chip protease assays are used to detect trypsin in buffer and serum. The detection limits are 1.2 nM in buffer and 17.7 nM in serum, which are comparable to conventional protease assays. Moreover, because only 1 µl of liquid is required, as little as 1.2 fmol of trypsin can be detected by using the on-chip assay. The protease assay also shows good specificity for trypsin and chymotrypsin. The gel array chip could be a useful miniaturized platform for high-throughput detection of different proteases and screening of their inhibitors. PMID:26569443

  1. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments.

  2. Knockdown of the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) suppresses lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah-Young; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-01-01

    The sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) plays an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis. In previous studies, we have shown that high dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) consumption in mice stimulated lung tumorigenesis and increased NPT2b expression. NPT2b has also been found to be highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues. The association of high expression of NPT2b in the lung with poor prognosis in oncogenic lung diseases prompted us to test whether knockdown of NPT2b may regulate lung cancer growth. To address this issue, aerosols that contained small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against NPT2b (siNPT2b) were delivered into the lungs of K-ras (LA1) mice, which constitute a murine model reflecting human lung cancer. Our results clearly showed that repeated aerosol delivery of siNPT2b successfully suppressed lung cancer growth and decreased cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis, while facilitating apoptosis. These results strongly suggest that NPT2b plays a role lung tumorigenesis and represents a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24194864

  3. Two Oligopeptide-Permease-Encoding Genes in the Clavulanic Acid Cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus Are Essential for Production of the β-Lactamase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzana, Luis M.; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan F.; Liras, Paloma

    2004-01-01

    orf7 (oppA1) and orf15 (oppA2) are located 8 kb apart in the clavulanic acid gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus and encode proteins which are 48.0% identical. These proteins show sequence similarity to periplasmic oligopeptide-binding proteins. Mutant S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc, disrupted in oppA1, lacks clavulanic acid production. Clavulanic acid production is restored by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA1, which carries oppA1, but not with the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, which carries oppA2. The mutant S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph also lacks clavulanic acid production, shows a bald phenotype, and overproduces holomycin (5). Clavulanic acid production at low levels is restored in the oppA2-disrupted mutants by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, but it is not complemented by the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA1. Both genes encode oligopeptide permeases with different substrate specificities. The disrupted S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph is not able to grow on RPPGFSPFR (Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Phe-Arg; bradykinin), but both mutants grow on VAPG (Val-Ala-Pro-Gly) as the only nitrogen source, indicating differences in the peptide bound by the proteins encoded by both genes. The null S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc and S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph mutants are more resistant to the toxic tripeptide phosphinothricyl-alanyl-alanine (also named bialaphos) than the wild-type strain, suggesting that this peptide might be transported by these peptide-binding proteins. PMID:15150229

  4. A novel self-assembled oligopeptide amphiphile for biomimetic mineralization of enamel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Researchers are looking for biomimetic mineralization of ena/mel to manage dental erosion. This study evaluated biomimetic mineralization of demineralized enamel induced by a synthetic and self-assembled oligopeptide amphiphile (OPA). Results The results showed that the OPA self-assembled into nano-fibres in the presence of calcium ions and in neutral acidity. The OPA was alternately immersed in calcium chloride and sodium hypophosphate solutions to evaluate its property of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed nucleation and growth of amorphous calcium phosphate along the self-assembled OPA nano-fibres when it was repetitively exposed to solutions with calcium and phosphate ions. Energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed that these nano-particles contained calcium and phosphate. Furthermore, electron diffraction pattern suggested that the nano-particles precipitated on OPA nano-fibres were comparable to amorphous calcium phosphate. Acid-etched human enamel slices were incubated at 37°C in metastable calcium phosphate solution with the OPA for biomimetic mineralization. SEM and X-ray diffraction indicated that the OPA induced the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals in organized bundles on etched enamel. TEM micrographs revealed there were 20–30 nm nano-amorphous calcium phosphate precipitates in the biomimetic mineralizing solution. The particles were found separately bound to the oligopeptide fibres. Biomimetic mineralization with or without the oligopeptide increased demineralized enamel microhardness. Conclusions A novel OPA was successfully fabricated, which fostered the biomimetic mineralization of demineralized enamel. It is one of the primary steps towards the design and construction of novel biomaterial for future clinical therapy of dental erosion. PMID:24766767

  5. Formation of oligopeptides on the surface of small bodies in solar system by cosmic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, M. B.; Kuzicheva, E. A.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Antropov, A. E.

    1997-05-01

    The present experiment indicates that oligopeptides are easily produced in solid state from mixtures of simple amino acids by irradiating with high energy charged particles. We investigated such amino acids and their mixtures as tryptophan, tyrosine and glycine. The thin films was irradiated with protons (6.6 MeV). Such dipeptides as Trp-Trp, Gly-Tyr, Tyr-Gly, and Tyr-Tyr have been detected as products of irradiation. Cosmic rays might be an effective energy source for abiotic formation of bioorganic compounds on the surface of small bodies in the solar system on early stage of formation of planets as well as at present day.

  6. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  7. Viscoelastic properties and nanoscale structures of composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the coassembly of mutually attractive, but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already-existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the coassembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G' decreased from 90 to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 to 100%). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics, and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data, showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formed less stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  8. Directed self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides for supramolecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Li, Songsong; Zhou, Yuecheng; Tovar, John; Wilson, William; Schroeder, Charles

    The directed mesoscale engineering of nanoscale building blocks holds enormous promise to catalyze a revolution in new functional materials for advanced electronics. Bio-inspired systems can play a key role in this effort due to their inherent ``programmable'' function. In this work, oligopeptide with defined flanking sequences was appended to π-conjugated units, thereby directing their assembly processes in a designed manner. By utilizing custom-designed microfluidic devices and controlled acid vapor diffusion, the self-assembly rate was directed and precisely tuned. Notably, the kinetics was found to play a key role in the morphology of self-assembled π-conjugated oligopeptides. The influence of flanking peptide sequences and π-conjugated core-core interactions on the self-assembly nanostructure was systematically investigated. Importantly, the electronic properties of the synthetic peptide assembly was explored by integration as the active layer of a field effect transistor. The presented study offers insights to the design and fabrication of supramolecular electronics.

  9. Optimization of Enzymatic Production of Oligopeptides from Apricot Almonds Meal with Neutrase and N120P

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Qiang; Tian, Jinqiang

    2010-01-01

    Neutrase 0.8L and N120P proteases were used for oligopeptide production from apricot almonds meal, and response surface design was carried out to optimize the effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrolysis degree (DH) and oligopeptide yield rate. Four independent variables were used to optimize the hydrolysis process: hydrolysis temperature (X1), enzyme-to substrate ratio (E/S) (X2), substrate concentration (X3) and reaction time (X4). Statistical analysis indicated that the four variables, quadratic terms of X1, X3, and X4, and the interaction terms with X1 had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on DH. The yield rate was also significantly affected by the four variables and quadratic terms of X1, X2 and X4. Two mathematical models with high determination coefficient were obtained and could be employed to optimize protein hydrolysis. The optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined as follows: hydrolysis temperature 52.5 °C; enzyme-to-substrate ratio (E/S) 7200 U/g; substrate concentration 2%; reaction time 173 min. The initial pH 6.5 and Neutrase-to-N120P dosage ratio 2:1 were fixed in this study according to the preliminary research. Under these conditions, the experimental DH and yield rate were 34.10 ± 5.25% and 72.42 ± 2.27%, respectively. PMID:21614184

  10. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  11. Modelling of the prebiotic synthesis of oligopeptides: silicate catalysts help to overcome the critical stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamaraev, Kirill I.; Romannikov, Vyacheslav N.; Salganik, Rudolph I.; Wlassoff, Wjatschesslaw A.; Khramtsov, Valeriy V.

    1997-08-01

    On the basis of experimental studies of the initial stages of glycine oligomerization in aqueous suspension of zeolite and kaolinite catalysts, a model is suggested for the prebiotic synthesis of oligopeptides from α-amino acids. The formation of linear dipeptides by hydrolysis of one amide bond in the cyclic piperazinedione intermediate (formed from glycine spontaneously) is found to be the critical stage of the reaction. This stage is base catalyzed and its rate increases when pH of the medium goes up. The linear glycyl-glycine yield rises under effect of hydroxyl anions generated from different sources including insoluble silicates and soluble sodium bicarbonate. During prebiotic evolution silicates capable of cation-exchange can serve as local sources of the hydroxyl anions which dramatically accelerate formation of linear dipeptides from cyclic ones. Oligopeptides of higher molecular weight are then easily formed from the linear dipeptides at neutral pH, even in the absence of catalysts or sources of energy (e.g. such as light). The described catalytic synthesis could occur in the proximity of submarine hydrothermal vents.

  12. Cell Lysis in S. pombe ura4 Mutants Is Suppressed by Loss of Functional Pub1, Which Regulates the Uracil Transporter Fur4.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Kohei; Kushima, Misaki; Matsuo, Yuzy; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Δura4 cells lyse when grown on YPD medium. A S. pombe non-essential gene deletion library was screened to determine suppressors of the lysis phenotype. Deletion of the pub1 gene, which encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, strongly suppressed cell lysis in Δura4 cells. The Δpub1 cells displayed high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, a toxic analog of uracil, and this sensitivity was suppressed by deletion of fur4, which encoded a uracil transporter. Fur4 localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and vacuoles in wild-type cells, but localization was predominantly at the plasma membrane in Δpub1 cells. Fur4 was necessary for the utilization of extracellular uracil, cytosine, or UMP. Uracil uptake activity increased in the Δpub1 strain in a Fur4-dependent manner. In addition, uracil starvation was critical for induction of cell lysis of Δura4 strains and uracil supplementation suppressed lysis. In summary, the increased uracil uptake ability of Δpub1 cells, where Fur4 was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, resulted in suppression of cell lysis in the Δura4 background.

  13. Cell Lysis in S. pombe ura4 Mutants Is Suppressed by Loss of Functional Pub1, Which Regulates the Uracil Transporter Fur4

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Kohei; Kushima, Misaki; Matsuo, Yuzy; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Δura4 cells lyse when grown on YPD medium. A S. pombe non-essential gene deletion library was screened to determine suppressors of the lysis phenotype. Deletion of the pub1 gene, which encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, strongly suppressed cell lysis in Δura4 cells. The Δpub1 cells displayed high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, a toxic analog of uracil, and this sensitivity was suppressed by deletion of fur4, which encoded a uracil transporter. Fur4 localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and vacuoles in wild-type cells, but localization was predominantly at the plasma membrane in Δpub1 cells. Fur4 was necessary for the utilization of extracellular uracil, cytosine, or UMP. Uracil uptake activity increased in the Δpub1 strain in a Fur4-dependent manner. In addition, uracil starvation was critical for induction of cell lysis of Δura4 strains and uracil supplementation suppressed lysis. In summary, the increased uracil uptake ability of Δpub1 cells, where Fur4 was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, resulted in suppression of cell lysis in the Δura4 background. PMID:26536126

  14. Short one-pot chemo-enzymatic synthesis of L-lysine and L-alanine diblock co-oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Fagerland, Jenny; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Numata, Keiji

    2014-03-10

    Amphiphilic diblock co-oligopeptides are interesting and functional macromolecular materials for biomedical applications because of their self-assembling properties. Here, we developed a synthesis method for diblock co-oligopeptides by using chemo-enzymatic polymerization, which was a relatively short (30 min) and efficient reaction (over 40% yield). Block and random oligo(L-lysine-co-L-alanine) [oligo(Lys-co-Ala)] were synthesized using activated papain as enzymatic catalyst. The reaction time was optimized according to kinetic studies of oligo(L-alanine) and oligo(L-lysine). Using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we confirmed that diblock and random co-oligopeptides were synthesized. Optical microscopy further revealed differences in the crystalline morphology between random and block co-oligopeptides. Plate-like, hexagonal, and hollow crystals were formed due to the strong impact of the monomer distribution and pH of the solution. The different crystalline structures open up interesting possibilities to form materials for both tissue engineering and controlled drug/gene delivery systems.

  15. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  16. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  17. Suppression of roll-off characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes by narrowing current injection/transport area to 50 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kyohei Inoue, Munetomo; Yoshida, Kou; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mikhnenko, Oleksandr; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Chihaya E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-02

    Using e-beam nanolithography, the current injection/transport area in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was confined into a narrow linear structure with a minimum width of 50 nm. This caused suppression of Joule heating and partial separation of polarons and excitons, so the charge density where the electroluminescent efficiency decays to the half of the initial value (J{sub 0}) was significantly improved. A device with a narrow current injection width of 50 nm exhibited a J{sub 0} that was almost two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of the unpatterned OLED.

  18. Suppression of NDA-type alternative mitochondrial NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in arabidopsis thaliana modifies growth and metabolism, but not high light stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Wallström, Sabá V; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L; Escobar, Matthew A; Geisler, Daniela A; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2014-05-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)⁺ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins.

  19. Free Energy Landscapes of Alanine Oligopeptides in Rigid-Body and Hybrid Water Models.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Divya; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2015-08-27

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics is used to study the effect of different rigid-body (mTIP3P, TIP4P, SPC/E) and hybrid (H1.56, H3.00) water models on the conformational free energy landscape of the alanine oligopeptides (acAnme and acA5nme), in conjunction with the CHARMM22 force field. The free energy landscape is mapped out as a function of the Ramachandran angles. In addition, various secondary structure metrics, solvation shell properties, and the number of peptide-solvent hydrogen bonds are monitored. Alanine dipeptide is found to have similar free energy landscapes in different solvent models, an insensitivity which may be due to the absence of possibilities for forming i-(i + 4) or i-(i + 3) intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The pentapeptide, acA5nme, where there are three intrapeptide backbone hydrogen bonds, shows a conformational free energy landscape with a much greater degree of sensitivity to the choice of solvent model, though the three rigid-body water models differ only quantitatively. The pentapeptide prefers nonhelical, non-native PPII and β-sheet populations as the solvent is changed from SPC/E to the less tetrahedral liquid (H1.56) to an LJ-like liquid (H3.00). The pentapeptide conformational order metrics indicate a preference for open, solvent-exposed, non-native structures in hybrid solvent models at all temperatures of study. The possible correlations between the properties of solvent models and secondary structure preferences of alanine oligopeptides are discussed, and the competition between intrapeptide, peptide-solvent, and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonding is shown to be crucial in the relative free energies of different conformers.

  20. Mutations in the YRB1 gene encoding yeast ran-binding-protein-1 that impair nucleocytoplasmic transport and suppress yeast mating defects.

    PubMed Central

    Künzler, M; Trueheart, J; Sette, C; Hurt, E; Thorner, J

    2001-01-01

    We identified two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in the essential gene, YRB1, which encodes the yeast homolog of Ran-binding-protein-1 (RanBP1), a known coregulator of the Ran GTPase cycle. Both mutations result in single amino acid substitutions of evolutionarily conserved residues (A91D and R127K, respectively) in the Ran-binding domain of Yrb1. The altered proteins have reduced affinity for Ran (Gsp1) in vivo. After shift to restrictive temperature, both mutants display impaired nuclear protein import and one also reduces poly(A)+ RNA export, suggesting a primary defect in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Consistent with this conclusion, both yrb1ts mutations display deleterious genetic interactions with mutations in many other genes involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, including SRP1 (alpha-importin) and several beta-importin family members. These yrb1ts alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress two different types of mating-defective mutants (respectively, fus1Delta and ste5ts), indicating that reduction in nucleocytoplasmic transport enhances mating proficiency. Indeed, in both yrb1ts mutants, Ste5 (scaffold protein for the pheromone response MAPK cascade) is mislocalized to the cytosol, even in the absence of pheromone. Also, both yrb1ts mutations suppress the mating defect of a null mutation in MSN5, which encodes the receptor for pheromone-stimulated nuclear export of Ste5. Our results suggest that reimport of Ste5 into the nucleus is important in downregulating mating response. PMID:11238397

  1. Ketoisocaproic acid, a metabolite of leucine, suppresses insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells in a BCAT2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Moghei, Mahshid; Tavajohi-Fini, Pegah; Beatty, Brendan; Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J

    2016-09-01

    Although leucine has many positive effects on metabolism in multiple tissues, elevated levels of this amino acid and the other branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their metabolites are implicated in obesity and insulin resistance. While some controversies exist about the direct effect of leucine on insulin action in skeletal muscle, little is known about the direct effect of BCAA metabolites. Here, we first showed that the inhibitory effect of leucine on insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6 myotubes was dampened when other amino acids were present, due in part to a 140% stimulation of basal glucose transport (P < 0.05). Importantly, we also showed that α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), an obligatory metabolite of leucine, stimulated mTORC1 signaling but suppressed insulin-stimulated glucose transport (-34%, P < 0.05) in an mTORC1-dependent manner. The effect of KIC on insulin-stimulated glucose transport was abrogated in cells depleted of branched-chain aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2), the enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transamination of KIC to leucine. We conclude that although KIC can modulate muscle glucose metabolism, this effect is likely a result of its transamination back to leucine. Therefore, limiting the availability of leucine, rather than those of its metabolites, to skeletal muscle may be more critical in the management of insulin resistance and its sequelae. PMID:27488662

  2. Tea catechins with a galloyl moiety suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by delaying lymphatic transport of dietary fat in rats.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo; Tsuda, Koichi; Suzuki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Makoto; Unno, Tomonori; Tomoyori, Hiroko; Goto, Hitomi; Kawata, Yayoi; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Nozawa, Ayumu; Kakuda, Takami

    2005-02-01

    Tea catechins, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), have been shown to be epimerized to (-)-catechin (C), (-)-gallocatechin (GC), (-)-catechin gallate (CG), and (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG), respectively, during heat treatment. In this study, we examined the effect of tea catechins rich in ECG and EGCG and heat-treated tea catechins rich in CG and GCG on postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in rats. Both tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia. Lymphatic recovery of (14)C-trioleoylglycerol in rats cannulated in the thoracic duct was delayed by the administration of tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins. Tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins had the same effect on all variables tested. These catechin preparations dose-dependently inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase in vitro. When purified catechins were used, only those with a galloyl moiety inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase. These results suggest that catechins with a galloyl moiety suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by slowing down triacylglycerol absorption through the inhibition of pancreatic lipase. Because postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, our results suggest that catechins with a galloyl moiety may prevent this disease.

  3. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    PubMed

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  4. Enhanced protease cleavage efficiency on the glucagon-fused interleukin-2 by the addition of synthetic oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Bum; Lee, Weon Sup; Jung, Woo-Hyuk; Ryu, Ji-Myung; Jang, Hyung-Wook; Jo, Young-Bae; Jung, Joon-Ki; Kim, Jung-Hoe

    2007-09-01

    Human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) was produced as a recombinant fusion protein (G3.IL-2/HF) consisting of three tandem-arranged human glucagon molecules (G3) and hIL-2. For the recovery of hIL-2, a factor Xa (FXa) cleavage sequence was introduced next to the N-terminus of hIL-2. Cleavage efficiency on this recombinant protein construct was very low because its recognition sequence was sterically hindered within the G3.IL-2/HF molecule and hence FXa access to the cleavage site was insufficient. We therefore introduced various synthetic oligopeptides upstream from the FXa cleavage site as a means to change substrate conformation and thereby increase cleavage efficiency. Among these oligopeptides, acidic or nucleophilic constructs were the most effective for the FXa-mediated cleavage of the fusion protein. In addition, insertion of various oligopeptides into the G3.IL-2/HF molecule varied the solubility of each construct depending on their physical properties. Consequently, the G3.IL-2/DF construct showed the highest final hIL-2 yields via FXa-mediated removal of the fusion partner. Lastly, we confirmed that cleavage efficiency was greatly increased but native hIL-2 was cleaved internally by non-specific cleavage when the acidic oligopeptide D4 (DDDD) was introduced upstream of the EK cleavage site within G3.IL-2/HE molecule. The G3.IL-2/HE molecule was shown to be an inefficient substrate to EK in a previous report (Biotechnol. Bioprocess Eng. (2000) 5, 13-16).

  5. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  6. Suppression of asymmetric acid efflux and gravitropism in maize roots treated with auxin transport inhibitors of sodium orthovanadate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    In gravitropically stimulated roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid WF9 x 38MS), there is more acid efflux on the rapidly growing upper side than on the slowly growing lower side. In light of the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism which states that gravitropic curvature results from lateral redistribution of auxin, the effects of auxin transport inhibitors on the development of acid efflux asymmetry and curvature in gravistimulated roots were examined. All the transport inhibitors tested prevented both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots. The results indicate that auxin redistribution may cause the asymmetry of acid efflux, a finding consistent with the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism. As further evidence that auxin-induced acid efflux asymmetry may mediate gravitropic curvature, sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of auxin-induced H+ efflux was found to prevent both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots.

  7. Suppression of spin transport in ferromagnet/oxide/semiconductor junctions by magnetic impurities in the tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiesser, Aurélie; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji; Jansen, Ron

    2016-10-01

    We have studied how the insertion of sub-monolayer amounts of Mn impurities in the middle of the oxide tunnel barrier of Fe/GeO2 on p-type Ge affects the spin transport, using three-terminal Hanle measurements. Strikingly, the magnitude of the Hanle spin voltage is strongly reduced by increasing the amount of Mn dopants and is even completely absent for devices having an amount of Mn impurities equivalent to a 0.2-nm-thick layer. This demonstrates that magnetic impurities in the tunnel barrier are detrimental to the spin transport in ferromagnet/oxide/semiconductor junctions, and that the localized states associated with such magnetic impurities do not produce three-terminal Hanle spin signals.

  8. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  9. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  10. Tumor Cellular Proteasome Inhibition and Growth Suppression by 8-Hydroxyquinoline and Clioquinol Requires Their Capabilities to Bind Copper and Transport Copper into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shumei; Yang, Lei; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Sun, Ying; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that when mixed with copper, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-OHQ) and its analog clioquinol (CQ) inhibited the proteasomal activity and proliferation in cultured human cancer cells. CQ treatment of high copper-containing human tumor xenografts also caused cancer suppression, associated with proteasome inhibition in vivo. However, the nature of copper dependence of these events has not been elucidated experimentally. In the current study, by using chemical probe molecules that mimic structures of 8-OHQ and CQ, but have no copper binding capability, we dissected the complex cellular processes elicited by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu mixture and revealed that copper-binding to 8-OHQ or CQ is required for transportation of copper complex into human breast cancer cells and the consequent proteasome-inhibitory, growth-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activities. In contrast, the non-copper-binding analogs of 8-OHQ or CQ blocked the very first step – copper binding in this chain of events mediated by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu. PMID:19809836

  11. LMP-associated proteolytic activities and TAP-dependent peptide transport for class 1 MHC molecules are suppressed in cell lines transformed by the highly oncogenic adenovirus 12

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on the surface of cells transformed by adenovirus 12 (Ad12) is generally very low, and correlates with the in vivo oncogenicity of this virus. In primary embryonal fibroblasts (H-2b) that express transgenic swine class I antigen (PD1), Ad12-mediated transformation results in inhibition in transport of newly synthesized class I molecules, as well as significant reduction in transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) gene expression. In this report we show that reexpression of TAP molecules either by stable transfection of mouse TAP genes or by infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing human TAP genes, only partially reconstitutes the expression and transport of the class I molecules. Further analysis of Ad12- transformed cells revealed that the expression of both LMP2 and LMP7, but not of other proteasome complex components, was downregulated, resulting in altered proteolytic activities of the 20S proteasomes. Reconstitution of both TAP and LMP expression resulted in complete restoration of PD1 cell surface expression and enhanced expression of the endogenous H-2D(b) molecules encoded by recombinant vaccinia viruses, in reconstituted Ad12-transformed cells, efficient transport of H-2 class I molecules could only be achieved by treatment of the cells with gamma-interferon. These data suggest that an additional factor(s) that is interferon-regulated plays a role in the biosynthetic pathway of the class I complex, and that its function is deficient in this cell system. Thus, Ad12 viral transformation appears to suppress the expression of multiple genes that are important for antigen processing and presentation, which allows such transformed cells to escape immune surveillance. This coordinate downregulation of immune response genes must likely occur through their use of common regulatory elements. PMID:8627162

  12. [Inhibitory effect of methyl esters of arginine-containing oligopeptides on thrombin and trypsin].

    PubMed

    Poiarkova, S A; Kibirev, V K; Serebrianyĭ, S B

    1987-01-01

    Stereoisomeric oligopeptides were studied for their inhibitory effect on the hydrolysis of benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester catalyzed by thrombin and trypsin, as well as on the thrombin-fibrinogen reaction. Comparison of the peptide structures, their conformational flexibility and inhibitory effects on thrombin and trypsin shows the availability of the essential differences in organization and functioning of the subsites S3, S2 and S'1 of these enzymes. In contrast to trypsin, thrombin is shown to be characterized by more pronounced secondary stereospecificity. This manifests in the more vigorous dropping of the catalytic constants of thrombin-catalyzed esterolysis than those of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of the substrates, containing D-amino acids at the subsite P2. It is revealed that the peptide Tos-D-Val-D-Ala-D-Agr-D-Phe-OCH3 is the most powerful inhibitor among studied compounds. It is noteworthy that its antithrombin effect is almost an order of magnitude higher than its antitrypsin effect.

  13. Design of amphiphilic oligopeptides as models for fine tuning peptide assembly with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha N; Gupta, Pardeep K

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the design of novel amphiphilic oligopeptides with hydrophobic and cationic amino acids to serve as models to understand peptide-DNA assembly. Biophysical and thermodynamic characterization of interaction of these amphiphilic peptides with plasmid DNA is presented. Peptides with at least +4 charges favor stable complex formation. Surface potential is dependent on the type of hydrophobic amino acid for a certain charge. Thermodynamically it is a spontaneous interaction between most of the peptides and plasmid DNA. Lys(7) and Tyr peptides with +4/+5 charges indicate cooperative binding with pDNA without saturation of interaction while Val(2)-Gly-Lys(4), Val-Gly-Lys(5), and Phe-Gly-Lys(5) lead to saturation of interaction indicating condensed pDNA within the range of N/Ps studied. We show that the biophysical properties of DNA-peptide complexes could be modulated by design and the peptides presented here could be used as building blocks for creating DNA-peptide complexes for various biomedical applications, mainly nucleic acid delivery.

