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Sample records for oligopeptide transporter suppress

  1. Characterization of the PT clade of oligopeptide transporters in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oligopeptide transporters (OPTs) are a group of membrane-localized proteins with a broad range of substrate transport capabilities, and which are thought to contribute to many biological processes. Nine OPTs belonging to the peptide transport (PT) clade were identified in the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ...

  2. Three oligopeptide-binding proteins are involved in the oligopeptide transport of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Garault, Peggy; Le Bars, Dominique; Besset, Colette; Monnet, Veronique

    2002-01-04

    The functions necessary for bacterial growth strongly depend on the features of the bacteria and the components of the growth media. Our objective was to identify the functions essential to the optimum growth of Streptococcus thermophilus in milk. Using random insertional mutagenesis on a S. thermophilus strain chosen for its ability to grow rapidly in milk, we obtained several mutants incapable of rapid growth in milk. We isolated and characterized one of these mutants in which an amiA1 gene encoding an oligopeptide-binding protein (OBP) was interrupted. This gene was a part of an operon containing all the components of an ATP binding cassette transporter. Three highly homologous amiA genes encoding OBPs work with the same components of the ATP transport system. Their simultaneous inactivation led to a drastic diminution in the growth rate in milk and the absence of growth in chemically defined medium containing peptides as the nitrogen source. We constructed single and multiple negative mutants for AmiAs and cell wall proteinase (PrtS), the only proteinase capable of hydrolyzing casein oligopeptides outside the cell. Growth experiments in chemically defined medium containing peptides indicated that AmiA1, AmiA2, and AmiA3 exhibited overlapping substrate specificities, and that the whole system allows the transport of peptides containing from 3 to 23 residues.

  3. Structure dependent spin selectivity in electron transport through oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, Vankayala; Cohen, Sidney R.; Naaman, Ron

    2017-03-01

    The chiral-induced spin selectivity (CISS) effect entails spin-selective electron transmission through chiral molecules. In the present study, the spin filtering ability of chiral, helical oligopeptide monolayers of two different lengths is demonstrated using magnetic conductive probe atomic force microscopy. Spin-specific nanoscale electron transport studies elucidate that the spin polarization is higher for 14-mer oligopeptides than that of the 10-mer. We also show that the spin filtering ability can be tuned by changing the tip-loading force applied on the molecules. The spin selectivity decreases with increasing applied force, an effect attributed to the increased ratio of radius to pitch of the helix upon compression and increased tilt angles between the molecular axis and the surface normal. The method applied here provides new insights into the parameters controlling the CISS effect.

  4. Structural Design of Oligopeptides for Intestinal Transport Model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Koyanagi, Riho; Shen, Weilin; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-03-16

    Glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar) is a well-known model substrate for the intestinal uptake of dipeptides through peptide transporter 1 (PepT1). However, there are no other model peptides larger than tripeptides to evaluate their intestinal transport ability. In this study, we designed new oligopeptides based on the Gly-Sar structure in terms of protease resistance. Gly-Sar-Sar was found to be an appropriate transport model for tripeptides because it does not degrade during the transport across the rat intestinal membrane, while Gly-Gly-Sar was degraded to Gly-Sar during the 60 min transport. Caco-2 cell transport experiments revealed that the designed oligopeptides based on Gly-Sar-Sar showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower transport ability by factors of 1/10-, 1/25-, and 1/40-fold for Gly-Sar-Sar, Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar, and Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar-Sar, respectively, compared to Gly-Sar (apparent permeability coefficient: 38.6 ± 11.4 cm/s). Cell experiments also showed that the designed tripeptide and Gly-Sar were transported across Caco-2 cell via PepT1, whereas the tetra- and pentapeptides were transported through the paracellular tight-junction pathway.

  5. Alternating access mechanism in the POT family of oligopeptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Solcan, Nicolae; Kwok, Jane; Fowler, Philip W; Cameron, Alexander D; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Newstead, Simon

    2012-08-15

    Short chain peptides are actively transported across membranes as an efficient route for dietary protein absorption and for maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, peptide transport occurs via PepT1 and PepT2, which belong to the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter, or POT family. The recent crystal structure of a bacterial POT transporter confirmed that they belong to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters. Despite the functional characterization of POT family members in bacteria, fungi and mammals, a detailed model for peptide recognition and transport remains unavailable. In this study, we report the 3.3-Å resolution crystal structure and functional characterization of a POT family transporter from the bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus. Crystallized in an inward open conformation the structure identifies a hinge-like movement within the C-terminal half of the transporter that facilitates opening of an intracellular gate controlling access to a central peptide-binding site. Our associated functional data support a model for peptide transport that highlights the importance of salt bridge interactions in orchestrating alternating access within the POT family.

  6. Alternating access mechanism in the POT family of oligopeptide transporters

    PubMed Central

    Solcan, Nicolae; Kwok, Jane; Fowler, Philip W; Cameron, Alexander D; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Newstead, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Short chain peptides are actively transported across membranes as an efficient route for dietary protein absorption and for maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, peptide transport occurs via PepT1 and PepT2, which belong to the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter, or POT family. The recent crystal structure of a bacterial POT transporter confirmed that they belong to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters. Despite the functional characterization of POT family members in bacteria, fungi and mammals, a detailed model for peptide recognition and transport remains unavailable. In this study, we report the 3.3-Å resolution crystal structure and functional characterization of a POT family transporter from the bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus. Crystallized in an inward open conformation the structure identifies a hinge-like movement within the C-terminal half of the transporter that facilitates opening of an intracellular gate controlling access to a central peptide-binding site. Our associated functional data support a model for peptide transport that highlights the importance of salt bridge interactions in orchestrating alternating access within the POT family. PMID:22659829

  7. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-08

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. Copyright © 2016 DHC corporation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. H{sup +}/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-08

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H{sup +} gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. -- Highlights: •PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes, which are more common than other skin cells. •Immunolocalization analysis using human skin revealed epidermal PEPT2 localization. •Keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H{sup +} gradient. •Di- and tripeptide pass actively through the epidermis.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates its cell surface via an oligopeptide permease (Opp) transport system

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Morris, Rowan P.; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial species utilize a vast repertoire of surface structures to interact with their surroundings and employ a number of strategies to reconfigure the cellular envelope according to specific stimuli. Gram-positive bacteria, exemplified by Streptomyces and Bacillus species, control production of some exposed molecules by importing oligopeptide signals via permeases (Opp). Such oligopeptides modulate intracellular signaling pathways. In this work, we functionally characterized an Opp of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and propose its reannotation. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found that Opp was required to modulate (fold-change ranging from −3.5 to 2.0) the expression of several genes, most of them encoding surface-exposed molecules. These included the virulence-associated lipids mycolic acids and phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) as well as PE-family proteins. By thin-layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF-MS we confirmed changes in the lipid profile, including an altered accumulation of triacylglycerides and an affected ratio of mycolic acids to PDIMs. An Opp loss of function mutant showed no in vitro growth defect, but had diminished burden during chronic infection and produced a slightly delayed time to death of animals when compared to WT Mtb infection.—Flores-Valdez, M. A., Morris, R. P., Laval, F., Daffé, M., Schoolnik, G. K. Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates its cell surface via an oligopeptide permease (Opp) transport system. PMID:19671666

  10. A novel fungal family of oligopeptide transporters identified by functional metatranscriptomics of soil eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Damon, Coralie; Vallon, Laurent; Zimmermann, Sabine; Haider, Muhammad Z; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie; Luis, Patricia; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland

    2011-12-01

    Functional environmental genomics has the potential to identify novel biological functions that the systematic sequencing of microbial genomes or environmental DNA may fail to uncover. We targeted the functions expressed by soil eukaryotes using a metatranscriptomic approach based on the use of soil-extracted polyadenylated messenger RNA to construct environmental complementary DNA expression libraries. Functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in di/tripeptide uptake identified a novel family of oligopeptide transporters expressed by fungi. This family has a patchy distribution in the Basidiomycota and Ascomycota and is present in the genome of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain. High throughput phenotyping of yeast mutants expressing two environmental transporters showed that they both displayed broad substrate specificity and could transport more than 60-80 dipeptides. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes one environmental transporter induced currents upon dipeptide addition, suggesting proton-coupled co-transport of dipeptides. This transporter was also able to transport specifically cysteine. Deletion of the two copies of the corresponding gene family members in the genome of the wine yeast strain severely reduced the number of dipeptides that it could assimilate. These results demonstrate that these genes are functional and can be used by fungi to efficiently scavenge the numerous, low concentration, oligopeptides continuously generated in soils by proteolysis.

  11. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the β-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  12. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines.

  13. CgOpt1, a putative oligopeptide transporter from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides that is involved in responses to auxin and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene produces high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in axenic cultures and during plant infection. We generated a suppression subtractive hybridization library enriched for IAA-induced genes and identified a clone, which was highly expressed in IAA-containing medium. Results The corresponding gene showed similarity to oligopeptide transporters of the OPT family and was therefore named CgOPT1. Expression of CgOPT1 in mycelia was low, and was enhanced by external application of IAA. cgopt1-silenced mutants produced less spores, had reduced pigmentation, and were less pathogenic to plants than the wild-type strain. IAA enhanced spore formation and caused changes in colony morphology in the wild-type strain, but had no effect on spore formation or colony morphology of the cgopt1-silenced mutants. Conclusion Our results show that IAA induces developmental changes in C. gloeosporioides. These changes are blocked in cgopt1-silenced mutants, suggesting that this protein is involved in regulation of fungal response to IAA. CgOPT1 is also necessary for full virulence, but it is unclear whether this phenotype is related to auxin. PMID:19698103

  14. Expression analyses of Arabidopsis oligopeptide transporters during seed germination, vegetative growth and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Minviluz G; Osawa, Hiroki; Patel, Ami; Gassmann, Walter; Stacey, Gary

    2006-01-01

    AtOPT promoter-GUS fusions were constructed for six of the nine known, putative oligopeptide transporters (OPTs) in Arabidopsis thaliana and used to examine AtOPT expression at various stages of plant development. AtOPT1, AtOPT3, AtOPT4, AtOPT6 and AtOPT7 were expressed in the embryonic cotyledons prior to root radicle emergence. Except for AtOPT8, which gave weak expression, all AtOPTs were strongly expressed in post-germinative seedlings with strongest expression in vascular tissues of cotyledons and hypocotyls. Preferential expression of AtOPTs in vascular tissues was also observed in cotyledons, leaves, hypocotyls, roots, flowers, siliques, and seed funiculi of seedlings and adult plants. Differential tissue-specific expression was observed for specific AtOPTs. For example, AtOPT1, AtOPT3 and AtOPT8 were uniquely expressed in pollen. Only AtOPT1 was expressed in growing pollen tubes, while only AtOPT6 was observed in ovules. AtOPT8 was transiently expressed in seeds during early stages of embryogenesis. Iron limitation was found to enhance expression of AtOPT3. These data suggest distinct cellular roles for specific AtOPTs including nitrogen mobilization during germination and senescence, pollen tube growth, pollen and ovule development, seed formation and metal transport.

  15. Human oligopeptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) mediates cellular uptake of polymyxins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxi; Chan, Ting; Xu, Chenghao; Zhu, Ling; Zhou, Qi Tony; Roberts, Kade D.; Chan, Hak-Kim; Li, Jian; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Polymyxins are a last-line therapy to treat MDR Gram-negative bacterial infections. Nephrotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for polymyxins and recent studies demonstrated significant accumulation of polymyxins in renal tubular cells. However, little is known about the mechanism of polymyxin uptake into these cells. Oligopeptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a solute carrier transporter (SLC) expressed at the apical membrane of renal proximal tubular cells and facilitates drug reabsorption in the kidney. In this study, we examined the role of PEPT2 in polymyxin uptake into renal tubular cells. Methods We investigated the inhibitory effects of colistin and polymyxin B on the substrate uptake mediated through 15 essential SLCs in overexpressing HEK293 cells. The inhibitory potency of both polymyxins on PEPT2-mediated substrate uptake was measured. Fluorescence imaging was employed to investigate PEPT2-mediated uptake of the polymyxin fluorescent probe MIPS-9541 and a transport assay was conducted with MIPS-9541 and [3H]polymyxin B1. Results Colistin and polymyxin B potently inhibited PEPT2-mediated [3H]glycyl-sarcosine uptake (IC50 11.4 ± 3.1 and 18.3 ± 4.2 μM, respectively). In contrast, they had no or only mild inhibitory effects on the transport activity of the other 14 SLCs evaluated. MIPS-9541 potently inhibited PEPT2-mediated [3H]glycyl-sarcosine uptake (IC50 15.9 μM) and is also a substrate of PEPT2 (Km 74.9 μM). [3H]polymyxin B1 was also significantly taken up by PEPT2-expressing cells (Km 87.3 μM). Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence of PEPT2-mediated uptake of polymyxins and contributes to a better understanding of the accumulation of polymyxins in renal tubular cells. PMID:26494147

  16. Expression of the oligopeptide transporter, PepT1, in larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Amberg, J J; Myr, C; Kamisaka, Y; Jordal, A-E O; Rust, M B; Hardy, R W; Koedijk, R; Rønnestad, I

    2008-06-01

    The intestinal absorption of di- and tri-peptides generally occurs via the oligopeptide transporter, PepT1. This study evaluates the expression of PepT1 in larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) during the three weeks following the onset of exogenous feeding. Larval Atlantic cod were fed either wild captured zooplankton or enriched rotifers. cDNA was prepared from whole cod larvae preceding first feeding and at 1000 each Tuesday and Thursday for the following three weeks. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of PepT1 mRNA were compared between fish consuming the two prey types using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Results indicated that PepT1 mRNA was expressed prior to the onset of exogenous feeding. In addition, PepT1 was expressed throughout the digestive system except the esophagus and sphincter regions. Expression slightly increased following first-feeding and continued to increase throughout the study for larvae feeding on both prey types. When comparing PepT1 expression in larvae larger than 0.15-mg dry mass with expression levels in larvae prior to feeding, no differences were detected for larvae fed rotifers, but the larvae fed zooplankton had significantly greater PepT1 expression at the larger size. In addition, PepT1 expression in the zooplankton fed larvae larger than 0.15-mg dry mass had significantly greater expression than rotifer fed larvae of a similar weight. Switching prey types did not affect PepT1 expression. These results indicate that Atlantic cod PepT1 expression was slightly different relative to dietary treatment during the three weeks following first-feeding. In addition, PepT1 may play an important role in the larval nutrition since it is widely expressed in the digestive tract.

  17. Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) family expression in human nasal epithelium and their drug transport potential.

    PubMed

    Agu, Remigius; Cowley, Elizabeth; Shao, Di; Macdonald, Christopher; Kirkpatrick, David; Renton, Ken; Massoud, Emad

    2011-06-06

    The molecular and functional expression of peptide transporters (PEPT1 and PEPT2, PHT1, PHT2) in human nasal epithelium was investigated. Quantitative/reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR/RT-PCR), Western blotting and indirect immuno-histochemistry were used to investigate the functional gene and protein expression for the transporters. Uptake and transport studies were performed using metabolically stable peptides [β-alanyl-L-lysyl-Nε-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarin-3-acetic acid (β-Ala-Lys-AMCA) and β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine)]. The effects of concentration, temperature, polarity, competing peptides, and inhibitors on peptide uptake and transport were investigated. PCR products corresponding to PEPT1 (150 bp), PEPT2 (127 bp), PHT1 (110 bp) and PHT2 (198 bp) were detected. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the functional expression of PEPT1 and PEPT2 genes. The uptake of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was concentration-dependent and saturable (Vmax =4.1 ( 0.07 μmol/min/mg protein, Km = 0.6 ( 0.07 μM). The optimal pH for intracellular accumulation of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was 6.5. Whereas dipeptides and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) significantly inhibited peptide uptake and transport, L-Phe had no effect on peptide transport. The permeation of β-alanyl-L-histidine was concentration-, direction-, and temperature-dependent. The uptake, permeation, qPCR/RT-PCR and protein expression data showed that the human nasal epithelium functionally expresses proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters.

  18. The oligopeptide transport system is essential for the development of natural competence in Streptococcus thermophilus strain LMD-9.

    PubMed

    Gardan, Rozenn; Besset, Colette; Guillot, Alain; Gitton, Christophe; Monnet, Véronique

    2009-07-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, oligopeptide transport systems, called Opp or Ami, play a role in nutrition but are also involved in the internalization of signaling peptides that take part in the functioning of quorum-sensing pathways. Our objective was to reveal functions that are controlled by Ami via quorum-sensing mechanisms in Streptococcus thermophilus, a nonpathogenic bacterium widely used in dairy technology in association with other bacteria. Using a label-free proteomic approach combining one-dimensional electrophoresis with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we compared the proteome of the S. thermophilus LMD-9 to that of a mutant deleted for the subunits C, D, and E of the ami operon. Both strains were grown in a chemically defined medium (CDM) without peptides. We focused our attention on proteins that were no more detected in the ami deletion mutant. In addition to the three subunits of the Ami transporter, 17 proteins fulfilled this criterion and, among them, 7 were similar to proteins that have been identified as essential for transformation in S. pneumoniae. These results led us to find a condition of growth, the early exponential state in CDM, that allows natural transformation in S. thermophilus LMD-9 to turn on spontaneously. Cells were not competent in M17 rich medium. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ami transporter controls the triggering of the competence state through the control of the transcription of comX, itself controlling the transcription of late competence genes. We also showed that one of the two oligopeptide-binding proteins of strain LMD-9 plays the predominant role in the control of competence.

  19. Fluorescent sensors for activity and regulation of the nitrate transceptor CHL1/NRT1.1 and oligopeptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-03-12

    To monitor nitrate and peptide transport activity in vivo, we converted the dual-affinity nitrate transceptor CHL1/NRT1.1/NPF6.3 and four related oligopeptide transporters PTR1, 2, 4, and 5 into fluorescence activity sensors (NiTrac1, PepTrac). Substrate addition to yeast expressing transporter fusions with yellow fluorescent protein and mCerulean triggered substrate-dependent donor quenching or resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence changes were nitrate/peptide-specific, respectively. Like CHL1, NiTrac1 had biphasic kinetics. Mutation of T101A eliminated high-affinity transport and blocked the fluorescence response to low nitrate. NiTrac was used for characterizing side chains considered important for substrate interaction, proton coupling, and regulation. We observed a striking correlation between transport activity and sensor output. Coexpression of NiTrac with known calcineurin-like proteins (CBL1, 9; CIPK23) and candidates identified in an interactome screen (CBL1, KT2, WNKinase 8) blocked NiTrac1 responses, demonstrating the suitability for in vivo analysis of activity and regulation. The new technology is applicable in plant and medical research. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01917.001.

  20. Fluorescent sensors for activity and regulation of the nitrate transceptor CHL1/NRT1.1 and oligopeptide transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-01-01

    To monitor nitrate and peptide transport activity in vivo, we converted the dual-affinity nitrate transceptor CHL1/NRT1.1/NPF6.3 and four related oligopeptide transporters PTR1, 2, 4, and 5 into fluorescence activity sensors (NiTrac1, PepTrac). Substrate addition to yeast expressing transporter fusions with yellow fluorescent protein and mCerulean triggered substrate-dependent donor quenching or resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence changes were nitrate/peptide-specific, respectively. Like CHL1, NiTrac1 had biphasic kinetics. Mutation of T101A eliminated high-affinity transport and blocked the fluorescence response to low nitrate. NiTrac was used for characterizing side chains considered important for substrate interaction, proton coupling, and regulation. We observed a striking correlation between transport activity and sensor output. Coexpression of NiTrac with known calcineurin-like proteins (CBL1, 9; CIPK23) and candidates identified in an interactome screen (CBL1, KT2, WNKinase 8) blocked NiTrac1 responses, demonstrating the suitability for in vivo analysis of activity and regulation. The new technology is applicable in plant and medical research. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01917.001 PMID:24623305

  1. Critical role of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) in the cellular uptake of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic, blasticidin S.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kenji; Kinsui, Eldaa Zefany Banami; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Blasticidin S (BlaS) interferes in the cell growth of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Its mode of action as a protein synthesis inhibitor has been investigated extensively. However, the mechanism of BlaS transport into the target cells is not understood well. Here, we show that Ptr2, a member of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family, is responsible for the uptake of BlaS in yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, some mutants of Ptr2 that are dysfunctional in dipeptide uptake were still competent to transport BlaS. Mouse-derived oligopeptide transporter PepT1 conferred BlaS sensitivity in the S. cerevisiae ptr2∆ mutant. Furthermore, bacterial POT family proteins also potentiated the BlaS sensitivity of E. coli. The role of the POT family oligopeptide transporters in the uptake of BlaS is conserved across species from bacteria to mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  3. Transport suppression by shear reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between transport and shear is a problem of considerable interest to magnetically confined plasmas. It is well known that there are cases in which an increase of flow shear can lead to a reduction of turbulent transport. However, this is not a generic result, and there are transport problems in which the opposite is the case. In particular, as originally discussed in Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete and Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993), barriers to chaotic transport typically form in regions of vanishing shear. This property, which is generic to the so-called non-twist Hamiltonian systems footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Greene, and Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996), explains the observed resilience of transport barriers in non-monotonic zonal flows in plasmas and fluids and the robustness of shearless magnetic surfaces in reverse shear configurations. Here we study the role of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the suppression of chaotic transport by shear reduction in a simplified model. Following Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Phys. Plasmas, 7, 1702 (2000) we consider a model consisting of a superposition of drift waves and a non-monotonic zonal flow. The FLR effects are incorporated by gyroaveraging the E xB velocity, and transport is studied by following the evolution of ensembles of test particles.

  4. Bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monnet, V

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins, which form part of the oligopeptide transport system belonging to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters. Depending on the bacterial species, these binding proteins (OppA) capture peptides ranging in size from 2 to 18 amino acids from the environment and pass them on to the other components of the oligopeptide transport system for internalisation. Bacteria have developed several strategies to produce these binding proteins, which are periplasmic in Gram- bacteria and membrane-anchored in Gram+, with a higher stoichiometry (probably necessary for efficient transport) than the other components in the transport system. The expression of OppA-encoding genes is clearly modulated by external factors, especially nitrogen compounds, but the mechanisms of regulation are not always clear. The best-understood roles played by OppAs are internalisation of peptides for nutrition and recycling of muropeptides. It has, however, recently become clear that OppAs are also involved in sensing the external medium via specific or non-specific peptides.

  5. New insights into the substrate specificities of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters from E. coli by a pH sensitive assay.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Jensen, Johanne M; Ernst, Heidi A; Iram, Nida; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2014-02-14

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that facilitate di- and tripeptide uptake by coupling it to an inward directed proton electrochemical gradient. Here the substrate specificities of Escherichia coli POTs YdgR, YhiP and YjdL were investigated by means of a label free transport assay using the hydrophilic pH sensitive dye pyranine and POT overexpressing E. coli cells. The results confirm and extend the functional knowledge on E. coli POTs. In contrast to previous assumptions, alanine and trialanine appears to be substrates of YjdL, albeit poor compared to dipeptides. Similarly tetraalanine apparently is a substrate of both YdgR and YhiP.

  6. Teleost fish models in membrane transport research: the PEPT1(SLC15A1) H+–oligopeptide transporter as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro; Barca, Amilcare; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    Human genes for passive, ion-coupled transporters and exchangers are included in the so-called solute carrier (SLC) gene series, to date consisting of 52 families and 398 genes. Teleost fish genes for SLC proteins have also been described in the last two decades, and catalogued in preliminary SLC-like form in 50 families and at least 338 genes after systematic GenBank database mining (December 2010–March 2011). When the kinetic properties of the expressed proteins are studied in detail, teleost fish SLC transporters always reveal extraordinary ‘molecular diversity’ with respect to the mammalian counterparts, which reflects peculiar adaptation of the protein to the physiology of the species and/or to the environment where the species lives. In the case of the H+–oligopeptide transporter PEPT1(SLC15A1), comparative analysis of diverse teleost fish orthologs has shown that the protein may exhibit very eccentric properties in terms of pH dependence (e.g. the adaptation of zebrafish PEPT1 to alkaline pH), temperature dependence (e.g. the adaptation of icefish PEPT1 to sub-zero temperatures) and/or substrate specificity (e.g. the species-specificity of PEPT1 for the uptake of l-lysine-containing peptides). The revelation of such peculiarities is providing new contributions to the discussion on PEPT1 in both basic (e.g. molecular structure–function analyses) and applied research (e.g. optimizing diets to enhance growth of commercially valuable fish). PMID:23981715

  7. Protein hydrolysate-induced cholecystokinin secretion from enteroendocrine cells is indirectly mediated by the intestinal oligopeptide transporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Liou, Alice P; Chavez, Diana I; Espero, Elvis; Hao, Shuzhen; Wank, Stephen A; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-01

    Dietary protein is a major stimulant for cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion by the intestinal I cell, however, the mechanism by which protein is detected is unknown. Indirect functional evidence suggests that PepT1 may play a role in CCK-mediated changes in gastric motor function. However, it is unclear whether this oligopeptide transporter directly or indirectly activates the I cell. Using both the CCK-expressing enteroendocrine STC-1 cell and acutely isolated native I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mice, we aimed to determine whether PepT1 directly activates the enteroendocrine cell to elicit CCK secretion in response to oligopeptides. Both STC-1 cells and isolated CCK-eGFP cells expressed PepT1 transcripts. STC-1 cells were activated, as measured by ERK(1/2) phosphorylation, by both peptone and the PepT1 substrate Cefaclor; however, the PepT1 inhibitor 4-aminomethyl benzoic acid (AMBA) had no effect on STC-1 cell activity. The PepT1-transportable substrate glycyl-sarcosine dose-dependently decreased gastric motility in anesthetized rats but had no affect on activation of STC-1 cells or on CCK secretion by CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion was significantly increased in response to peptone but not to Cefaclor, cephalexin, or Phe-Ala in CCK-eGFP cells. Taken together, the data suggest that PepT1 does not directly mediate CCK secretion in response to PepT1 specific substrates. PepT1, instead, may have an indirect role in protein sensing in the intestine.

  8. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Roy, Partha; Kim, Dokyun; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Hagai; Naaman, Ron

    2016-04-13

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles' (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100-200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated.

  9. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter 1 plays a major role in the intestinal permeability and absorption of 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yehua; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has been widely used in photodynamic therapy and immunofluorescence of tumours. In the present study, the intestinal permeability and oral pharmacokinetics of 5-ALA were evaluated to probe the contribution of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) to the oral absorption and systemic exposure of this substrate. In situ single-pass intestinal perfusions and in vivo oral pharmacokinetic studies were performed in wildtype and Pept1 knockout mice. Perfusion studies were performed as a function of concentration dependence, specificity and permeability of 5-ALA in different intestinal segments. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed after 0.2 and 2.0 μmoL·g(-1) doses of 5-ALA. The permeability of 5-ALA was substantial in duodenal, jejunal and ileal regions of wildtype mice, but the residual permeability of 5-ALA in the small intestine from Pept1 knockout mice was only about 10% of that in wildtype animals. The permeability of 5-ALA in jejunum was specific for PEPT1 with no apparent contribution of other transporters, including the proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1). After oral dosing, the systemic exposure of 5-ALA was reduced by about twofold during PEPT1 ablation, and the pharmacokinetics were dose-proportional after the 0.2 and 2.0 µmol·g(-1) doses. PEPT1 had a minor effect on the disposition and peripheral tissue distribution of 5-ALA. Our findings suggested a major role of PEPT1 in the intestinal permeability and oral absorption of 5-ALA. In contrast, another proton-coupled transporter, PAT1, appeared to play a limited role, at best. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Molecular cloning, distribution and ontogenetic expression of the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 mRNA in Tibetan suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wence; Shi, Changyou; Zhang, Jianshe; Gu, Wanting; Li, Tiejun; Gen, Meimei; Chu, Wuying; Huang, Ruilin; Liu, Yulan; Hou, Yongqing; Li, Peng; Yin, Yulong

    2009-10-01

    The gene encoding the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 (HGMW-approved gene symbol SLC15A1) from Tibetan porcine intestine was cloned. The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes 708 deduced amino acid residues that show high sequence similarity with its ovine and bovine counterparts. The putative protein has 12 putative transmembrane domains, including many structural features that are highly conserved among the vertebrate orthologs. PepT1 mRNA expression can be detected in duodenum, jejunum and ileum from Tibetan pigs at 28 days by RT-PCR. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the jejunum had the highest expression of PepT1 when compared with the duodenum and ileum. PepT1 mRNA expression in the duodenum and proximal jejunum increases continuously from day 1 to day 14: expression was highest at day14 (P < 0.01) and then decreased gradually from day 21 to day 35. Our findings show that PepT1 mRNA expression in the distal jejunum increased gradually with age in suckling Tibetan piglet, and this may have important implications for amino acid and protein nutrition in young animals.

  11. [Oligopeptides in plant medicines cited in Chinese Pharmacopoeia].

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Jiang, Yan-Yan; Liu, Bin

    2016-08-01

    In total, 23 plant plant medicined containing oligopeptides were cited in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (1 part) of 2015 version including Rubia cordifolia, Linum usitatissimum, Aster tataricus, Psammosilene tunicoides, Pseudostellaria heterophylla, Stellaria dichotoma, Vaccaria segetalis, Dianthus superbus, Celosia argentea, Lycii Cortex, Citrus medica, C. aurantium, Panax ginseng, Parmx notoginseng, Schisandra chinensis, Sparganium stoloniferum, Euryale ferox, Ophiopogon japonicas, Pinellia ternate, Achyranthes bidentata, Physalis alkekengi, Polygonatum odoratum, and Leonuri Fructus. There were 187 oligopeptides in plant medicines above as reported. Oligopeptides consisted mainly of linear peptides and cyclic peptides. The linear peptides included dipeptides, tripeptides and pentapeptides, and cyclic peptides included cyclic, bicyclic and tricyclic peptides. The number of residues of single cyclic peptides ranged from two to twelve. Bicyclic peptides were isolated mainly from R. cordifolia and C. argentea. Modern pharmacological study showed that oligopeptides had many pharmacological effects, including antitumor, anticoagulant, antibacterial, immune suppression and so on. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. Expression of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POTs) in prostate of mice and patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa).

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongli; Tan, Fuqing; Fang, Danbo; Wang, Yuqing; Zeng, Su; Jiang, Huidi

    2013-02-15

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) serve as integral membrane protein for the cellular uptake of di/tripeptide. Prostate has a large requirement of nutriment for its function to produce and secrete prostatic fluid. Besides, prostate suffered from limited therapy effect of drug treatment. Thus present study was performed to evaluate the expression of POTs in prostate of mice and human with the aim to provide information for potential role of POTs in absorption of nutriment and peptidomimetic drugs in prostate. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot methods were applied to study the mRNA, protein expression of POTs in prostate, human prostate cancer cells (PC-3), and human prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). qRT-PCR study showed different characteristic of POTs mRNA expression in mouse prostate. Among these transporters, protein expression of PepT2 was detected and increasing during the development of mouse prostate, while PepT1, PHT1, and PHT2 protein was not detected. Furthermore, different characteristic of regulation by inflammation on POTs mRNA expression was found in RWPE-1 and PC-3. In addition, mRNA expression of PepT2 and PHT1 in prostate of patients with PCa was demonstrated be lower compared with BPH. These findings provide the first evidence for the expression of POTs in prostate of mice and patients with BPH or PCa and suggest that POTs are likely to play a role in the transport of di/tripeptides and peptidomimetics in prostate. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A novel pineal-specific product of the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 gene: circadian expression mediated by cAMP activation of an intronic promoter.

    PubMed

    Gaildrat, Pascaline; Møller, Morten; Mukda, Sujira; Humphries, Ann; Carter, David A; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Klein, David C

    2005-04-29

    The oligopeptide transporter 1, PepT1, is a member of the Slc15 family of 12 membrane-spanning domain transporters; PepT1 has proton/peptide cotransport activity and is selectively expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it is responsible for the nutritional absorption of di- and tri-peptides. Here, a novel PepT1 gene product has been identified in the rat pineal gland, termed pgPepT1. It encodes a 150-amino acid protein encompassing the C-terminal 3 membrane-spanning domains of intestinal PepT1 protein, with 3 additional N-terminal residues. Expression of pgPepT1 appears to be restricted to the pineal gland and follows a marked circadian pattern with >100-fold higher levels of mRNA occurring at night; this is accompanied by an accumulation of membrane-associated pgPepT1 protein ( approximately 16 kDa). The daily rhythm in pgPepT1 mRNA is regulated by the well described neural pathway that controls pineal melatonin production. This includes the retina, the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, central structures, and projections from the superior cervical ganglia; activation of this pathway results in the release of norepinephrine. Here it was found that pgPepT1 expression is mediated by a norepinephrine-->cyclic AMP mechanism that activates an alternative promoter located in intron 20 of the gene. pgPepT1 protein was found to have transporter-modulator activity; it could contribute to circadian changes in pineal function through this mechanism.