  14. Crystal structure of a putative oligopeptide-binding periplasmic protein from a hyperthermophile.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hee Jung; Mikami, Bunzo; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Oligopeptide-binding proteins (Opps) are part of the ATP-binding cassette system, playing a crucial role in nutrient uptake and sensing the external environment in bacteria, including hyperthermophiles. Opps serve as a binding platform for diverse peptides; however, how these peptides are recognized by Opps is still largely unknown and few crystal structures of Opps from hyperthermophiles have been determined. To facilitate such an understanding, the crystal structure of a putative Opp, OppA from Thermotoga maritima (TmOppA), was solved at 2.6-Å resolution in the open conformation. TmOppA is composed of three domains. The N-terminal domain consists of twelve strands, nine helices, and four 310 helices, and the C-terminal domain consists of five strands, ten helices, and one 310 helix. These two domains are connected by the linker domain, which consists of two strands, three helices, and three 310 helices. Based on structural comparisons of TmOppA with other OppAs and binding studies, we suggest that TmOppA might be a periplasmic Opp. The most distinct feature of TmOppA is the insertion of two helices, which are lacking in other OppAs. A cavity volume between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is suggested to be responsible for binding peptides of various lengths. PMID:27377296

  15. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early- stage self-assembly of pi-conjugated oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Bryce; Tovar, John; Ferguson, Andrew

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate self-assembly. At low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ~ - 25kB T . Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini. We model simulations of hundereds of monomers as a continuous-time Markov process. We infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Award DE-SC0004857. Molecular simulations partially conducted on University of Illinois Computational Science and Engineering Program parallel computing resources.

  16. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with short oligopeptides for early endosomal escape and enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi; Mallick, Sudipta; Choi, Joon Sig

    2015-08-15

    Recently, non-viral vectors have become a popular research topic in the field of gene therapy. In this study, we conjugated short oligopeptides to polyamidoamine-generation 4 (PAMAM G4) to achieve higher transfection efficiency. Previous reports have shown that the PAMAM G4-histidine (H)-arginine (R) dendrimer enhances gene delivery by improving cell penetration and internalization mechanisms. Therefore, we synthesized PAMAM G4-H phenylalanine (F) R, PAMAM G4-FHR and PAMAM G4-FR derivatives to determine the best gene carrier with the lowest toxicity. Physicochemical studies were performed to determine mean diameters and surface charge of PAMAM derivatives/pDNA polyplexes. DNA condensation was confirmed using a gel retardation assay. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency were analyzed using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Similar levels of transfection were achieved in both cell lines by using gold standard transfection reagent PEI 25 kD. Therefore, our results show that these carriers are promising and may help achieve higher transfection with negligible cytotoxicity. PMID:26187169

  17. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  18. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  19. Adsorption of a cell-adhesive oligopeptide on polymer surfaces irradiated by ion beams.

    PubMed

    Satriano, C; Manso, M; Gambino, G L; Rossi, F; Marletta, G

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of H-Arg-Gly-Asp-OH (RGD) oligopeptide on ion-irradiated polymer surfaces has been studied. The RGD-incubated surfaces of poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) and poly(hydroxymethylsiloxane) (PHMS) thin films, before and after irradiation with 50 keV Ar+ to 1x10(15) ions/cm2, were investigated by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. It was found that no significant adsorption occurs on PET, while a measurable amount of RGD is preferentially adsorbed onto irradiated PHMS surfaces. The evaluated surface coverage was found to range between 5 and 12%. In situ adsorption measurements performed by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring technique showed that the irradiation induced remarkable changes of mass uptake with respect to the unirradiated surfaces, mostly attributed to the change in the water adsorption capability of the irradiated surfaces. The adsorption results are discussed in terms of the ion-induced changes on the morphology, chemical structure and composition, surface free energy and surface charge. PMID:15623933

  20. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibitory effects of an octameric oligopeptide isolated from abalone Haliotis discus hannai.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Ryu, Bomi; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Young-Mog; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Won Sun; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Geun Hyung; Je, Jae-Young; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2013-11-01

    Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) is a marine gastropod, and an important fishery and food industrial resource that is massively maricultured in Asia, Africa, Australia and America. However, its health benefits have rarely been studied for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical application. In this study, the purified abalone oligopeptide (AOP) with anti-matrix metalloproteinases (anti-MMPs) effects was isolated from the digests of abalone intestine using recycle HPLC with a JAI W253 column and an OHpak SB-803 HQ column. The AOP was identified as Ala-Glu-Leu-Pro-Ser-Leu-Pro-Gly (MW=782.4 Da) with a de novo peptide sequencing technique using a tandem mass spectrometer. The AOP exhibited a specific inhibitory effect against MMP-2/-9 activity and attenuated protein expression of p50 and p65 in the human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells, dose-dependently. The results presented illustrate that the AOP could inhibit MMP-2/-9 expression in HT1080 cells via the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB)-mediated pathway. This data suggest that the AOP from H. discus hannai intestine may possess therapeutic and preventive potential for the treatment of MMPs-related disorders such as angiogenesis and cardiovascular diseases.

  2. HIV-1 Suppressive Sequences Are Modulated by Rev Transport of Unspliced RNA and Are Required for Efficient HIV-1 Production

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kousei; Ishibashi, Keisuke; Miyokawa, Kaori; Hokari, Manami; Kanno, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Norio; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs are translated as Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins or packaged as genomes into viral particles. Efficient translation is necessary before the transition to produce infective virions. The viral protein Rev exports all intron-containing viral RNAs; however, it also appears to enhance translation. Cellular microRNAs target cellular and viral mRNAs to silence their translation and enrich them at discrete cytoplasmic loci that overlap with the putative interim site of Gag and the genome. Here, we analyzed how Rev-mediated transport and the splicing status of the mRNA influenced the silencing status imposed by microRNA. Through identification and mutational analysis of the silencing sites in the HIV-1 genome, we elucidated the effect of silencing on virus production. Renilla luciferase mRNA, which contains a let-7 targeting site in its 3′ untranslated region, was mediated when it was transported by Rev and not spliced, but it was either not mediated when it was spliced even in a partial way or it was Rev-independent. The silencing sites in the pol and env-nef regions of the HIV-1 genome, which were repressed in T cells and other cell lines, were Drosha-dependent and could also be modulated by Rev in an unspliced state. Mutant viruses that contained genomic mutations that reflect alterations to show more derepressive effects in the 3′ untranslated region of the Renilla luciferase gene replicated more slowly than wild-type virus. These findings yield insights into the HIV-1 silencing sites that might allow the genome to avoid translational machinery and that might be utilized in coordinating virus production during initial virus replication. However, the function of Rev to modulate the silencing sites of unspliced RNAs would be advantageous for the efficient translation that is required to support protein production prior to viral packaging and particle production. PMID:23251516

  3. Transport phenomena in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators at high current densities: Suppression of the broken neutrality drift

    SciTech Connect

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Tandoev, A. G.; Yurkov, S. N.; Levinshtein, M. E.

    2013-08-14

    It is shown that, in addition to the diffusion and broken neutrality drift (BND) modes well-known for insulators and very lightly doped semiconductors, the quasineutral drift (QND) mode is possible. The transition from the BND to QND mode is accompanied by the appearance of a portion with a very sharp current rise in the current-voltage characteristic. This effect is observed in a new type of semiconductor detectors (CIDs, Current Injected Detectors) of high-intensity neutron and proton radiation, suggested, in particular, for Large Hadron Collider. The effect is unambiguously attributed now to the presence of radiation-induced deep centers in a semiconductor. It is shown, however, in this paper that the effect of a very sharp rise in current upon a slight increase in voltage is even possible when there are no deep centers. An equation adequately describing the possible transport modes in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators is derived. The results of an analytical study are confirmed by an adequate simulation.

  4. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides. PMID:25800013

  5. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases.

  6. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  7. Supramolecular assemblies of histidinylated β-cyclodextrin for enhanced oligopeptide delivery into osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xuejin; Wang, Rui; Xu, Hong; Chi, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the problem of drug delivery through the cell membrane in order to treat and manage bone diseases recently. The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles made of amino- and histidinyl-modified amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) entrapping osteoclast inhibitor, a hydrophobic oligopeptides drug, across the membrane of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Drug-loaded β-CDs nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation technique and fully characterized for size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. Spherical NPs displaying a hydrodynamic radius of about 295 nm which did not change upon storage as an aqueous dispersion, a positive zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency of drug very close to 98% were produced. Flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry analysis indicated that the model drug itself was not taken up by the BMMs; however, NP systems underwent significant cellular uptake. In particular, histidinyl group-modified CD (β-CD-H) NPs were taken up more efficiently than amino group-modified (β-CD-A) ones. Cellular uptake mechanism study demonstrated that the permeability of drug-loaded NPs across the membrane of BMMs is probably due to macropinocytosis pathway. Cell viability studies showed that both β-CD-A and β-CD-H exhibited no significant cytotoxicity up to 1.0 mg/ml against the cells. These results highlight the developed β-CD-H NPs have great potential in safely and effectively delivering osteoclast inhibitors and other therapeutic agents toward bone disease. PMID:26907470

  8. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  9. Engineered bacterial hydrophobic oligopeptide repeats in a synthetic yeast prion, [REP-PSI (+)].

    PubMed

    Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Giraldo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The yeast translation termination factor Sup35p, by aggregating as the [PSI (+)] prion, enables ribosomes to read-through stop codons, thus expanding the diversity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. Yeast prions are functional amyloids that replicate by templating their conformation on native protein molecules, then assembling as large aggregates and fibers. Prions propagate epigenetically from mother to daughter cells by fragmentation of such assemblies. In the N-terminal prion-forming domain, Sup35p has glutamine/asparagine-rich oligopeptide repeats (OPRs), which enable propagation through chaperone-elicited shearing. We have engineered chimeras by replacing the polar OPRs in Sup35p by up to five repeats of a hydrophobic amyloidogenic sequence from the synthetic bacterial prionoid RepA-WH1. The resulting hybrid, [REP-PSI (+)], (i) was functional in a stop codon read-through assay in S. cerevisiae; (ii) generates weak phenotypic variants upon both its expression or transformation into [psi (-)] cells; (iii) these variants correlated with high molecular weight aggregates resistant to SDS during electrophoresis; and (iv) according to fluorescence microscopy, the fusion of the prion domains from the engineered chimeras to the reporter protein mCherry generated perivacuolar aggregate foci in yeast cells. All these are signatures of bona fide yeast prions. As assessed through biophysical approaches, the chimeras assembled as oligomers rather than as the fibers characteristic of [PSI (+)]. These results suggest that it is the balance between polar and hydrophobic residues in OPRs what determines prion conformational dynamics. In addition, our findings illustrate the feasibility of enabling new propagation traits in yeast prions by engineering OPRs with heterologous amyloidogenic sequence repeats.

  10. Effects of soya oligosaccharides and soya oligopeptides on lipid metabolism in hyperlipidaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shali; Zhu, Jundong; Zhang, Yanqi; Shi, Kai; Shi, Yuangang; Ma, Xiao

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of soya oligosaccharides (SOS) and soya oligopeptides (SOP) on blood lipid levels, release of vasoactive substances, antioxidant activity and faecal bile acid (FBA) excretion in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were evenly divided into five groups according to diets as follows: regular diet (control), HFD, HFD enriched with 2 % of SOS (SOS), HFD enriched with 3 % of SOP (SOP) and HFD enriched with 2 % SOS and 3 % SOP (SOSP). The results showed that SOS and SOP significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TAG, whereas HDL-cholesterol concentration was significantly increased. Furthermore, SOS and SOP reduced plasma apoB, apoE and the apoB:apoAI ratio, whereas apoAI was significantly increased. Moreover, SOS and SOP also reduced plasma thromboxane A₂ (TXA₂) and the TXA₂:prostacyclin (PGI₂) ratio, whereas plasma PGI₂ and nitric oxide were significantly increased. In addition, SOS and SOP significantly reduced serum and liver malondialdehyde concentrations and increased FBA excretion. However, we did not observe obvious influences of SOS and SOP on superoxide dismutase activities in the liver of HFD-fed rats. The combination of 2 % SOS and 3 % SOP showed a more marked effect than SOS or SOP alone in improving the lipid profile, release of vasoactive substances and increasing FBA excretion (P < 0.05). In summary, SOS and SOP might help prevent atherosclerosis through improving abnormal blood lipid levels, regulating vasoactive substances and protecting against oxidative stress.

  11. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  12. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  13. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  14. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  15. Effect of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation under mild and hydrothermal conditions in related to chemical evolution of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao

    2009-07-01

    The role of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation was inspected to see whether minerals possess catalytic activity under mild and hydrothermal conditions. Under mild conditions, oligopeptide formation from negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) using different minerals and the elongation of alanine oligopeptides ((Ala) 2-(Ala) 5) were attempted using apatite minerals. Oligo(Asp) up to 10 amino acid units from Asp were observed in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). Notable influence of minerals was not detected for the oligo(Asp) formation. Oligo(Asp) was gradually degraded by the further incubation in the presence of EDC in both the absence and presence of minerals. The formation of oligo(Glu) was less efficient in the presence of carbonyldiimidazole. The elongation from (Ala) 3, (Ala) 4, and (Ala) 5 and the formation of diketopiperazine from (Ala) 2 proceeded immediately in the presence of EDC in the meantime of the sample preparations. In addition, it was unexpected that the disappearance of the products and the reformation of the reactants occurred by the further incubation for 24 h; for instance, (Ala) 5 decreased but (Ala) 4 increased with increasing the reaction time in the reaction of (Ala) 4 with EDC. These facts suggest that the activation of the reactant amino acids or peptides immediately occurs. Under the simulated hydrothermal conditions, EDC did not enhance the formation of oligopeptides from Asp, Glu or Ala nor the spontaneous formation of (Ala) 5 from (Ala) 4.

  16. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  17. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  18. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide–CdSe nanoparticles’ (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100–200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated. PMID:27027885

  19. Integrating Terminal Truncation and Oligopeptide Fusion for a Novel Protein Engineering Strategy To Improve Specific Activity and Catalytic Efficiency: Alkaline α-Amylase as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we integrated terminal truncation and N-terminal oligopeptide fusion as a novel protein engineering strategy to improve specific activity and catalytic efficiency of alkaline α-amylase (AmyK) from Alkalimonas amylolytica. First, the C terminus or N terminus of AmyK was partially truncated, yielding 12 truncated mutants, and then an oligopeptide (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK) was fused at the N terminus of the truncated AmyK, yielding another 12 truncation-fusion mutants. The specific activities of the truncation-fusion mutants AmyKΔC500-587::OP and AmyKΔC492-587::OP were 25.5- and 18.5-fold that of AmyK, respectively. The kcat/Km was increased from 1.0 × 105 liters · mol−1 · s−1 for AmyK to 30.6 × and 23.2 × 105 liters · mol−1 · s−1 for AmyKΔC500-587::OP and AmyKΔC492-587::OP, respectively. Comparative analysis of structure models indicated that the higher flexibility around the active site may be the main reason for the improved catalytic efficiency. The proposed terminal truncation and oligopeptide fusion strategy may be effective to engineer other enzymes to improve specific activity and catalytic efficiency. PMID:23956385

  20. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance. PMID:25461681

  1. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  2. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J.-K.; Shiraki, D.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9, or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2-3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%-12%, which is close to the 13%-14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  3. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  4. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity.

  5. Multi-responsive Hydrogels Derived from the Self-assembly of Tethered Allyl-functionalized Racemic Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuwu; Li, Richen; Pollack, Kevin A.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Zou, Jiong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-responsive triblock hydrogelator oligo(dl-allylglycine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-oligo(dl-allylglycine) (ODLAG-b-PEG-b-ODLAG) was synthesized facilely by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of DLAG N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) with a diamino-terminated PEG as the macroinitiator. This system exhibited heat-induced sol-to-gel transitions and either sonication- or enzyme-induced gel-to-sol transitions. The β-sheeting of the oligopeptide segments was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The β-sheets further displayed tertiary ordering into fibrillar structures that, in turn generated a porous and interconnected hydrogel matrix, as observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reversible macroscopic sol-to-gel transitions triggered by heat and gel-to-sol transitions triggered by sonication were correlated with the transformation of nanostructural morphologies, with fibrillar structures observed in gel and spherical aggregates in sol, respectively. The enzymatic breakdown of the hydrogels was also investigated. This allyl-functionalized hydrogelator can serve as a platform for the design of smart hydrogels, appropriate for expansion into biological systems as bio-functional and bio-responsive materials. PMID:25485113

  6. Isolation and purification of oligopeptides from Ruditapes philippinarum and its inhibition on the growth of DU‑145 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuisu; Zhao, Yuqin; Yan, Haiqiang; Xu, Lv; Ding, Guofang; Yu, Di; Sun, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Ruditapes philippinarum is a member of the Veneridae family of marine bivalve molluscs. RPOI‑1 (Ruditapes philippinarum oligopeptide) is a tetrapeptide that can be extracted from Ruditapes philippinarum by means of enzymolysis. This study showed that RPOI‑1 strongly inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in DU‑145 human prostate cancer cells. When cells were treated with varying concentrations of RPOI‑1, significant inhibition of proliferation was detected by an MTT assay, and sub‑G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest was observed using flow cytometric (FCM) analysis. Furthermore, morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis and an increase in the proportion of apoptotic cells were observed using double sequential acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, FCM analysis and transmission election microscopy. FCM studies showed that exposing DU‑145 cells to 10, 20 and 30 mg/ml RPOI‑1 for 24 h increased the percentage of cells in the early‑stages of apoptotis in a dose‑dependent manner, with the numbers rising from 3.01% in the control group to 13.40% in the group treated with the highest dose.

  7. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  8. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data. PMID:27092480

  9. Sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) oligopeptides: immunomodulatory effects based on stimulating Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Bin; Chen, Qi-He; Liu, Rui; Ren, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulating activity of small molecule oligopeptides from sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) (SOP) in mice. Seven assays were performed to determine the immunomodulatory effects, including splenic lymphocyte proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays (cell-mediated immunity), IgM antibody response of spleen to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and serum hemolysin level assays (humoral immunity), the carbon clearance assay and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal cavity phagocytes assay (macrophage phagocytosis), and the NK cell activity assay. Spleen T lymphocyte subpopulations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays of serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for small intestinal secretory immunoglobulin were performed to study the mechanism by which SOP affects the immune system. We found that SOP could improve immune functions in mice, which may be due to the enhancement of the functions of cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activity. From the cellular and molecular assays, we postulated that the immunomodulatory effects are most likely attributed to the stimulation of Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production. PMID:26838796

  10. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; et al

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2more » mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.« less

  11. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lazerson, Sam A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J. -K.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  12. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on the Non-thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-06-01

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on the flare coronal temperature that can be attained, on the post-impulsive-phase cooling of heated coronal plasma, and on the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the possible ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy associated with accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  13. Histidine-Rich Oligopeptides To Lessen Copper-Mediated Amyloid-β Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ana B; Terol-Ordaz, Laia; Espargaró, Alba; Vázquez, Guillem; Nicolás, Ernesto; Sabaté, Raimon; Gamez, Patrick

    2016-05-17

    Brain copper imbalance plays an important role in amyloid-β aggregation, tau hyperphosphorylation, and neurotoxicity observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the administration of biocompatible metal-binding agents may offer a potential therapeutic solution to target mislocalized copper ions and restore metallostasis. Histidine-containing peptides and proteins are excellent metal binders and are found in many natural systems. The design of short peptides showing optimal binding properties represents a promising approach to capture and redistribute mislocalized metal ions, mainly due to their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and the possibility of fine-tuning their metal-binding affinities in order to suppress unwanted competitive binding with copper-containing proteins. In the present study, three peptides, namely HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH, have been designed with the objective of reducing copper toxicity in AD. These tripeptides form highly stable albumin-like complexes, showing higher affinity for Cu(II) than that of Aβ(1-40). Furthermore, HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH act as very efficient inhibitors of copper-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and prevent the copper-induced overproduction of toxic oligomers in the initial steps of amyloid aggregation in the presence of Cu(II) ions. These tripeptides, and more generally small peptides including the sequence His-Xaa-His at the N-terminus, may therefore be considered as promising motifs for the future development of new and efficient anti-Alzheimer drugs. PMID:27071336

  14. Specific Oligopeptides in Fermented Soybean Extract Inhibit NF-κB-Dependent iNOS and Cytokine Induction by Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Wu, Hong Min; Lee, Chan Gyu; Sung, Dae Il; Song, Hye Jung; Matsui, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The ethanol extract of fermented soybean from Glycine max (chungkookjang, CHU) has been claimed to have chemopreventive and cytoprotective effects. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of CHU on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands treatment and attempted to identify the responsible active components. Nitric oxide (NO) content and iNOS levels in the media or RAW264.7 cells were measured using the Griess reagent and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. CHU treatment inhibited NO production and iNOS induction elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4L) in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 productions were also diminished. Peptidoglycans (TLR2/6L) and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (TLR9L) from CHU inhibited iNOS induction, but not poly I:C (TLR3L) or loxoribine (TLF7L). The anti-inflammatory effect resulted from the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) through the inhibition of inhibitory-κB degradation. Of the representative components in CHU, specific oligopeptides (AFPG and GVAWWMY) had the ability to inhibit iNOS induction by LPS, whereas others failed to do so. Daidzein, an isoflavone used for comparative purposes, was active at a relatively higher concentration. In an animal model, oral administration of CHU to rats significantly diminished carrageenan-induced paw edema and iNOS induction. Our results demonstrate that CHU has anti-inflammatory effects against TLR ligands by inhibiting NF-κB activation, which may result from specific oligopeptide components in CHU. Since CHU is orally effective, dietary applications of CHU and/or the identified oligopeptides may be of use in the prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25184943

  15. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on Non-Thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on several items of interest to the modeling of flares, including: the peak flare coronal temperature that can be attained, the post-impulsive-phase cooling time of heated coronal plasma, and the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy content of accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  16. Interaction of the Hydrophobic Tip of an Atomic Force Microscope with Oligopeptides Immobilized Using Short and Long Tethers.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Derek; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Wang, Chenxuan; Gellman, Samuel H; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-03-29

    We report an investigation of the adhesive force generated between the hydrophobic tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and surfaces presenting oligopeptides immobilized using either short (∼1 nm) or long (∼60 nm) tethers. Specifically, we used either sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SSMCC) or 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) end-functionalized with maleimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide groups to immobilize helical oligomers of β-amino acids (β-peptides) to mixed monolayers presenting tetraethylene glycol (EG4) and amine-terminated EG4 (EG4N) groups. When SSMCC was used to immobilize the β-peptides, we measured the adhesive interaction between the AFM tip and surface to rupture through a single event with magnitude consistent with the interaction of a single β-peptide with the AFM tip. Surprisingly, this occurred even when, on average, multiple β-peptides were located within the interaction area between the AFM tip and surface. In contrast, when using the long 10 kDa PEG tether, we observed the magnitude of the adhesive interaction as well as the dynamics of the rupture events to unmask the presence of the multiple β-peptides within the interaction area. To provide insight into these observations, we formulated a simple mechanical model of the interaction of the AFM tip with the immobilized β-peptides and used the model to demonstrate that adhesion measurements performed using short tethers (but not long tethers) are dominated by the interaction of single β-peptides because (i) the mechanical properties of the short tether are highly nonlinear, thus causing one β-peptide to dominate the adhesion force at the point of rupture, and (ii) the AFM cantilever is mechanically unstable following the rupture of the adhesive interaction with a single β-peptide. Overall, our study reveals that short tethers offer the basis of an approach that facilitates measurement of adhesive interactions with single molecules presented at

  17. The superfamily of organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuch, B; Meier, P J

    2003-01-10

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps/OATPs) form a growing gene superfamily and mediate transport of a wide spectrum of amphipathic organic solutes. Different Oatps/OATPs have partially overlapping and partially distinct substrate preferences for organic solutes such as bile salts, steroid conjugates, thyroid hormones, anionic oligopeptides, drugs, toxins and other xenobiotics. While some Oatps/OATPs are preferentially or even selectively expressed in one tissue such as the liver, others are expressed in multiple organs including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), choroid plexus, lung, heart, intestine, kidney, placenta and testis. This review summarizes the actual state of the rapidly expanding OATP superfamily and covers the structural properties, the genomic classification, the phylogenetic relationships and the functional transport characteristics. In addition, we propose a new species independent and open ended nomenclature and classification system, which is based on divergent evolution and agrees with the guidelines of the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee.

  18. Sulfonate group-modified FePtCu nanoparticles as a selective probe for LDI-MS analysis of oligopeptides from a peptide mixture and human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Akira, Tarui; Watanabe, Takehiro; Nozaki, Kazuyoshi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2009-11-01

    Bare FePtCu nanoparticles (NPs) are first prepared for laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (LDI-MS) analysis as affinity probes to selectively trap oppositely charged analytes from a sample solution. Our present results demonstrate bare FePtCu NPs to be a potentially useful matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (SALDI-MS), for the analysis of small proteins and peptides. The upper detectable mass range of peptides was approximately 5 kDa, and the detection limit for peptides approximately 5 fmol. Sulfonate group-modified FePtCu nanoparticles (FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs), with ionization being independent of the solution pH, can interact with a positively charged analyte, and the analyte-bound NPs can be separated from the reaction supernatant by centrifugation or an external magnetic field. An oligopeptide, Gly-Gly-Tyr-Arg (GGYR) from an oligopeptide mixture containing Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp (DDDD), Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly (GGGG) and GGYR, was detected using SALDI-MS with FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs employing electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs can detect lysozyme (Lyz) in human serum through the electrostatic attraction between positively charged Lyz and FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs at pH 8, while detection of negatively charged albumin in human serum is not possible.

  19. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin gallate suppresses IGF-I and IGF-II stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocyte glucose uptake via the glucose transporter 4, but not glucose transporter 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hui-Chen; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Kao, Chung-Cheng; Weng, Jueng-Tsueng; Shih, Li-Jane; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Liu, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Shu-Wei; Kuo, Yow-Chii; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the pathways involved in EGCG modulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. EGCG inhibited IGF-I and IGF-II stimulation of adipocyte glucose uptake with dose and time dependencies. EGCG at 20μM for 2h decreased IGF-I- and IGF-II-stimulated glucose uptake by 59% and 64%, respectively. Pretreatment of adipocytes with antibody against the EGCG receptor (also known as the 67-kDa laminin receptor; 67LR), prevented the effects of EGCG on IGF-increased glucose uptake, but pretreatment with normal rabbit immunoglobulin did not. This suggests that the 67LR mediates the anti-IGF effect of EGCG on adipocyte glucose uptake. Further analysis indicated EGCG, IGF-I, and IGF-II did not alter total levels of GLUT1 or GLUT4 protein. However, EGCG prevented the IGF-increased GLUT4 levels in the plasma membrane and blocked the IGF-decreased GLUT4 levels in low-density microsomes. Neither EGCG nor its combination with IGF altered GLUT1 protein levels in the plasma membrane and low-density microsomes. EGCG also suppressed the IGF-stimulated phosphorylation of IGF signaling molecules, PKCζ/λ, but not AKT and ERK1/2, proteins. This study suggests that EGCG suppresses IGF stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocyte glucose uptake through inhibition of the GLUT4 translocation, but not through alterations of the GLUT1 pathway.

  20. A major Sm epitope anchored to sequential oligopeptide carriers is a suitable antigenic substrate to detect anti-Sm antibodies.