  14. Surface state transport suppression in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, Anjan A.; Tian, Y.; Pohl, G.; Kivlichan, I. D.; Zhao, S. Y. Frank; Kim, Y.-J.; Jia, S.; Cava, R. J.; Kwok, D. C.; Lee, N.; Cheong, S. W.; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2013-03-01

    An unresolved question in experimental research on topological insulators (TI) is the suppression mechanism of a TI's surface state transport. While room temperature ARPES studies reveal clear evidence of surface states, their observation in transport measurements is limited to low temperatures. A better understanding of this suppression is of fundamental interest, and crucial for pushing the boundary of device applications towards room-temperature operation. In this talk, we report the temperature dependent optical properties of the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS), obtained by infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, probing surface and bulk states simultaneously. We see clear evidence of coherent surface state transport at low temperature and find that electron-phonon coupling causes the gradual suppression of surface state transport as temperature rises to 43K. In the bulk, electron-phonon coupling enables the emergence of an indirect band gap transition, which peaks at 43K, and is limited by thermal ionization of the bulk valance band above 43K. For comparison with other resistive TIs, we also discuss the optical properties to BiSbSe2Te. Financially supported by NSERC CRSNG, Ontario Research Fund, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds, NSF

  15. Optimization of human nasal epithelium primary culture conditions for optimal proton oligopeptide and organic cation transporters expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shao, Di; Massoud, Emad; Clarke, David; Cowley, Elizabeth; Renton, Ken; Agu, Remigius U

    2013-01-30

    To investigate the effect of key tissue culture conditions on cell growth, gene expression and functional uptake of peptide and organic cation transporter substrates in the human nasal epithelium (HNE). HNE were cultured on different growth surfaces (polystyrene plastic, collagen film, and hydrated collagen gel) and were maintained with three popular nasal tissue culture media supplements [DMEM/F12 supplemented with Ultroser(®) G (2%), FBS (10%) and NuSerum(®) (10%)], respectively. The expression of gene transcripts for organic cation and peptide transporters were screened using qPCR and substrate uptake studies. Cell growth surface (polystyrene plastic surface, dried collagen film and hydrated collagen gel) did not significantly alter gene expression levels. However, Ultroser(®) G and FBS caused significant increase in PEPT1, PEPT2, PHT1, OCT3, and OCTN1 levels (~/=2-5-fold for FBS and 2-8-fold for Ultroser(®) G). In terms of the degree to which the supplements affected gene expression, the following observations were made: effect on OCTN1>PEPT2>OCT3>PHT1>PEPT1. Functional uptake of organic cation (4-Di-1-ASP) and peptide [β-Ala-Lys (AMCA)] transporter substrates was significantly lower in cells cultured with NuSerum(®) compared to Ultroser(®) G and FBS cultured cells (p>0.05). Tissue culture media had a major effect on SLC gene expression levels of the human nasal epithelium in primary culture. Ultroser(®) G was identified as the most efficient culture supplement in maintaining SLC transporter expression under most culture conditions, whereas FBS appears to be an economical choice. We do not recommend the use of NuSerum(®) as a supplement for growing HNE for transport studies involving SLC transporters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural model and ligand interactions of the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri oligopeptide-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Moutran, A; Balan, A; Ferreira, L C S; Giorgetti, A; Tramontano, A; Ferreira, R C C

    2007-12-11

    The oligopeptide-binding protein, OppA, ushers oligopeptide substrates to the membrane-associated oligopeptide permease (Opp), a multi-component ABC-type transporter involved in the uptake of oligopeptides by several bacterial species. In the present study, we report a structural model and an oligopeptide docking analysis of the OppA protein expressed by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri), the etiological agent of citrus canker. The X. citri OppA structural model showed a conserved three-dimensional structure, irrespective of the low amino acid identities with previously defined structures of Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium orthologs. Oligopeptide docking analysis carried out with the proposed model indicated that the X. citri OppA preferentially binds tri- and tetrapeptides. The present study represents the first structural analysis of an OppA ortholog expressed by a phytopathogen and contributes to the understanding of the physiology and nutritional strategies of X. citri.

  17. Stoichiometry and pH dependence of the rabbit proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, A; Nussberger, S; Romero, M F; Boron, W F; Boyd, C A; Hediger, M A

    1997-01-01

    1. The intestinal H(+)-coupled peptide transporter PepT1, displays a broad substrate specificity and accepts most charged and neutral di- and tripeptides. To study the proton-to-peptide stoichiometry and the dependence of the kinetic parameters on extracellular pH (pHo), rabbit PepT1 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and used for uptake studies of radiolabelled neutral and charged dipeptides, voltage-clamp analysis and intracellular pH measurements. 2. PepT1 did not display the substrate-gated anion conductances that have been found to be characteristic of members of the Na(+)- and H(+)-coupled high-affinity glutamate transporter family. In conjunction with previous data on the ion dependence of PepT1, it can therefore be concluded that peptide-evoked charge fluxes of PepT1 are entirely due to H+ movement. 3. Neutral, acidic and basic dipeptides induced intracellular acidification. The rate of acidification, the initial rates of the uptake of radiolabelled peptides and the associated charge fluxes gave proton-substrate coupling ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 1:1 for neutral, acidic and basic dipeptides, respectively. 4. Maximal transport of the neutral and charged dipeptides Gly-Leu, Gly-Glu, Gly-Lys and Ala-Lys occurred at pHo 5.5, 5.2, 6.2 and 5.8, respectively. The Imax values were relatively pHo independent but the apparent affinity (Km(app) values for these peptides were shown to be highly pHo dependent. 5. Our data show that at physiological pH (pHo 5.5-6.0) PepT1 prefers neutral and acidic peptides. The shift in transport maximum for the acidic peptide Gly-Glu to a lower pH value suggests that acidic dipeptides are transported in the protonated form. The shift in the transport maxima of the basic dipeptides to higher pH values may involve titration of a side-chain on the transporter molecule (e.g. protonation of a histidine group). These considerations have led us to propose a model for coupled transport of neutral, acidic and basic dipeptides. Images Figure 3

  18. The specificity of oligopeptide transport by Streptococcus thermophilus resembles that of Lactococcus lactis and not that of pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Juille, Odile; Le Bars, Dominique; Juillard, Vincent

    2005-06-01

    Peptide transport is a crucial step in the growth of Streptococcus thermophilus in protein- or peptide-containing media. The objective of the present work was to determine the specificity of peptide utilization by this widely used lactic acid bacterium. To reach that goal, complementary approaches were employed. The capability of a proteinase-negative S. thermophilus strain to grow in a chemically defined medium containing a mixture of peptides isolated from milk as the source of amino acids was analysed. Peptides were separated into three size classes by ultrafiltration. The strain was able to use peptides up to 3.5 kDa during growth, as revealed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses. The same strain was grown in chemically defined medium containing a tryptic digest of casein, and the respective time-course consumption of the peptides during growth was estimated. The ability to consume large peptides (up to 23 residues) was confirmed, as long as they are cationic and hydrophobic. These results were confirmed by peptide transport studies. Extension of the study to 11 other strains revealed that they all shared these preferences.

  19. Effects of fasting and refeeding on gene expression of slc15a1a, a gene encoding an oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), in the intestine of Mozambique tilapia.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Zenith Gaye A; Soma, Satoshi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Watanabe, Soichi

    2017-01-01

    The tissue distribution of slc15a1a, a gene that encodes an oligopeptide transporter, PepT1, and its response to fasting and refeeding were investigated in the intestinal epithelium of Mozambique tilapia for a better understanding of its role on nutrient absorption. The slc15a1a was predominantly expressed in the absorptive epithelia of the anterior part of the intestine, suggesting that digested oligopeptides are primarily absorbed in the anterior intestine. The response of slc15a1a to fasting was evaluated at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 14days after the last feeding. Fasting revealed a biphasic effect, where short-term fasting significantly upregulated slc15a1a expression and long-term fasting resulted in downregulation. The expression level continued to decrease and fell below the pre-fasted level from day 4 to 14. Proximal (the hepatic loop, HL) and distal parts (the proximal major coil, PMC) of the anterior intestine showed different magnitudes of responses to fasting; slc15a1a expression in the PMC showed greater upregulation and downregulation than that in the HL. Refeeding significantly stimulated slc15a1a expression at day 3, although the expression did not exceed the pre-fasted level. Observed responses of slc15a1a to fasting and refeeding suggest that the expression level of this gene can serve as a sensitive indicator of the changes that may occur in altering nutritional conditions. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the role of PepT1 in nutrition and of the complex mechanisms underlying the absorption of oligopeptides and amino acids in the intestine, and may lead to development of possible means to manipulate the absorption processes for the improvement of growth and other metabolic and physiological conditions in fish. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  1. TcOPT3, a Member of Oligopeptide Transporters from the Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens, Is a Novel Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi Ting; Ming, Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Yan, Jing Ying; Xu, Zheng Yu; Li, Gui Xin; Xu, Chun Yan; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Thlaspi caerulescens is a natural selected heavy metal hyperaccumulator that can not only tolerate but also accumulate extremely high levels of heavy metals in the shoots. Thus, to identify the transportors involved in metal long-distance transportation is very important for understanding the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation in this hyperaccumulator. Methodology/Principal Findings We cloned and characterized a novel gene TcOPT3 of OPT family from T. caerulescens. TcOPT3 was pronouncedly expressed in aerial parts, including stem and leaf. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that TcOPT3 expressed in the plant vascular systems, especially in the pericycle cells that may be involved in the long-distance transportation. The expression of TcOPT3 was highly induced by iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiency, especially in the stem and leaf. Sub-cellular localization showed that TcOPT3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Furthermore, heterogonous expression of TcOPT3 by mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) complementation experiments demonstrated that TcOPT3 could transport Fe2+ and Zn2+. Moreover, expression of TcOPT3 in yeast increased metal (Fe, Zn, Cu and Cd) accumulation and resulted in an increased sensitivity to cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Conclusions Our data demonstrated that TcOPT3 might encode an Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu influx transporter with broad-substrate. This is the first report showing that TcOPT3 may be involved in metal long-distance transportation and contribute to the heavy metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:22761683

  2. TcOPT3, a member of oligopeptide transporters from the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens, is a novel Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu transporter.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi Ting; Ming, Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Yan, Jing Ying; Xu, Zheng Yu; Li, Gui Xin; Xu, Chun Yan; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens is a natural selected heavy metal hyperaccumulator that can not only tolerate but also accumulate extremely high levels of heavy metals in the shoots. Thus, to identify the transportors involved in metal long-distance transportation is very important for understanding the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation in this hyperaccumulator. We cloned and characterized a novel gene TcOPT3 of OPT family from T. caerulescens. TcOPT3 was pronouncedly expressed in aerial parts, including stem and leaf. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that TcOPT3 expressed in the plant vascular systems, especially in the pericycle cells that may be involved in the long-distance transportation. The expression of TcOPT3 was highly induced by iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiency, especially in the stem and leaf. Sub-cellular localization showed that TcOPT3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Furthermore, heterogonous expression of TcOPT3 by mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) complementation experiments demonstrated that TcOPT3 could transport Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). Moreover, expression of TcOPT3 in yeast increased metal (Fe, Zn, Cu and Cd) accumulation and resulted in an increased sensitivity to cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Our data demonstrated that TcOPT3 might encode an Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu influx transporter with broad-substrate. This is the first report showing that TcOPT3 may be involved in metal long-distance transportation and contribute to the heavy metal hyperaccumulation.

  3. Prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy in vitro using anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide carried by atelocollagen.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maeda, Tasuku; Haruna, Marie; Shiota, Chieko; Ochi, Arisa; Abe, Tomoki; Kohno, Shohei; Ohno, Ayako; Teshima-Kondo, Sigetada; Mori, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Eiji; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs when the rate of protein degradation exceeds that of protein synthesis in various catabolic conditions, such as fasting, disuse, aging, and chronic diseases. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling stimulates muscle growth and suppresses muscle protein breakdown. In atrophied muscles, ubiquitin ligase, Cbl-b, increases and stimulates the ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an intermediate in IGF-1 signaling pathway, resulting in IGF-1 resistance. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of atelocollagen (ATCOL)-transported anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide (Cblin: Cbl-b inhibitor) (consisting of tyrosine phosphorylation domain of IRS-1) in starved C2C12 myotubes. The amount of IRS-1 protein was lower in starved versus unstarved myotubes. The Cblin-ATCOL complex inhibited IRS-1 degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. Myotubes incubated with Cblin-ATCOL complex showed significant resistance to starvation-induced atrophy (p<0.01). Furthermore, the Cblin-ATCOL complex significantly inhibited any decrease in Akt phosphorylation (p<0.01) and localization of FOXO3a to the nucleus in starved myotubes. These results suggest that Cblin prevented starvation-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy by maintaining the IGF-1/Akt/FOXO signaling. Therefore, attachment of anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide, Cblin, to ATCOL enhances its delivery to myotubes and could be a potentially effective strategy in the treatment of atrophic myopathies.

  4. Oligopeptides of Chorionic Gonadotropin β-Subunit in Induction of T Cell Differentiation into Treg and Th17.

    PubMed

    Zamorina, S A; Shirshev, S V

    2015-11-01

    The role of oligopeptides of chorionic gonadotropin β-subunit (LQGV, AQGV, and VLPALP) in induction of differentiation into T-regulatory lymphocytes (Treg) and IL-17-producing lymphocytes (Th17) was studied in an in vitro system. Chorionic gonadotropin and oligopeptides promoted CD4(+) cell differentiation into functionally active Treg (FOXP3(+)GITR(+) and FOXP3(+)CTLA-4(+)), while chorionic gonadotropin and AQGV additionally stimulated IL-10 production by these cells. In parallel, chorionic gonadotropin and oligopeptides prevented CD4(+) cell differentiation into Th17 lymphocytes (ROR-gt(+)IL-17A(+)) and suppressed IL-17A secretion. Hence, oligopeptides of chorionic gonadotropin β-subunit promoted differentiation of CD4(+) cells into Treg and, in parallel, suppress Th17 induction, thus virtually completely reproducing the effects of the hormone, which opens new vista for their use in clinical practice.

  5. Divergent Developmental Expression and Function of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporters PepT2 and PhT1 in Regional Brain Slices of Mouse and Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongjun; Xie, Yehua; Keep, Richard F.; Smith, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the developmental gene and protein expression of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs: PepT1, PepT2, PhT1 and PhT2) in different regions of rodent brain, and the age-dependent uptake of a POT substrate, glycylsarcosine, in brain slices. Slices were obtained from cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hypothalamus of wildtype and PepT2 null mice, and from rats at different ages. Gene and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. Brain slice uptakes of radiolabeled glycylsarcosine were determined in the absence and presence of excess unlabeled glycylsarcosine or L-histidine, the latter being an inhibitor of PhT1/2 but not PepT1/2. Whereas PepT2 and PhT1 transcripts were abundantly expressed in all three regions of mouse brain, little to no expression was observed for PepT1 and PhT2. PhT1 protein was present in brain regions of adult but not neonatal mice and expression levels increased with age in rats. Glycylsarcosine uptake, inhibition and transporter dominance did not show regional brain or species differences. However, there were clear age-related differences in functional activity, with PepT2 dominating in neonatal mice and rats, and PhT1 dominating in adult rodents. These developmental changes may markedly impact the neural activity of both endogenous and exogenous (drug) peptides/mimetics. PMID:24548120

  6. Collective microdynamics and noise suppression in dispersive electron beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, Avraham; Dyunin, Egor; Duchovni, Tamir; Nause, Ariel

    2011-12-15

    A general formulation is presented for deep collective interaction micro-dynamics in dispersive e-beam transport. In the regime of transversely coherent interaction, the formulation is applicable to both coherent and random temporal modulation of the electron beam. We demonstrate its use for determining the conditions for suppressing beam current noise below the classical shot-noise level by means of transport through a dispersive section with a small momentum compaction parameter.

  7. Suppression of Phonon Transport in Molecular Christmas Trees.

    PubMed

    Famili, Marjan; Grace, Iain; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, Colin J

    2017-05-19

    Minimising the phonon thermal conductance of self-assembled molecular films, whilst preserving their electrical properties, is highly desirable, both for thermal management at the nanoscale and for the design of high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Here we highlight a new strategy for minimising the phonon thermal conductance of Christmas-tree-like molecules composed of a long trunk, along which phonons can propagate, attached to pendant molecular branches. We demonstrate that phonon transport along the trunk is suppressed by Fano resonances associated with internal vibrational modes of the branches and that thermal conductance is suppressed most-effectively in molecules with pendant branches of different lengths. As examples, we use density functional theory to demonstrate the reduction in phonon transport in tree-like molecules formed from alkane or acene trunks with various pendant branches. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Production of the refolded oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) encoded by the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, A; Ferreira, R C C; Ferreira, L C S

    2008-02-01

    The oligopeptide-binding protein, OppA, binds and ushers oligopeptide substrates to the membrane-associated oligopeptide permease (Opp), a multi-component ABC-type transporter involved in the uptake of oligopeptides expressed by several bacterial species. In the present study, we report the cloning, purification, refolding and conformational analysis of a recombinant OppA protein derived from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri), the etiological agent of citrus canker. The oppA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain under optimized inducing conditions and the recombinant protein remained largely insoluble. Solubilization was achieved following refolding of the denatured protein. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that the recombinant OppA protein preserved conformational features of orthologs expressed by other bacterial species. The refolded recombinant OppA represents a useful tool for structural and functional analyses of the X. citri protein.

  9. Enhancing biocompatibility of D-oligopeptide hydrogels by negative charges.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Twomey, Julianne D; Vogel, Savannah; Hsieh, Adam H; Yu, Y Bruce

    2013-02-11

    Oligopeptide hydrogels are emerging as useful matrices for cell culture with commercial products on the market, but L-oligopeptides are labile to proteases. An obvious solution is to create D-oligopeptide hydrogels, which lack enzymatic recognition. However, D-oligopeptide matrices do not support cell growth as well as L-oligopeptide matrices. In addition to chiral interactions, many cellular activities are strongly governed by charge-charge interactions. In this work, the effects of chirality and charge on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior were studied using hydrogels assembled from oppositely charged oligopeptides. It was found that negative charges significantly improved hMSC viability and proliferation in D-oligopeptide gels but had little effect on their interactions with L-oligopeptide gels. This result points to the possibility of using charge and other factors to engineer biomaterials whose chirality is distinct from that of natural biomaterials, but whose performance is close to that of natural biomaterials.

  10. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  11. Targeting glutamine transport to suppress melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Otte, Nicholas J; Font, Josep; Bailey, Charles G; van Geldermalsen, Michelle; Sharp, Danae M; Tiffen, Jessamy C; Ryan, Renae M; Jormakka, Mika; Haass, Nikolas K; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine and glutamine, are important for tumor cell growth, survival and metabolism. A range of different transporters deliver each specific amino acid into cells, some of which are increased in cancer. These amino acids consequently activate the mTORC1 pathway and drive cell cycle progression. The leucine transporter LAT1/4F2hc heterodimer assembles as part of a large complex with the glutamine transporter ASCT2 to transport amino acids. In this study, we show that the expression of LAT1 and ASCT2 is significantly increased in human melanoma samples and is present in both BRAF(WT) (C8161 and WM852) and BRAF(V600E) mutant (1205Lu and 451Lu) melanoma cell lines. While inhibition of LAT1 by BCH did not suppress melanoma cell growth, the ASCT2 inhibitor BenSer significantly reduced both leucine and glutamine transport in melanoma cells, leading to inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. Cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were significantly reduced in the presence of BenSer in melanoma cells in 2D and 3D cell culture. This included reduced expression of the cell cycle regulators CDK1 and UBE2C. The importance of ASCT2 expression in melanoma was confirmed by shRNA knockdown, which inhibited glutamine uptake, mTORC1 signaling and cell proliferation. Taken together, our study demonstrates that ASCT2-mediated glutamine transport is a potential therapeutic target for both BRAF(WT) and BRAF(V600E) melanoma.

  12. The Ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 is essential for oligopeptide utilization in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kenji; Nakase, Mai; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-03-01

    Uptake of extracellular oligopeptides in yeast is mediated mainly by specific transporters of the peptide transporter (PTR) and oligopeptide transporter (OPT) families. Here, we investigated the role of potential peptide transporters in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Utilization of naturally occurring dipeptides required only Ptr2/SPBC13A2.04c and none of the other 3 OPT proteins (Isp4, Pgt1, and Opt3), whereas only Isp4 was indispensable for tetrapeptide utilization. Both Ptr2 and Isp4 localized to the cell surface, but under rich nutrient conditions Isp4 localized in the Golgi apparatus through the function of the ubiquitin ligase Pub1. Furthermore, the ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 played a significant role in oligopeptide utilization. The mRNA levels of both the ptr2 and isp4 genes were significantly reduced in ubr11Δ cells, and the dipeptide utilization defect in the ubr11Δ mutant was rescued by the forced expression of Ptr2. Consistent with its role in transcriptional regulation of peptide transporter genes, the Ubr11 protein was accumulated in the nucleus. Unlike the situation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oligopeptide utilization defect in the S. pombe ubr11Δ mutant was not rescued by inactivation of the Tup11/12 transcriptional corepressors, suggesting that the requirement for the Ubr ubiquitin ligase in the upregulation of peptide transporter mRNA levels is conserved in both yeasts; however, the actual mechanism underlying the control appears to be different. We also found that the peptidomimetic proteasome inhibitor MG132 was still operative in a strain lacking all known PTR and OPT peptide transporters. Therefore, irrespective of its peptide-like structure, MG132 is carried into cells independently of the representative peptide transporters.

  13. A toolbox of oligopeptide-modified polymers for tailored elastomers.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Liang, Su; Schweizer, Thomas; Balog, Sandor; Mionić, Marijana; Snellings, Ruben; Cugnoni, Joël; Michaud, Véronique; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-09-08

    Biomaterials are constructed from limited sets of building blocks but exhibit extraordinary and versatile properties, because hierarchical structure formation lets them employ identical supramolecular motifs for different purposes. Here we exert a similar degree of structural control in synthetic supramolecular elastomers and thus tailor them for a broad range of thermomechanical properties. We show that oligopeptide-terminated polymers selectively self-assemble into small aggregates or nanofibrils, depending on the length of the oligopeptides. This process is self-sorting if differently long oligopeptides are combined so that different nanostructures coexist in bulk mixtures. Blends of polymers with oligopeptides matching in length furnish reinforced elastomers that exhibit shear moduli one order of magnitude higher than the parent polymers. By contrast, novel interpenetrating supramolecular networks that display excellent vibration damping properties are obtained from blends comprising non-matching oligopeptides or unmodified polymers. Hence, blends of oligopeptide-modified polymers constitute a toolbox for tailored elastomers with versatile properties.

  14. Insulin complexes with PEGylated basic oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Sideratou, Zili; Sterioti, Nikoletta; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Nounesis, George; Paleos, Constantinos M

    2012-10-15

    Biodegradable oligolysine and oligoarginine-type homopeptides functionalized with PEG of two different molecular weights interact with insulin, at physiological pH, affording complexes studied by dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential, circular dichroism, FTIR spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). High levels of insulin complexation efficiencies (>99.5%) were determined for all derivatives. FTIR spectra suggest that the positively charged homo-oligopeptide derivatives interact with B chain C-terminus of insulin leading to the formation of nanoparticles than can be traced even at low oligopeptide/insulin molar ratios. The ITC profiles are complex, displaying significant endothermic and exothermic contributions. Oligoarginine-type derivatives exhibit the strongest interactions, while PEGylation of either oligopeptide with the high molecular weight chains significantly affects the ITC profiles and leads to larger enthalpy changes. This may be attributed to PEG-induced aggregation of insulin due to the depletion attraction effect leading to the formation of stable nanocomplexes. Stabilization of complexed insulin against enzymatic degradation by trypsin and α-chymotrypsin is observed especially for the high molecular weight PEGylated arginine-based derivative. Insulin release rates in simulated intestinal fluid are controlled by the length of PEG chains and the presence of arginine end-groups. Released insulin retains its secondary structure as established by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  15. Effects of chain length on oligopeptide hydrogelation

    PubMed Central

    Taraban, Marc B.; Ramachandran, Sivakumar; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The co-assembly of mutually complementary, but self-repulsive oligopeptide pairs into viscoelastic hydrogels has been studied. Oligopeptides of 6, 10, and 14 amino acid residues were used to investigate the effects of peptide chain length on the structural and mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogels. Biophysical characterizations, including dynamic rheometry, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fluorescence spectroscopy, were used to investigate hydrogelation at the bulk, fiber, and molecular levels, respectively. Upon mixing, the 10-mer peptides and the 14-mer peptides both form hydrogels while the 6-mer peptides do not. SAXS studies point to morphological similarity of the cross-sections of fibers underlying the 10:10 and 14:14 gels. However, fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest tighter packing of the amino acid side chains in the 10:10 fibers. Consistent with this tighter packing, dynamic rheometry data show that the 10:10 gel has much higher elastic modulus than the 14:14 mer (18 kPa vs. 0.1 kPa). Therefore, from the standpoint of mechanical strength, the optimum peptide chain length for this class of oligopeptide-based hydrogels is around 10 amino acid residues. PMID:22287980

  16. Nonequilibrium Self-Assembly of π-Conjugated Oligopeptides in Solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Songsong; Zhou, Yuecheng; Ardoña, Herdeline Ann M; Valverde, Lawrence R; Wilson, William L; Tovar, John D; Schroeder, Charles M

    2017-02-01

    Supramolecular assembly is a powerful method that can be used to generate materials with well-defined structures across multiple length scales. Supramolecular assemblies consisting of biopolymer-synthetic polymer subunits are specifically known to exhibit exceptional structural and functional diversity as well as programmable control of noncovalent interactions through hydrogen bonding in biopolymer subunits. Despite recent progress, there is a need to control and quantitatively understand assembly under nonequilibrium conditions. In this work, we study the nonequilibrium self-assembly of π-conjugated synthetic oligopeptides using a combination of experiments and analytical modeling. By isolating an aqueous peptide solution droplet within an immiscible organic layer, the rate of peptide assembly in the aqueous solution can be controlled by tuning the transport rate of acid that is used to trigger assembly. Using this approach, peptides are guided to assemble under reaction-dominated and diffusion-dominated conditions, with results showing a transition from a diffusion-limited reaction front to spatially homogeneous assembly as the transport rate of acid decreases. Interestingly, our results show that the morphology of self-assembled peptide fibers is controlled by the assembly kinetics such that increasingly homogeneous structures of self-assembled synthetic oligopeptides were generally obtained using slower rates of assembly. We further developed an analytical reaction-diffusion model to describe oligopeptide assembly, and experimental results are compared to the reaction-diffusion model across a range of parameters. Overall, this work highlights the importance of molecular self-assembly under nonequilibrium conditions, specifically showing that oligopeptide assembly is governed by a delicate balance between reaction kinetics and transport processes.

  17. Structural-functional diversity of the natural oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zamyatnin, Alexander A

    2017-09-30

    Natural oligopeptides may regulate nearly all vital processes. To date, the chemical structures of many oligopeptides have been identified from >2000 organisms representing all the biological kingdoms. We have considered a number of mathematical (sequence length), chemical, physical, and biological features of an array of natural oligopeptides on the basis of the oligopeptide EROP-Moscow database (http://erop.inbi.ras.ru, 15,351 entries) data. There is the substantial difference of these substances from polypeptide molecules of proteins according to their physicochemical characteristics. These characteristics may be critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the action of oligopeptides that lead to the development of physiological effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Non-Statistical Oligopeptide Fragmentation by IR Photons with λ=16-18 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M.; Schmidt, Lothar

    2015-12-01

    In this article we analyse the vibration excitation and following dissociation of protonated oligopeptide molecules induced by IR photons with λ=16-18 μm. The analysis is based on our previous works in which we considered a specific non-statistical dissociation process in organic molecules containing substructures consisting of chained identical diatomic dipoles such as (CH2)n. Such dipole chains can serve as IR antennas for external radiation in the IR frequency range. The acquired vibration energy accumulated in IR antennas can be large enough to dissociate molecules within a femtosecond time interval by a non-statistical process, which is driven by a radiationless low-energy transport mechanism inside the peptide molecules. We point out in this article that the suggested IR-induced dissociation mechanism can be applied to obtain sequence information of protonated oligopeptides.

  19. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    PubMed

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions.

  20. Promising approaches to crystallization of macromolecules suppressing the convective mass transport to the growing crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, K. M.; Popov, V. O.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Conditions of mass transport to growing crystals are important factors that have an impact on the size and quality of macromolecular crystals. The mass transport occurs via two mechanisms — by diffusion and convection. The crystal quality can be influenced by changing (either suppressing or enhancing) the convective mass transport. The review gives an overview and analysis of the published data on different methods of macromolecular crystallization providing the suppression of convective mass transport to growing crystals in order to improve the crystal quality. The bibliography includes 91 references.

  1. A Highly Selective Oligopeptide Binding Protein from the Archaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gogliettino, M.; Balestrieri, M.; Pocsfalvi, G.; Fiume, I.; Natale, L.; Rossi, M.; Palmieri, G.

    2010-01-01

    SSO1273 of Sulfolobus solfataricus was identified as a cell surface-bound protein by a proteomics approach. Sequence inspection of the genome revealed that the open reading frame of sso1273 is associated in an operon-like structure with genes encoding all the remaining components of a canonical protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. sso1273 gene expression and SSO1273 protein accumulation on the cell surface were demonstrated to be strongly induced by the addition of a peptide mixture (tryptone) to the culture medium. The native protein was obtained in multimeric form, mostly hexameric, under the purification conditions used, and it was characterized as an oligopeptide binding protein, named S. solfataricus OppA (OppASs). OppaASs possesses typical sequence patterns required for glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchoring, resulting in an N-linked glycoprotein with carbohydrate moieties likely composed of high mannose and/or hybrid complex carbohydrates. OppASs specifically binds oligopeptides and shows a marked selectivity for the amino acid composition of substrates when assayed in complex peptide mixtures. Moreover, a truncated version of OppASs, produced in recombinant form and including the putative binding domain, showed a low but significant oligopeptide binding activity. PMID:20382765

  2. Black-tea polyphenols suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by suppressing lymphatic transport of dietary fat in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Ichitani, Masaki; Suzuki, Yuko; Unno, Tomonori; Sugawara, Takashi; Yamahira, Takashi; Kato, Masaki; Takihara, Takanobu; Sagesaka, Yuko; Kakuda, Takami; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2009-08-12

    Administration of black-tea polyphenols (BTP) at 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight in rats suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of BTP also suppressed lymphatic recovery of (14)C-trioleoylglycerol in rats that were cannulated in the thoracic duct. BTP dose-dependently inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase in vitro with an IC50 of 0.254 mg/mL. When purified theaflavins, which are components of BTP, were used, theaflavins with galloyl moieties, but not those without galloyl moiety, inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase. Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TFDG) was more effective in inhibiting the activity of pancreatic lipase than epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and a mixture of EGCG and ECG. BTP and TFDG had a similar effect in inhibiting the activity of pancreatic lipase when the total polyphenol amount was adjusted to the same. BTP had no effect on micellar solubility of hydrolysis products of triacylglycerol. These results suggest that BTP suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by reducing triacylglycerol absorption via the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity.