    PubMed

    Petrovas, C J; Vlachoyiannopoulos, P G; Tzioufas, A G; Alexopoulos, C; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, M; Sakarellos, C; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1998-11-01

    A sensitive, highly reproducible, solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (ELISA), was developed in order to investigate whether the synthetic heptapeptide PPGMRPP-a major epitope of the Sm autoantigen-anchored in five copies to a sequential oligopeptide carrier (SOC), [(PPGMRPP)5-SOC5] is a suitable antigenic substrate to identify anti-Sm/antibodies. Sera with different autoantibody specificities [45 anti-Sm, 40 anti-U1RNP, 40 anti-Ro (SSA)/La(SSB) positive, 21 Antinuclear antibody positive, but negative for antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ANA + /ENA - ) and 75 normal human sera, ANA negative] and 75 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were tested for anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 reactivity in order to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the method to detect anti-Sm antibodies. RNA immunoprecipitation assays for the detection of anti-Sm and anti-U1RNP antibodies and counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) for the detection of anti-Ro(SSA) and anti-La(SSB) antibodies were used as reference techniques. The sensitivity of the method was 98% and the specificity was 68% for the determination of anti-Sm antibodies, while for the determination of anti-Sm and/or anti-U1RNP reactivity (antibodies to snRNPs) the corresponding values were 82% and 86%, respectively. In a comparison of the above assay with an ELISA, using Sm/U1RNP purified complex as immobilized antigen it was shown that the sensitivity of the anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA in detecting anti-snRNPs was 74%; in addition sera with anti-Sm antibodies gave higher binding in the anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 ELISA compared with anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA. Intra- and inter-assay precision was measured on four sera with reactivities extending into a wide range of absorbance values showed that the intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV%) ranged from 2.7 to 6 and the inter-assay CV% ranged from 9 to 14.5. These results indicate that the PPGMRPP peptide anchored to a pentameric SOC as a carrier is a suitable antigen for

  1. Novel role of the nitrite transporter NirC in Salmonella pathogenesis: SPI2-dependent suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyanka; Lahiri, Amit; Lahiri, Ayan; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-08-01

    Activation of macrophages by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and the subsequent production of nitric oxide (NO) are critical for the host defence against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. We report here the inhibition of IFN-gamma-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with wild-type Salmonella. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the nirC gene, which encodes a potential nitrite transporter. We observed a higher NO output from IFN-gamma-treated macrophages infected with a nirC mutant of Salmonella. The nirC mutant also showed significantly decreased intracellular proliferation in a NO-dependent manner in activated RAW264.7 macrophages and in liver, spleen and secondary lymph nodes of mice, which was restored by complementing the gene in trans. Under acidified nitrite stress, a twofold more pronounced NO-mediated repression of SPI2 was observed in the nirC knockout strain compared to the wild-type. This enhanced SPI2 repression in the nirC knockout led to a higher level of STAT-1 phosphorylation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression than seen with the wild-type strain. In iNOS knockout mice, the organ load of the nirC knockout strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, indicating that the mutant is exclusively sensitive to the host nitrosative stress. Taken together, these results reveal that intracellular Salmonella evade killing in activated macrophages by downregulating IFN-gamma-induced NO production, and they highlight the critical role of nirC as a virulence gene.

  2. Astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through the IRS1/AKT pathway and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Lizhen; Gu, Bin; Huang, Shengli

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV is a monomer isolated from Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bunge, which is one of the most widely used plant-derived drugs in traditional Chinese medicine for diabetes therapy. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of astragaloside IV on glucose in C2C12 myotubes and the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects. Four-day differentiated C2C12 myotubes were exposed to palmitate for 16 h in order to establish a model of insulin resistance and 3H glucose uptake, using 2-Deoxy‑D‑[1,2-3H(N)]-glucose (radiolabeled 2-DG), was detected. Astragaloside IV was added 2 h prior to palmitate exposure. The translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) was evaluated by subcellular fractionation, and the expression of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor β (IRβ), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1/protein kinase B (AKT) and inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/inhibitor-κBα (IκBα), which are associated with insulin signal transduction, were assessed in the basal or the insulin‑stimulated state using western blot analysis or RT-PCR. We also examined the mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and Toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4). Taken together, these findings demonstrated that astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through a mechanism involving the IRS1/AKT pathway, and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway.

  3. Peptide binding in OppA, the crystal structures of the periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein in the unliganded form and in complex with lysyllysine.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, S H; Tame, J R; Dodson, E J; Wilkinson, A J

    1997-08-12

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein, OppA, acts as the initial receptor for the uptake of peptides by the oligopeptide permease (Opp) in Gram-negative bacteria. Opp will handle peptides between two and five amino acid residues regardless of their sequence. The crystal structures of a series of OppA-peptide complexes have revealed an enclosed but versatile peptide binding pocket and have illustrated how tri- and tetrapeptide ligands are accommodated. Here, the crystal structures of (i) OppA complexed with a dipeptide (lysyllysine) and (ii) unliganded OppA have been solved using X-ray data extending to 1.8 and 2.4 A spacing, respectively. In the dipeptide complex, the alpha-amino group of the ligand is anchored through an ion pair interaction with Asp419, as observed in complexes with longer peptides. However, its alpha-carboxylate group forms water-mediated interactions with the guanidinium groups of Arg404 and Arg413 rather than the direct salt bridges to Arg413 and His371 observed in the tripeptide and tetrapeptide complexes, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements of the binding of lysine-containing peptides of different lengths to OppA show that the dipeptide, KK, is bound with approximately 60-fold lower affinity than related tri- and tetrapeptides (KKK and KKKA, respectively). These data are discussed with reference to the calculated enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding and the structures of the OppA peptide complexes. In the unliganded molecule, domain III has rotated as a rigid body through 26 degrees away from domains I and II, exposing the ligand binding site. The water structure in the binding cleft shows similarities to that in the various OppA-peptide complexes.

  4. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  5. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  6. Effective suppressibility of chaos.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-06-01

    Suppression of chaos is a relevant phenomenon that can take place in nonlinear dynamical systems when a parameter is varied. Here, we investigate the possibilities of effectively suppressing the chaotic motion of a dynamical system by a specific time independent variation of a parameter of our system. In realistic situations, we need to be very careful with the experimental conditions and the accuracy of the parameter measurements. We define the suppressibility, a new measure taking values in the parameter space, that allows us to detect which chaotic motions can be suppressed, what possible new choices of the parameter guarantee their suppression, and how small the parameter variations from the initial chaotic state to the final periodic one are. We apply this measure to a Duffing oscillator and a system consisting on ten globally coupled Hénon maps. We offer as our main result tool sets that can be used as guides to suppress chaotic dynamics. PMID:23822472

  7. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  8. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  9. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-23

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  10. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  11. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  12. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to...

  13. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to...

  14. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to...

  15. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to...

  16. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to...

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of the high-affinity glutamate transporter, EAAC1, in the retina of representative vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Schultz, K; Stell, W K

    1996-06-28

    The glutamate transporter, EAAC1, was localized immunocytochemically in goldfish, salamander, turtle, chicken, and rat retinas, using affinity-purified oligopeptide antibodies. Immunoreactive (IR) EAAC1 was present in the inner plexiform layer of all species, and in cell bodies of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells of most species, but absent from photoreceptors and Müller's glial cells. Western blots revealed an IR-EAAC1 band at 70 kDa. Staining was abolished by preabsorption with EAAC1 peptide. PMID:8817573

  18. Fusion of an oligopeptide to the N terminus of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica simultaneously improves the enzyme's catalytic efficiency, thermal stability, and resistance to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Lu, Xinyao; Liu, Long; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we constructed and expressed six fusion proteins composed of oligopeptides attached to the N terminus of the alkaline α-amylase (AmyK) from Alkalimonas amylolytica. The oligopeptides had various effects on the functional and structural characteristics of AmyK. AmyK-p1, the fusion protein containing peptide 1 (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK), exhibited improved specific activity, catalytic efficiency, alkaline stability, thermal stability, and oxidative stability compared with AmyK. Compared with AmyK, the specific activity and catalytic constant (kcat) of AmyK-p1 were increased by 4.1-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively. The following properties were also improved in AmyK-p1 compared with AmyK: kcat/Km increased from 1.8 liter/(g·min) to 9.7 liter/(g·min), stable pH range was extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 7.0 to 12.0, optimal temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, and the half-life at 60°C increased by ∼2-fold. Moreover, AmyK-p1 showed improved resistance to oxidation and retained 54% of its activity after incubation with H2O2, compared with 20% activity retained by AmyK. Finally, AmyK-p1 was more compatible than AmyK with the commercial solid detergents tested. The mechanisms responsible for these changes were analyzed by comparing the three-dimensional (3-D) structural models of AmyK and AmyK-p1. The significantly enhanced catalytic efficiency and stability of AmyK-p1 suggests its potential as a detergent ingredient. In addition, the oligopeptide fusion strategy described here may be useful for improving the catalytic efficiency and stability of other industrial enzymes.

  19. Fusion of an Oligopeptide to the N Terminus of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica Simultaneously Improves the Enzyme's Catalytic Efficiency, Thermal Stability, and Resistance to Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Lu, Xinyao; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Du, Guocheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed and expressed six fusion proteins composed of oligopeptides attached to the N terminus of the alkaline α-amylase (AmyK) from Alkalimonas amylolytica. The oligopeptides had various effects on the functional and structural characteristics of AmyK. AmyK-p1, the fusion protein containing peptide 1 (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK), exhibited improved specific activity, catalytic efficiency, alkaline stability, thermal stability, and oxidative stability compared with AmyK. Compared with AmyK, the specific activity and catalytic constant (kcat) of AmyK-p1 were increased by 4.1-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively. The following properties were also improved in AmyK-p1 compared with AmyK: kcat/Km increased from 1.8 liter/(g·min) to 9.7 liter/(g·min), stable pH range was extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 7.0 to 12.0, optimal temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, and the half-life at 60°C increased by ∼2-fold. Moreover, AmyK-p1 showed improved resistance to oxidation and retained 54% of its activity after incubation with H2O2, compared with 20% activity retained by AmyK. Finally, AmyK-p1 was more compatible than AmyK with the commercial solid detergents tested. The mechanisms responsible for these changes were analyzed by comparing the three-dimensional (3-D) structural models of AmyK and AmyK-p1. The significantly enhanced catalytic efficiency and stability of AmyK-p1 suggests its potential as a detergent ingredient. In addition, the oligopeptide fusion strategy described here may be useful for improving the catalytic efficiency and stability of other industrial enzymes. PMID:23455344

  20. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome.

  1. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito . E-mail: zakay@ri.imcj.go.jp

    2005-12-23

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application.

  2. A redox-sensitive, oligopeptide-guided, self-assembling, and efficiency-enhanced (ROSE) system for functional delivery of microRNA therapeutics for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qida; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xu; Li, Yang; Fu, Qihan; Liang, Tingbo; Tang, Guping

    2016-10-01

    Lack of efficient adjuvant therapy contributes to a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A novel therapeutic is required for adjuvant treatment of HCC. We developed a polymer-based nanosystem (ROSE) for functional gene therapy by synthesizing a supramolecular complex self-assembled from polycations and functional adamantyl modules. The ROSE system condensing tumor suppressor microRNA-34a (miR-34a) therapeutics becomes ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles that could facilitate gene transfection in HCC cells with satisfied stability and efficiency, possibly due to proton sponge effect by polycations, PEGlyation protection, and controlled release by breakdown of disulfide bonds. Meanwhile, modification with a targeting oligopeptide SP94 in ROSE/miR-34a enables approximately higher affinity for LM3 HCC cells than hepatocytes in vitro and greater HCC specificity in vivo. Furthermore, ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, representing a notable effect improvement over conventional gene delivery strategies. ROSE/miR-34a, featuring redox-responsiveness, oligopeptide-guided specificity, self-assembly, and enhanced transfection, is therefore a potential therapeutic agent in future adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. PMID:27459325

  3. A redox-sensitive, oligopeptide-guided, self-assembling, and efficiency-enhanced (ROSE) system for functional delivery of microRNA therapeutics for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qida; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xu; Li, Yang; Fu, Qihan; Liang, Tingbo; Tang, Guping

    2016-10-01

    Lack of efficient adjuvant therapy contributes to a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A novel therapeutic is required for adjuvant treatment of HCC. We developed a polymer-based nanosystem (ROSE) for functional gene therapy by synthesizing a supramolecular complex self-assembled from polycations and functional adamantyl modules. The ROSE system condensing tumor suppressor microRNA-34a (miR-34a) therapeutics becomes ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles that could facilitate gene transfection in HCC cells with satisfied stability and efficiency, possibly due to proton sponge effect by polycations, PEGlyation protection, and controlled release by breakdown of disulfide bonds. Meanwhile, modification with a targeting oligopeptide SP94 in ROSE/miR-34a enables approximately higher affinity for LM3 HCC cells than hepatocytes in vitro and greater HCC specificity in vivo. Furthermore, ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, representing a notable effect improvement over conventional gene delivery strategies. ROSE/miR-34a, featuring redox-responsiveness, oligopeptide-guided specificity, self-assembly, and enhanced transfection, is therefore a potential therapeutic agent in future adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment.

  4. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  5. Unifying mechanism for bacterial cell signalers (4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione, lactones and oligopeptides): electron transfer and reactive oxygen species. Practical medical features.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling has attracted much attention involving higher organisms, and more recently is of considerable interest concerning involvement in the bacterial realm. Many aspects can apply, including quorum sensing. Of the participating molecules, designated autoinducers, 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD) is one of the most important. It is in equilibrium with a furanone and a furanosyl-borate diester (AI-2). A prior hypothesis for cell signaling in higher organisms invoked a key role for electron transfer (ET) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as conduits, relays and electrical effects. The principal ET functionalities are quinones, metal complexes, ArNO(2), and iminium species. A lesser known type is the alpha-dicarbonyl class. Diacetyl, a member, as well as its imine derivatives, can serve as a model for DPD, since the parent possesses a reduction potential amenable to ET in the biological domain. Hence, it is conceivable that DPD and its imine derivatives may be involved in ET-ROS processes. Presence of hydroxy groups should facilitate ET by DPD vs. diacetyl. Extensive prior literature supports participation of ET functionalities in action of therapeutic drugs, toxins and various illnesses. This biochemical behavior also applies to the alpha-dicarbonyl parent models. A second important bacterial autoinducer is the lactone category. Although ET functionality is lacking, the presence of the 1,3-dicarbonyl structure can provide a site for avid chelation with redox metal, e.g., iron or copper, followed by ET-ROS. Findings with added iron furnish support for the proposal. Oligopeptides comprise the third principal type of bacterial signaling agent. A prior review incorporates these within the theoretical framework based on ET by redox amino acids and redox enzymes. In recent years there has been a rapid increase in resistance to antibiotics by pathogenic bacteria. Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and the third leading cause in

  6. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  7. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  8. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  9. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  10. Mechanisms of pH-gradient driven transport mediated by organic anion polypeptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Leuthold, Simone; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Wagner, Carsten A; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2009-03-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (humans OATPs, rodents Oatps) are expressed in most mammalian tissues and mediate cellular uptake of a wide variety of amphipathic organic compounds such as bile salts, steroid conjugates, oligopeptides, and a large list of drugs, probably by acting as anion exchangers. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of the extracellular pH on the transport activity of nine human and four rat OATPs/Oatps. Furthermore, we aimed to test the concept that OATP/Oatp transport activity is accompanied by extrusion of bicarbonate. By using amphibian Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing OATPs/Oatps and mammalian cell lines stably transfected with OATPs/Oatps, we could demonstrate that in all OATPs/Oatps investigated, with the exception of OATP1C1, a low extracellular pH stimulated transport activity. This stimulation was accompanied by an increased substrate affinity as evidenced by lower apparent Michaelis-Menten constant values. OATP1C1 is lacking a highly conserved histidine in the third transmembrane domain, which was shown by site-directed mutagenesis to be critically involved in the pH dependency of OATPs/Oatps. Using online intracellular pH measurements in OATP/Oatp-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells, we could demonstrate the presence of a 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid-sensitive chloride/bicarbonate exchanger in CHO-K1 cells and that OATP/Oatp-mediated substrate transport is paralleled by bicarbonate efflux. We conclude that the pH dependency of OATPs/Oatps may lead to a stimulation of substrate transport in an acidic microenvironment and that the OATP/Oatp-mediated substrate transport into cells is generally compensated or accompanied by bicarbonate efflux.

  11. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  12. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  13. High polar organic-inorganic hybrid coating stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangju; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei

    2012-09-21

    In this work, partially sulfonated polystyrene-titania (PSP-TiO(2)) organic-inorganic hybrid stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel and blending methods, and a new method of PSP-TiO(2) coating stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for the analysis of seleno-amino acids (selenocystine (SeCys(2)), methylseleno-cysteine (MeSeCys), selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenoethionine (SeEt)) and seleno-oligopeptides (γ-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine (γ-GluMeSeCys) and selenodiglutathione (GS-Se-SG)) in biological samples. The prepared high polar PSP-TiO(2) hybrid coating avoided the swelling of PSP and cracking of TiO(2) coating by combining the good film-forming property of PSP with the high mechanical strength of TiO(2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that no obvious swelling and damage occurred for the PSP-TiO(2) hybrid stir bar coating after 30 extraction/desorption cycles. The preparation reproducibility of PSP-TiO(2) coated stir bar, evaluated with the relative standard deviations (RSDs), was in the range of 6.7-12.6% (n=5) in one batch, and 9.9-17.6% (n=7) among different batches. The limits of detection (LODs) of the developed method for six target selenium species were in the range of 50.2-185.5 ngL(-1) (as (77)Se) and 45.9-158.8 ngL(-1) (as (82)Se) with the RSDs within 4.9-11.7%. The dynamic linear range was found to cover three orders of magnitude with correlation coefficient of 0.9995-0.9999. The developed method was applied for the analysis of Certified Reference Material SELM-1 selenium enriched yeast and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method has also been applied for the analysis of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in human urine and garlic samples. Different from the conventional organic polymer SBSE coatings (such as polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS), the extraction mechanism

  14. Nonsense suppression in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  15. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea.

  16. Denervation suppresses gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Westphalen, Christoph B.; Andersen, Gøran T.; Flatberg, Arnar; Johannessen, Helene; Friedman, Richard A.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Sandvik, Arne K.; Beisvag, Vidar; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Quante, Michael; Li, Zhishan; Gershon, Michael D.; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Duan

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of epithelial homeostasis and has also been postulated to play a role in tumorigenesis. We provide evidence that proper innervation is critical at all stages of gastric tumorigenesis. In three separate mouse models of gastric cancer, surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach (bilateral or unilateral truncal vagotomy, or local injection of botulinum toxin type A) markedly reduced tumor incidence and progression, but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. Vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment also enhanced the therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy and prolonged survival. Denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis was associated with inhibition of Wnt signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion. In gastric organoid cultures, neurons stimulated growth in a Wnt-mediated fashion through cholinergic signaling. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor suppressed gastric tumorigenesis. In gastric cancer patients, tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling, whereas vagotomy reduced the risk of gastric cancer. Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor–mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer. PMID:25143365

  17. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  18. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition.

  19. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  20. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  1. Giant suppression of flux-flow resistivity in heavy-ion irradiated Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films - Influence of linear defects on vortex transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Suenaga, M.; Liou, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A large shift of the onset of flux-flow resistivity and the irreversibility line H(irr)(T) to higher temperatures is observed in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing linear defects created by Ag(+21) ion irradiation. The H(irr)(T), which has a characteristic L shape in highly anisotropic Tl and Bi based cuprates, becomes more like that of YBa2Cu3O7 in the presence of these defects. The Jc at 77 K also shows a large increase as a result of flux localization at the defects. The transport data indicate that in the H-T plane above H(irr)(T) of the unirradiated material, an ensemble of unoccupied defects is required for effective pinning of each flux line in the system.

  2. Summation of punishment suppression.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, R; Rudolph, R

    1971-01-01

    In two experiments, eight rats were trained to lever press with food on a variable-interval schedule. Bar pressing produced shock on a variable-interval schedule in the presence of two independently presented stimuli, a light and a tone. Two rats in each experiment received alternative presentations of the light and the tone and were consequently always in the presence of a stimulus that signalled variable-interval punishment. The other two rats in each experiment were treated similarly except that they received periods in which neither light nor tone was present. During these periods, bar pressing was not punished. The two stimuli that signalled punishment were then presented simultaneously to evaluate the effect of stimulus compounding on response suppression. The subjects trained without punishment-free periods did not show summation to the compound stimulus; the subjects trained with punishment-free periods showed summation of suppression. The major difference between the two experiments was the longer mean interval of variable-interval punishment used in the second experiment. This manipulation made the summation effect more resistant to extinction and thus increased its magnitude. PMID:16811483

  3. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  4. Suppression and restoration of primordial germ cell marker gene expression in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, using knockdown constructs regulated by copper transport protein gene promoters: Potential for reversible transgenic sterilization.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Grewe, Peter M; Patil, Jawahar G; Peatman, Eric; Perera, Dayan A; Cheng, Qi; Li, Chao; Weng, Chia-Chen; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhanjiang; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-12-01

    Complementary DNA overexpression and short hairpin RNA interference approaches were evaluated for decreasing expression of primordial germ cell (PGC) marker genes and thereby sterilizing channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by delivering knockdown constructs driven by a constitutive promoter from yeast and a copper transport protein gene into fish embryos by electroporation. Two PGC marker genes, nanos and dead end, were the target knockdown genes, and their expressions, along with that of an off-target gene, vasa, were evaluated temporally using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Copper sulfate was evaluated as a repressor compound. Some of the constructs knocked down PGC marker gene expression, and some of the constructs were partially repressed by application of 0.1-ppm copper sulfate. When the rate of sexual maturity was compared for three-year-old broodfish that had been exposed to the sterilizing constructs during embryologic development and controls that had not been exposed, several treatments had reduced sexual maturity for the exposed fish. Of two promoter systems evaluated, the one which had been designed to be less sensitive to copper generally was more effective at achieving sterilization and more responsive to repression. Knockdown constructs based on 3' nanos short hairpin RNA interference appeared to result in the best repression and restoration of normal sexual maturity. We conclude that these copper-based systems exhibited good potential for repressible transgenic sterilization. Optimization of this system could allow environmentally safe application of transgenic technology and might be applicable to other applications for aquatic organisms. PMID:26341409

  5. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  6. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  7. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  8. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  9. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre. PMID:22274056

  10. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre.

  11. Tormentic acid, a major component of suspension cells of Eriobotrya japonica, suppresses high-fat diet-induced diabetes and hyperlipidemia by glucose transporter 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Bin; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Ho, Hui-Ya; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects and mechanism of tormentic acid (PTA) on diabetes and dyslipidemia in high-fat (HF)-fed mice. Feeding C57BL/6J mice with a HF diet for 12 weeks induced type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. During the last 4 weeks, the mice were given orally PTA (at two dosages) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or water. In this study, the HF diet increased glucose, triglyceride, insulin, and leptin levels, whereas PTA effectively prevented these phenomena and ameliorated insulin resistance. PTA reduced visceral fat mass and hepatic triacylglycerol contents; moreover, PTA significantly decreased both the area of adipocytes and ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes. PTA caused increased skeletal muscular AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) proteins, but reduced the hepatic expressions of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase) genes. PTA enhanced skeletal muscular Akt phosphorylation and increased insulin sensitivity. PTA also enhanced phospho-AMPK in the liver. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by PTA results in decreasing hepatic glucose production while increasing skeletal muscular GLUT4 contents, thus contributing to attenuating the diabetic state. Moreover, PTA exhibits an antihyperlipidemic effect by down-regulations of the hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and apolipoprotein C-III (apo C-III) and an increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α expression, thus resulting in decreases in blood triglycerides. These findings demonstrated that PTA was effective for the treatment of diabetes and hyperlipidemia in HF-fed mice.

  12. Crystal structure of the E. coli peptide transporter YbgH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Mao, Guotao; Liu, Min; Zhang, Laixing; Wang, Xianping; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2014-08-01

    E. coli YbgH belongs to the family of proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs), a subfamily of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of secondary active transporters. Like other MFS transporters, POT proteins switch between two major conformations during substrate transport. Apart from possessing a canonical 12-helix, two-domain transmembrane (TM) core, prokaryotic POT proteins usually have two TM helices inserted between the two domains. Here we determined the crystal structure of YbgH in its inward-facing conformation. Our structure-based functional studies investigated the roles of both the POT signature motif 2 and the inserted interdomain TM helix pair in the stabilization and regulation of the major conformational change in MFS/POT transporters. Furthermore, of all the proton-titratable amino acid residues, Glu21 is the only conserved one (among POTs) located in the central cavity and is critical for in vivo transport. Together, our results support the notion that MFS symporters utilize a transport mechanism based on substrate-protonation coupling.

  13. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  14. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  15. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  16. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  17. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-05-29

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs.

  18. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects.

  19. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  20. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    . This was a considerable improvement, considering that uncoated CoSb3 had been found to decompose to form the lowest antimonide at the surface at only 600 C. Evidently, because the mean free path of Sb at the given temperature and pressure was of the order of tens of centimeters, any barrier closer than tens of centimeters (as was the niobium foil) would have suppressed transport of Sb vapor, thereby suppressing sublimation of Sb

  1. Enantioselective Synthesis of (2R, 3S)- and (2S, 3R)-4,4,4-trifluoro-N-Fmoc-O-tert-butyl-threonine and their Racemization-free Incorporation into Oligopeptides via Solid-phase Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nu; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    An efficient method for the enantioselective synthesis of (2R, 3S)- and (2S, 3R)-4,4,4-trifluoro-N-Fmoc-O-tert-butyl-threonine (tfT) on multi-gram scales was developed. Absolute configurations of the two stereoisomers were ascertained by X-ray crystallography. Racemization-free coupling conditions for the incorporation of tfT into oligopeptides were then explored. For solution-phase synthesis, tfT racemization was not an issue under conventional coupling conditions. For solid-phase synthesis, the following conditions were identified to achieve racemization-free synthesis: if tfT (3.0 eq.) was not the first amino acid to be linked to the resin (1.0 eq.), the condition is: 2.7 eq. DIC/3.0 eq. HOBt as the coupling reagent at 0 °C for 20 h; if tfT (3.0 eq.) was the first amino acid to be linked to the resin (1.0 eq.), then 1.0 eq. of CuCl2 needs to be added to the coupling reagent. PMID:17702025

  2. A formula for charmonium suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, C. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    In this work a formula for charmonium suppression obtained by Matsui in 1989 is analytically generalized for the case of complex cc-barpotential described by a 3-dimensional and isotropic time-dependent harmonic oscillator (THO). It is suggested that under certain scheme the formula can be applied to describe J/{psi} suppression in heavy-ion collisions at CERN-SPS, RHIC, and LHC with the advantage of analytical tractability.