  3. Transepithelial Ion Transport is Suppressed in Hypoxic Sinonasal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Angela; Zhang, Shaoyan; Chestnut, Michael; Hixon, Brian; Skinner, Daniel; Sorscher, Eric J.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sinonasal respiratory epithelial mucociliary clearance (MCC) is dependent on the transepithelial transport of ions such as Cl−. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the role of oxygen restriction in 1) Cl− transport across primary sinonasal epithelial monolayers, 2) expression of the apical Cl− channels CFTR and TMEM16A, and 3) the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design In vitro investigation. Methods Murine nasal septal epithelial (MNSE, wild type) and human sinonasal epithelial (HSNE) cultures were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2, 5% CO2). Cultures were mounted in Ussing chambers for ion transport measurements. CFTR and TMEM16A expression were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results The change in short-circuit current (ΔISC (µA/cm2) attributable to CFTR (forskolin-stimulated) was significantly decreased due to a 12 hour hypoxia exposure in both MNSE (13.55+/− 0.46 vs. 19.23+/−0.18) and HSNE (19.55+/−0.56 vs. 25.49+/−1.48 (control); p<0.05. TMEM16A (UTP-stimulated transport) was inhibited by 48 hours of hypoxic exposure in MNSE (15.92+/−2.87 vs. 51.44+/−3.71(control) p<0.05] and by 12 hours of hypoxic exposure in HSNE (16.75+/−0.68 vs. 24.15+/−1.35 (control). Quantitative RT-PCR (reported as relative mRNA levels+/−S.D.) demonstrated significant reductions in both CFTR and TMEM16A mRNA expression in MNSE and HSNE due to airway epithelial hypoxia. Conclusions Sinonasal epithelial CFTR and TMEM16A-mediated Cl− transport and mRNA expression were robustly decreased in an oxygen restricted environment. The findings in the present study indicate persistent hypoxia may lead to acquired defects in sinonasal Cl− transport in a fashion likely to confer mucociliary dysfunction in CRS. Level of Evidence 1b PMID:22024847

  4. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  5. Suppression of mammalian bone growth by membrane transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loqman, Mohamad Y; Bush, Peter G; Farquharson, Colin; Hall, Andrew C

    2013-03-01

    Bone lengthening during skeletal growth is driven primarily by the controlled enlargement of growth plate (GP) chondrocytes. The cellular mechanisms are unclear but membrane transporters are probably involved. We investigated the role of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NHE1) and anion exchanger (AE2) in bone lengthening and GP chondrocyte hypertrophy in Sprague-Dawley 7-day-old rat (P7) bone rudiments using the inhibitors EIPA (5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride) and DIDS (4,4-diidothiocyano-2,2-stilbenedisulphonate), respectively. We have also determined cell-associated levels of these transporters along the GP using fluorescent immunohistochemistry (FIHC). Culture of bones with EIPA or DIDS inhibited rudiment growth (50% at approx. 250 and 25 µM, respectively). Both decreased the size of the hypertrophic zone (P < 0.05) but had no effect on overall length or cell density of the GP. In situ chondrocyte volume in proliferative and hypertrophic zones was decreased (P < 0.01) with EIPA but not DIDS. FIHC labeling of NHE1 was relatively high and constant along the GP but declined steeply in the late hypertrophic zone. In contrast, AE2 labeling was relatively low in proliferative zone cells but increased (P < 0.05) reaching a maximum in the early hypertrophic zone, before falling rapidly in the late hypertrophic zone suggesting AE2 might regulate the transition phase of chondrocytes between proliferative and hypertrophic zones. The inhibition of bone growth by EIPA may be due to a reduction to chondrocyte volume set-point. However the effect of DIDS was unclear but could result from inhibition of AE2 and blocking of the transition phase. These results demonstrate that NHE1 and AE2 are important regulators of bone growth. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Formation of oligopeptides in high yield under simple programmable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marc; Surman, Andrew J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Suárez-Marina, Irene; Hosni, Zied; Lee, Michael P.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Many high-yielding reactions for forming peptide bonds have been developed but these are complex, requiring activated amino-acid precursors and heterogeneous supports. Herein we demonstrate the programmable one-pot dehydration–hydration condensation of amino acids forming oligopeptide chains in around 50% yield. A digital recursive reactor system was developed to investigate this process, performing these reactions with control over parameters such as temperature, number of cycles, cycle duration, initial monomer concentration and initial pH. Glycine oligopeptides up to 20 amino acids long were formed with very high monomer-to-oligomer conversion, and the majority of these products comprised three amino acid residues or more. Having established the formation of glycine homo-oligopeptides, we then demonstrated the co-condensation of glycine with eight other amino acids (Ala, Asp, Glu, His, Lys, Pro, Thr and Val), incorporating a range of side-chain functionality. PMID:26442968

  7. [Theory study on glycine linear oligopeptide vibrational spectrum frequency shift].

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-Peng; Li, Xin; Yang, Meng-Shi; Chen, Liang; Xu, Can; Chu, Xiu-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    By using the density functional theory, glycine linear oligopeptide of different lengths was geometrically optimized on the 6-31G (d) basis set level, their growth processes were simulated, and the average binding energy and vibration frequency were calculated with geometry. The results showed that the average binding energies tend to change in a regular pattern and stabilize with the number of residues increasing; With the oligopeptide chain bond length analysis it was found that the chain to the radial direction there is a opposite trend for chain and radial direction, which is anisotropic. It was found by the IR spectrum analysis that red shifts and blue shifts occur respectively when the same group of peptide bond vibrate, which is anisotropic; These phenomena originate from that quasi one-dimensional nanostructures lead to the anisotropy of the bond length; the induced effects, coupling effects and hydrogen bonding etc. between the same groups lead to the vibration frequency red shifts and blue shifts. The authors conclude that the growth of glycine linear oligopeptide is conducive to stability of the structure, and the authors infer that the oligopeptide has the tendency of self-assembled growth; Through the conformation and spectrum, the authors infer that there is a size effect in physical and chemical properties. The physical and chemical properties of peptide chain end group are extremely stable and unaffected by the impact of the oligopeptide chain length The results are significant to measuring the length and the number of residue of peptide, and to manufacturing the special features oligopeptide chain.

  8. Oligopeptides as External Molecular Signals Affecting Growth and Death in Animal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, František

    Protein hydrolysates in the form of oligopeptides and free amino acids are widely used in animal cell culture for the production of therapeutic proteins. The primary function of protein hydrolysates is to provide nitrogen source and at the same they may increase cell density and higher yields of proteins. It is interesting to note that some peptides exclusively increase cell density, others improve both cell density and product yield, and some peptides suppress cell growth and enhance the product yield. Thus it is very clear that oligopeptides act as external molecular signals affecting growth and death. However, the effect of peptide size and amino acid composition in the protein hydrolysates and the exact mechanism as how this is achieved is still not elucidated in animal cells. In this chapter we describe our work on the fractionation of protein hydrolysates and the use of synthetic peptides on hybridomas. This research work shed some insight about the peptide size, amino acids, concentration and composition of peptides, feeding strategies for peptides but by any means this is not complete and more work needs to be done. For example it is essential to extend this type of work with peptides larger than tetra and penta peptides and with different cell lines to elucidate the mode of action of peptides.

  9. Oligopeptide m13 phage display in pathogen research.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Jonas; Zantow, Jonas; Meyer, Torsten; Hust, Michael

    2013-10-16

    Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  10. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Jonas; Zantow, Jonas; Meyer, Torsten; Hust, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline. PMID:24136040

  11. Suppression of space broadening of exciton polariton transport by Bloch oscillation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xudong; Zou, Bingsuo; Zhang, Yongyou

    2015-12-01

    We theoretically study the transport of exciton polaritons under different applied photon potentials. The relation between the photon potentials and the thickness of the cavity layer is first calculated by finite-element simulation. The theoretical analysis and numerical calculation indicate that the cavity photon potential is proportional to the thickness of the cavity layer with the coefficient being about 1.8 meV nm-1. Further, the periodic and linear photon potentials are considered to control the transport of the exciton polaritons in weak- and strong-field pump situations. In both situations the periodic potential cannot by itself effectively suppress the scatterings of the disorder potentials of the cavity photons and excitons and the nonlinear exciton-exciton interaction. When the linear potential is added to the cavity photons, the exciton polariton transport exhibits the Bloch oscillation behavior. Importantly, the polariton Bloch oscillation can strongly suppress the space broadening of the exciton polariton transport due to the disorder potentials and nonlinear exciton-exciton interaction, which is beneficial for designing the polariton circuits.

  12. Conditions for coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced microbunching suppression in multibend beam transport or recirculation arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C.

    2017-02-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high-brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in beam phase space degradation. On one hand, CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beam line and possibly cause emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching instability. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Correspondingly, a few scenarios have been introduced to suppress CSR-induced microbunching instability, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching instability along transport or recirculation arcs. Examples are presented with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our developed semianalytical Vlasov solver [C.-Y. Tsai, D. Douglas, R. Li, and C. Tennant, Linear microbunching analysis for recirculation machines, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 19, 114401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.19.114401]. The example lattices include low-energy (˜100 MeV ) and high-energy (˜1 GeV ) recirculation arcs, and medium-energy compressor arcs. Our studies show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. Beam current dependences of maximal CSR microbunching gains are also demonstrated, which should help outline a beam line design for different scales of nominal currents. We expect this analysis can shed light on the lattice design approach that aims to control the CSR-induced microbunching.

  13. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  14. Oligopeptides as biomarkers of cyanobacterial subpopulations. Toward an understanding of their biological role.

    PubMed

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-06-23

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria.

  15. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants Is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3

    PubMed Central

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S.; Gomez, S. Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D.; Daniels, Dierdra A.; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Harrison, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  16. Chemical interference with iron transport systems to suppress bacterial growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics.

  17. Giant suppression of phononic heat transport in a quantum magnet BiCu2PO6

    DOE PAGES

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Koteswararao, B.; Park, C. B.; ...

    2016-11-15

    Thermal transport of quantum magnets has elucidated the nature of low energy elementary excitations and complex interplay between those excited states via strong scattering of thermal carriers. BiCu2PO6 is a unique frustrated spin-ladder compound exhibiting highly anisotropic spin excitations that contain both itinerant and localized dispersion characters along the b- and a-axes respectively. Here, we investigate thermal conductivity κ of BiCu2PO6 under high magnetic fields (H) of up to 30 tesla. A dip-feature in κ, located at ~15K at zero-H along all crystallographic directions, moves gradually toward lower temperature (T) with increasing H, thus resulting in giant suppression by amore » factor of ~30 near the critical magnetic field of Hc≅23.5 tesla. The giant H- and T-dependent suppression of κ can be explained by the combined result of resonant scattering of phononic heat carriers with magnetic energy levels and increased phonon scattering due to enhanced spin fluctuation at Hc, unequivocally revealing the existence of strong spin-phonon coupling. Moreover, we find an experimental indication that the remaining magnetic heat transport along the b-axis becomes almost gapless at the magnetic quantum critical point realized at Hc.« less

  18. Giant suppression of phononic heat transport in a quantum magnet BiCu2PO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Koteswararao, B.; Park, C. B.; Shu, G. J.; Riggs, S. C.; Moon, E. G.; Chung, S. B.; Chou, F. C.; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport of quantum magnets has elucidated the nature of low energy elementary excitations and complex interplay between those excited states via strong scattering of thermal carriers. BiCu2PO6 is a unique frustrated spin-ladder compound exhibiting highly anisotropic spin excitations that contain both itinerant and localized dispersion characters along the b- and a-axes respectively. Here, we investigate thermal conductivity κ of BiCu2PO6 under high magnetic fields (H) of up to 30 tesla. A dip-feature in κ, located at ~15 K at zero-H along all crystallographic directions, moves gradually toward lower temperature (T) with increasing H, thus resulting in giant suppression by a factor of ~30 near the critical magnetic field of Hc ≅ 23.5 tesla. The giant H- and T-dependent suppression of κ can be explained by the combined result of resonant scattering of phononic heat carriers with magnetic energy levels and increased phonon scattering due to enhanced spin fluctuation at Hc, unequivocally revealing the existence of strong spin-phonon coupling. Moreover, we find an experimental indication that the remaining magnetic heat transport along the b-axis becomes almost gapless at the magnetic quantum critical point realized at Hc.

  19. Giant suppression of phononic heat transport in a quantum magnet BiCu2PO6

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Koteswararao, B.; Park, C. B.; Shu, G. J.; Riggs, S. C.; Moon, E. G.; Chung, S. B.; Chou, F. C.; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Thermal transport of quantum magnets has elucidated the nature of low energy elementary excitations and complex interplay between those excited states via strong scattering of thermal carriers. BiCu2PO6 is a unique frustrated spin-ladder compound exhibiting highly anisotropic spin excitations that contain both itinerant and localized dispersion characters along the b- and a-axes respectively. Here, we investigate thermal conductivity κ of BiCu2PO6 under high magnetic fields (H) of up to 30 tesla. A dip-feature in κ, located at ~15 K at zero-H along all crystallographic directions, moves gradually toward lower temperature (T) with increasing H, thus resulting in giant suppression by a factor of ~30 near the critical magnetic field of Hc ≅ 23.5 tesla. The giant H- and T-dependent suppression of κ can be explained by the combined result of resonant scattering of phononic heat carriers with magnetic energy levels and increased phonon scattering due to enhanced spin fluctuation at Hc, unequivocally revealing the existence of strong spin-phonon coupling. Moreover, we find an experimental indication that the remaining magnetic heat transport along the b-axis becomes almost gapless at the magnetic quantum critical point realized at Hc. PMID:27845377

  20. Monolayer suppression of transport imaged in annealed PbSe nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Michael D; Puster, Matthew; Drndic, Marija

    2010-06-09

    We use correlated electrostatic force, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy (EFM, TEM, and AFM) to visualize charge transport in monolayers and up to five layers of PbSe nanocrystal arrays drop-cast on electrode devices. Charge imaging reveals that current paths are dependent on the locally varying thickness and continuity of an array. Nanocrystal monolayers show suppressed conduction compared to bilayers and other multilayers, suggesting a departure from linear scaling of conductivity with array thickness. Moreover, multilayer regions appear electrically isolated if connected solely by a monolayer. Partial suppression is also observed within multilayer regions that contain narrow junctions only several nanocrystals wide. High-resolution TEM structural imaging of the measured devices reveals a larger reduction of inter-nanocrystal spacing in multilayers compared to monolayers upon vacuum-annealing, offering a likely explanation for the difference in conductivity between these two cases. This restriction of transport by monolayers and narrow junctions is an important factor that must be addressed in future designs of optoelectronic devices based on nanocrystals.

  1. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  2. Mechanistic study for immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV-activated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lian Hao; Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV activated surfaces decorated with N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilyl chloride (DMOAP). Our result shows that cysteine group, regardless of its position in the oligopeptide, is essential for successful immobilization of oligopeptide on the UV-activated surface. A possible reaction mechanism is nucleophilic addition of thiolates to surface aldehyde groups generated during UV activation. By using this technique, we are able to incorporate anchoring points into oligopeptides through cysteine residues. Furthermore, immobilized oligopeptides on the UV-activated surface is very stable even under harsh washing conditions. Finally, we show that an HPQ-containing oligopeptide can be immobilized on the UV-activated surface, but the final surface density and its ability to bind streptavidin are affected by the position of cysteine and HPQ. An oligopeptide with a cysteine at the N-terminus and a HPQ motif at the C-terminus gives the highest binding signal in the streptavidin-binding assay. This result is potentially useful for the development of functional oligopeptide microarrays for detecting target protein molecules.

  3. [The role of a lysine residue in the antioxidant and dna-protective activity of oligopeptides].

    PubMed

    Prazdnova, E V; Mazanko, M S; Zolotukhin, P V; Kharchenko, E Y; Chistyakov, V A; Arutiunov, V A; Kozina, L S

    2016-01-01

    Oligopeptides present in the living cell were found to have antioxidative activity and to be involved in the regulation of antioxidant balance by interaction with the redox-dependent cellular signaling cascades. Experiments on animal models have shown that the introduction of oligopeptides causes geroprotective and adaptogenic effects. In the present work, we investigate the biological action of a number of synthetic oligopeptides using bacterial biosensors. This approach allows us to precisely estimate the antioxidant properties of the compounds without affecting their participation in regulatory cascades typical to eukaryotic cells. It has been shown that the ability of oligopeptides to protect cells from action of physical prooxidant factors (UV irradiation) is related to the presence of a lysine residue in the molecule. For chemical pro-oxidants (dioxidine), we have observed a similar, though less strict pattern. This effect also correlates with DNA-protective activity of the investigated oligopeptides.

  4. [Novel L-amino acid ligases catalyzing oligopeptide synthesis].