  3. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  4. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  5. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  6. Odour suppression in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cashion, Larry; Livermore, Andrew; Hummel, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    It has been suggested that odours causing stronger trigeminal activation suppress weaker trigeminal stimuli and that mixed olfactory-trigeminal stimuli suppress odorants that only activate one of these systems. Volunteer normosmic participants (n=20) were exposed to six odorants with varying trigeminal impact to test the hypothesis that more intense "trigeminal" odorants would suppress weaker trigeminal stimuli in binary odour mixtures. It was also hypothesised that stronger trigeminal odorants would dominate six-odour mixtures. The predicted linear pattern of suppression was not seen, with a quadratic model emerging from the data. Stronger trigeminal stimuli failed to dominate six-odour mixtures. Despite the fact that the major hypothesis was not supported, it can be hypothesised from this experiment that the effect of suppression in binary mixtures is reliant upon two major effects: (1) the association formed between odours and the multiple memory systems that they interact with during the encoding and recognition processes, and (2) the balance between activation of the olfactory and trigeminal systems.

  7. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  8. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds.

  9. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility.

  10. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  11. Transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics.

  12. Serologic profiling of Haemophilus parasuis-vaccinated sows and their litters using a novel oligopeptide permease A enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reveals unexpected patterns of serological response and maternal antibody transfer.

    PubMed

    Galina Pantoja, Lucina; Stammen, Bethany; Minton, Bill; Amodie, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an economically important swine pathogen with 15 recognized serovars. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed that detects serum antibodies to the oligopeptide permease A (OppA) polypeptide membrane protein present in the reference strains for 13 of the H. parasuis serovars. Using the OppA-ELISA, H. parasuis serologic profiles were assessed on 2 swine farms, with seroconversion defined as an OppA-ELISA sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio ≥0.5. Ten gilts from each farm were vaccinated for H. parasuis using either a live avirulent culture vaccine (farm 1) or an inactivated autogenous vaccine (farm 2). Seroconversion occurred in 100% of farm 1 gilts and 90% of farm 2 gilts, with a mean S/P ratio (MSPR) of 3.36 and 1.43, respectively. The OppA-ELISA MSPRs were determined for 2 piglets, 1 male and 1 female, randomly selected from 10 first-parity (P1), 10 second-parity (P2), and 10 third-parity (P3) litters farrowed by respective vaccinated gilts on each farm. On both farms, postfarrowing MSPRs and rate of seropositivity were highest in P1 versus P2 and P3 dams. Parity 1 piglets had higher MSPRs and rates of seropositivity versus later parities, with the difference being significant (P < 0.05) on farm 2. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of nasal swabs indicated that 100% of farm 1 piglets and 47-84%, depending on parity, of farm 2 piglets were H. parasuis-colonized at weaning. The results indicated that H. parasuis vaccination of gilts will not maintain serologic responses in the OppA-ELISA over their reproductive lifetimes, and that maternally derived antibodies do not prevent H. parasuis colonization of piglets.

  13. Visual cortex: suppression by depression?

    PubMed

    Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas; Hübener, Mark

    2002-08-20

    The response of a neuron in the visual cortex to an oriented light bar is strongly reduced by concurrent presentation of a stimulus with a different orientation. New data suggest this 'cross-orientation suppression' is caused, not by intracortical inhibition, but by rapid depression of thalamocortical synapses.

  14. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  15. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  16. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants.

  17. Fire alarm system/fire suppression system for mobile tactical shelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, F. K.; Lecours, C. A.; Radcliff, O.

    1985-08-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a fire detection/suppression capability for DoD standard family mobile tactical shelters. The systems developed and tested provide complete protection during all employment conditions; in garrison use, storage, transportation, and deployed field conditions. The reports outlines the requirement and the test and evaluation program. Two manufacturers of detection systems and two manufacturers of suppression systems were identified and qualified to meet the fire protection requirements for mobile tactical shelters.

  18. Isoform-selective Inhibition of Facilitative Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  19. A dipeptide transporter from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis is upregulated in the intraradical phase.

    PubMed

    Belmondo, Simone; Fiorilli, Valentina; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ferrol, Nuria; Marmeisse, Roland; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which form an ancient and widespread mutualistic symbiosis with plants, are a crucial but still enigmatic component of the plant micro biome. Nutrient exchange has probably been at the heart of the success of this plant-fungus interaction since the earliest days of plants on land. To characterize genes from the fungal partner involved in nutrient exchange, and presumably important for the functioning of the AM symbiosis, genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained from the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis were exploited. A gene sequence, showing amino acid sequence and transmembrane domains profile similar to members of the PTR2 family of fungal oligopeptide transporters, was identified and called RiPTR2. The functional properties of RiPTR2 were investigated by means of heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in either one or both of its di/tripeptide transporter genes PTR2 and DAL5. These assays showed that RiPTR2 can transport dipeptides such as Ala-Leu, Ala-Tyr or Tyr-Ala. From the gene expression analyses it seems that RiPTR2 responds to different environmental clues when the fungus grows inside the root and in the extraradical phase.

  20. A dipeptide transporter from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis is upregulated in the intraradical phase

    PubMed Central

    Belmondo, Simone; Fiorilli, Valentina; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ferrol, Nuria; Marmeisse, Roland; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which form an ancient and widespread mutualistic symbiosis with plants, are a crucial but still enigmatic component of the plant micro biome. Nutrient exchange has probably been at the heart of the success of this plant-fungus interaction since the earliest days of plants on land. To characterize genes from the fungal partner involved in nutrient exchange, and presumably important for the functioning of the AM symbiosis, genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained from the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis were exploited. A gene sequence, showing amino acid sequence and transmembrane domains profile similar to members of the PTR2 family of fungal oligopeptide transporters, was identified and called RiPTR2. The functional properties of RiPTR2 were investigated by means of heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in either one or both of its di/tripeptide transporter genes PTR2 and DAL5. These assays showed that RiPTR2 can transport dipeptides such as Ala-Leu, Ala-Tyr or Tyr-Ala. From the gene expression analyses it seems that RiPTR2 responds to different environmental clues when the fungus grows inside the root and in the extraradical phase. PMID:25232358

  1. A dipeptide transporter from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis is upregulated in the intraradical phase.

    PubMed

    Belmondo, Simone; Fiorilli, Valentina; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ferrol, Nuria; Marmeisse, Roland; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which form an ancient and widespread mutualistic symbiosis with plants, are a crucial but still enigmatic component of the plant micro biome. Nutrient exchange has probably been at the heart of the success of this plant-fungus interaction since the earliest days of plants on land. To characterize genes from the fungal partner involved in nutrient exchange, and presumably important for the functioning of the AM symbiosis, genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained from the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis were exploited. A gene sequence, showing amino acid sequence and transmembrane domains profile similar to members of the PTR2 family of fungal oligopeptide transporters, was identified and called RiPTR2. The functional properties of RiPTR2 were investigated by means of heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in either one or both of its di/tripeptide transporter genes PTR2 and DAL5. These assays showed that RiPTR2 can transport dipeptides such as Ala-Leu, Ala-Tyr or Tyr-Ala. From the gene expression analyses it seems that RiPTR2 responds to different environmental clues when the fungus grows inside the root and in the extraradical phase. PMID:25232358

  2. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  3. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  4. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  5. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate ‘weak links’ where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors.

  6. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-27

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors.

  7. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors. PMID:25626170

  8. Heat transfer enhancement accompanying Leidenfrost state suppression at ultrahigh temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Arjang; Wurz, Jillian; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2014-10-14

    The well-known Leidenfrost effect is the formation of a vapor layer between a liquid and an underlying hot surface. This insulating vapor layer severely degrades heat transfer and results in surface dryout. We measure the heat transfer enhancement and dryout prevention benefits accompanying electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state. Interfacial electric fields in the vapor layer can attract liquid toward the surface and promote wetting. This principle can suppress dryout even at ultrahigh temperatures exceeding 500 °C, which is more than 8 times the Leidenfrost superheat for organic solvents. Robust Leidenfrost state suppression is observed for a variety of liquids, ranging from low electrical conductivity organic solvents to electrically conducting salt solutions. Elimination of the vapor layer increases heat dissipation capacity by more than 1 order of magnitude. Heat removal capacities exceeding 500 W/cm(2) are measured, which is 5 times the critical heat flux (CHF) of water on common engineering surfaces. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate can be electrically controlled by the applied voltage. The underlying science is explained via a multiphysics analytical model which captures the coupled electrostatic-fluid-thermal transport phenomena underlying electrostatic Leidenfrost state suppression. Overall, this work uncovers the physics underlying dryout prevention and demonstrates electrically tunable boiling heat transfer with ultralow power consumption.

  9. Slurry transport medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, W.; Schiffman, L.

    1980-06-03

    This invention provides for an improvement in slurry transport systems, especially coal slurry lines. Instead of the usual use of fresh water resources which, in some geographic areas, are scarce for slurry transport, concentrated brine is used which is prepared from abundant salt water resources. Because of the higher density of this concentrated brine, it is a superior carrier of pulverized material. It diminishes the separation and settling tendency of slurry components during transport and particularly during shutdown. Other advantages in the use of concentrated brine include: freezing point depression which permits ease of transport during winter and at lower temperatures; dust suppression of stored coal; avoidance of spontaneous combustion of stored coal; inhibit freeze packing of dewatered pipeline coal; and diminished extent of corrosion in ferrous metal pipelines as compared to that which might occur with lower concentration brines. Important in the economy of the process is that the concentrated brine can be recycled. An inexpensive method for producing the concentrated brine is given.

  10. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  11. Essential letters in the fungal alphabet: ABC and MFS transporters and their roles in survival and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Perlin, Michael H; Andrews, Jared; Toh, Su San

    2014-01-01

    Fungi depend heavily on their ability to exploit resources that may become available to them in their myriad of possible lifestyles. Whether this requires simple uptake of sugars as saprobes or competition for host-derived carbohydrates or peptides, fungi must rely on transporters that effectively allow the fungus to accumulate such nutrients from their environments. In other cases, fungi secrete compounds that facilitate their interactions with potential hosts and/or neutralize their competition. Finally, fungi that find themselves on the receiving end of insults, from hosts, competitors, or the overall environment are better served if they can get rid of such toxins or xenobiotics. In this chapter, we update studies on the most ubiquitous transporters, the ABC and MFS superfamilies. In addition, we discuss the importance of subsets of these proteins with particular relevance to plant pathogenic fungi. The availability of ever-increasing numbers of sequenced fungal genomes, combined with high-throughput methods for transcriptome analysis, provides insights previously inaccessible prior to the -omics era. As examples of such broader perspectives, we point to revelations about exploitive use of sugar transporters by plant pathogens, expansion of trichothecene efflux pumps in fungi that do not produce these mycotoxins, and the discovery of a fungal-specific oligopeptide transporter class that, so far, is overrepresented in the plant pathogenic fungi.

  12. Exciton Transport in a Bilayer Quantum Hall Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, J. P.; Finck, A. D. K.; Nandi, D.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2013-08-01

    Bilayer quantum Hall systems at vT = 1 support an excitonic ground state. In addition to the usual charged quasiparticles, this system possesses a condensate degree of freedom: exciton transport. Detection of this neutral transport mode is facilitated by the use of the Corbino multiply-connected geometry in which charge transport is suppressed. We here summarize our recent experiments on Corbino devices which directly demonstrate exciton transport across the bulk of the incompressible vT = 1 quantum Hall state.

  13. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  14. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah; Allen, Lisa; Millar, Debra; Dalziel, Nancy; Gascon, Suzy; Hakim, Julie; Ryckman, Julie; Spitzer, Rachel; Van Eyk, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins de santé, un document de consensus canadien comptant des recommandations pour ce qui est de la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui font face à des obstacles physiques et/ou cognitifs ou chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’un traitement contre le cancer et pour lesquelles les règles pourraient exercer un effet délétère sur la santé. Options : Le présent document analyse les options disponibles aux fins de la suppression menstruelle, les indications, les contre-indications et les effets indésirables (tant immédiats qu’à long terme) propres à cette dernière, et les explorations et le monitorage nécessaires tout au long de la suppression. Issues : Les cliniciens seront mieux renseignés au sujet des options et des indications propres à la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui présentent des déficiences cognitives et/ou physiques et chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’une chimiothérapie, d’une radiothérapie ou d’autres traitements contre le cancer. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE, OVID et The Cochrane Library au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « heavy menstrual bleeding », « menstrual suppression », « chemotherapy/radiation », « cognitive disability », « physical disability », « learning disability »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés, aux études observationnelles et aux études pilotes. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de langue ou de date. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et du nouveau matériel a été intégré à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d

  15. Disorder-Enhanced Transport in Photonic Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Liad; Rechtsman, Mikael; Freedman, Barak; Schwartz, Tal; Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-06-01

    Quasicrystals are aperiodic structures with rotational symmetries forbidden to conventional periodic crystals; examples of quasicrystals can be found in aluminum alloys, polymers, and even ancient Islamic art. Here, we present direct experimental observation of disorder-enhanced wave transport in quasicrystals, which contrasts directly with the characteristic suppression of transport by disorder. Our experiments are carried out in photonic quasicrystals, where we find that increasing disorder leads to enhanced expansion of the beam propagating through the medium. By further increasing the disorder, we observe that the beam progresses through a regime of diffusive-like transport until it finally transitions to Anderson localization and the suppression of transport. We study this fundamental phenomenon and elucidate its origins by relating it to the basic properties of quasicrystalline media in the presence of disorder.

  16. Methods of suppressing automotive interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, H. E.

    1981-11-01

    Automotive manufacturers utilize several techniques to reduce EMI emanating from the vehicle. The techniques include resistor spark plugs, resistor spark plug cables, use of silicone lubricant in the distributor, use of capacitors as filters, placement of grounding straps at key locations, conductive fan belt discharge, and tire static-charge reduction. If even further reduction is needed to obtain the maximum capability of a specific mobile communication system, additional suppression techniques are discussed which are effective at frequencies from approximately 30 to 1000 MHz. Measurement results show that the EMI from a new production-line automobile, measured in accordance with SAE Standard J551g, can be reduced as much as 10 to 15 dB by employing these suppression techniques. The amount of degradation to a mobile narrow-band FM receiver, such as the type used by law enforcement agencies, can be measured using the measurement technique described. This same technique can then be used as a tool to further reduce EMI from the vehicle components.

  17. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  18. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elvis H W; Wang, Wei; Xu, C; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P M

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1-p, respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ(p) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p. For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ(p) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p≤pR, and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for ppR. A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  19. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  20. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  1. Characterization of the Opp Peptide Transporter of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Its Role in Virulence and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Pablo M. R. O.; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Wanderson M.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Silva, Renata F.; Lima, Danielle D.; Hirata, Raphael; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Despite the economic importance of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), a chronic disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, few genes related to the virulence of its etiologic agent have been characterized. The oligopeptide permease (Opp) transporters are located in the plasma membrane and have functions generally related to the uptake of peptides from the extracellular environment. These peptide transporters, in addition to having an important role in cell nutrition, also participate in the regulation of various processes involving intercellular signaling, including the control of the expression of virulence genes in pathogenic bacteria. To study the role of Opp in C. pseudotuberculosis, an OppD deficient strain was constructed via simple crossover with a nonreplicative plasmid carrying part of the oppD gene sequence. As occurred to the wild-type, the ΔoppD strain showed impaired growth when exposed to the toxic glutathione peptide (GSH), indicating two possible scenarios: (i) that this component can be internalized by the bacterium through an Opp-independent pathway or (ii) that there is toxicity while the peptide is extracellular. Additionally, the ΔoppD mutant presented a reduced ability to adhere to and infect macrophages compared to the wild-type, although both strains exhibit the same potential to colonize spleens and cause injury and death to infected mice. PMID:24895581

  2. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  3. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  4. Hiding information by cell suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Vinterbo, S. A.; Ohno-Machado, L.; Dreiseitl, S.

    2001-01-01

    Joining relational data can jeopardize patient confidentiality if disseminated data for research can be joined with publicly available data containing, for example, explicit identifiers. Ambiguity in data hinders the construction of primary keys that are of importance when joining data tables. We define two values to be indiscernible if they are the same or at least one of them is a special value. Two rows in a data table are indiscernible if their corresponding entries are indiscernible. We further define a table to be k-ambiguous if each row is indiscernible from at least k rows in the same table. We present two simple heuristics to make a table k-ambiguous by cell suppression, and compare them on example data. PMID:11825281

  5. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  6. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Beale, John H; Parker, Joanne L; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W; Newstead, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  7. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport

    PubMed Central

    Beale, John H.; Parker, Joanne L.; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L.; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E.; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  8. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  9. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  10. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  11. Residual Versus Suppressed-Carrier Coherent Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. K.; Million, S.

    1996-07-01

    This article addresses the issue of when to suppress or not to suppress the transmitted carrier in designing a coherent communication system employing a carrier tracking loop for carrier synchronization. Assuming that a phase-locked loop (PLL) is used whenever there exists a residual carrier and a Costas loop is used whenever the carrier is suppressed, the regions of system parameters that delineate these two options are presented based on the desire to minimize the average probability of error of the system.

  12. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  13. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression.

  14. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  15. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  16. Intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    These animations depict generalities of intercellular transport. The animation called "permeability and transport" demonstrates the permeability of four classes of molecules. The "gap junctions" animation shows how these intercellular complexes exclude large factors while they allow small factors to diffuse between cells. These animations serve as useful resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, introductory biology, and physiology.

  17. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  18. Identifying separate components of surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision.

  19. Suppressive soils: back on the radar screen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suppressive soils are those in which a pathogen does not establish or persist, establishes but causes little or no damage, or establishes and causes disease for a while but thereafter the disease is less important, although the pathogen may persist in the soil (Weller, 2002). ‘General suppression,’ ...

  20. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  1. Prolonged over-suppression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Good, A E; Kempers, R D

    1974-07-01

    The syndrome of postpill amenorrhea was investigated retrospectively by studying records of diagnosed cases of amenorrhea (1300) treated or confirmed at the Mayo Clinic. Data are taken from records dating to 1960 (low use of contraceptives) and terminate in 1971. 12 cases are reviewed which were diagnosed as prolonged oversuppression syndrome. No particular oral contraceptive formulation was implicated. 4 of 12 patients had had irregular menstrual cycles before oral contraceptive therapy; whereas 8 had had regular cycles. Bioassay of urinary gonadotropins were consistently in the mid-low normal limits (only 1 determination was available for each patient); some patients had been radioimmunoassayed (single assay) for other pituitary hormones: LH (luteinizing hormone) was at normal basal levels and FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) was also in the normal range. Concentrations of total circulating estrogens were in low or subnormal range in each case. 4 cases had associated galactorrhea, which was attributed to exogenous steroid suppression of the prolactin-inhibiting center of the pituitary. Clomiphene citrate was used to restore functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and of the 8 receiving clomiphene, 5 responded and 2 conceived.

  2. Vibration suppression of satellites using multifunctional platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antin, Nicolas; Russ, Richard; Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2009-03-01

    This research focuses on a finite element analysis of active vibration suppression capabilities of a smart composite platform, which is a structural interface between a satellite main thruster and its structure and possesses simultaneous precision positioning and vibration suppression capabilities for thrust vector control of a satellite. First, the combined system of the smart composite platform and the satellite structure are briefly described followed by the finite element modeling and simulations. The smart platform piezoelectric patches and stacks material properties modeling, for the finite element analysis, are developed consistent with the manufacturer data. Next, a vibration suppression scheme, based on the modal analysis, is presented and used in vibration suppression analysis of satellite structures of the thrust vector under the thruster-firing excitation. The approach introduced here is an effective technique for the design of smart structures with complex geometry to study their MIMO active vibration suppression capabilities.

  3. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  4. Suppressing irrelevant information: knowledge activation or inhibition?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S; McDaniel, Mark A

    2004-03-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not general-topic, sentences. Experiment 3 demonstrated that participants with greater general knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of the ambiguous words in general-topic sentences. As predicted by D. S. McNamara's (1997) knowledge-based account of suppression, ambiguity effects are influenced by greater activation of knowledge related to the intended meaning of the homograph. These results challenge inhibition (e.g. M. A. Gernsbacher, K. R. Varner. & M. Faust, 1990) as the sole mechanism responsible for the suppression of irrelevant information.

  5. Suppression of operant vs consummatory behavior.

    PubMed

    DeCosta, M J; Ayres, J J

    1971-07-01

    The magnitude and variability of conditioned suppression of bar pressing and dipper licking were compared. In two steady-state experiments, suppression of bar pressing was more profound and more stable from day to day. The two measures of suppression were uncorrelated as indexed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients computed for adjacent trials. Correlations within measures (internal consistency) were somewhat higher for the bar-press system except when a high proportion of rats completely suppressed on one of the correlated trials. In a transient state experiment in which possible adventitious punishment of both response systems was eliminated, suppression of bar pressing was again more profound and considerably slower to extinguish. PMID:5142387

  6. OPT3 Is a Phloem-Specific Iron Transporter That Is Essential for Systemic Iron Signaling and Redistribution of Iron and Cadmium in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Zhiyang; Gayomba, Sheena R.; Jung, Ha-il; Vimalakumari, Nanditha K.; Piñeros, Miguel; Craft, Eric; Rutzke, Michael A.; Danku, John; Lahner, Brett; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Salt, David E.; Kochian, Leon V.; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for both plant growth and human health and nutrition. Knowledge of the signaling mechanisms that communicate iron demand from shoots to roots to regulate iron uptake as well as the transport systems mediating iron partitioning into edible plant tissues is critical for the development of crop biofortification strategies. Here, we report that OPT3, previously classified as an oligopeptide transporter, is a plasma membrane transporter capable of transporting transition ions in vitro. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana show that OPT3 loads iron into the phloem, facilitates iron recirculation from the xylem to the phloem, and regulates both shoot-to-root iron signaling and iron redistribution from mature to developing tissues. We also uncovered an aspect of crosstalk between iron homeostasis and cadmium partitioning that is mediated by OPT3. Together, these discoveries provide promising avenues for targeted strategies directed at increasing iron while decreasing cadmium density in the edible portions of crops and improving agricultural productivity in iron deficient soils. PMID:24867923

  7. Functional Implications and Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation of the Peptide Transporter Ptr2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Ken; Moriya, Atsuto; Uemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The peptide transporter Ptr2 plays a central role in di- or tripeptide import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although PTR2 transcription has been extensively analyzed in terms of upregulation by the Ubr1-Cup9 circuit, the structural and functional information for this transporter is limited. Here we identified 14 amino acid residues required for peptide import through Ptr2 based on the crystallographic information of Streptococcus thermophilus peptide transporter PepTst and based on the conservation of primary sequences among the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs). Expression of Ptr2 carrying one of the 14 mutations of which the corresponding residues of PepTst are involved in peptide recognition, salt bridge interaction, or peptide translocation failed to enable ptr2Δtrp1 cell growth in alanyl-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) medium. We observed that Ptr2 underwent rapid degradation after cycloheximide treatment (half-life, approximately 1 h), and this degradation depended on Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. The ubiquitination of Ptr2 most likely occurs at the N-terminal lysines 16, 27, and 34. Simultaneous substitution of arginine for the three lysines fully prevented Ptr2 degradation. Ptr2 mutants of the presumed peptide-binding site (E92Q, R93K, K205R, W362L, and E480D) exhibited severe defects in peptide import and were subjected to Rsp5-dependent degradation when cells were moved to Ala-Trp medium, whereas, similar to what occurs in the wild-type Ptr2, mutant proteins of the intracellular gate were upregulated. These results suggest that Ptr2 undergoes quality control and the defects in peptide binding and the concomitant conformational change render Ptr2 subject to efficient ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. PMID:25172766

  8. Momentum Injection in Tokamak Plasmas and Transitions to Reduced Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, F. I.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.

    2011-03-18

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  9. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  10. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  11. Light-hormone interaction in the red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ansuman; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-03-01

    Red light perceived by the shoot bottom suppresses photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings mediated by phytochrome A. Shoots of these seedlings grown in red light having their shoot bottom exposed were deficient in chlorophyll and accumulated high concentration of trans-zeatin riboside. However, reduced presence of isopentynyl adenosine, dihydrozeatin riboside was observed in shoots of red-light-grown non-green seedlings in comparison to green seedling. The message abundance of cytokinin receptor (OsHK5), transporters (OsENT1, OsENT2), and response regulators (OsRR4, OsRR10) was downregulated in these red-light-grown non-green seedlings. Attenuation of greening process was reversed by application of exogenous cytokinin analogue, benzyladenine, or supplementing red light with blue light. In the same vein, the suppression of gene expression of cytokinin receptor, transporters, and type-A response regulators was reversed in red-light-grown seedlings treated with benzyladenine suggesting that the disarrayed cytokinin (CK) signaling cascade is responsible for non-greening of seedlings grown in red light. The reversal of red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis by blue light and benzyladenine demonstrates the interaction of light and cytokinin signaling cascades in the regulation of photomorphogenesis. Partial reversal of greening process by exogenous application of benzyladenine suggests, apart from CKs perception, transportation and responsiveness, other factors are also involved in modulation of suppression of photomorphogenesis by red light.

  12. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  13. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls - Review of developments and applications based on the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of the aerodynamic energy concept, involving the use of active controls for flutter suppression, is reviewed. Applications of the concept include the suppression of external-store flutter of three different configurations of the YF-17 flutter model using a single trailing edge control surface activated by a single fixed-gain control law. Consideration is also given to some initial results concerning the flutter suppression of the 1/20 scale low speed wind-tunnel model of the Boeing 2707-300 supersonic transport using an activated trailing edge control surface.

  14. Suppression of dark current through barrier engineer for solution-processed colloidal quantum-dots infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Liu, Yan; Mo, Chen; Wang, Li; Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Liu, Jie; Kurhade, Kandhar K.; Xu, Jian E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Wenjun; You, Guanjun; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-31

    In an attempt to suppress the dark current, the barrier layer engineer for solution-processed PbSe colloidal quantum-dot (CQD) photodetectors has been investigated in the present study. It was found that the dark current can be significantly suppressed by implementing two types of carrier blocking layers, namely, hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, sandwiched in between two active PbSe CQD layers. Meanwhile no adverse impact has been observed for the photo current. Our study suggests that this improvement resides on the transport pathway created via carrier recombination at intermediate layer, which provides wide implications for the suppression of dark current for infrared photodetectors.