    PubMed

    Kino, Kuniki

    2010-11-01

    L-Amino acid ligase (EC 6.3.2.28) is a microbial enzyme catalyzing formation of an alpha-peptide bond from unprotected L-amino acids in an ATP-dependent manner. The YwfE protein from Bacillus subtilis 168 was the first reported L-amino acid ligase, and it synthesizes various dipeptides. Thereafter, several L-amino acid ligases were newly obtained by in silico analysis using the ATP-grasp motif. But these L-amino acid ligases synthesize only dipeptide and no longer peptide. A novel L-amino acid ligase capable of catalyzing oligopeptide synthesis is required to increase the variety of peptides. We have previously found a new member of L-amino acid ligase, RizA, from B. subtilis NBRC3134, a microorganism that produces the peptide-antibiotic rhizocticin. We newly found that a gene at approximately 9 kbp upstream of rizA encoded a novel L-amino acid ligase RizB. Recombinant RizB synthesized homo-oligomers of branched-chain amino acids consisting of 2 to 5 amino acids, and also synthesized various heteropeptides. RizB is the first reported L-amino acid ligase that catalyzes oligopeptide synthesis. In addition, we obtained L-amino acid ligases showing oligopeptide synthesis activities by in silico analysis using BLAST, which is a set of similarity search programs. These L-amino acid ligases showed low similarity in amino acid sequence, but commonly used branched-chain amino acids, such as RizB, as substrates. Furthermore, the spr0969 protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae synthesized longer peptides than those synthesized by RizB, and the BAD_1200 protein of Bifidobacteria adolescentis showed higher activity toward aromatic amino acids than toward branched-chain ones.

  5. Suppression of population transport and control of exciton distributions by entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Schlawin, Frank; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Fingerhut, Benjamin P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Entangled photons provide an important tool for secure quantum communication, computing and lithography. Low intensity requirements for multi-photon processes make them idealy suited for minimizing damage in imaging applications. Here we show how their unique temporal and spectral features may be used in nonlinear spectroscopy to reveal properties of multiexcitons in chromophore aggregates. Simulations demostrate that they provide unique control tools for two-exciton states in the bacterial reaction centre of Blastochloris viridis. Population transport in the intermediate single-exciton manifold may be suppressed by the absorption of photon pairs with short entanglement time, thus allowing the manipulation of the distribution of two-exciton states. The quantum nature of the light is essential for achieving this degree of control, which cannot be reproduced by stochastic or chirped light. Classical light is fundamentally limited by the frequency-time uncertainty, whereas entangled photons have independent temporal and spectral characteristics not subjected to this uncertainty.

  6. Suppression of population transport and control of exciton distributions by entangled photons

    PubMed Central

    Schlawin, Frank; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Entangled photons provide an important tool for secure quantum communication, computing and lithography. Low intensity requirements for multi-photon processes make them idealy suited for minimizing damage in imaging applications. Here we show how their unique temporal and spectral features may be used in nonlinear spectroscopy to reveal properties of multiexcitons in chromophore aggregates. Simulations demostrate that they provide unique control tools for two-exciton states in the bacterial reaction centre of Blastochloris viridis. Population transport in the intermediate single-exciton manifold may be suppressed by the absorption of photon pairs with short entanglement time, thus allowing the manipulation of the distribution of two-exciton states. The quantum nature of the light is essential for achieving this degree of control, which cannot be reproduced by stochastic or chirped light. Classical light is fundamentally limited by the frequency-time uncertainty, whereas entangled photons have independent temporal and spectral characteristics not subjected to this uncertainty. PMID:23653194

  7. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  8. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-12-14

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn(2+) were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  9. Hepcidin Suppresses Brain Iron Accumulation by Downregulating Iron Transport Proteins in Iron-Overloaded Rats.

    PubMed

    Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Luo, Qianqian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Iron accumulates progressively in the brain with age, and iron-induced oxidative stress has been considered as one of the initial causes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Based on the role of hepcidin in peripheral organs and its expression in the brain, we hypothesized that this peptide has a role to reduce iron in the brain and hence has the potential to prevent or delay brain iron accumulation in iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of hepcidin expression adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) and hepcidin peptide on brain iron contents, iron transport across the brain-blood barrier, iron uptake and release, and also the expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons. We demonstrated that hepcidin significantly reduced brain iron in iron-overloaded rats and suppressed transport of transferrin-bound iron (Tf-Fe) from the periphery into the brain. Also, the peptide significantly inhibited expression of TfR1, DMT1, and Fpn1 as well as reduced Tf-Fe and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake and iron release in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons, while downregulation of hepcidin with hepcidin siRNA retrovirus generated opposite results. We concluded that, under iron-overload, hepcidin functions to reduce iron in the brain by downregulating iron transport proteins. Upregulation of brain hepcidin by ad-hepcidin emerges as a new pharmacological treatment and prevention for iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  11. Mining gut microbiome oligopeptides by functional metaproteome display

    PubMed Central

    Zantow, Jonas; Just, Sarah; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Kisling, Sigrid; Dübel, Stefan; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infections, autoimmune diseases, and chronic inflammatory disorders are associated with systemic antibody responses from the host immune system. Disease-specific antibodies can be important serum biomarkers, but the identification of antigens associated with specific immune reactions is challenging, in particular if complex communities of microorganisms are involved in the disease progression. Despite promising new diagnostic opportunities, the discovery of these serological markers becomes more difficult with increasing complexity of microbial communities. In the present work, we used a metagenomic M13 phage display approach to select immunogenic oligopeptides from the gut microbiome of transgenic mice suffering from chronic ileitis. We constructed three individual metaproteome phage display libraries with a library size of approximately 107 clones each. Using serum antibodies, we selected and validated three oligopeptides that induced specific antibody responses in the mouse model. This proof-of-concept study provides the first successful application of functional metaproteome display for the study of protein-protein interactions and the discovery of potential disease biomarkers. PMID:27703179

  12. Mining gut microbiome oligopeptides by functional metaproteome display.

    PubMed

    Zantow, Jonas; Just, Sarah; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Kisling, Sigrid; Dübel, Stefan; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-05

    Pathogen infections, autoimmune diseases, and chronic inflammatory disorders are associated with systemic antibody responses from the host immune system. Disease-specific antibodies can be important serum biomarkers, but the identification of antigens associated with specific immune reactions is challenging, in particular if complex communities of microorganisms are involved in the disease progression. Despite promising new diagnostic opportunities, the discovery of these serological markers becomes more difficult with increasing complexity of microbial communities. In the present work, we used a metagenomic M13 phage display approach to select immunogenic oligopeptides from the gut microbiome of transgenic mice suffering from chronic ileitis. We constructed three individual metaproteome phage display libraries with a library size of approximately 10(7) clones each. Using serum antibodies, we selected and validated three oligopeptides that induced specific antibody responses in the mouse model. This proof-of-concept study provides the first successful application of functional metaproteome display for the study of protein-protein interactions and the discovery of potential disease biomarkers.

  13. StMYB44 negatively regulates phosphate transport by suppressing expression of PHOSPHATE1 in potato

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Zha, Manrong; Huang, Jing; Li, Li; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Phosphorus is an important macronutrient for plant growth, but often deficient in soil. To understand the molecular basis of the complex responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to phosphate (Pi) deficiency stress, the RNA-Seq approach was taken to identify genes responding to Pi starvation in potato roots. A total of 359 differentially expressed genes were identified, among which the Solanum tuberosum transcription factor gene MYB44 (StMYB44) was found to be down-regulated by Pi starvation. StMYB44 was ubiquitously expressed in potato tissues and organs, and StMYB44 protein was exclusively localized in the nucleus. Overexpression of StMYB44 in potato resulted in lower accumulation of Pi in shoots. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that the abundance of S. tuberosum PHOSPHATE1 (StPHO1), a Pi transport-related gene, was reduced in StMYB44 overexpression lines. In contrast, knock-out of StMYB44 by a CRISPR/Cas9 system failed to increase transcription of StPHO1. Moreover, StMYB44 was found to interact in the nucleus with AtWRKY6, a known Arabidopsis transcription factor directly regulating PHO1 expression, and StWRKY6, indicating that StMYB44 could be a member of the regulatory complex controlling transcription of StPHO1. Taken together, our study demonstrates that StMYB44 negatively regulates Pi transport in potato by suppressing StPHO1 expression. PMID:28338870

  14. Coordinative modulation of human zinc transporter 2 gene expression through active and suppressive regulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ju; Liu, Ya-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Zinc transporter 2 (ZnT2) is one of the cellular factors responsible for Zn homeostasis. Upon Zn overload, ZnT2 reduces cellular Zn by transporting it into excretory vesicles. We investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates human ZnT2 (hZnT2) gene expression. Zn induces hZnT2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Overexpression of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) increases hZnT2 transcription, whereas depletion of MTF-1 reduces hZnT2 expression. There are five putative metal response elements (MREs) within 1kb upstream of the hZnT2 gene. A serial deletion of the hZnT2 promoter region (from 5' to 3') shows that the two MREs proximal to the gene are essential for Zn-induced promoter activity. Further mutation analysis concludes that the penultimate MRE (MREb) supports the metal-induced promoter activity. The hZnT2 promoter has also a zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB) binding element. Mutation or deletion of this ZEB binding element elevates the basal and Zn-induced hZnT2 promoter activities. Knockdown of ZEB1 mRNA enhances the hZnT2 transcript level in HEK-293 cells. In MCF-7 (ZEB-deficient) cells, expression of ZEB proteins attenuates the Zn-induced hZnT2 expression. However, expressions of MTF-1 target genes such as human ZnT1 and metallothionein IIA were not affected. Our study shows the expression of the hZnT2 gene is coordinately regulated via active and suppressive modulators.

  15. CD147 silencing inhibits tumor growth by suppressing glucose transport in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Juan; Gao, Tianyuan; Jiang, Minghao; Wu, Lisha; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhao, Shuang; Peng, Cong; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very malignant disease and there are still no effective treatments. CD147 participates in the carcinogenesis of multiple human cancers and GLUT-1, as a glucose transporter, is associated with tumor growth. However, the function of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma have not been completely understood. Thus, in this study we investigated the expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma tissue, which were overexpressed compared with that in nevus tissue. In addition, CD147 and GLUT-1 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of human melanoma A375 cells. Immunoprecipitation proved that CD147 interacted with GLUT-1 at D105-199. Silencing CD147 by specific siRNA could downregulate GLUT-1 level via inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling and decrease glucose uptake in A375 cells. In vivo experiments also supported that CD147 knockdown suppressed the tumor growth in melanoma subcutaneous mice model, observed by micro PET/CT. Our results could help validate CD147 as a new therapeutic target for treating melanoma. PMID:27556188

  16. Apigenin inhibits the proliferation of adenoid cystic carcinoma via suppression of glucose transporter-1

    PubMed Central

    FANG, JIN; BAO, YANG-YANG; ZHOU, SHUI-HONG; FAN, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Apigenin is a natural phyto-oestrogen flavonoid, which exerts various biological effects, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In addition, apigenin has recently been reported to target hypoxic markers; however, there are currently no studies regarding the association between apigenin and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). The present study investigated whether apigenin inhibits the proliferation of ACC cells or suppresses the expression of GLUT-1 in ACC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that apigenin inhibits ACC-2 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with apigenin also induced apoptosis and G2/M-phase arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Corresponding with the above results, the expression levels of GLUT-1 were significantly decreased following treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that the inhibition of ACC-2 cell growth by apigenin may be due to the decreased expression of GLUT-1. PMID:26300442

  17. Preparation, Identification and Antioxidant Properties of Black-Bone Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) Iron(II)-Oligopeptide Chelate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huanglei; Song, Shasha; Ma, Qiuyue; Wei, Hui; Ren, Difeng; Lu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Black-bone silky fowl iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate was synthesized from iron(II) solution and the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide, which was extracted from the muscle protein of black-bone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson). Orthogonal array analysis was used to determine the optimal conditions for the iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging assays were performed to compare the antioxidant abilities of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. The optimal conditions for iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation were 4% of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and a ratio of the black- -bone silky fowl oligopeptide to FeCl2·4H2O of 5:1 at pH=4. Under these conditions, the chelation rate was (84.9±0.2) % (p<0.05), and the chelation yield was (40.3±0.1) % (p<0.05). The structures detected with UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and FTIR spectra changed significantly after chelation, suggesting that Fe(II) ions formed coordinate bonds with carboxylate (-RCOOŻ) and amino (-NH2) groups in the oligopeptides, confirming that this is a new oligopeptide-iron chelate. The iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate had stronger scavenging activity towards DPPH and superoxide radicals than did the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide.

  18. Preparation, Identification and Antioxidant Properties of Black-Bone Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) Iron(II)-Oligopeptide Chelate

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Huanglei; Song, Shasha; Ma, Qiuyue; Wei, Hui; Ren, Difeng; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Black-bone silky fowl iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate was synthesized from iron(II) solution and the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide, which was extracted from the muscle protein of black-bone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson). Orthogonal array analysis was used to determine the optimal conditions for the iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging assays were performed to compare the antioxidant abilities of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate. The optimal conditions for iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate preparation were 4% of the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide and a ratio of the black- -bone silky fowl oligopeptide to FeCl2·4H2O of 5:1 at pH=4. Under these conditions, the chelation rate was (84.9±0.2) % (p<0.05), and the chelation yield was (40.3±0.1) % (p<0.05). The structures detected with UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and FTIR spectra changed significantly after chelation, suggesting that Fe(II) ions formed coordinate bonds with carboxylate (-RCOOŻ) and amino (-NH2) groups in the oligopeptides, confirming that this is a new oligopeptide-iron chelate. The iron(II)-oligopeptide chelate had stronger scavenging activity towards DPPH and superoxide radicals than did the black-bone silky fowl oligopeptide. PMID:27904406

  19. Self-organizing bioinspired oligothiophene–oligopeptide hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Schillinger, Eva-Kathrin; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Schmid, Sylvia; Khalatur, Pavel G; Bäuerle, Peter; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2011-01-01

    Summary In this minireview, we survey recent advances in the synthesis, characterization, and modeling of new oligothiophene–oligopeptide hybrids capable of forming nanostructured fibrillar aggregates in solution and on solid substrates. Compounds of this class are promising for applications because their self-assembly and stimuli-responsive properties, provided by the peptide moieties combined with the semiconducting properties of the thiophene blocks, can result in novel opportunities for the design of advanced smart materials. These bio-inspired molecular hybrids are experimentally shown to form stable fibrils as visualized by AFM and TEM. While the experimental evidence alone is not sufficient to reveal the exact molecular organization of the fibrils, theoretical approaches based on quantum chemistry calculations and large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are attempted in an effort to reveal the structure of the fibrils at the nanoscale. Based on the combined theoretical and experimental analysis, the most likely models of fibril formation and aggregation are suggested. PMID:22003459

  20. Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale Rare Earth-Tissue Mimicking Oligopeptide Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluzzi, R.; Guertin, R. P.; Haas, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    New peptide-metal composite materials were synthesized using wet chemistry techniques by attaching the rare earths Gd and Dy to glutamic acid bases at the terminal ends of small linear amino acid chains (oligopeptides). The oligopeptides selected mimic those of strong linear proteins found in collagen and silk. The resulting composites were carefully dried and found to crystallize in smectic-like arrays over length scales much longer than those of the molecular dimensions (=10 nm for collagen-mimicking oligopeptides and =4 nm for silk-mimicking oligopeptides). The resulting crystals (1-2 mg) were insulating and transparent in the visible. The rare earths form quasi-two dimensional sheets with a separation distance determined by the linear dimension of the oligopeptide. The magnetization, M(B,T), was determined down to 2 K and in fields to 5.5 T using SQUID magnetometry. All samples were paramagnetic. Crystalline electric field modification of the magnetization was evident in isothermal M(B) for Dy-based composites, but it was absent, as expected, for the Gd-based composites. A crossover in M(T, 0.5 T) indicated incipient ordering among the Dy-based short silk-like but not the longer collagen-like oligopeptide. Supported in part by the Research Corporation and NASA grant NAG8-1699.

  1. Anomalous and neoclassical transport suppression by the radial electric field, induced by Alfvén waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsypin, V. S.; Nascimento, I. C.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Elfimov, A. G.; Amarante Segundo, G. S.; Tendler, M.

    1999-09-01

    The suppression of anomalous transport and/or reduction of neoclassical transport caused by the Alfvén-wave-induced shear of the radial electric field in tokamaks is investigated. The simple quantitative estimates reported in previous papers are checked by a consistent evaluation of the profile of the radial electric field created by the resonant absorption of Alfvén waves. The radial variations of the ion viscosity and heat conductivity across the mode conversion layer are evaluated both in the banana and potato regions. In agreement with previous analytical results, it is shown that the kinetic Alfvén waves may play the role of a convenient mechanism for reduction of anomalous and neoclassical transport and formation of transport barriers in tokamaks.

  2. The oligopeptide permease (Opp) of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Moutran, Alexandre; Quaggio, Ronaldo Bento; Balan, Andrea; Ferreira, Luis Carlos de Souza; Ferreira, Rita de Cássia Café

    2004-05-01

    The oligopeptide permease (Opp), a protein-dependent ABC transporter, has been found in the genome of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ( Xac), but not in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ( Xcc). Sequence analysis indicated that 4 opp genes ( oppA, oppB, oppC, oppD/F), located in a 33.8-kbp DNA fragment present only in the Xac genome, are arranged in an operon-like structure and share highest sequence similarities with Streptomyces roseofulvus orthologs. Nonetheless, analyses of the GC content, codon usage, and transposon positioning suggested that the Xac opp operon does not have an exogenous origin. The presence of a stop codon at one of the ATP-binding domains of OppD/F would render the uptake system nonfunctional, but detection of a single polycistronic mRNA and periplasmic OppA in actively growing bacteria suggests that the Opp permease is active and could contribute to the distinct nutritional requirements and host specificities of the two Xanthomonas species.

  3. Drosophila Brat and Human Ortholog TRIM3 Maintain Stem Cell Equilibrium and Suppress Brain Tumorigenesis by Attenuating Notch Nuclear Transport.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Zhang, Changming; Moberg, Kenneth; Read, Renee; Hadjipanayis, Costas; Brat, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem cells exert enormous influence on neoplastic behavior, in part by governing asymmetric cell division and the balance between self-renewal and multipotent differentiation. Growth is favored by deregulated stem cell division, which enhances the self-renewing population and diminishes the differentiation program. Mutation of a single gene in Drosophila, Brain Tumor (Brat), leads to disrupted asymmetric cell division resulting in dramatic neoplastic proliferation of neuroblasts and massive larval brain overgrowth. To uncover the mechanisms relevant to deregulated cell division in human glioma stem cells, we first developed a novel adult Drosophila brain tumor model using brat-RNAi driven by the neuroblast-specific promoter inscuteable Suppressing Brat in this population led to the accumulation of actively proliferating neuroblasts and a lethal brain tumor phenotype. brat-RNAi caused upregulation of Notch signaling, a node critical for self-renewal, by increasing protein expression and enhancing nuclear transport of Notch intracellular domain (NICD). In human glioblastoma, we demonstrated that the human ortholog of Drosophila Brat, tripartite motif-containing protein 3 (TRIM3), similarly suppressed NOTCH1 signaling and markedly attenuated the stem cell component. We also found that TRIM3 suppressed nuclear transport of active NOTCH1 (NICD) in glioblastoma and demonstrated that these effects are mediated by direct binding of TRIM3 to the Importin complex. Together, our results support a novel role for Brat/TRIM3 in maintaining stem cell equilibrium and suppressing tumor growth by regulating NICD nuclear transport. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2443-52. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Bacterial chemotactic oligopeptides and the intestinal mucosal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D.M.; Butt, T.J.; Broom, M.F.; Hunter, J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1989-07-01

    Intestinal absorption and enterohepatic circulation of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-/sup 125/I-tyrosine, a bioactive synthetic analog of the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine has been investigated in the rat. In ileum and proximal and distal colon, dithiothreitol, which increases mucosal permeability, increased peptide absorption and biliary recovery fourfold, 70-fold, and 20-fold over control values, respectively. When dithiothreitol was combined with d-l-benzyl succinate, a potent inhibitor of intestinal carboxypeptidase, absorption and biliary recovery from ileal loops increased markedly to 40-fold over control, whereas there was no further increase in absorption from colon loops. There was a strong correlation between biliary N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-/sup 125/I-tyrosine recovery and intestinal absorption of /sup 51/Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetate, a marker of passive mucosal permeability (r = 0.97). We conclude that in the ileum both enzymic degradation and restricted mucosal permeability contribute to the intestinal barrier to luminal bacterial formyl oligopeptides. In the colon, however, enzymic mechanisms are less active and restricted mucosal permeability is the major factor. Abnormalities of the intestinal mucosal barrier to proinflammatory bacterial peptides could play a role in inflammatory disorders of the gut.

  5. Boosting Antimicrobial Peptides by Hydrophobic Oligopeptide End Tags*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtchen, Artur; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Mörgelin, Matthias; Davoudi, Mina; Alenfall, Jan; Chalupka, Anna; Malmsten, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach for boosting antimicrobial peptides through end tagging with hydrophobic oligopeptide stretches is demonstrated. Focusing on two peptides derived from kininogen, GKHKNKGKKNGKHNGWK (GKH17) and HKHGHGHGKHKNKGKKN (HKH17), tagging resulted in enhanced killing of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and fungal Candida albicans. Microbicidal potency increased with tag length, also in plasma, and was larger for Trp and Phe stretches than for aliphatic ones. The enhanced microbicidal effects correlated to a higher degree of bacterial wall rupture. Analogously, tagging promoted peptide binding to model phospholipid membranes and liposome rupture, particularly for anionic and cholesterol-void membranes. Tagged peptides displayed low toxicity, particularly in the presence of serum, and resisted degradation by human leukocyte elastase and by staphylococcal aureolysin and V8 proteinase. The biological relevance of these findings was demonstrated ex vivo and in vivo in porcine S. aureus skin infection models. The generality of end tagging for facile boosting of antimicrobial peptides without the need for post-synthesis modification was also demonstrated. PMID:19398550

  6. Synthetic adhesive oligopeptides with rigid polyhydroxylated amino acids.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Manjeet; Singh, Shashi; Geyer, Armin

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing polyhydroxylated bicyclic dipeptide (Glc=Tap) are investigated for their adhesion properties. The non-natural amino acid building block composed of Glc=Tap is derived from glucuronic acid and mimics the hydroxyl-amino acids of the natural proteins. Peptide oligomers of Glc=Tap flanked by the amino acids Tyr and Lys were synthesized and characterized. Solution structural studies performed by circular dichromism spectroscopy suggests that poly(Lys-Glc=Tap-Tyr) and poly(Glc=Tap-Tyr) adopts extended helical structures. Adhesion of these oligomers to the mica surface is shown by atomic force microscopy spectroscopy. Studies indicate that extended polyproline II polyhydroxylated peptide chains, which bear additional phenolic as well as cationic side chains, can mimic some of the adhesion properties of the natural protein models. Furthermore, obtained data suggest that poly(Glc=Tap-Tyr) and poly(Lys-Glc=Tap-Tyr) as outstanding adhesive compounds, which combine efficient synthetic accessibility with promising adhesive properties.

  7. Reduction-Induced Suppression of Electron Flow (RISE) in the Photosynthetic Electron Transport System of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Shaku, Keiichiro; Shimakawa, Ginga; Hashiguchi, Masaki; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of electrons under conditions of environmental stress produces a reduced state in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) system and causes the reduction of O2 by PSI in the thylakoid membranes to produce the reactive oxygen species superoxide radical, which irreversibly inactivates PSI. This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism for the oxidation of reaction center Chl of PSI, P700, after saturated pulse (SP) light illumination of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under steady-state photosynthetic conditions. Both P700 and NADPH were transiently oxidized after SP light illumination under CO2-depleted photosynthesis conditions. In contrast, the Chl fluorescence intensity transiently increased. Compared with the wild type, the increase in Chl fluorescence and the oxidations of P700 and NADPH were greatly enhanced in a mutant (Δflv1/3) deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON 1 (FLV1) and FLV3 proteins even under high photosynthetic conditions. Furthermore, oxidation of Cyt f was also observed in the mutant. After SP light illumination, a transient suppression of O2 evolution was also observed in Δflv1/3. From these observations, we propose that the reduction in the plastquinone (PQ) pool suppresses linear electron flow at the Cyt b6/f complex, which we call the reduction-induced suppression of electron flow (RISE) in the PET system. The accumulation of the reduced form of PQ probably suppresses turnover of the Q cycle in the Cyt b6/f complex.

  8. Oligopeptide-assisted self-assembly of oligothiophenes: co-assembly and chirality transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongxia; Gong, Ruiying; Mu, Youbing; Wang, Xiao; Wan, Xiaobo

    2014-11-01

    The biomolecule-assisted self-assembly of semiconductive molecules has been developed recently for the formation of potential bio-based functional materials. Oligopeptide-assisted self-assembly of oligothiophene through weak intermolecular interactions was investigated; specifically the self-assembly and chirality-transfer behavior of achiral oligothiophenes in the presence of an oligopeptide with a strong tendency to form β-sheets. Two kinds of oligothiophenes without (QT) or with (QTDA) carboxylic groups were selected to explore the effect of the end functional group on self-assembly and chirality transfer. In both cases, organogels were formed. However, the assembly behavior of QT was quite different from that of QTDA. It was found that QT formed an organogel with the oligopeptide and co-assembled into chiral nanostructures. Conversely, although QTDA also formed a gel with the oligopeptide, it has a strong tendency to self-assemble independently. However, during the formation of the xerogel, the chirality of the oligopeptide can also be transferred to the QTDA assemblies. Different assembly models were proposed to explain the assembly behavior.

  9. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  10. Mussel oligopeptides protect human fibroblasts from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Dong, Ying; Xu, Qing-Gang; Zhu, Shu-Yun; Tian, Shi-Lei; Huo, Jing-jing; Hao, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Bei-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Mussel bioactive peptides have been viewed as mediators to maximize the high quality of life. In this study, the anti-aging activities of mussel oligopeptides were evaluated using H2O2-induced prematurely senescent MRC-5 fibroblasts. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry displayed that exposure to H2O2 led to the loss of cell viability and cell cycle arrest. In addition, H2O2 caused the elevation of senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity and formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF). It was found that pretreatment with mussel oligopeptides could significantly attenuate these properties associated with cellular senescence. Mussel oligopeptides also led to the increase of glutathione (GSH) level and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) recovery. In addition, mussel oligopeptides resulted in an improvement in transcriptional activity of peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1), nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). This study revealed that mussel oligopeptides could protect against cellular senescence induced by H2O2, and the effects were closely associated with redox cycle modulating and potentiating the SIRT1 pathway. These findings provide new insights into the beneficial role of mussel bioactive peptides on retarding senescence process. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypocholesterolemic effect of sericin-derived oligopeptides in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Lapphanichayakool, Phakhamon; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effect of cholesterol-lowering proteins and/or peptides derived from various dietary sources is continuously reported. A non-dietary protein from silk cocoon, sericin, has also demonstrated cholesterol-lowering activity. A sericin hydrolysate prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis was also expected to posses this effect. The present study was aimed at investigating the cholesterol-lowering effect of sericin peptides, so called "sericin-derived oligopeptides" (SDO) both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that SDO at all three doses tested (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and 200 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) suppressed serum total and non-HDL cholesterol levels in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels were not significantly changed among all groups. The fecal contents of bile acids and cholesterol did not differ among high-cholesterol fed rats. SDO dose-dependently reduced cholesterol solubility in lipid micelles, and inhibited cholesterol uptake in monolayer Caco-2 cells. SDO also effectively bound to all three types of bile salts including taurocholate, deoxytaurocholate, and glycodeoxycholate. Direct interaction with bile acids of SDO may disrupt micellar cholesterol solubility, and subsequently reduce the absorption of dietary cholesterol in intestines. Taking all data together, SDO or sericin peptides exhibit a beneficial effect on blood cholesterol levels and could be potentially used as a health-promoting dietary supplement or nutraceutical product.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus NorD, a putative efflux pump coregulated with the Opp1 oligopeptide permease, contributes selectively to fitness in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanpeng; Fu, Yingmei; Lee, Jean C; Hooper, David C

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus readily infects humans, causing infections from mild superficial skin infections to lethal bacteremia and endocarditis. Transporters produced by S. aureus allow the pathogen to adapt to a variety of settings, including survival at sites of infection and in the presence of antibiotics. The native functions of many transporters are unknown, but their potential dual contribution to fitness and antimicrobial resistance highlights their importance in staphylococcal infections. Here, we show that S. aureus NorD, a newly recognized efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, contributes to fitness in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. In community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain MW2, norD was selectively upregulated 36-fold at the infection site relative to growth in vitro, and the norD mutant demonstrated significant fitness impairment in abscesses, with fitness 20- to 40-fold lower than that of the parent MW2 strain. Plasmid-encoded NorD could complement the fitness defect of the MW2 norD mutant. Chromosomal norD expression is polycistronic with the upstream oligopeptide permease genes (opp1ABCDF), which encode an ABC oligopeptide transporter. Both norD and opp1 were upregulated in abscesses and iron-restricted culture medium and negatively regulated by Fur, but only NorD contributed to fitness in the murine abscess model.

  13. Increase of turbulence and transport with resonant magnetic perturbations in ELM-suppressed plasmas on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Holland, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Evans, T. E.; Moyer, R. A.; Mordijck, S.; Nazikian, R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, O.; Wade, M. R.

    2013-11-01

    Long-wavelength turbulence increases dramatically in the outer regions of DIII-D plasmas with the application of resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) that suppress edge-localized modes (ELMs). Correspondingly, transport increases and global energy confinement decreases in these low-collisionality RMP-ELM suppressed discharges. The core and pedestal density are sharply reduced, while ion and electron temperatures may change only slightly. Low wavenumber density turbulence (k⊥ρi < 1) in the range of 60-300 kHz, measured with beam emission spectroscopy, is modified and generally increases throughout the outer region (0.6 < ρ < 1.0) of the plasma in response to RMPs over a range of q95 values; ELM suppression, in contrast, occurs for a narrower range in q95. Radial magnetic field modulation experiments indicate that these turbulence modifications occur on a time scale of a few milliseconds or less near ρ = 0.85-0.95, significantly faster than transport time-scales and faster than the local pressure gradients and shearing rates evolve at these locations. As the internal coil current is modulated in a square-wave fashion from 3.2 to 4.2 kA, the turbulence magnitude varies in phase by 30% or more, while local density changes by only a few per cent. This dynamical behaviour suggests that the turbulence is directly affected by the RMP, which may partially or largely explain the resulting increased transport and stabilization of the pedestal against peeling-ballooning instabilities that are thought to drive ELMs.

  14. Counting basic sites in oligopeptides via gas-phase ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    Cations derived from oligopeptides ranging from laminin fragment (5 residues) to {beta}-lactoglobulin (162 residues) have been subjected to gas-phase ion/molecule reactions with hydroiodic acid. The sum of the ion charge state and the maximum number of molecules of hydroiodic acid that attach to the ion is equal to the total number of lysines, arginines, histidines, and N-termini consisting of a primary amine for ions derived from all 21 oligopeptides studied. These results suggest that ion/molecule reactions can provide useful information regarding oligopeptide basic site number, which might be used as a criterion for searching protein data bases instead of, or in conjunction with, use of proteolytic digestion or gas-phase ion dissociation procedures. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Pretranslational Suppression of an Insulin-Responsive Glucose Transporter in Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, W. Timothy; Huecksteadt, Thomas P.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    1989-07-01

    A prominent feature of diabetes mellitus is the inability of insulin to appropriately increase the transport of glucose into target tissues. The contributions of different glucose transport proteins to insulin resistance in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes was evaluated. A glucose transporter messenger RNA and its cognate protein that are exclusively expressed in muscle and adipose tissue were specifically depleted in diabetic animals, and these effects were reversed after insulin therapy; a different glucose transporter and its messenger RNA that exhibit a less restricted tissue distribution were not specifically modulated in this way. Depletion of the muscle- and adipose-specific glucose transporter species correlates with and may account for the major portion of cellular insulin resistance in diabetes in these animals.