  15. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  16. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  17. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  18. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Heidi A.; Pham, Antony; Hald, Helle; Kastrup, Jette S.; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2009-11-06

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC{sub 50} value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC{sub 50} values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  19. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  20. Effects of tic suppression: ability to suppress, rebound, negative reinforcement, and habituation to the premonitory urge.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Woods, Douglas W; Nicotra, Cassandra M; Kelly, Laura M; Ricketts, Emily J; Conelea, Christine A; Grados, Marco A; Ostrander, Rick S; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) represents a safe, effective non-pharmacological treatment for Tourette's disorder that remains underutilized as a treatment option. Contributing factors include the perceived negative consequences of tic suppression and the lack of a means through which suppression results in symptom improvement. Participants (n = 12) included youth ages 10-17 years with moderate-to-marked tic severity and noticeable premonitory urges who met Tourette's or chronic tic disorder criteria. Tic frequency and urge rating data were collected during an alternating sequence of tic freely or reinforced tic suppression periods. Even without specific instructions regarding how to suppress tics, youth experienced a significant, robust (72%), stable reduction in tic frequency under extended periods (40 min) of contingently reinforced tic suppression in contrast to periods of time when tics were ignored. Following periods of prolonged suppression, tic frequency returned to pre-suppression levels. Urge ratings did not show the expected increase during the initial periods of tic suppression, nor a subsequent decline in urge ratings during prolonged, effective tic suppression. Results suggest that environments conducive to tic suppression result in reduced tic frequency without adverse consequences. Additionally, premonitory urges, underrepresented in the literature, may represent an important enduring etiological consideration in the development and maintenance of tic disorders.

  1. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  2. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  3. Suppression of reactions to certain cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A

    1977-08-01

    Reactions to hair dyes and bleaches may be "suppressed" with corticosteroids and antihistamines. Reactions to nail polish may be prevented by a "drying" or "polymerizing" technique. Sensitization to certain perfume ingredients may be inhibited by a "quenching" phenomenon.

  4. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  5. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  6. Morphine suppression of ethanol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Wallace, J E; Schwerter, H A; Eubanks, J D

    1976-01-15

    The acute administration of morphine, alcohol or dopamine results in a pronounced suppression of the convulsions produced by alcohol in mice. The suppressive action of morphine on alcohol withdrawal in the mouse apparently is not a product of morphine intoxication, but rather to some other specific interaction between alcohol and morphine in the central nervous system. The conclusion suggest that dopamine may play a significant role as a modulator in convulsions produced during alcohol withdrawal.

  7. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  8. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  9. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  10. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  11. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities.

  12. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  13. The temporal frequency tuning of continuous flash suppression reveals peak suppression at very low frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shui’er; Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a psychophysical technique where a rapidly changing Mondrian pattern viewed by one eye suppresses the target in the other eye for several seconds. Despite the widespread use of CFS to study unconscious visual processes, the temporal tuning of CFS suppression is currently unknown. In the present study we used spatiotemporally filtered dynamic noise as masking stimuli to probe the temporal characteristics of CFS. Surprisingly, we find that suppression in CFS peaks very prominently at approximately 1 Hz, well below the rates typically used in CFS studies (10 Hz or more). As well as a strong bias to low temporal frequencies, CFS suppression is greater for high spatial frequencies and increases with increasing masker contrast, indicating involvement of parvocellular/ventral mechanisms in the suppression process. These results are reminiscent of binocular rivalry, and unifies two phenomenon previously thought to require different explanations. PMID:27767078

  14. LNG transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

  15. Transport experiments with Dirac electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkelsky, Joseph George

    This thesis presents transport experiments performed on solid state systems in which the behavior of the charge carriers can be described by the Dirac equation. Unlike the massive carriers in a typical material, in these systems the carriers behave like massless fermions with a photon-like dispersion predicted to greatly modify their spin and charge transport properties. The first system studied is graphene, a crystalline monolayer of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The band structure calculated from the hexagonal lattice has the form of the massless Dirac Hamiltonian. At the charge neutral Dirac point, we find that application of a magnetic field drives a transition to an insulating state. We also study the thermoelectric properties of graphene and find that the states near the Dirac point have a unique response compared to those at higher charge density. The second system is the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3, where a Dirac-like dispersion for states on the 2D surface of the insulating 3D crystal arises as a result of the topology of the 3D bands and time reversal symmetry. To access the transport properties of the 2D states, we suppress the remnant bulk conduction channel by chemical doping and electrostatic gating. In bulk crystals we find strong quantum corrections to transport at low temperature when the bulk conduction channel is maximally suppressed. In microscopic crystals we are able better to isolate the surface conduction channel properties. We identify in-gap conducting states that have relatively high mobility compared to the bulk and exhibit weak anti-localization, consistent with predictions for protected 2D surface states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  16. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  17. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  18. The suppression of the large magnetoresistance in thin WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Woods, John; Cha, Judy

    The layered nature of WTe2 suggests the possibility of making a single layer WTe2 memory device that exploits the recently observed large magnetoresistance. Presently, the origin of the magnetoresistance is attributed to the charge balance between the electron and hole carriers, yet the exact underlying physical mechanism is unclear. Here we show a systematic suppression of the large magnetoresistance, as well as turn-on temperature, with decreasing thickness of WTe2. We attribute the thickness-dependent transport properties to undesirable parasitic effects that become dominant in thin films of WTe2. Our results highlight the increasing importance of characterizing the parasitic effects for 2D layered materials in a single- to a few-layer thick limit. Finally, our observations support the hypothesis that the origin of the large magnetoresistance may be due to the charge balance between the electron and the hole carriers.

  19. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  20. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE PAGES

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore » Wave heating.« less

  1. How to suppress the backscattering of conduction electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibis, O. V.

    2014-09-01

    It is shown theoretically that the strong coupling of electrons to a high-frequency electromagnetic field results in the nulling of electron backscattering within the Born approximation. The conditions of the effect depend only on field parameters and do not depend on the concrete form of the scattering potential. As a consequence, this phenomenon is of universal physical nature and can take place in various conducting systems. Since the suppression of electron backscattering results in decreasing electrical resistance, the solved quantum-mechanical problem opens a new way to control electronic transport properties of conductors by a laser-generated field. Particularly, the elaborated theory is applicable to nanostructures exposed to a strong monochromatic electromagnetic wave.

  2. Enhancement and Suppression of Heat Transfer by MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    2006-07-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on heat transfer within magnetized plasmas for energy injection velocities both larger and smaller than the Alfvén speed. We find that in the latter regime the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the former regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale lA at which the turbulent velocity is equal to the Alfvén velocity is an important new parameter. When the electron mean free path λ is larger than lA, the stronger the turbulence, the lower the thermal conductivity by electrons. The turbulent motions, however, induce their own advective heat transport, which, for the parameters of intracluster medium, provides effective heat diffusivity that exceeds the classical Spitzer value.

  3. Charmonium suppression with cc¯ dissociation by strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiss, J.; Greiner, C.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.

    1999-02-01

    We study the production of cc¯ pairs in nuclear reactions at SPS energies within the covariant transport approach HSD. The production of cc¯ pairs is treated perturbatively employing experimental cross sections while the interactions of cc¯ pairs with baryons are included by conventional cascade-type two-body collisions. Adopting 6 mb for the cc¯-baryon cross section the data on J/Ψ suppression in p+A reactions are reproduced in line with calculations based on the Glauber model. Additionally the dissociation of the cc¯ pairs by strings is included in a purely geometrical way. We find good agreement with the experimental data from the NA38 and NA50 Collaborations with an estimate for the string radius of Rs~0.2-0.25 fm.

  4. Extensions to PIFCGT: Multirate output feedback and optimal disturbance suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    New control synthesis procedures for digital flight control systems were developed. The theoretical developments are the solution to the problem of optimal disturbance suppression in the presence of windshear. Control synthesis is accomplished using a linear quadratic cost function, the command generator tracker for trajectory following and the proportional-integral-filter control structure for practical implementation. Extensions are made to the optimal output feedback algorithm for computing feedback gains so that the multirate and optimal disturbance control designs are computed and compared for the advanced transport operating system (ATOPS). The performance of the designs is demonstrated by closed-loop poles, frequency domain multiinput sigma and eigenvalue plots and detailed nonlinear 6-DOF aircraft simulations in the terminal area in the presence of windshear.

  5. Reduced tubulin polyglutamylation suppresses flagellar shortness in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Hirono, Masafumi; Aikawa, Takumi; Kamiya, Ritsu; Witman, George B

    2015-08-01

    Ciliary length control is an incompletely understood process essential for normal ciliary function. The flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants lacking multiple axonemal dyneins are shorter than normal; previously it was shown that this shortness can be suppressed by the mutation suppressor of shortness 1 (ssh1) via an unknown mechanism. To elucidate this mechanism, we carried out genetic analysis of ssh1 and found that it is a new allele of TPG2 (hereafter tpg2-3), which encodes FAP234 functioning in tubulin polyglutamylation in the axoneme. Similar to the polyglutamylation-deficient mutants tpg1 and tpg2-1, tpg2-3 axonemal tubulin has a greatly reduced level of long polyglutamate side chains. We found that tpg1 and tpg2-1 mutations also promote flagellar elongation in short-flagella mutants, consistent with a polyglutamylation-dependent mechanism of suppression. Double mutants of tpg1 or tpg2-1 and fla10-1, a temperature-sensitive mutant of intraflagellar transport, underwent slower flagellar shortening than fla10-1 at restrictive temperatures, indicating that the rate of tubulin disassembly is decreased in the polyglutamylation-deficient flagella. Moreover, α-tubulin incorporation into the flagellar tips in temporary dikaryons was retarded in polyglutamylation-deficient flagella. These results show that polyglutamylation deficiency stabilizes axonemal microtubules, decelerating axonemal disassembly at the flagellar tip and shifting the axonemal assembly/disassembly balance toward assembly.

  6. MPLM fire detection and suppression: architecture and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balocco, P.; Potenza, F.; Cafero, E. |

    1993-12-31

    The Mini Pressurized Logistics Module (MPLM) is a servicer of the Space Station Freedom (SSF), whose purpose is to provide location for both subsystems and payload racks (active racks i.e. namely a freezer and a freezer/refrigerator, is to be serviced, and passive racks). The MPLM will be used to supply and return a pressurized cargo to and from the SSF via the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), optimizing the NSTS cargo capabilities. Being a pressurized module, the MPLM is characterized by an Environmental Control System that consists of two sections: The Enviromental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). The ECLSS is constituted by other subsections, among which is the Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS) Subsystem. The fire suppression method, selected at SSF level, is the CO2 discharge and diffusion in the affected enclosed areas. As far as the mathematical simulation of the FDS aspects is concerned, a big effort has been made and is still on-going. The related mathematical modelization is quite complex, involving two-phase phenomena, chocked flow and gas diffusion: this means the implementation and running of dedicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The diffusion analysis is particularly time-consuming, due to the complexity of the geometry with respect to modelization capability.

  7. Suppression Characteristics of Cup-Burner Flames in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Linteris, Gregory T.; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and suppression of laminar methane-air co-flow diffusion flames formed on a cup burner have been studied experimentally and numerically using physically acting fire-extinguishing agents (CO2, N2, He, and Ar) in normal earth (lg) and zero gravity (0g). The computation uses a direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and radiative heat-loss models. An initial observation of the flame without agent was also made at the NASA Glenn 2.2-Second Drop Tower. An agent was introduced into a low-speed coflowing oxidizing stream by gradually replacing the air until extinguishment occurred under a fixed minimal fuel velocity. The suppression of cup-burner flames, which resemble real fires, occurred via a blowoff process (in which the flame base drifted downstream) rather than the global extinction phenomenon typical of counterflow diffusion flames. The computation revealed that the peak reactivity spot (the reaction kernel) formed in the flame base was responsible for attachment and blowoff phenomena of the trailing diffusion flame. The thermal and transport properties of the agents affected the flame extinguishment limits.

  8. Suppression of rectification at metal-Mott insulator interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemitsu, Kenji; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2007-12-01

    Charge transport through metal-Mott insulator interfaces is studied and compared with that through metal-band-insulator interfaces. For band insulators, rectification has been known to occur owing to a Schottky barrier, which is produced by the work-function difference. For Mott insulators, however, qualitatively different current-voltage characteristics are obtained. Theoretically, we use the one-dimensional Hubbard model for a Mott insulator and attach to it the tight-binding model for metallic electrodes. A Schottky barrier is introduced by a solution to the Poisson equation with a simplified density-potential relation. The current density is calculated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We mainly use the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation and also use exact many-electron wave functions on small systems for comparison. Rectification is found to be strongly suppressed even for large work-function differences. We show its close relationship with the fact that field-effect injections into one-dimensional Mott insulators are ambipolar. Experimentally, we fabricated asymmetric contacts on top of single crystals of quasi-one-dimensional organic Mott and band insulators. Rectification is strongly suppressed at an interface between metallic magnesium and Mott-insulating (BEDT-TTF)(F2TCNQ) [ BEDT-TTF=bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene ; F2TCNQ=2,5-difluorotetracyanoquinodimethane ].

  9. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Flevaris, Anastasia V; Murray, Scott O

    2015-01-28

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension.

  10. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  11. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  12. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.; Ashbaugh, L.; Van Curen, T.; Campbell, R.

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  13. TEOAE suppression in adults with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Glattke, Theodore; Cone-Wesson, Barbara K

    2008-10-01

    The presentation of contralateral noise during the recording of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) reduces the amplitude of the TEOAE in normally-hearing adults. This is known as TEOAE suppression. The present study investigated TEOAE suppression in 18 adults with learning disabilities (LDs) compared to 18 adults without LDs. TEOAEs were elicited by 60 dB p.e. SPL clicks and were suppressed by the presentation of 60 dB SPL contralateral broadband noise. Suppression was measured as a change in the overall TEOAE response amplitude, and also analysed in 2-ms epochs representing different TEOAE frequency-response bands. A significant interaction was evident between group type and ear tested. Participants in the control group had right ear dominance for the suppression effect, whereas the left ear was found to be dominant for the LD group. These findings suggest a mechanism of the medial olivary cochlear bundle and efferent auditory pathway that differs in those with LD compared to those with typical learning abilities.

  14. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  15. Self-induced suppression of collective neutrino oscillations in a supernova.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huaiyu; Friedland, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    We investigate collective flavor oscillations of supernova neutrinos at late stages of the explosion. We first show that the frequently used single-angle (averaged coupling) approximation predicts oscillations close to, or perhaps even inside, the neutrinosphere, potentially invalidating the basic neutrino transport paradigm. Fortunately, we also find that the single-angle approximation breaks down in this regime; in the full multiangle calculation, the oscillations start safely outside the transport region. The new suppression effect is traced to the interplay between the dispersion in the neutrino-neutrino interactions and the vacuum oscillation term.

  16. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  17. Suppression of behavior by timeout punishment when suppression results in loss of positive reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Arnold; Baron, Alan

    1968-01-01

    This investigation, using rats as subjects and punishment by timeout for responses maintained on a ratio schedule, sought to determine whether behavior would be suppressed by timeout punishment when such suppression also reduced reinforcement density or frequency. A series of experiments indicated that timeout punishment suppressed responding, with the degree of suppression increasing as a function of the duration of the timeout period. Suppressive effects were found to decrease as a function of increases in deprivation (body weight) and were eliminated when the punished response also was reinforced. It was concluded that timeout can produce aversive effects even when loss of reinforcement results. An alternative interpretation of the findings, based on the effects of extinction periods and delay of reinforcement on chained behavior, was discussed. PMID:5722425

  18. Suppression of behavior by timeout punishment when suppression results in loss of positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A; Baron, A

    1968-09-01

    This investigation, using rats as subjects and punishment by timeout for responses maintained on a ratio schedule, sought to determine whether behavior would be suppressed by timeout punishment when such suppression also reduced reinforcement density or frequency. A series of experiments indicated that timeout punishment suppressed responding, with the degree of suppression increasing as a function of the duration of the timeout period. Suppressive effects were found to decrease as a function of increases in deprivation (body weight) and were eliminated when the punished response also was reinforced. It was concluded that timeout can produce aversive effects even when loss of reinforcement results. An alternative interpretation of the findings, based on the effects of extinction periods and delay of reinforcement on chained behavior, was discussed.

  19. Mesoscopic electronics beyond DC transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Carlo, Leonardo

    Since the inception of mesoscopic electronics in the 1980's, direct current (dc) measurements have underpinned experiments in quantum transport. Novel techniques complementing dc transport are becoming paramount to new developments in mesoscopic electronics, particularly as the road is paved toward quantum information processing. This thesis describes seven experiments on GaAs/AlGaAs and graphene nanostructures unified by experimental techniques going beyond traditional dc transport. Firstly, dc current induced by microwave radiation applied to an open chaotic quantum dot is investigated. Asymmetry of mesoscopic fluctuations of induced current in perpendicular magnetic field is established as a tool for separating the quantum photovoltaic effect from classical rectification. A differential charge sensing technique is next developed using integrated quantum point contacts to resolve the spatial distribution of charge inside a double quantum clot. An accurate method for determining interdot tunnel coupling and electron temperature using charge sensing is demonstrated. A two-channel system for detecting current noise in mesoscopic conductors is developed, enabling four experiments where shot noise probes transmission properties not available in dc transport and Johnson noise serves as an electron thermometer. Suppressed shot noise is observed in quantum point contacts at zero parallel magnetic field, associated with the 0.7 structure in conductance. This suppression evolves with increasing field into the shot-noise signature of spin-lifted mode degeneracy. Quantitative agreement is found with a phenomenological model for density-dependent mode splitting. Shot noise measurements of multi-lead quantum-dot structures in the Coulomb blockade regime distill the mechanisms by which Coulomb interaction and quantum indistinguishability correlate electron flow. Gate-controlled sign reversal of noise cross correlation in two capacitively-coupled dots is observed, and shown to

  20. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  1. Semantic and subword priming during binocular suppression.

    PubMed

    Costello, Patricia; Jiang, Yi; Baartman, Brandon; McGlennen, Kristine; He, Sheng

    2009-06-01

    In general, stimuli that are familiar and recognizable have an advantage of predominance during binocular rivalry. Recent research has demonstrated that familiar and recognizable stimuli such as upright faces and words in a native language could break interocular suppression faster than their matched controls. In this study, a visible word prime was presented binocularly then replaced by a high-contrast dynamic noise pattern presented to one eye and either a semantically related or unrelated word was introduced to the other eye. We measured how long it took for target words to break from suppression. To investigate word-parts priming, a second experiment also included word pairs that had overlapping subword fragments. Results from both experiments consistently show that semantically related words and words that shared subword fragments were faster to gain dominance compared to unrelated words, suggesting that words, even when interocularly suppressed and invisible, can benefit from semantic and subword priming.

  2. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Daniel J; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10(7) and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  3. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  4. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  5. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Melissa S.; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Meagher, Richard B.; Smith, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator. PMID:23108027

  6. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Melissa S; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Meagher, Richard B; Smith, Aaron P

    2013-01-10

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator.

  7. A current view of serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function-to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  8. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  9. THEORETICAL ISSUES IN J/PSI SUPPRESSION.

    SciTech Connect

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2006-11-14

    Two decades ago Matsui and Satz suggested that Debye screening in the quark-gluon plasma would result in J/{psi} suppression in heavy ion collisions. Much has happened in the subsequent years, and the picture of quark-gluon plasma at present is rapidly evolving - what does it imply for the J/{psi} suppression? What are the recent RHIC and SPS results trying to tell us? What else has to be done? This talk is an attempt to address these questions.

  10. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  11. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  12. The Altered Renal and Hepatic Expression of Solute Carrier Transporters (SLCs) in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenghao; Zhu, Ling; Chan, Ting; Lu, Xiaoxi; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C.; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that significantly affects human health and well-being. The Solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the Organic anion/cation transporters (Oats/Octs/Octns), Organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) and Oligopeptide transporters (Pepts) are essential membrane proteins responsible for cellular uptake of many endogenous and exogenous substances such as clinically important drugs. They are widely expressed in mammalian key organs especially the kidney and liver, in which they facilitate the influx of various drug molecules, thereby determining their distribution and elimination in body. The altered expression of SLCs in diabetes mellitus could have a profound and clinically significant influence on drug therapies. In this study, we extensively investigated the renal and hepatic expression of twenty essential SLCs in the type 1 diabetic Ins2Akita murine model that develops both hyperglycemia and diabetes-related complications using real-time PCR and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the renal expression of mOatp1a1, mOatp1a6, mOat1, mOat3, mOat5, mOct2 and mPept2 was decreased; while that of mPept1 was increased at the mRNA level in the diabetic mice compared with non-diabetic controls. We found up-regulated mRNA expression of mOatp1a4, mOatp1c1, mOctn2, mOct3 and mPept1 as well as down-regulation of mOatp1a1 in the livers of diabetic mice. We confirmed the altered protein expression of several SLCs in diabetic mice, especially the decreased renal and hepatic expression of mOatp1a1. We also found down-regulated protein expression of mOat3 and mOctn1 in the kidneys as well as increased protein expression of mOatp1a4 and mOct3 in the livers of diabetic mice. Our findings contribute to better understanding the modulation of SLC transporters in type 1 diabetes mellitus, which is likely to affect the pharmacokinetic performance of drugs that are transported by these transporters and therefore, forms the

  13. Gyroaverage effects on nontwist Hamiltonians: Separatrix reconnection and chaos suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Martinell, J. J.

    2012-05-01

    A study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E × B test particle chaotic transport in non-monotonic zonal flows with drift waves in magnetized plasmas is presented. Due to the non-monotonicity of the zonal flow, the Hamiltonian does not satisfy the twist condition. The electrostatic potential is modeled as a linear superposition of a zonal flow and the regular neutral modes of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. FLR effects are incorporated by gyro-averaging the E × B Hamiltonian. It is shown that there is a critical value of the Larmor radius for which the zonal flow transitions from a profile with one maximum to a profile with two maxima and a minimum. This bifurcation leads to the creation of additional shearless curves and resonances. The gyroaveraged nontwist Hamiltonian exhibits complex patterns of separatrix reconnection. A change in the Larmor radius can lead to heteroclinic-homoclinic bifurcations and dipole formation. For Larmor radii for which the zonal flow has bifurcated, double heteroclinic-heteroclinic, homoclinic-homoclinic and heteroclinic-homoclinic separatrix topologies are observed. It is also shown that chaotic transport is typically reduced as the Larmor radius increases. Poincare sections show that, for large enough Larmor radius, chaos can be practically suppressed. In particular, changes of the Larmor radius can restore the shearless curve.

  14. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of active controls on the suppression of flutter and gust alleviation of two different types of subsonic aircraft (the Arava, twin turboprop STOL transport, and the Westwind twin-jet business transport) are investigated. The active controls are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a leading-edge (LE) control and a trailing-edge (TE) control. Each control surface is allowed to be driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system, located on the activated strip. The control law, which translates the sensor signals into control surface rotations, is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy. The results indicate the extreme effectiveness of the active systems in controlling flutter. A single system spanning 10% of the wing semispan made the Arava flutter-free, and a similar active system, for the Westwind aircraft, yielded a reduction of 75% in the maximum bending moment of the wing and a reduction of 90% in the acceleration of the cg of the aircraft. Results for simultaneous activation of several LE - TE systems are presented. Further work needed to bring the investigation to completion is also discussed.

  15. Gyroaverage effects on nontwist Hamiltonians: separatrix reconnection and chaos suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Martinell, J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of nite Larmor radius (FLR) eects on E B test particle chaotic transport in non- monotonic zonal ows with drift waves in magnetized plasmas is presented. Due to the non- monotonicity of the zonal ow, the Hamiltonian does not satisfy the twist condition. The electro- static potential is modeled as a linear superposition of a zonal ow and regular neutral modes of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. FLR eects are incorporated by gyro-averaging the EB Hamiltonian. It is shown that there is a critical value the Larmor radius for which the zonal ow transitions from a prole with one maximum to a prole with two maxima and a minimum. This bifurcation leads to the creation of additional shearless curves and resonances. The gyroaveraged nontwist Hamiltonian exhibits complex patterns of separatrix reconnection. A change in the Larmor ra- dius can lead to heteroclinic-homoclinic bifurcations and dipole formation. For Larmor radii for which the zonal ow has bifurcated, double heteroclinic-heteroclinic, homoclinic-homoclinic and heteroclinic-homoclinic topologies are observed. It is also shown that chaotic transport is typically reduced as the Larmor radius increases. Poincare sections shows that, for large enough Larmor radius, chaos can be practically suppressed. In particular, small changes on the Larmor radius can restore the shearless curve.

  16. Gyroaverage effects on nontwist Hamiltonians: Separatrix reconnection and chaos suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Martinell, J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E x B test particle chaotic transport in non-monotonic zonal flows with drift waves in magnetized plasmas is presented. Due to the non-monotonicity of the zonal flow, the Hamiltonian does not satisfy the twist condition. The electrostatic potential is modeled as a linear superposition of a zonal flow and the regular neutral modes of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. FLR effects are incorporated by gyro-averaging the E x B Hamiltonian. It is shown that there is a critical value of the Larmor radius for which the zonal flow transitions from a profile with one maximum to a profile with two maxima and a minimum. This bifurcation leads to the creation of additional shearless curves and resonances. The gyroaveraged nontwist Hamiltonian exhibits complex patterns of separatrix reconnection. A change in the Larmor radius can lead to heteroclinic-homoclinic bifurcations and dipole formation. For Larmor radii for which the zonal flow has bifurcated, double heteroclinic-heteroclinic, homoclinic-homoclinic and heteroclinic-homoclinic separatrix topologies are observed. It is also shown that chaotic transport is typically reduced as the Larmor radius increases. Poincare sections show that, for large enough Larmor radius, chaos can be practically suppressed. In particular, changes of the Larmor radius can restore the shearless curve.

  17. Reappraising suppression: subjective and physiological correlates of experiential suppression in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; El-Hage, Wissam; Frangou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emotion regulation strategies based on suppressing behavioral expressions of emotion have been considered maladaptive. However, this may not apply to suppressing the emotional experience (experiential suppression). The aim of this study was to define the effect of experiential suppression on subjective and physiological emotional responses. Methods: Healthy adults (N = 101) were characterized in terms of the temperament, personality, and hedonic capacity using the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Fawcett–Clark Pleasure Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Participants were shown positive, negative, and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System under two conditions, passive viewing, and experiential suppression. During both conditions, subjective ratings of the intensity and duration of emotional responses and physiological measures of skin conductance (SC) and cardiac inter-beat interval (IBI) to each picture were recorded. Results: Negative pictures elicited the most intense physiological and emotional responses regardless of experimental condition. Ratings of emotional intensity were not affected by condition. In contrast, experiential suppression, compared to passive viewing, was associated with decreased duration of the emotional response, reduced maximum SC amplitude and longer IBIs independent of age, picture valence, personality traits, hedonic capacity, and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that experiential suppression may represent an adaptive emotion regulation mechanism associated with reduced arousal and cardiovascular activation. PMID:24966844

  18. Suppression Situations in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes alternative expressions for the two most prevailing definitions of suppression without resorting to the standardized regression modeling. The formulation provides a simple basis for the examination of their relationship. For the two-predictor regression, the author demonstrates that the previous results in the literature are…

  19. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Tessa; Regina, Antonio; Righi, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive, and neutral), participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions, and individual differences in regulating emotions.

  20. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  1. Visual Blocking: Suppression of Excessive Verbalizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlomke, Lee; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Visual blocking procedures (briefly holding a paper screen in front of a subject's face contingent upon inappropriate behavior) were effective in decreasing inappropriate verbalizations in a moderately retarded 32-year-old male. Followup 4 months later indicated that suppression was maintained in treatment settings but failed to generalize to…

  2. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  3. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  4. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  5. Motor induced suppression of auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Sheye O.; Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory responses to stimuli that are triggered by a self-initiated motor act are suppressed when compared with the response to the same stimuli triggered externally, a phenomenon referred to as motor-induced suppression (MIS) of sensory cortical feedback. Studies in the somatosensory system suggest that such suppression might be sensitive to delays between the motor act and the stimulus-onset, and a recent study in the auditory system suggests that such MIS develops rapidly. In three MEG experiments, we characterize the properties of MIS, by examining the M100 response from the auditory cortex to a simple tone triggered by a button press. In Experiment 1, we found that MIS develops for zero-delays but does not generalize to non-zero delays. In Experiment 2, we found that MIS developed for 100 ms delays within 300 trials and occurs in excess of auditory habituation. In Experiment 3, we found that unlike MIS for zero-delays, MIS for non-zero delays does not exhibit sensitivity to sensory, delay or motor-command changes. These results are discussed in relation to suppression to self-produced speech and a general model of sensory motor control. PMID:18593265

  6. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  7. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  8. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  9. Phytochrome B promotes branching in Arabidopsis by suppressing auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Krishna Reddy, Srirama; Finlayson, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    Many plants respond to competition signals generated by neighbors by evoking the shade avoidance syndrome, including increased main stem elongation and reduced branching. Vegetation-induced reduction in the red light:far-red light ratio provides a competition signal sensed by phytochromes. Plants deficient in phytochrome B (phyB) exhibit a constitutive shade avoidance syndrome including reduced branching. Because auxin in the polar auxin transport stream (PATS) inhibits axillary bud outgrowth, its role in regulating the phyB branching phenotype was tested. Removing the main shoot PATS auxin source by decapitation or chemically inhibiting the PATS strongly stimulated branching in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) deficient in phyB, but had a modest effect in the wild type. Whereas indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were elevated in young phyB seedlings, there was less IAA in mature stems compared with the wild type. A split plate assay of bud outgrowth kinetics indicated that low auxin levels inhibited phyB buds more than the wild type. Because the auxin response could be a result of either the auxin signaling status or the bud's ability to export auxin into the main shoot PATS, both parameters were assessed. Main shoots of phyB had less absolute auxin transport capacity compared with the wild type, but equal or greater capacity when based on the relative amounts of native IAA in the stems. Thus, auxin transport capacity was unlikely to restrict branching. Both shoots of young phyB seedlings and mature stem segments showed elevated expression of auxin-responsive genes and expression was further increased by auxin treatment, suggesting that phyB suppresses auxin signaling to promote branching.

  10. Phosphite, an analog of phosphate, suppresses the coordinated expression of genes under phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Deepa K; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S; Matilda, Paino Durzo; Raghothama, Kashchandra G

    2002-07-01

    Phosphate (Pi) and its analog phosphite (Phi) are acquired by plants via Pi transporters. Although the uptake and mobility of Phi and Pi are similar, there is no evidence suggesting that plants can utilize Phi as a sole source of phosphorus. Phi is also known to interfere with many of the Pi starvation responses in plants and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In this study, effects of Phi on plant growth and coordinated expression of genes induced by Pi starvation were analyzed. Phi suppressed many of the Pi starvation responses that are commonly observed in plants. Enhanced root growth and root to shoot ratio, a hallmark of Pi stress response, was strongly inhibited by Phi. The negative effects of Phi were not obvious in plants supplemented with Pi. The expression of Pi starvation-induced genes such as LePT1, LePT2, AtPT1, and AtPT2 (high-affinity Pi transporters); LePS2 (a novel acid phosphatase); LePS3 and TPSI1 (novel genes); and PAP1 (purple acid phosphatase) was suppressed by Phi in plants and cell cultures. Expression of luciferase reporter gene driven by the Pi starvation-induced AtPT2 promoter was also suppressed by Phi. These analyses showed that suppression of Pi starvation-induced genes is an early response to addition of Phi. These data also provide evidence that Phi interferes with gene expression at the level of transcription. Synchronized suppression of multiple Pi starvation-induced genes by Phi points to its action on the early molecular events, probably signal transduction, in Pi starvation response.

  11. Phosphite, an Analog of Phosphate, Suppresses the Coordinated Expression of Genes under Phosphate Starvation1

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Deepa K.; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Matilda, Paino Durzo; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) and its analog phosphite (Phi) are acquired by plants via Pi transporters. Although the uptake and mobility of Phi and Pi are similar, there is no evidence suggesting that plants can utilize Phi as a sole source of phosphorus. Phi is also known to interfere with many of the Pi starvation responses in plants and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In this study, effects of Phi on plant growth and coordinated expression of genes induced by Pi starvation were analyzed. Phi suppressed many of the Pi starvation responses that are commonly observed in plants. Enhanced root growth and root to shoot ratio, a hallmark of Pi stress response, was strongly inhibited by Phi. The negative effects of Phi were not obvious in plants supplemented with Pi. The expression of Pi starvation-induced genes such as LePT1, LePT2, AtPT1, and AtPT2 (high-affinity Pi transporters); LePS2 (a novel acid phosphatase); LePS3 and TPSI1 (novel genes); and PAP1 (purple acid phosphatase) was suppressed by Phi in plants and cell cultures. Expression of luciferase reporter gene driven by the Pi starvation-induced AtPT2 promoter was also suppressed by Phi. These analyses showed that suppression of Pi starvation-induced genes is an early response to addition of Phi. These data also provide evidence that Phi interferes with gene expression at the level of transcription. Synchronized suppression of multiple Pi starvation-induced genes by Phi points to its action on the early molecular events, probably signal transduction, in Pi starvation response. PMID:12114577

  12. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  13. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  14. Lactic Acid Suppresses IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Inflammatory Responses via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α-Dependent miR-155 Suppression.

    PubMed

    Abebayehu, Daniel; Spence, Andrew J; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Taruselli, Marcela T; McLeod, Jamie J A; Caslin, Heather L; Chumanevich, Alena P; Kolawole, Elizabeth Motunrayo; Paranjape, Anuya; Baker, Bianca; Ndaw, Victor S; Barnstein, Brian O; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Sell, Scott A; Ryan, John J

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is present in tumors, asthma, and wound healing, environments with elevated IL-33 and mast cell infiltration. Although IL-33 is a potent mast cell activator, how LA affects IL-33-mediated mast cell function is unknown. To investigate this, mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells were cultured with or without LA and activated with IL-33. LA reduced IL-33-mediated cytokine and chemokine production. Using inhibitors for monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) or replacing LA with sodium lactate revealed that LA effects are MCT-1- and pH-dependent. LA selectively altered IL-33 signaling, suppressing TGF-β-activated kinase-1, JNK, ERK, and NF-κB phosphorylation, but not p38 phosphorylation. LA effects in other contexts have been linked to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which was enhanced in bone marrow-derived mast cells treated with LA. Because HIF-1α has been shown to regulate the microRNA miR-155 in other systems, LA effects on miR-155-5p and miR-155-3p species were measured. In fact, LA selectively suppressed miR-155-5p in an HIF-1α-dependent manner. Moreover, overexpressing miR-155-5p, but not miR-155-3p, abolished LA effects on IL-33-induced cytokine production. These in vitro effects of reducing cytokines were consistent in vivo, because LA injected i.p. into C57BL/6 mice suppressed IL-33-induced plasma cytokine levels. Lastly, IL-33 effects on primary human mast cells were suppressed by LA in an MCT-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that LA, present in inflammatory and malignant microenvironments, can alter mast cell behavior to suppress inflammation. PMID:27559047

  15. Advances in the Understanding of ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have expanding the operating window for RMP ELM suppression to higher q95 with dominant electron heating and fully non-inductive current drive relevant to advanced modes of ITER operation. Robust ELM suppression has also been obtained with a reduced coil set, mitigating the risk of coil failure in maintaining ELM suppression in ITER. These results significantly expand the operating space and reduce risk for obtaining RMP ELM suppression in ITER. Efforts have also been made to search for 3D cause of ELM suppression. No internal non-axisymmetric structure is detected at the top of the pedestal, indicating that the dominant effect of the RMP is to produce an n=0 transport modification of the profiles. Linear two fluid MHD simulations using M3D-C1 indicate resonant field penetration and significant magnetic stochasticity at the top of the pedestal, consistent with the absence of detectable 3D structure in that region. A profile database was developed to compare the scaling of the pedestal and global confinement with the applied 3D field strength in ELM suppressed and ELM mitigated plasmas. The EPED pedestal model accurately predicts the measured pedestal pressure at the threshold of ELM suppression, increasing confidence in theoretical projections to ITER pedestal conditions. Both the H-factor (H(sub)98y2) and thermal energy confinement time do not degrade substantially with applied RMP fields near the threshold of ELM suppression, enhancing confidence in the compatibility of ITER high performance operation with RMP ELM suppression.

  16. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  17. [The advances of suppression in research of amblyopia].

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Liu, H

    2016-04-11

    Suppression that is the result of interocular competition is an important machanism of amblyopia. The imbalance of suppression may lead the consequence to amblyopia. In the early study, researchers had raised the theory of II. Quadratic Summation which had revealed the relationship of interocular interaction and suppression. In some basic researches, other studies had showed the most possible anatomic location of suppression. Recently, researchers found a new method to quantify the interocular suppression named the noise model. Further studies found a novel disinhibition therapy to treat amblyopia. We summarized the research advances in suppression and disinhibition treatment in amblyopia. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 305-308). PMID:27094069

  18. Fire Suppression in Low Gravity Using a Cup Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Linteris, Gregory T.; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    Longer duration missions to the moon, to Mars, and on the International Space Station increase the likelihood of accidental fires. The goal of the present investigation is to: (1) understand the physical and chemical processes of fire suppression in various gravity and O2 levels simulating spacecraft, Mars, and moon missions; (2) provide rigorous testing of numerical models, which include detailed combustion suppression chemistry and radiation sub-models; and (3) provide basic research results useful for advances in space fire safety technology, including new fire-extinguishing agents and approaches. The structure and extinguishment of enclosed, laminar, methane-air co-flow diffusion flames formed on a cup burner have been studied experimentally and numerically using various fire-extinguishing agents (CO2, N2, He, Ar, CF3H, and Fe(CO)5). The experiments involve both 1g laboratory testing and low-g testing (in drop towers and the KC-135 aircraft). The computation uses a direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and radiative heat-loss models. An agent was introduced into a low-speed coflowing oxidizing stream until extinguishment occurred under a fixed minimal fuel velocity, and thus, the extinguishing agent concentrations were determined. The extinguishment of cup-burner flames, which resemble real fires, occurred via a blowoff process (in which the flame base drifted downstream) rather than the global extinction phenomenon typical of counterflow diffusion flames. The computation revealed that the peak reactivity spot (the reaction kernel) formed in the flame base was responsible for attachment and blowoff of the trailing diffusion flame. Furthermore, the buoyancy-induced flame flickering in 1g and thermal and transport properties of the agents affected the flame extinguishment limits.

  19. Fire Suppression in Low Gravity Using a Cup Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Linteris, Gregory T.; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    Longer duration missions to the moon, to Mars, and on the International Space Station increase the likelihood of accidental fires. The goal of the present investigation is to: (1) understand the physical and chemical processes of fire suppression in various gravity and O2 levels simulating spacecraft, Mars, and moon missions; (2) provide rigorous testing of numerical models, which include detailed combustion-suppression chemistry and radiation sub-models; and (3) provide basic research results useful for advances in space fire safety technology, including new fire-extinguishing agents and approaches.The structure and extinguishment of enclosed, laminar, methane-air co-flow diffusion flames formed on a cup burner have been studied experimentally and numerically using various fire-extinguishing agents (CO2, N2, He, Ar, CF3H, and Fe(CO)5). The experiments involve both 1g laboratory testing and low-g testing (in drop towers and the KC-135 aircraft). The computation uses a direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and radiative heat-loss models. An agent was introduced into a low-speed coflowing oxidizing stream until extinguishment occurred under a fixed minimal fuel velocity, and thus, the extinguishing agent concentrations were determined. The extinguishment of cup-burner flames, which resemble real fires, occurred via a blowoff process (in which the flame base drifted downstream) rather than the global extinction phenomenon typical of counterflow diffusion flames. The computation revealed that the peak reactivity spot (the reaction kernel) formed in the flame base was responsible for attachment and blowoff of the trailing diffusion flame. Furthermore, the buoyancy-induced flame flickering in 1g and thermal and transport properties of the agents affected the flame extinguishment limits.

  20. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie; Rader, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, Timothy W.

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  1. Evolutionary suppression of erythropoiesis via the modulation of TGF-β signalling in an Antarctic icefish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianghua; Cai, Chang; Hu, Xingxing; Liu, Yun; Guo, Yanan; Hu, Peng; Chen, Zuozhou; Peng, Sihua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Jiang, Shouwen; Wu, Zhichao; Chan, Jiulin; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic icefish, a family (Channichthyidae) of teleosts within the perciform suborder Notothenioidei, are the only known vertebrates without oxygen-transporting haemoglobins and that are largely devoid of circulating erythrocytes. To elucidate the evo-devo mechanisms underpinning the suppressed erythropoiesis in the icefish, we conducted comparative studies on the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of the primary haematopoietic tissues between an icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) and two red-blooded notothenioids (Trematomus bernacchii and Gymnodraco acuticeps). We identified substantial remodelling of the haematopoietic programs in the icefish through which erythropoiesis is selectively suppressed. Experimental verification showed that erythropoietic suppression in the icefish may be attributable to the upregulation of TGF-β signalling, which coincides with reductions in multiple transcription factors essential for erythropoiesis and the upregulation of hundreds of microRNAs, the majority (> 80%) of which potentially target erythropoiesis regulating factors. Of the six microRNAs selected for verification, three miRNAs (miR-152, miR-1388 and miR-16b) demonstrated suppressive functions on GATA1 and ALAS2, which are two factors important for erythroid differentiation, resulting in reduced numbers of erythroids in microinjected zebra fish embryos. Codon substitution analyses of the genes of the TGF-β superfamily revealed signs of positive selection in TGF-β1 and endoglin in the lineages leading to Antarctic notothenioids. Both genes are previously known to function in erythropoietic suppression. These findings implied a general trend of erythropoietic suppression in the cold-adapted notothenioid lineages through evolutionary modulation of the multi-functional TGF-β signalling pathway. This trend is more pronounced in the haemoglobin-less icefish, which may pre-emptively hinder the otherwise defective erythroids from production. PMID:26268413

  2. Evolutionary suppression of erythropoiesis via the modulation of TGF-β signalling in an Antarctic icefish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianghua; Cai, Chang; Hu, Xingxing; Liu, Yun; Guo, Yanan; Hu, Peng; Chen, Zuozhou; Peng, Sihua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Jiang, Shouwen; Wu, Zhichao; Chan, Jiulin; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic icefish, a family (Channichthyidae) of teleosts within the perciform suborder Notothenioidei, are the only known vertebrates without oxygen-transporting haemoglobins and that are largely devoid of circulating erythrocytes. To elucidate the evo-devo mechanisms underpinning the suppressed erythropoiesis in the icefish, we conducted comparative studies on the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of the primary haematopoietic tissues between an icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) and two red-blooded notothenioids (Trematomus bernacchii and Gymnodraco acuticeps). We identified substantial remodelling of the haematopoietic programs in the icefish through which erythropoiesis is selectively suppressed. Experimental verification showed that erythropoietic suppression in the icefish may be attributable to the upregulation of TGF-β signalling, which coincides with reductions in multiple transcription factors essential for erythropoiesis and the upregulation of hundreds of microRNAs, the majority (> 80%) of which potentially target erythropoiesis regulating factors. Of the six microRNAs selected for verification, three miRNAs (miR-152, miR-1388 and miR-16b) demonstrated suppressive functions on GATA1 and ALAS2, which are two factors important for erythroid differentiation, resulting in reduced numbers of erythroids in microinjected zebra fish embryos. Codon substitution analyses of the genes of the TGF-β superfamily revealed signs of positive selection in TGF-β1 and endoglin in the lineages leading to Antarctic notothenioids. Both genes are previously known to function in erythropoietic suppression. These findings implied a general trend of erythropoietic suppression in the cold-adapted notothenioid lineages through evolutionary modulation of the multi-functional TGF-β signalling pathway. This trend is more pronounced in the haemoglobin-less icefish, which may pre-emptively hinder the otherwise defective erythroids from production.

  3. Transporting Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dayton Ray

    The book presents guidelines for adaptive transportation measures for handicapped students. Part 1 considers the transportation cycle as a means to evaluate individual student competencies at all logical points during the transportation experience. The transportation cycle is reviewed from deciding to transport the student to gaining access to…

  4. Isoform-selective inhibition of facilitative glucose transporters: elucidation of the molecular mechanism of HIV protease inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A; Hruz, Paul W

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  5. Transport of ochratoxin A by renal multispecific organic anion transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Sekine, T; Takeda, M; Cha, S H; Kanai, Y; Kimura, M; Endou, H

    1999-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the transport of ochratoxin A (OTA) by kidney-specific organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, OAT1 mediated sodium-independent uptake of OTA (Km = 2.1 microM). Piroxicam, which has been shown to prevent the nephrotoxicity of OTA, inhibited OAT1-mediated uptake of OTA. By contrast, another protective compound, aspartame, did not. Using a cell line derived from the mouse kidney terminal proximal tubule (S3) transfected with OAT1 cDNA, we investigated the transport of OTA and also its effect on cell proliferation and cell viability. S3 cells expressing OAT1 mediated the saturable transport of OTA (Km = 0.57 microM). Cell proliferation was suppressed in S3 cells expressing OAT1 when exposed to 2 and 10 microM OTA. This suppression was rescued by the coaddition of 1 mM p-aminohippurate in the media. The present study indicates that OTA is transported by OAT1 and that the accumulation of OTA via OAT1 in proximal tubular cells is the primary event in the development of OTA nephrotoxicity.

  6. Photoassisted transport in silicon dangling bond wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Joachim, Christian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically investigate charge transport through dangling bond (DB) nanostructures built on a passivated silicon (100) surface by selectively removing hydrogen atoms. We focus on dangling bond wires and on T-junctions. In the latter case, destructive quantum interference effects lead to a strong suppression of charge transport mediated by the DB electronic states. We demonstrate, however, that by applying a time periodic voltage, mimicking irradiation with monochromatic light, a dramatic enhancement of the current up to the μA range can be achieved. This result is however limited by the restriction on the AC field strength and frequency that bulk states should minimally contribute to charge transport; otherwise current leakage will set in. Despite this constraint, transconductance values of the order of 10 - 6 A/V can be achieved, illustrating the potential of the discussed systems to find applications in nanoscale electronics.

  7. Cavity-Enhanced Transport of Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Genes, Claudiu; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2015-05-01

    We show that exciton-type transport in certain materials can be dramatically modified by their inclusion in an optical cavity: the modification of the electromagnetic vacuum mode structure introduced by the cavity leads to transport via delocalized polariton modes rather than through tunneling processes in the material itself. This can help overcome exponential suppression of transmission properties as a function of the system size in the case of disorder and other imperfections. We exemplify massive improvement of transmission for excitonic wave packets through a cavity, as well as enhancement of steady-state exciton currents under incoherent pumping. These results may have implications for experiments of exciton transport in disordered organic materials. We propose that the basic phenomena can be observed in quantum simulators made of Rydberg atoms, cold molecules in optical lattices, as well as in experiments with trapped ions.

  8. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  9. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  10. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  11. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  12. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  13. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  14. Suppression of Eimeria tenella sporulation by disinfectants.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-08-01

    The disinfectant effects (DEs) of 10 types of chemicals, defined by their ability to destroy or inhibit oocysts and consequently prevent sporulation of Eimeria tenella field isolate, were evaluated in vitro. Correct species assignments and sample purities were confirmed by the singular internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR analysis. A total of 18 treatments were performed, and the disinfection suppression levels were 75.9% for 39% benzene + 22% xylene (1:10 dilution), 85.5% for 30% cresol soup (1:1 dilution), and 91.7% for 99.9% acetic acid (1:2 dilution) group. The results indicate that acetic acid, cresol soup, and benzene+xylene are good candidates for suppression of E. tenella oocyst sporulation.

  15. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  16. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  17. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness.

  18. System for Suppressing Vibration in Turbomachine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor); Provenza, Andrew J. (Inventor); Choi, Benjamin B. (Inventor); Bakhle, Milind A. (Inventor); Min, James B (Inventor); Stefko, George L. (Inventor); Kussmann, John A (Inventor); Fougere, Alan J (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for suppressing vibration and noise mitigation in structures such as blades in turbomachinery. The system includes flexible piezoelectric patches which are secured on or imbedded in turbomachinery blades which, in one embodiment, comprises eight (8) fan blades. The system further includes a capacitor plate coupler and a power transfer apparatus, which may both be arranged into one assembly, that respectively transfer data and power. Each of the capacitive plate coupler and power transfer apparatus is configured so that one part is attached to a fixed member while another part is attached to a rotatable member with an air gap there between. The system still further includes a processor that has 16 channels, eight of which serve as sensor channels, and the remaining eight, serving as actuation channels. The processor collects and analyzes the sensor signals and, in turn, outputs corrective signals for vibration/noise suppression of the turbine blades.

  19. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  20. Suppression of attentional bias in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Constans, Joseph I; McCloskey, Michael S; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Brailey, Kevin; Mathews, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    Sixty combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder performed an emotional Stroop task under 1 of 4 contextual conditions designed to test theoretical explanations for an attentional bias suppression effect. Results revealed that when the emotional Stroop task was performed under conditions involving a future threat of either watching a combat video or giving a speech, attentional bias was inhibited. There was limited support for the prediction that the suppression effect was strongest when stressor content matched word content on the Stroop. In contrast to participants in the threat conditions, veterans who believed that they would receive additional compensation for speeded color naming or who believed that they would have no other experimental demands were slower when color naming combat-threat words. Potential theoretical explanations of the findings are discussed.

  1. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  2. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  3. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  4. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  5. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis.

  6. The retinoblastoma protein: multitasking to suppress tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Vormer, Tinke L; Hansen, Jacob B; Te Riele, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor activity of the retinoblastoma protein pRB is preserved despite loss of interaction with E2F transcription factors (E2F) or proteins harboring a leucine-x-cysteine-x-glutamic acid motif (LxCxE, where x is any amino acid). This indicates that pRB uses several parallel pathways to suppress tumorigenesis, which may also include E2F- and LxCxE-independent interactions. PMID:27308398

  7. The retinoblastoma protein: multitasking to suppress tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vormer, Tinke L.; Hansen, Jacob B; te Riele, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor activity of the retinoblastoma protein pRB is preserved despite loss of interaction with E2F transcription factors (E2F) or proteins harboring a leucine-x-cysteine-x-glutamic acid motif (LxCxE, where x is any amino acid). This indicates that pRB uses several parallel pathways to suppress tumorigenesis, which may also include E2F- and LxCxE-independent interactions. PMID:27308398

  8. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis. PMID:17909897

  9. Neoclassical momentum transport in an impure rotating tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, S.; Helander, P.

    2006-01-15

    It is widely believed that transport barriers in tokamak plasmas are caused by radial electric-field shear, which is governed by angular momentum transport. Turbulence is suppressed in the barrier, and ion thermal transport is comparable to the neoclassical prediction, but experimentally angular momentum transport has remained anomalous. With this motivation, the collisional transport matrix is calculated for a low collisionality plasma with collisional impurity ions. The bulk plasma toroidal rotation velocity is taken to be subsonic, but heavy impurities undergo poloidal redistribution due to the centrifugal force. The impurities give rise to off-diagonal terms in the transport matrix, which cause the plasma to rotate spontaneously. At conventional aspect ratio, poloidal impurity redistribution increases the angular momentum flux by a factor up to {epsilon}{sup -3/2} over previous predictions, making it comparable to the 'banana' regime heat flux. The flux is primarily driven by radial pressure and temperature gradients.

  10. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on “here and now” experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one’s own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed. PMID:26083379

  11. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  12. Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift.

    PubMed

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstäubler, T E; Riehle, F

    2011-07-15

    We develop a concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift and its fluctuations can be suppressed by 1-3 orders of magnitude independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies ν1 and ν2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a "synthetic" frequency ν(syn) ∝ (ν1 - ε12ν2) largely immune to the blackbody radiation shift. For example, in the case of 171Yb+ it is possible to create a synthetic-frequency-based clock in which the fractional blackbody radiation shift can be suppressed to the level of 10(-18) in a broad interval near room temperature (300±15  K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies ν1 and ν2, where the frequency ν(syn) is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum.

  13. Hypergravity suppresses bone resorption in ovariectomized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Tesshu; Kawaguchi, Amu; Okabe, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Nakamichi, Yuko; Nakamura, Midori; Uehara, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2011-04-01

    The effects of gravity on bone metabolism are unclear, and little has been reported about the effects of hypergravity on the mature skeleton. Since low gravity has been shown to decrease bone volume, we hypothesized that hypergravity increases bone volume. To clarify this hypothesis, adult female rats were ovariectomized and exposed to hypergravity (2.9G) using a centrifugation system. The rats were killed 28 days after the start of loading, and the distal femoral metaphysis of the rats was studied. Bone architecture was assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and bone mineral density was measured using peripheral quantitative CT (pQCT). Hypergravity increased the trabecular bone volume of ovariectomized rats. Histomorphometric analyses revealed that hypergravity suppressed both bone formation and resorption and increased bone volume in ovariectomized rats. Further, the cell morphology, activity, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts exposed to hypergravity were evaluated in vitro. Hypergravity inhibited actin ring formation in mature osteoclasts, which suggested that the osteoclast activity was suppressed. However, hypergravity had no effect on osteoblasts. These results suggest that hypergravity can stimulate an increase in bone volume by suppressing bone resorption in ovariectomized rats.

  14. Mechanisms of interleukin-10-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Blaser, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of anergy are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. Interleukin-10 (IL-10), a suppressor cytokine of T-cell proliferative and cytokine responses, plays a key regulatory role in tolerizing exogenous antigens during specific immunotherapy (SIT) of allergy and natural exposure to antigens. Specific T-cell tolerance is directed against the T-cell epitopes of an antigen and characterized by suppressed proliferative and T helper type 1 (Th1) and type 2 (Th2) cytokine responses. IL-10 elicits tolerance in T cells by selective inhibition of the CD28 co-stimulatory pathway and thereby controls suppression and development of antigen-specific immunity. IL-10 only inhibits T cells stimulated by low numbers of triggered T-cell receptors and which therefore depend on CD28 co-stimulation. T cells receiving a strong signal from the T-cell receptor alone, and thus not requiring CD28 co-stimulation, are not affected by IL-10. IL-10 inhibits CD28 tyrosine phosphorylation, the initial step of the CD28 signalling pathway, and consequently the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 binding to CD28. Together these results demonstrate that IL-10-induced selective inhibition of the CD28 co-stimulatory pathway acts as a decisive mechanism in determining whether a T cell will contribute to an immune response or become anergic. PMID:11412299

  15. Suppression of Ostwald Ripening by Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable and coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Ostwald ripening must thus be suppressed to stabilize emulsions, e.g. to control the properties of pharmaceuticals, food, or cosmetics. Suppression of Ostwald ripening is also important in biological cells, which contain stable liquid-like compartments, e.g. germ granules, Cajal-bodies, and centrosomes. Such systems are often driven away from equilibrium by chemical reactions and can thus be called active emulsions. Here, we show that non-equilibrium chemical reactions can suppress Ostwald Ripening, leading to stable, monodisperse emulsions. We derive analytical approximations of the typical droplet size, droplet count, and time scale of the dynamics from a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics. We also compare these results to numerical simulations of the continuous concentration fields. Generally, we thus show how chemical reactions can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties in technology and nature.

  16. Turbulence Suppression in a coherent structure of localized current and vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhyung; Terry, Paul W.

    2010-11-01

    As a prelude to studying momentum transport in the RFP we examine the quasi-single helicity state of RFX as a transport barrier. Using analytic and numerical approaches we investigate turbulence suppression by a coherent structure of localized current and vorticity with a reduced MHD model. Previously, suppression was investigated inside a localized vortex structure in 2D Navier-Stokes turbulenceootnotetextP. W. Terry, D. E. Newman, and N. Mattor. Phys. Fluids A, 40 (5):927--937, 1992. and a localized current structure in kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence.ootnotetextP. W. Terry and K. W. Smith. Astrophys. J., 6650 (1):402--415, 2007. Following the previous works, the time scales of coherent structures with a flow shear and magnetic field shear and ambient turbulence are assumed to be separated and a variant of eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) closure is applied to the turbulence. Qualitative criteria will be estimated for flow shear dominated, and magnetic field shear dominated suppression of turbulence. Numerical calculations will be given for comparison with the analytical estimates.

  17. ESCRT-0 is not required for ectopic Notch activation and tumor suppression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Emiliana; Wollscheid, Nadine; Cortese, Katia; Tacchetti, Carlo; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular endosome (MVE) sorting depends on proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) family. These are organized in four complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, -III) that act in a sequential fashion to deliver ubiquitylated cargoes into the internal luminal vesicles (ILVs) of the MVE. Drosophila genes encoding ESCRT-I, -II, -III components function in sorting signaling receptors, including Notch and the JAK/STAT signaling receptor Domeless. Loss of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in Drosophila epithelia causes altered signaling and cell polarity, suggesting that ESCRTs genes are tumor suppressors. However, the nature of the tumor suppressive function of ESCRTs, and whether tumor suppression is linked to receptor sorting is unclear. Unexpectedly, a null mutant in Hrs, encoding one of the components of the ESCRT-0 complex, which acts upstream of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in MVE sorting is dispensable for tumor suppression. Here, we report that two Drosophila epithelia lacking activity of Stam, the other known components of the ESCRT-0 complex, or of both Hrs and Stam, accumulate the signaling receptors Notch and Dome in endosomes. However, mutant tissue surprisingly maintains normal apico-basal polarity and proliferation control and does not display ectopic Notch signaling activation, unlike cells that lack ESCRT-I, -II, -III activity. Overall, our in vivo data confirm previous evidence indicating that the ESCRT-0 complex plays no crucial role in regulation of tumor suppression, and suggest re-evaluation of the relationship of signaling modulation in endosomes and tumorigenesis. PMID:24718108

  18. Suppression of Electron Thermal Conduction in the High β Intracluster Medium of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberg-Clark, G. T.; Drake, J. F.; Reynolds, C. S.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the thermodynamic state of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in a galaxy cluster requires knowledge of the plasma transport processes, especially thermal conduction. The basic physics of thermal conduction in plasmas with ICM-like conditions has yet to be elucidated, however. We use particle-in-cell simulations and analytic models to explore the dynamics of an ICM-like plasma (with small gyroradius, large mean free path, and strongly sub-dominant magnetic pressure) driven by the diffusive heat flux associated with thermal conduction. Linear theory reveals that whistler waves are driven unstable by electron heat flux, even when the heat flux is weak. The resonant interaction of electrons with these waves then plays a critical role in scattering electrons and suppressing the heat flux. In a 1D model where only whistler modes that are parallel to the magnetic field are captured, the only resonant electrons are moving in the opposite direction to the heat flux, and the electron heat flux suppression is small. In 2D or more, oblique whistler modes also resonate with electrons moving in the direction of the heat flux. The overlap of resonances leads to effective symmetrization of the electron distribution function and a strong suppression of heat flux. The results suggest that thermal conduction in the ICM might be strongly suppressed, possibly to negligible levels.

  19. The role of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate in metabolic suppression during hibernation and arousal.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christopher; Staples, James F

    2010-06-01

    Hibernation elicits a major reduction in whole-animal O(2) consumption that corresponds with active suppression of liver mitochondrial electron transport capacity at, or downstream of, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). During arousal from the torpor phase of hibernation this suppression is reversed and metabolic rates rise dramatically. In this study, we used the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) to assess isolated liver mitochondrial respiration during the torpor phase of hibernation and various stages of arousal to elucidate a potential role of SDH in metabolic suppression. State 3 and state 4 respiration rates were seven- and threefold lower in torpor compared with the summer-active and interbout euthermic states. Respiration rates increased during arousal so that when body temperature reached 30 degrees C in late arousal, state 3 and state 4 respiration were 3.3- and 1.8-fold greater than during torpor, respectively. SDH activity was 72% higher in interbout euthermia than in torpor. Pre-incubating with isocitrate [to alleviate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibition] increased state 3 respiration rate during torpor by 91%, but this rate was still fourfold lower than that measured in interbout euthermia. Isocitrate pre-incubation also eliminated differences in SDH activity among hibernation bout stages. OAA concentration correlated negatively with both respiration rates and SDH activity. These data suggest that OAA reversibly inhibits SDH in torpor, but cannot fully account for the drastic metabolic suppression observed during this hibernation phase.

  20. Optimization Studies of a Compton Suppression Spectrometer Using Experimentally Validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    W. Scates; W. Scates; M. E. Mc Ilwain; R. Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector and if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  1. Optimization studies of a Compton suppression spectrometer using experimentally validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; W. Scate; J. K. Hartwell; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector, if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  2. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  3. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  4. Manipulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities to Induce Suppressive Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease suppressive soils have been documented in a variety of cropping systems, and in many instances the biological attributes contributing to suppressiveness have been identified. While these studies have often yielded an understanding of operative mechanisms leading to the suppressive state, si...

  5. 48 CFR 452.236-78 - Fire Suppression and Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire Suppression and... Fire Suppression and Liability. As prescribed in § 436.578, the following clause may be inserted in... Suppression and Liability (MAY 2014) (a) Contractor's Responsibility for Fire Fighting. The Contractor,...

  6. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  7. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvation-inducible gene. We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. Previous experiments demonstrated a defect in phosphate uptake in phosphate-starved pho84Delta cells; however, the pho84Delta strain expresses PHO5 constitutively when grown in phosphate-replete media. We determined that pho84Delta cells have a significant defect in phosphate uptake even when grown in high phosphate media. Overexpression of unrelated phosphate transporters or a glycerophosphoinositol transporter in the pho84Delta strain suppresses the PHO5 constitutive phenotype. These data suggest that PHO84 is not required for sensing phosphate. We further characterized putative phosphate transporters, identifying two new phosphate transporters, PHO90 and PHO91. A synthetic lethal phenotype was observed when five phosphate transporters were inactivated, and the contribution of each transporter to uptake in high phosphate conditions was determined. Finally, a PHO84-dependent compensation response was identified; the abundance of Pho84p at the plasma membrane increases in cells that are defective in other phosphate transporters. PMID:11779791

  8. Human chromosome 3 mediates growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis in microcell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Speevak, M D; Chevrette, M

    1996-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of tumor cells leads either to tumor cell death (usually by apoptosis) or to the formation of drug-resistant subpopulations. Known mechanisms of cancer cell drug resistance include gene amplification and increased expression of drug transporters. On the other hand, normal cells survive many forms of chemotherapy with minimal damage probably because of their capacity for growth arrest and stringent control of apoptosis. Microcell hybrids between B78 (murine melanoma) and HSF5 (normal human fibroblasts) were analyzed to identify a new human chromosomal region involved in the promotion of drug-induced growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis. In these hybrids, the presence of human chromosome 3 was strongly associated with suppression of apoptosis via G1 and G2 growth arrest during exposure to the antimetabolite N-phosphonoacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), suggesting that a gene(s) on chromosome 3 serves an antiproliferative role in a drug-responsive growth arrest pathway. PMID:8628288

  9. Suppressing turbulence and enhancing liquid suspension flow in pipelines with electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Gu, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Flows through pipes, such as crude oil through pipelines, are the most common and important method of transportation of fluids. To enhance the flow output along the pipeline requires reducing viscosity and suppressing turbulence simultaneously and effectively. Unfortunately, no method is currently available to accomplish both goals simultaneously. Here we show that electrorheology provides an efficient solution. When a strong electric field is applied along the flow direction in a small section of pipeline, the field polarizes and aggregates the particles suspended inside the base liquid into short chains along the flow direction. Such aggregation breaks the rotational symmetry and makes the fluid viscosity anisotropic. In the directions perpendicular to the flow, the viscosity is substantially increased, effectively suppressing the turbulence. Along the flow direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced; thus the flow along the pipeline is enhanced. Recent field tests with a crude oil pipeline fully confirm the theoretical results.

  10. Suppressing turbulence and enhancing liquid suspension flow in pipelines with electrorheology.

    PubMed

    Tao, R; Gu, G Q

    2015-01-01

    Flows through pipes, such as crude oil through pipelines, are the most common and important method of transportation of fluids. To enhance the flow output along the pipeline requires reducing viscosity and suppressing turbulence simultaneously and effectively. Unfortunately, no method is currently available to accomplish both goals simultaneously. Here we show that electrorheology provides an efficient solution. When a strong electric field is applied along the flow direction in a small section of pipeline, the field polarizes and aggregates the particles suspended inside the base liquid into short chains along the flow direction. Such aggregation breaks the rotational symmetry and makes the fluid viscosity anisotropic. In the directions perpendicular to the flow, the viscosity is substantially increased, effectively suppressing the turbulence. Along the flow direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced; thus the flow along the pipeline is enhanced. Recent field tests with a crude oil pipeline fully confirm the theoretical results.

  11. Suppression of microbunching instability using bending magnets in free-electron-laser linacs.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad E; Venturini, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The microbunching instability driven by collective effects of the beam inside an accelerator can significantly degrade the final electron beam quality for free electron laser (FEL) radiation. In this Letter, we propose an inexpensive scheme to suppress such an instability in accelerators for next generation FEL light sources. Instead of using an expensive device such as a laser heater or RF deflecting cavities, this scheme uses longitudinal mixing associated with the transverse spread of the beam through bending magnets inside the accelerator transport system to suppress the instability. The final uncorrelated energy spread increases roughly by the current compression factor, which is important in seeded FEL schemes in order to achieve high harmonic short-wavelength x-ray radiation.

  12. SLC transporters as a novel class of tumour suppressors: identity, function and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Yang, Shengping; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    The role of plasma membrane transporters in cancer is receiving increasing attention in recent years. Several transporters for essential nutrients are up-regulated in cancer and serve as tumour promoters. Transporters could also function as tumour suppressors. To date, four transporters belonging to the SLC gene family have been identified as tumour suppressors. SLC5A8 is a Na(+)-coupled transporter for monocarboxylates. Among its substrates are the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate and the ubiquitous metabolite pyruvate. The tumour-suppressive function of this transporter relates to the ability of butyrate, propionate and pyruvate to inhibit histone deacetylases (HDAC). SLC5A8 functions as a tumour suppressor in most tissues studied thus far, and provides a molecular link to Warburg effect, a characteristic feature in most cancers. It also links colonic bacteria and dietary fibre to the host. SLC26A3 as a tumour suppressor is restricted to colon; it is a Cl(-)/HCO(-) 3 exchanger, facilitating the efflux of HCO(-) 3 The likely mechanism for the tumour-suppressive function of SLC26A3 is related to intracellular pH regulation. SLC39A1 is a Zn(2+) transporter and its role in tumour suppression has been shown in prostate. Zn(2+) is present at high concentrations in normal prostate where it elicits its tumour-suppressive function. SLC22A18 is possibly an organic cation transporter, but the identity of its physiological substrates is unknown. As such, there is no information on molecular pathways responsible for the tumour-suppressive function of this transporter. It is likely that additional SLC transporters will be discovered as tumour suppressors in the future.

  13. SLC transporters as a novel class of tumour suppressors: identity, function and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Yang, Shengping; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    The role of plasma membrane transporters in cancer is receiving increasing attention in recent years. Several transporters for essential nutrients are up-regulated in cancer and serve as tumour promoters. Transporters could also function as tumour suppressors. To date, four transporters belonging to the SLC gene family have been identified as tumour suppressors. SLC5A8 is a Na+-coupled transporter for monocarboxylates. Among its substrates are the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate and the ubiquitous metabolite pyruvate. The tumour-suppressive function of this transporter relates to the ability of butyrate, propionate and pyruvate to inhibit histone deacetylases (HDAC). SLC5A8 functions as a tumour suppressor in most tissues studied thus far, and provides a molecular link to Warburg effect, a characteristic feature in most cancers. It also links colonic bacteria and dietary fibre to the host. SLC26A3 as a tumour suppressor is restricted to colon; it is a Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, facilitating the efflux of HCO3-. The likely mechanism for the tumour-suppressive function of SLC26A3 is related to intracellular pH regulation. SLC39A1 is a Zn2+ transporter and its role in tumour suppression has been shown in prostate. Zn2+ is present at high concentrations in normal prostate where it elicits its tumour-suppressive function. SLC22A18 is possibly an organic cation transporter, but the identity of its physiological substrates is unknown. As such, there is no information on molecular pathways responsible for the tumour-suppressive function of this transporter. It is likely that additional SLC transporters will be discovered as tumour suppressors in the future. PMID:27118869

  14. Therapeutic potential of monoamine transporter substrates.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Baumann, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine transporter proteins are targets for many psychoactive compounds, including therapeutic and abused stimulant drugs. This paper reviews recent work from our laboratory investigating the interaction of stimulants with transporters in brain tissue. We illustrate how determining the precise mechanism of stimulant drug action (uptake inhibitor vs. substrate) can provide unique opportunities for medication discovery. An important lesson learned from this work is that drugs which display equipotent substrate activity at dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) transporters have minimal abuse liability and few stimulant side-effects, yet are able to suppress ongoing drug-seeking behavior. As a specific example, we describe the development of PAL-287 (alpha-methylnapthylethylamine), a dual DA/5-HT releasing agent that suppresses cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys, without the adverse effects associated with older phenylethylamine 5-HT releasers (e.g., fenfluramine) and DA releasers (e.g., amphetamine). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of developing non-amphetamine releasing agents as potential treatments for substance abuse disorders and other psychiatric conditions. PMID:17017961

  15. Weed Suppression by Seven Clover Species

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; O'Donovan, John T.

    2001-01-01

    Used as cover crops, clover species may differ in their ability to suppress weed growth. Field trials were conducted in Alberta, Canada to measure the growth of brown mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], in mowed and nonmowed production, as influenced by alsike (Trifolium hybridum L.), balansa [T. michelianum Savi var. balansae (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson [T. incarnatum (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson (T. incarnatum L.), Persian (T. resupinatum L.), red (T. pratense L.), and white Dutch (T. repens L.) clover and fall rye (Secale cereale L.). In 1997, clovers reduced mustard biomass in nonmowed treatments by 29% on a high- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboroll) at Edmonton and by 57% on a low- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboralf) at Breton. At Edmonton, nonmowed mustard biomass was reduced by alsike and berseem clover in 1996 and by alsike, balansa, berseem, and crimson clover in 1997. At Breton, all seven clover species suppressed weed biomass. A negative correlation was noted among clover and mustard biomass at Edmonton but not at Breton. The effects of mowing varied with location, timing, and species. Mowing was beneficial to crop/weed proportion at Edmonton but not at Breton. Mowing at early flowering of mustard large-seeded legumes and sweetclover (Melilotus offici) produced greater benefit than mowing at late flowering. With early mowing, all clover species suppressed mustard growth at Edmonton. Clovers reduced mustard regrowth (g plant21 ) and the number of mustard plants producing regrowth. The characteristics of berseem clover (upright growth, long stems, high biomass, and late flowering) would support its use as a cover crop or forage in north-central Alberta.

  16. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  17. Neutron suppression in polarized dd fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Liu, K.F.; Shuy, G.W.

    1999-11-01

    We report a model-independent partial-wave analysis of polarized dd fusion reactions at low energies. The radial transition amplitudes, designated by the central, spin-orbit, and tensor forces, are determined by fitting angular distributions of the tensor and vector analyzing powers A{sub XZ}({theta}), A{sub ZZ}({theta}), A{sub XX-YY}({theta}), and A{sub Y}({theta}), and the unpolarized cross section {sigma}{sub 0}({theta}). The polarized fusion cross section {sigma}{sub 1,1}({theta}) is then predicted from these radial transition amplitudes. We stress that this is feasible only when these amplitudes are separated according to the tensor rank of the interaction. This study includes the {ital D}-state components of the deuteron, triton, and {sup 3}He, and the partial-wave expansion is done up to the {ital d} wave for both the entrance and exit channels. Experimental data at E{sub lab}=30, 50, 70, and 90 keV for the d(d,p)t reaction are very well fitted with this method. It is found that the ratio of polarized to unpolarized cross sections is about 86{percent} at 30 keV and goes down to 22{percent} at 90 keV. The implication of the suppression of a polarized dd fusion reaction is discussed in the context of the neutron-lean fusion reactor with polarized {ital D}-{sup 3}He fuel. It turns out that the important range of energy for suppressing the d(d,p)t and d(d,n){sup 3}He reactions at the plasma temperature T=60 keV is E{sub d}=80{endash}600 keV. More experimental data are needed in this range to make a detailed study of the neutron suppression. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. UAV visual signature suppression via adaptive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Melkert, Joris

    2005-05-01

    Visual signature suppression (VSS) methods for several classes of aircraft from WWII on are examined and historically summarized. This study shows that for some classes of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), primary mission threats do not stem from infrared or radar signatures, but from the amount that an aircraft visually stands out against the sky. The paper shows that such visual mismatch can often jeopardize mission success and/or induce the destruction of the entire aircraft. A psycho-physioptical study was conducted to establish the definition and benchmarks of a Visual Cross Section (VCS) for airborne objects. This study was centered on combining the effects of size, shape, color and luminosity or effective illumance (EI) of a given aircraft to arrive at a VCS. A series of tests were conducted with a 6.6ft (2m) UAV which was fitted with optically adaptive electroluminescent sheets at altitudes of up to 1000 ft (300m). It was shown that with proper tailoring of the color and luminosity, the VCS of the aircraft dropped from more than 4,200cm2 to less than 1.8cm2 at 100m (the observed lower limit of the 20-20 human eye in this study). In laypersons terms this indicated that the UAV essentially "disappeared". This study concludes with an assessment of the weight and volume impact of such a Visual Suppression System (VSS) on the UAV, showing that VCS levels on this class UAV can be suppressed to below 1.8cm2 for aircraft gross weight penalties of only 9.8%.

  19. Leuprolide acetate suppresses pedophilic urges and arousability.

    PubMed

    Schober, Justine M; Kuhn, Phyllis J; Kovacs, Paul G; Earle, James H; Byrne, Peter M; Fries, Ruth A

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was compared with cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented by leuprolide acetate (LA) for suppression of pedophilic behavior. Five male pedophiles (M age, 50 years; range, 36-58) were administered LA by Depo injection for 12 months, followed by saline placebo for 12 months. Testosterone levels, sexual interest preference by visual reaction time (Abel Assessment), penile tumescence (Monarch Penile Plethysmography, PPG), as well as strong sexual urges toward children and masturbatory frequency involving thoughts of children (polygraph), were measured every 3 months. On LA, testosterone decreased to castrate levels. Penile tumescence was significantly suppressed compared with baseline, but sufficient response remained to detect pedophilic interest. Pedophilic interest was also detected by visual reaction times. When asked about having pedophilic urges and masturbating to thoughts of children, all subjects self-reported a decrease. Polygraph responses indicated subjects were not deceptive. On placebo, testosterone and physiologic arousal eventually rose to baseline. As noted by polygraph, at baseline and on placebo, subjects were deceptive regarding increased pedophilic urges and masturbatory frequency. Interest preference, as measured by Abel Assessment and Monarch PPG, was generally unchanged throughout the study. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented with LA significantly reduced pedophilic fantasies, urges, and masturbation; however, pedophilic interest did not change during 1 year of therapy. Deceptive responses by polygraph suggested that self-report was unreliable. Follow-up utilizing objective measures is essential for monitoring efficacy of treatment in pedophilia. Our study supports the premise that suppression of pedophilic behavior is possible. LA may augment cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and help break the sequence leading to a re-offense.

  20. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Clem, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone’s effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  1. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V−1 s−1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices. PMID:27040501

  2. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices.

  3. Role for Apyrases in Polar Auxin Transport in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Wu, Jian; Clark, Greg; Lundy, Stacey; Lim, Minhui; Arnold, David; Chan, Jing; Tang, Wenqiang; Muday, Gloria K.; Gardner, Gary; Roux, Stanley J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that extracellular nucleotides regulate plant growth. Exogenous ATP has been shown to block auxin transport and gravitropic growth in primary roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Cells limit the concentration of extracellular ATP in part through the activity of ectoapyrases (ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases), and two nearly identical Arabidopsis apyrases, APY1 and APY2, appear to share this function. These findings, plus the fact that suppression of APY1 and APY2 blocks growth in Arabidopsis, suggested that the expression of these apyrases could influence auxin transport. This report tests that hypothesis. The polar movement of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid in both hypocotyl sections and primary roots of Arabidopsis seedlings was measured. In both tissues, polar auxin transport was significantly reduced in apy2 null mutants when they were induced by estradiol to suppress the expression of APY1 by RNA interference. In the hypocotyl assays, the basal halves of APY-suppressed hypocotyls contained considerably lower free indole-3-acetic acid levels when compared with wild-type plants, and disrupted auxin transport in the APY-suppressed roots was reflected by their significant morphological abnormalities. When a green fluorescent protein fluorescence signal encoded by a DR5:green fluorescent protein construct was measured in primary roots whose apyrase expression was suppressed either genetically or chemically, the roots showed no signal asymmetry following gravistimulation, and both their growth and gravitropic curvature were inhibited. Chemicals that suppress apyrase activity also inhibit gravitropic curvature and, to a lesser extent, growth. Taken together, these results indicate that a critical step connecting apyrase suppression to growth suppression is the inhibition of polar auxin transport. PMID:23071251

  4. Suppressed $B_s$ decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco

    2011-05-01

    We review three recent results of the CDF collaboration on B{sub s}{sup 0} suppressed decays: the first search for CP-violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay, where two CP-violating asymmetries expected to be zero in the Standard Model are measured, and the observation and the branching ratio measurements of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} K{sup (*)} decays.

  5. Optimization of sodium fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-01

    This report describes the major areas of revision and optimization of the design of the CRBRP Sodium Fire Suppression System (SFSS) following the confirmatory testing program. The design temperatures for the SFSS were substantially increased after the Large Scale Sodium Fire Test (LSSFT) making the original design inadequate. A redesign of the main features was performed in which the experience in the construction of the LSSFT test article was also utilized for optimization. The design criteria, loads and load combinations and revised design are discussed.

  6. Suppression of Fermi acceleration in composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Kellen Manoela; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2016-09-01

    We study the motion of a composite particle in a one-dimensional billiard with a moving wall. The particle is modeled by two point masses coupled by a harmonic spring. We show that the energy gained by the composite particle is greatly reduced with respect to a single point particle. We show that the amount of energy transferred to the system at each collision with the walls is independent of the spring constant. However, the presence of the spring is responsible for the energy suppression because it diminishes the number of collisions by storing part of the system's energy and reducing the velocity of the particle's center of mass.

  7. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  8. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul J. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Techniques of combining separate but correlated measurements to form a second-order or higher order correlation function to suppress the effects of noise in the initial condition of a system capable of retaining memory of an initial state of the system with a characteristic relaxation time. At least two separate measurements are obtained from the system. The temporal separation between the two separate measurements is preferably comparable to or less than the characteristic relaxation time and is adjusted to allow for a correlation between two measurements.

  9. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  10. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  11. Suppressed carrier full-spectrum combining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    A technique to accomplish full spectrum arraying where all the telemetry power is put into the subcarrier sidebands (suppressed carrier) is described. The matched filter needed in each antenna prior to cross correlation for deriving the coherence delay and phase offsets is an open loop version of the telemetry phase lock loop provided in the Advanced Digital Receiver. In analogy with a Costas loop telemetry receiver, a squaring loss is derived, and a signal to noise ratio for the cross correlation loop phase is presented.

  12. Suppressed carrier full-spectrum combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogstad, D. H.

    1991-11-01

    A technique to accomplish full spectrum arraying where all the telemetry power is put into the subcarrier sidebands (suppressed carrier) is described. The matched filter needed in each antenna prior to cross correlation for deriving the coherence delay and phase offsets is an open loop version of the telemetry phase lock loop provided in the Advanced Digital Receiver. In analogy with a Costas loop telemetry receiver, a squaring loss is derived, and a signal to noise ratio for the cross correlation loop phase is presented.

  13. Dynamics of Double Layers, Ion Acceleration, and Heat Flux Suppression during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-01

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  14. Dynamics of double layers, ion acceleration, and heat flux suppression during solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-20

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  15. Expression after suppression: a motivational explanation of postsuppressional rebound.

    PubMed

    Liberman, N; Förster, J

    2000-08-01

    Five studies examined the effect of expressing a construct after suppressing it on subsequent accessibility. Suppression of color terms (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and of stereotypes (Studies 3 and 4) were examined. Both expression alone and suppression alone enhanced the construct's accessibility relative to the no-suppression/no-expression condition, demonstrating activation by recent construct use and postsuppressional rebound, respectively. However, introducing expression after suppression reduced accessibility relative to both the suppression alone and the expression alone conditions. These results are explained within a motivational theory of rebound, according to which suppressing a construct induces a need to use it, and subsequent expression satisfies this need, thereby instigating an inhibition of the accessibility of need-related constructs.

  16. Orientation-tuned surround suppression in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Self, Matthew W; Lorteije, Jeannette A M; Vangeneugden, Joris; van Beest, Enny H; Grigore, Mihaela E; Levelt, Christiaan N; Heimel, J Alexander; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2014-07-01

    The firing rates of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by large stimuli, an effect known as surround suppression. In cats and monkeys, the strength of suppression is sensitive to orientation; responses to regions containing uniform orientations are more suppressed than those containing orientation contrast. This effect is thought to be important for scene segmentation, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We asked whether it is possible to study these mechanisms in the visual cortex of mice, because of recent advances in technology for studying the cortical circuitry in mice. It is unknown whether neurons in mouse V1 are sensitive to orientation contrast. We measured the orientation selectivity of surround suppression in the different layers of mouse V1. We found strong surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers, part of which was orientation tuned: iso-oriented surrounds caused more suppression than cross-oriented surrounds. Surround suppression was delayed relative to the visual response and orientation-tuned suppression was delayed further, suggesting two separate suppressive mechanisms. Previous studies proposed that surround suppression depends on the activity of inhibitory somatostatin-positive interneurons in the superficial layers. To test the involvement of the superficial layers we topically applied lidocaine. Silencing of the superficial layers did not prevent orientation-tuned suppression in layer 4. These results show that neurons in mouse V1, which lacks orientation columns, show orientation-dependent surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers and that surround suppression in layer 4 does not require contributions from neurons in the superficial layers.

  17. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  18. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27125275

  19. Population-level effects of suppressing fever

    PubMed Central

    Earn, David J. D.; Andrews, Paul W.; Bolker, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    Fever is commonly attenuated with antipyretic medication as a means to treat unpleasant symptoms of infectious diseases. We highlight a potentially important negative effect of fever suppression that becomes evident at the population level: reducing fever may increase transmission of associated infections. A higher transmission rate implies that a larger proportion of the population will be infected, so widespread antipyretic drug use is likely to lead to more illness and death than would be expected in a population that was not exposed to antipyretic pharmacotherapies. We assembled the published data available for estimating the magnitudes of these individual effects for seasonal influenza. While the data are incomplete and heterogeneous, they suggest that, overall, fever suppression increases the expected number of influenza cases and deaths in the US: for pandemic influenza with reproduction number , the estimated increase is 1% (95% CI: 0.0–2.7%), whereas for seasonal influenza with , the estimated increase is 5% (95% CI: 0.2–12.1%). PMID:24452021

  20. Suppression of soil nitrification by plants.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Worthington, Margaret; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ando, Yasuo; Sahrawat, Kanwar Lal; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudhana; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Kishii, Masahiro; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, weakens the soil's ability to retain N and facilitates N-losses from production agriculture through nitrate-leaching and denitrification. This process has a profound influence on what form of mineral-N is absorbed, used by plants, and retained in the soil, or lost to the environment, which in turn affects N-cycling, N-use efficiency (NUE) and ecosystem health and services. As reactive-N is often the most limiting in natural ecosystems, plants have acquired a range of mechanisms that suppress soil-nitrifier activity to limit N-losses via N-leaching and denitrification. Plants' ability to produce and release nitrification inhibitors from roots and suppress soil-nitrifier activity is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI). With recent developments in methodology for in-situ measurement of nitrification inhibition, it is now possible to characterize BNI function in plants. This review assesses the current status of our understanding of the production and release of biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) and their potential in improving NUE in agriculture. A suite of genetic, soil and environmental factors regulate BNI activity in plants. BNI-function can be genetically exploited to improve the BNI-capacity of major food- and feed-crops to develop next-generation production systems with reduced nitrification and N2O emission rates to benefit both agriculture and the environment. The feasibility of such an approach is discussed based on the progresses made.

  1. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  2. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  3. Error suppression and correction for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel

    While adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing enjoy a certain degree of inherent robustness against excitations and control errors, there is no escaping the need for error correction or suppression. In this talk I will give an overview of our work on the development of such error correction and suppression methods. We have experimentally tested one such method combining encoding, energy penalties and decoding, on a D-Wave Two processor, with encouraging results. Mean field theory shows that this can be explained in terms of a softening of the closing of the gap due to the energy penalty, resulting in protection against excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. Decoding recovers population from excited states and enhances the success probability of quantum annealing. Moreover, we have demonstrated that using repetition codes with increasing code distance can lower the effective temperature of the annealer. References: K.L. Pudenz, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Error corrected quantum annealing with hundreds of qubits'', Nature Commun. 5, 3243 (2014). K.L. Pudenz, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Quantum annealing correction for random Ising problems'', Phys. Rev. A. 91, 042302 (2015). S. Matsuura, H. Nishimori, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction''. arXiv:1510.07709. W. Vinci et al., in preparation.

  4. Inducing nonsense suppression by targeted pseudouridylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Guowei; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Isomerization from uridine to pseudouridine (pseudouridylation) is largely catalyzed by a family of small ribonucleoproteins called box H/ACA RNPs, each of which contains one unique small RNA—the box H/ACA RNA. The specificity of the pseudouridylation reaction is determined by the base-pairing interactions between the guide sequence of the box H/ACA RNA and the target sequence within an RNA substrate. Thus, by creating a new box H/ACA RNA harboring an artificial guide sequence that base-pairs with the substrate sequence, one can site-specifically introduce pseudouridines into virtually any RNA (e.g., mRNA, ribosomal RNA, small nuclear RNA, telomerase RNA and so on). Pseudouridylation changes the properties of a uridine residue and is likely to alter the role of its corresponding RNA in certain cellular processes, thereby enabling basic research into the effects of RNA modifications. Here we take a TRM4 reporter gene (also known as NCL1) as an example, and we present a protocol for designing a box H/ACA RNA to site-specifically pseudouridylate TRM4 mRNA. Disease-related mutation can result in early termination of translation by creating a premature termination codon (PTC); however, pseudouridylation at the PTC can suppress this translation termination (nonsense suppression). Thus, the experimental procedures described in this protocol may provide a novel way to treat PTC-related diseases. This protocol takes 10–13 d to complete. PMID:22461068

  5. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  6. Jet noise suppression by porous plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A. B.; Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Jet noise suppression data presented earlier by Maestrello for porous plug nozzles were supplemented by the testing of a family of nozzles having an equivalent throat diameter of 11.77 cm. Two circular reference nozzles and eight plug nozzles having radius ratios of either 0.53 or 0.80 were tested at total pressure ratios of 1.60 to 4.00. Data were taken both with and without a forward motion or coannular flow jet, and some tests were made with a heated jet. Jet thrust was measured. The data were analyzed to show the effects of suppressor geometry on nozzle propulsive efficiency and jet noise. Aerodynamic testing of the nozzles was carried out in order to study the physical features that lead to the noise suppression. The aerodynamic flow phenomena were examined by the use of high speed shadowgraph cinematography, still shadowgraphs, extensive static pressure probe measurements, and two component laser Doppler velocimeter studies. The different measurement techniques correlated well with each other and demonstrated that the porous plug changes the shock cell structure of a standard nozzle into a series of smaller, periodic cell structures without strong shock waves. These structures become smaller in dimension and have reduced pressure variations as either the plug diameter or the porosity is increased, changes that also reduce the jet noise and decrease thrust efficiency.

  7. Autophagy in tumor Suppression and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Che-Pei; Budina, Anna; Balaburski, Gregor; Bergenstock, Marika K.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a stress-induced cell survival program whereby cells under metabolic, proteotoxic, or other stress remove dysfunctional organelles and/or misfolded/polyubiquitylated proteins by shuttling them via specialized structures called autophagosomes to the lysosome for degradation. The end result is the release of free amino acids and metabolites for use in cell survival. For tumor cells, autophagy is a double-edged sword: autophagy genes are frequently mono-allelically deleted, silenced, or mutated in human tumors, resulting in an environment of increased oxidative stress that is conducive to DNA damage, genomic instability, and tumor progression. As such, autophagy is tumor suppressive. In contrast, it is important to note that although tumor cells have reduced levels of autophagy, they do not eliminate this pathway completely. Furthermore, the exposure of tumor cells to an environment of increased metabolic and other stresses renders them reliant on basal autophagy for survival. Therefore, autophagy inhibition is an active avenue for the identification of novel anti-cancer therapies. Not surprisingly, the field of autophagy and cancer has experienced an explosion of research in the past 10 years. This review covers the basic mechanisms of autophagy, discusses its role in tumor suppression and cancer therapy, and posits emerging questions for the future. PMID:21967333

  8. Adaptive flutter suppression, analysis and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.; Hwang, C.; Joshi, D. S.; Harvey, C. A.; Huttsell, L. T.; Farmer, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of adaptive control have been applied to suppress a potentially violent flutter condition of a half-span model of a lightweight figher aircraft. This marked the confluence of several technologies with active flutter suppression, digital control and adaptive control theory the primary contributors. The control algorithm was required to adapt both to slowly varying changes, corresponding to changes in the flight condition or fuel loading and to rapid changes, corresponding to a store release or the transition from a stable to an unstable flight condition. The development of the adaptive control methods was followed by a simulation and checkout of the complete system and a wind tunnel demonstration. As part of the test, a store was released from the model wing tip, transforming the model abruptly from a stable configuration to a violent flutter condition. The adaptive algorithm recognized the unstable nature of the resulting configuration and implemented a stabilizing control law in a fraction of a second. The algorithm was also shown to provide system stability over a range of wind tunnel Mach numbers and dynamic pressures.

  9. miR-340 suppresses glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ruiguang; He, Lei; Li, Mei; Li, Yi; Peng, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRs) contributes to tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of miR-340 is observed in multiple types of cancers. However, the biological function of miR-340 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that expression of miR-340 was downregulated in both glioma cell lines and tissues. Survival of GBM patients with high levels of miR-340 was significantly extended in comparison to patients expressing low miR-340 levels. Biological functional experiments showed that the restoration of miR-340 dramatically inhibited glioma cell proliferation, induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and promoted autophagy and terminal differentiation. Mechanistic studies disclosed that, miR-340 over-expression suppressed several oncogenes including p-AKT, EZH2, EGFR, BMI1 and XIAP. Furthermore, ROCK1 was validated as a direct functional target miR-340 and silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the anti-tumor effect of mR-340. Our findings indicate an important role of miR-340 as a glioma killer, and suggest a potential prognosis biomarker and therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:25831237

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 ABC Transporter NppA1A2BCD Is Required for Uptake of Peptidyl Nucleoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Yvonne; Dubiley, Svetlana; Lafon, Corinne; Köhler, Thilo; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Mourez, Michael; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of the genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 revealed the presence of an operon encoding an ABC-type transporter (NppA1A2BCD) showing homology to the Yej transporter of Escherichia coli. The Yej transporter is involved in the uptake of the peptide-nucleotide antibiotic microcin C, a translation inhibitor that targets the enzyme aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Furthermore, it was recently shown that the Opp transporter from P. aeruginosa PAO1, which is identical to Npp, is required for uptake of the uridyl peptide antibiotic pacidamycin, which targets the enzyme translocase I (MraY), which is involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. We used several approaches to further explore the substrate specificity of the Npp transporter. Assays of growth in defined minimal medium containing peptides of various lengths and amino acid compositions as sole nitrogen sources, as well as Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays, showed that the Npp transporter is not required for di-, tri-, and oligopeptide uptake. Overexpression of the npp operon increased susceptibility not just to pacidamycin but also to nickel chloride and the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic blasticidin S. Furthermore, heterologous expression of the npp operon in a yej-deficient mutant of E. coli resulted in increased susceptibility to albomycin, a naturally occurring sideromycin with a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic. Additionally, heterologous expression showed that microcin C is recognized by the P. aeruginosa Npp system. Overall, these results suggest that the NppA1A2BCD transporter is involved in the uptake of peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics by P. aeruginosa PA14. IMPORTANCE One of the world's most serious health problems is the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. There is a desperate need to find novel antibiotic therapeutics that either act on new biological targets or are able to bypass known resistance mechanisms. Bacterial ABC transporters play an important role in nutrient uptake from the

  11. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  12. Anisotropy Enhancement of Thermal Energy Transport in Supported Black Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jige; Chen, Shunda; Gao, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Thermal anisotropy along the basal plane of materials possesses both theoretical importance and application value in thermal transport and thermoelectricity. Though common two-dimensional materials may exhibit in-plane thermal anisotropy when suspended, thermal anisotropy would often disappear when supported on a substrate. In this Letter, we find a strong anisotropy enhancement of thermal energy transport in supported black phosphorene. The chiral preference of energy transport in the zigzag rather than the armchair direction is greatly enhanced by coupling to the substrate, up to a factor of approximately 2-fold compared to the suspended one. The enhancement originates from its puckered lattice structure, where the nonplanar armchair energy transport relies on the out-of-plane corrugation and thus would be hindered by the flexural suppression due to the substrate, while the planar zigzag energy transport is not. As a result, thermal conductivity of supported black phosphorene shows a consistent anisotropy enhancement under different temperatures and substrate coupling strengths. PMID:27320775

  13. Anisotropy Enhancement of Thermal Energy Transport in Supported Black Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jige; Chen, Shunda; Gao, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Thermal anisotropy along the basal plane of materials possesses both theoretical importance and application value in thermal transport and thermoelectricity. Though common two-dimensional materials may exhibit in-plane thermal anisotropy when suspended, thermal anisotropy would often disappear when supported on a substrate. In this Letter, we find a strong anisotropy enhancement of thermal energy transport in supported black phosphorene. The chiral preference of energy transport in the zigzag rather than the armchair direction is greatly enhanced by coupling to the substrate, up to a factor of approximately 2-fold compared to the suspended one. The enhancement originates from its puckered lattice structure, where the nonplanar armchair energy transport relies on the out-of-plane corrugation and thus would be hindered by the flexural suppression due to the substrate, while the planar zigzag energy transport is not. As a result, thermal conductivity of supported black phosphorene shows a consistent anisotropy enhancement under different temperatures and substrate coupling strengths.

  14. Transport coefficients of a relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a self-consistent transport theory for a relativistic plasma is developed. Using the notation of Braginskii [S. I. Braginskii, in Reviews of Plasma Physics, edited by M. A. Leontovich (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 174], we provide semianalytical forms of the electrical resistivity, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivity tensors for a Lorentzian plasma in a magnetic field. This treatment is then generalized to plasmas with arbitrary atomic number by numerically solving the linearized Boltzmann equation. The corresponding transport coefficients are fitted by rational functions in order to make them suitable for use in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and transport calculations. Within the confines of linear transport theory and on the assumption that the plasma is optically thin, our results are valid for temperatures up to a few MeV. By contrast, classical transport theory begins to incur significant errors above kBT ˜10 keV, e.g., the parallel thermal conductivity is suppressed by 15% at kBT =20 keV due to relativistic effects.

  15. Ballistic spin transport in exciton gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, A. V.; Vladimirova, M.; Jouault, B.; Liew, T. C. H.; Leonard, J. R.; Butov, L. V.

    2013-11-01

    Traditional spintronics relies on spin transport by charge carriers, such as electrons in semiconductor crystals. The challenges for the realization of long-range electron spin transport include rapid spin relaxation due to electron scattering. Scattering and, in turn, spin relaxation can be effectively suppressed in excitonic devices where the spin currents are carried by electrically neutral bosonic quasiparticles: excitons or exciton-polaritons. They can form coherent quantum liquids that carry spins over macroscopic distances. The price to pay is a finite lifetime of the bosonic spin carriers. We present the theory of exciton ballistic spin transport which may be applied to a range of systems supporting bosonic spin transport, in particular to indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. We describe the effect of spin-orbit interaction for the electron and the hole on the exciton spin, account for the Zeeman effect induced by external magnetic fields and long-range and short-range exchange splittings of the exciton resonances. We also consider exciton transport in the nonlinear regime and discuss the definitions of the exciton spin current, polarization current, and spin conductivity.

  16. Fuzzy Model-based Pitch Stabilization and Wing Vibration Suppression of Flexible Wing Aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoubi, Mohammad A.; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy nonlinear controller to regulate the longitudinal dynamics of an aircraft and suppress the bending and torsional vibrations of its flexible wings. The fuzzy controller utilizes full-state feedback with input constraint. First, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy linear model is developed which approximates the coupled aeroelastic aircraft model. Then, based on the fuzzy linear model, a fuzzy controller is developed to utilize a full-state feedback and stabilize the system while it satisfies the control input constraint. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques are employed to solve the fuzzy control problem. Finally, the performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  17. Suppression of bulk conductivity in InAs/GaSb broken gap composite quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Charpentier, Christophe; Fält, Stefan; Reichl, Christian; Nichele, Fabrizio; Nath Pal, Atindra; Pietsch, Patrick; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Wegscheider, Werner

    2013-09-09

    The two-dimensional topological insulator state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells manifests itself by topologically protected helical edge channel transport relying on an insulating bulk. This work investigates a way of suppressing bulk conductivity by using gallium source materials of different degrees of impurity concentrations. While highest-purity gallium is accompanied by clear conduction through the sample bulk, intentional impurity incorporation leads to a bulk resistance over 1 MΩ, independent of applied magnetic fields. In addition, ultra high electron mobilities for GaAs/AlGaAs structures fabricated in a molecular beam epitaxy system used for the growth of Sb-based samples are reported.

  18. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and affects the regulation of the phosphate signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, split-ubiquitin assays and co-immunoprecipitation suggest that the SPX domain of both Pho90 and Pho87 interacts physically with the regulatory protein Spl2. This work suggests that the SPX domain inhibits low-affinity phosphate transport through a physical interaction with Spl2. PMID:19590579

  19. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  20. Transportation Technology: Rail Transport and Logistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Aaron B.

    2011-01-01

    Transportation can simply be defined as the movement of goods, services, and people from one location to another. Without an efficient means to transport goods from place to place, the economy would be nothing like it is today. Throughout the history of the United States, American railroads have paved the way toward creating a nation of great…

  1. Suppression of thermopower of NaxCoO2 by an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H. J.; Singh, David J

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the thermopower in Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} using the standard Boltzmann transport theory and first principles electronic structures with spin polarization taken into account. The thermopower is found to be smaller when the system is polarized, which thereby provides an alternative reasonable explanation for the suppression of thermopower in a magnetic field. The role of the spin-orbit coupling on the thermoelectricity is also discussed.

  2. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  3. Vibration suppression in a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, Kumpati S.

    1988-01-01

    The Yale University Center for Systems Science and the NASA Johnson Space Center collaborated in a study of vibration suppression in a large space structure during the period January 1985 to August 1987. The research proposal submitted by the Center to NASA concerned disturbance isolation in flexible space structures. The general objective of the proposal was to create within the Center a critical mass of expertise on problems related to the dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. A specific objective was to formulate both passive and active control strategies for the disturbance isolation problem. Both objectives were achieved during the period of the contract. While an extensive literature exists on the control of flexible space structures, it is generally acknowledged that many important questions remain open at even a fundamental level. Hence, instead of studying grossly simplified models of complex structural systems, it was decided as a first step to confine attention to detailed and thorough analyses of simple structures.

  4. Apparatus and method for jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1983-08-01

    A method and apparatus for jet noise suppression through control of the static pressure of the jet and control of the rate of entrainment of ambient fluid into the jet downstream of the exhaust nozzle is disclosed. The momentum flux over an extended region of the jet is regulated, affecting Reynolds stresses in the jet and the spreading angle of the jet. Static pressure is controlled through a long hollow, porous nozzle plug centerbody which may be selectively vented to ambient conditions, connected to a vacuum source, or supplied with fluids of various densities for injection into the stream. Sound in the jet may be channeled along the nozzle plug centerbody by injecting coolant such as a cryogenic fluid throughout the center-body into the jet.

  5. Noise suppressions in synchronized chaos lidars.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Ting; Liao, Yi-Huan; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2010-12-01

    The noise suppressions in the chaos lidar (CLIDAR) and the synchronized chaos lidar (S-CLIDAR) systems with the optoelectronic feedback (OEF) and optical feedback (OF) schemes are studied numerically. Compared with the CLIDAR system, the S-CLIDAR system with the OEF scheme has better correlation coefficients in the large noise regime for SNR < 15 dB. For the S-CLIDAR system with the OF scheme, better detections are also achieved in wide ranges depending on the levels of the phase noise presented in the channel. To have the best synchronization and detection quality, the optimized conditions for the coupling and feedback strengths in the S-CLIDAR system are also discussed.

  6. Exploiting Symmetry for Quantum Error Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Yunseong; Blümel, Reinhold

    2016-05-01

    In light of recent experimental progress in quantum computing, the time is ripe to discuss quantum computer hardware optimization. Taking the digital/analog hybrid nature of quantum computers into account, choosing a proper processor architecture for a given quantum algorithm becomes crucial in making quantum computing a practical reality. As a first step in this direction, we investigate the robustness of quantum adders with respect to naturally occurring hardware defects and errors. In particular, we compare the robustness of the ripple-carry adder to that of the quantum Fourier adder. We show that, surprisingly, when used in Shor's algorithm, the quantum Fourier adder may well be more robust than the ripple-carry adder. We present a noise suppression scheme, called symmetric noise, applicable to the quantum Fourier architecture, that, measured in terms of fidelity, results in an order-of-magnitude performance boost.

  7. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  8. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  9. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  10. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  11. Axionic suppression of plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, D. A.; Noble, A.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Contemporary attempts to explain the existence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using plasma-based wakefield acceleration deliberately avoid non-standard model particle physics. However, such proposals exploit some of the most extreme environments in the Universe and it is conceivable that hypothetical particles outside the standard model have significant implications for the effectiveness of the acceleration process. Axions solve the strong CP problem and provide one of the most important candidates for cold dark matter, and their potential significance in the present context should not be overlooked. Our analysis of the field equations describing a plasma augmented with axions uncovers a dramatic axion-induced suppression of the energy gained by a test particle in the wakefield driven by a particle bunch, or an intense pulse of electromagnetic radiation, propagating at ultra-relativistic speeds within the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

  12. Predicting fire suppression in a simulated engine nacelle.

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David R.; Hewson, John C.

    2004-06-01

    The Vulcan fire-field model is employed to simulate the evolution of pool fires and the distribution of fire suppressants in a engine nacelle simulator. The objective is to identify conditions for which suppression will and will not be successful in order to (1) provide input on experimental design and (2) to test the model's predictive capabilities through comparison with future test results. Pool fires, where the fuel pool is on the bottom of the nacelle, have been selected for these tests because they have been identified as among the most challenging to suppress. Modeling of the production HFC-125 fire suppression system predicts that all pool fires are extinguished. Removing nozzles and reducing the rate of suppressant injection eventually lead to a predicted failure to suppress the fires. The stability of the fires, and therefore the difficulty in extinguishing them, depends on a variety of additional factors as discussed in the text.

  13. Transport properties of individual C60-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géranton, G.; Seiler, C.; Bagrets, A.; Venkataraman, L.; Evers, F.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical and thermal transport properties of C60 molecules are investigated with density-functional-theory based calculations. These calculations suggest that the optimum contact geometry for an electrode terminated with a single-Au atom is through binding to one or two C-atoms of C60 with a tendency to promote the sp2-hybridization into an sp3-type one. Transport in these junctions is primarily through an unoccupied molecular orbital that is partly hybridized with the Au, which results in splitting the degeneracy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital triplet. The transmission through these junctions, however, cannot be modeled by a single Lorentzian resonance, as our results show evidence of quantum interference between an occupied and an unoccupied orbital. The interference results in a suppression of conductance around the Fermi energy. Our numerical findings are readily analyzed analytically within a simple two-level model.

  14. Are Claims of Global Warming Being Suppressed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last few years, I have heard many rumors that climate science relevant to the global warming discussion is being suppressed by the Bush Administration. One cannot do much about third-hand information. However, on 29 January, the New York Times published a front page article on NASA efforts to suppress statements about global warming by James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A claim by one government scientist, though, no matter how distinguished, still requires examples from other scientists before a general conclusion can be drawn about the overall scope of the problem. But if the charges are more widespread, then some government scientists might be reluctant to make such claims, because they might feel that their positions were jeopardized. Therefore, an alternate way may be needed to determine the scope of the issue, while still safeguarding government workers from possible retaliation. -On 30 January, Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, wrote a letter to NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addressing many of the concerns Crowley has raised. Boehlert wrote,``It ought to go without saying that government scientists must be free to describe their scientific conclusions and the implications of those conclusions to their fellow scientists, policymakers and the general public.'' He continued,``Good science cannot long persist in an atmosphere of intimidation. Political figures ought to be reviewing their public statements to make sure they are consistent with the best available science; scientists should not be reviewing their statements to make sure they are consistent with the current political orthodoxy.'' I commend Rep. Boehlert for his quick and clear statement of the importance of unfettered communication of science. -FRED SPILHAUS, Editor

  15. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  16. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}≈110 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (≲ 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (Σ{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ≈50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ≈150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-σ relation.

  17. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J.; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-il; Huang Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  18. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S.

    2015-09-22

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. The isomerization suppression agent is phosphorous acid, a phosphorous acid ester, phosphinic acid, a phosphinic acid ester or combinations thereof. Methods of refining natural oils are described.

  19. Development of chitosan-SLN microparticles for chemotherapy: in vitro approach through efflux-transporter modulation.

    PubMed

    Dharmala, Kiran; Yoo, Jin Wook; Lee, Chi H

    2008-11-12

    Drug efflux-transporters serve as a major barrier to anticancer drugs at the target site. One strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of drugs against cancer is to increase their available concentrations at the target site by suppressing or modulating efflux-transporters. This manuscript deals with the development and evaluation of the particle type drug delivery system made of stearic acid (Solid Lipid Nanoparticle - SLN) and chitosan for the delivery of Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a tumor-suppressive agent, through the pulmonary route. The rationale behind the particle type drug delivery system involves a prior release of the efflux-transporter inhibitors, such as tamoxifen, verapamil HCl or nifedipine, to suppress or modulate the efflux activity of ABC transporters followed by the release of the efflux-transporter substrate, PEITC. The efficacy of Chitosan-SLN Microparticles (CSM) as a carrier for PEITC was evaluated by investigating the release profiles of PEITC loaded in CSM and its cytotoxicity in the presence or absence of the efflux-transporter inhibitors. An initial burst release of the inhibitors, followed by gradual, sustained release of PEITC and subsequent increase in cytotoxicity was observed. This finding indicated that the efflux transporter inhibitors significantly affected the PEITC uptake rate by Calu-3 cells. Judging from these results, CSM can be an efficient drug delivery system for the substrates susceptible to the efflux-transporters. PMID:18723057

  20. Sodium fire testing: structural evaluation of sodium fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect

    1984-08-01

    This report describes the development and the lessons learned from the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Sodium Fire Testing Program (DRS 26.03). The purpose of this program was to evaluate the behavior of the Sodium Fire Suppression System and validate the analytical techniques used in the calculation of the effects of sodium fires in air-filled cells. This report focuses on the fire suppression capability and the structural integrity of the Fire Suppression System. System features are discussed; the test facility is described and the key results are provided. Modifications to the fire suppression system and the plant made as a result of test experience are also discussed.