  16. Suppressed intrinsic catalytic activity of GLUT1 glucose transporters in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.A.; Buxton, J.M.; Czech, M.P. )

    1991-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that the erythroid-type (GLUT1) glucose transporter isoform contributes to basal but not insulin-stimulated hexose transport in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the present studies it was found that basal hexose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was about 50% lower than that in 3T3-L1 or CHO-K1 fibroblasts. Intrinsic catalytic activities of GLUT1 transporters in CHO-K1 and 3T3-L1 cells were compared by normalizing these hexose transport rates to GLUT1 content on the cell surface, as measured by two independent methods. Cell surface GLUT1 levels in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes were about 10- and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in CHO-K1 fibroblasts, as assessed with an anti-GLUT1 exofacial domain antiserum, delta. The large excess of cell surface GLUT1 transporters in 3T3-L1 adipocytes relative to CHO-K1 fibroblasts was confirmed by GLUT1 protein immunoblot analysis and by photoaffinity labeling (with 3-({sup 125}I)iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyldeacetylforskolin) of glucose transporters in isolated plasma membranes. Thus, GLUT1 intrinsic activity is markedly reduced in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts compared with the CHO-K1 fibroblasts, and further reduction occurs upon differentiation to adipocytes. The authors conclude that a mechanism that markedly suppresses basal hexose transport catalyzed by GLUT1 is a major contributor to the dramatic insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  17. Hesperidin Suppresses Melanosome Transport by Blocking the Interaction of Rab27A-Melanophilin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Jee-Young; Lee, Ha-Yeon; Nam, Ky-Youb; Park, JongIl; Lee, Su Min; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Joo Dong; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of hesperidin on melanogenesis. To find melanosome transport inhibitor from natural products, we collected the structural information of natural products from Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) and performed pharmacophore-based in silico screening for Rab27A and melanophilin (MLPH). Hesperidin did not inhibit melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and also did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase. But, hesperidin inhibited melanosome transport in melanocyte and showed skin lightening effect in pigmented reconstructed epidermis model. Therefore, we suggest that hesperidin is a useful inhibitor of melanosome transport and it might be applied to whitening agent. PMID:24244821

  18. Suppressing phonon transport in nanowires: A simple model for phonon-surface-roughness interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttalib, K. A.; Abhinav, S.

    2017-08-01

    Suppressing phonon propagation in nanowires is an essential goal towards achieving efficient thermoelectric devices. Recent experiments have shown unambiguously that surface roughness is a key factor that can reduce the thermal conductivity well below the Casimir limit in thin crystalline silicon nanowires. We use insights gained from the experimental studies to construct a simple analytically tractable model of the phonon-surface-roughness interaction that provides a better theoretical understanding of the effects of surface roughness on the thermal conductivity, which could potentially help in designing better thermoelectric devices.

  19. Suppression of flow pulsation activity by relaxation process of additive effect on viscous media transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, S.; Dedeyev, P.; Meucci, L.; Shenderova, I.; Manastirniy, A.; Usenko, M.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the analysis of the processes occurring together with the turbulent transfer of impulse in mixture of hydrocarbon fluid and polymer solutions (anti-turbulent additives). The study evaluates complex shear flows by popular theoretical and practical methods. Understanding of hydrodynamic and dissipative effects of laminar-turbulent transition tightening and turbulence suppression is provided. The peculiarities of "thin" flow structure in pipeline zones with complex shape walls are evaluated. Recommendations to forecast the local flow parameters, calculation of hydraulic resistance are given.

  20. Separation of chiral nanotubes with an opposite handedness by chiral oligopeptide adsorption: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-12-18

    The separation of enantiomeric chiral nanotubes that can form non-covalent complexes with an unlike stability upon adsorption of chiral molecules is a process of potential interest in different fields and applications. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we report in this paper a theoretical study of the adsorption and denaturation of an oligopeptide formed by 16 chiral amino acids having a helical structure in the native state on both the inner and the outer surface of the chiral (10, 20) and (20, 10) single-walled carbon nanotubes having an opposite handedness, and of the armchair (16, 16) nanotube with a similar diameter for comparison. In the final adsorbed state, the oligopeptide loses in all cases its native helical conformation, assuming elongated geometries that maximize its contact with the surface through all the 16 amino acids. We find that the complexes formed by the two chiral nanotubes and the chosen oligopeptide have a strongly unlike stability both when adsorption takes place on the outer convex surface of the nanotube, and when it occurs on the inner concave surface. Thus, our molecular simulations indicate that separation of chiral, enantiomeric carbon nanotubes for instance by chromatographic methods can indeed be carried out using oligopeptides of a sufficient length.

  1. Synthesis of oligopeptides containing an oxirane ring in the place of a peptidic bond.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M

    1999-01-01

    Oligopeptides containing an oxirane ring have recently been identified as inhibitors of a variety of proteases (1-3). These peptidomimetics have the potential to coordinate with metal present in the active site and, after nucleophilic ring opening, irreversibly blocking the enzyme. For this reason, oxirane containing peptidomimetics are good candidates to became transition states analogs or suicide inhibitors with long term efficacy in vivo (3). Synthetic routes to a variety of terminal (4-8) and internal epoxide peptidomimetics (9-11) have been reported but there are no examples of incorporation of such epoxides into oligopeptides. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of oligopeptides (up to a three-peptide) containing an epoxide in the place of the peptide bond. The structures prepared here can be identified, using the notation suggested by Spatola (12) as AAxψ[traws-epoxy]-AAy. The general synthetic approach described in this chapter is based on the aldol type reaction of a silylketene thioacetal and a β-amino α-selenyl aldehyde derived from an oligopeptide. This reaction stereoselectively generates a vicinal hydroxy selenide which can be further oxidized to epoxide (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Retrosynthetic analysis of oxirane peptidomimetrics.

  2. Suppressing a Putative Sterol Carrier Gene Reduces Plasmodesmal Permeability and Activates Sucrose Transporter Genes during Cotton Fiber Elongation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Ruan, Yong-Ling; Zhou, Na; Wang, Fang; Guan, Xueying; Fang, Lei; Shang, Xiaoguang; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2017-08-01

    Plasmodesmata (PDs) play vital roles in cell-to-cell communication and plant development. Emerging evidence suggests that sterols are involved in PD activity during cytokinesis. However, whether sterols contribute to PD gating between established cells remains unknown. Here, we isolated GhSCP2D, a putative sterol carrier protein gene from elongating cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers. In contrast to wild-type fiber PDs, which opened at 5 to 10 d postanthesis (DPA) and closed only at 15 to 25 DPA, plants with suppressed GhSCP2D expression had reduced sterol contents and closed PDs at 5 through 25 DPA The GhSCP2D-suppressed fibers exhibited callose deposition at the PDs, likely due to reduced expression of GhPdBG3-2A/D, which encodes a PD-targeting β-1,3-glucanase. Both GhPdBG3-2A/D expression and callose deposition were sensitive to a sterol biosynthesis inhibitor. Moreover, suppressing GhSCP2D upregulated a cohort of SUT and SWEET sucrose transporter genes in fiber cells. Collectively, our results indicate that (1) GhSCP2D is required for GhPdBG3-2A/D expression to degrade callose at the PD, thereby contributing to the establishment of the symplasmic pathway; and (2) blocking the symplasmic pathway by downregulating GhSCP2D activates or increases the expression of SUTs and SWEETs, leading to the switch from symplasmic to apoplasmic pathways. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. Deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc6a14 suppresses tumour growth in spontaneous mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-01

    SLC6A14 mediates Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled concentrative uptake of a broad-spectrum of amino acids. It is expressed at low levels in many tissues but up-regulated in certain cancers. Pharmacological blockade of SLC6A14 causes amino acid starvation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells and suppresses their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this transporter in breast cancer by deleting Slc6a14 in mice and monitoring the consequences of this deletion in models of spontaneous breast cancer (Polyoma middle T oncogene-transgenic mouse and mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu-transgenic mouse). Slc6a14-knockout mice are viable, fertile and phenotypically normal. The plasma amino acids were similar in wild-type and knockout mice and there were no major compensatory changes in the expression of other amino acid transporter mRNAs. There was also no change in mammary gland development in the knockout mouse. However, when crossed with PyMT-Tg mice or MMTV/Neu (mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu)-Tg mice, the development and progression of breast cancer were markedly decreased on Slc6a14(-/-) background. Analysis of transcriptomes in tumour tissues from wild-type mice and Slc6a14-null mice indicated no compensatory changes in the expression of any other amino acid transporter mRNA. However, the tumours from the null mice showed evidence of amino acid starvation, decreased mTOR signalling and decreased cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SLC6A14 is critical for the maintenance of amino acid nutrition and optimal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling in ER+ breast cancer and that the transporter is a potential target for development of a novel class of anti-cancer drugs targeting amino acid nutrition in tumour cells.

  4. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Inhibition of IGF receptor signaling and hepatoma cell growth by an antibody to ligand oligopeptide of receptor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Diao, Zhenyu; Deng, Xiaozhao

    2008-02-01

    Research on insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system have shown it to be potent mitogen for hepatoma cells and made it an attractive therapeutic target. But little strategy has been reported to date on targeting and sequestrating IGF against hepatoma. This study is based on the capability of ligand oligopeptide (LOP) to recognize IGF receptor with high efficiency, which is over-expressed on some hepatoma cells. We have been hypothesizing that antibody to LOP would mimic the extracellular ligand-binding domain of IGF receptor and inhibit receptor signaling and cell proliferation. Gene encoding for LOP [E5 (EPFRSPDLALETYG)] of IGF receptor was inserted into HBc carrier for expression in Escherichia coli. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific LOP potently inhibited signal transduction mediated by the IGF-IR interaction with IGF-I. Furthermore, it exhibited 47% inhibitory rate of soft agar colony formation and also induced apoptosis. These results indicate an anti-hepatoma potential of the mAb to an LOP of IGF receptor could block the activation of receptor and downstream signaling pathways, and suppress the biological effects mediated by receptor.

  6. Apigenin inhibits the proliferation of adenoid cystic carcinoma via suppression of glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jin; Bao, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Fan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin is a natural phyto-oestrogen flavonoid, which exerts various biological effects, including anti‑oxidative, anti‑inflammatory and anticancer activities. In addition, apigenin has recently been reported to target hypoxic markers; however, there are currently no studies regarding the association between apigenin and glucose transporter‑1 (GLUT‑1) in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). The present study investigated whether apigenin inhibits the proliferation of ACC cells or suppresses the expression of GLUT‑1 in ACC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that apigenin inhibits ACC‑2 cell growth in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Treatment with apigenin also induced apoptosis and G2/M‑phase arrest in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Corresponding with the above results, the expression levels of GLUT‑1 were significantly decreased following treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that the inhibition of ACC-2 cell growth by apigenin may be due to the decreased expression of GLUT-1.

  7. Hypouricemic effects of novel concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 inhibitors through suppressing intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Hiratochi, Masahiro; Tatani, Kazuya; Shimizu, Kazuo; Kuramochi, Yu; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Kamada, Noboru; Itoh, Fumiaki; Isaji, Masayuki

    2012-09-05

    We have developed concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 (CNT2) inhibitors as a novel pharmacological approach for improving hyperuricemia by inhibiting intestinal absorption of purines. Dietary purine nucleosides are absorbed in the small intestines by CNTs expressed in the apical membrane. In humans, the absorbed purine nucleosides are rapidly degraded to their final end product, uric acid, by xanthine oxidase. Based on the expression profile of human CNTs in digestive tract tissues, we established a working hypothesis that mainly CNT2 contributes to the intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides. In order to confirm this possibility, we developed CNT2 inhibitors and found that (2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-8-{[3'-(3-aminopropoxy)-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl]-amino}-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-3,4-diol (KGO-2142) and 1-[3-(5-{[1-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylamino]-methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)-propyl]-piperidine-4-carboxylic acid amide (KGO-2173) were inhibitory. These CNT2 inhibitors had potent inhibitory activity against inosine uptake via human CNT2, but they did not potently interfere with nucleoside uptake via human CNT1, CNT3 or equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) in vitro. After oral administration of KGO-2173 along with [(14)C]-inosine, KGO-2173 significantly decreased the urinary excretion of radioactivity at 6 and 24h in rats. Since dietary purine nucleosides are not utilized in the body and are excreted into the urine rapidly, this decrease in radioactivity in the urine represented the inhibitory activity of KGO-2173 toward the absorption of [(14)C]-inosine in the small intestines. KGO-2142 almost completely inhibited dietary RNA-induced hyperuricemia and the increase in urinary excretion of uric acid in cebus monkeys. These novel CNT2 inhibitors, KGO-2142 and KGO-2173, could be useful therapeutic options for the treatment of hyperuricemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Oligopeptide-terminated poly(β-amino ester)s for highly efficient gene delivery and intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Nathaly; Dosta, Pere; Cascante, Anna; Ramos, Victor; Borrós, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    The main limitation of gene therapy towards clinics is the lack of robust, safe and efficient gene delivery vectors. This paper describes new polycations for gene delivery based on poly(β-amino ester)s (pBAE) containing terminal oligopeptides. The authors developed oligopeptide-modified pBAE-pDNA nanoparticles that achieve better cellular viability and higher transfection efficacy than other end-modified pBAE and commercial transfection agents. Gene expression in highly permissive cell lines was remarkably high, but transfection efficiency in less-permissive cell lines was highly dependent on oligopeptide composition and nanoparticle formulation. Moreover, the use of selected oligopeptides in the pBAE formulation led to preferential intracellular localization of the particles. Particle analysis of highly efficient pBAE formulations revealed different particle sizes and charge features, which indicates chemical pseudotyping of the particle surface, related to the oligopeptide chemical nature. In conclusion, chemical modification at the termini of pBAE with amine-rich oligopeptides is a powerful strategy for developing delivery systems for future gene therapy applications.

  9. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  10. Combinatorial peptide libraries reveal the ligand-binding mechanism of the oligopeptide receptor OppA of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Detmers, Frank J. M.; Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Abele, Rupert; Jack, Ralph W.; Tampé, Robert; Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    The oligopeptide transport system (Opp) of Lactococcus lactis has the unique capacity to mediate the transport of peptides from 4 up to at least 18 residues. The substrate specificity of this binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter is determined mainly by the receptor protein OppA. To study the specificity and ligand-binding mechanism of OppA, the following strategy was used: (i) OppA was purified and anchored via the lipid moiety to the surface of liposomes; (ii) the proteoliposomes were used in a rapid filtration-based binding assay with radiolabeled nonameric bradykinin as a reporter peptide; and (iii) combinatorial peptide libraries were used to determine the specificity and selectivity of OppA. The studies show that (i) OppA is able to bind peptides up to at least 35 residues, but there is a clear optimum in affinity for nonameric peptides; (ii) the specificity for nonameric peptides is not equally distributed over the whole peptide, because positions 4, 5, and 6 in the binding site are more selective; and (iii) the differences in affinity for given side chains is relatively small, but overall hydrophobic residues are favored—whereas glycine, proline, and negatively charged residues lower the binding affinity. The data indicate that not only the first six residues (enclosed by the protein) but also the C-terminal three residues interact in a nonopportunistic manner with (the surface of) OppA. This binding mechanism is different from the one generally accepted for receptors of ATP-binding cassette-transporter systems. PMID:11050157

  11. Epigenetic suppression of potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 expression in inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA).

    PubMed

    Lin, C-R; Cheng, J-K; Wu, C-H; Chen, K-H; Liu, C-K

    2017-02-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to the stimulus-evoked pain hypersensitivity that may be experienced after peripheral inflammation. Persistent pathological stimuli in many pain conditions affect the expression of certain genes through epigenetic alternations. The main purpose of our study was to investigate the role of epigenetic modification on potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2) gene expression in the persistence of inflammatory pain. Persistent inflammatory pain was induced through the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left hind paw of rats. Acetyl-histone H3 and H4 level was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation in the spinal dorsal horn. Pain behaviour and inhibitory synaptic function of spinal cord were determined before and after CFA injection. KCC2 expression was determined by real time RT-PCR and Western blot. Intrathecal KCC2 siRNA (2 μg per 10 μL per rat) or HDAC inhibitor (10 μg per 10 μL per rat) was injected once daily for 3 days before CFA injection. Persistent inflammatory pain epigenetically suppressed KCC2 expression through histone deacetylase (HDAC)-mediated histone hypoacetylation, resulting in decreased inhibitory signalling efficacy. KCC2 knock-down caused by intrathecal administration of KCC2 siRNA in naïve rats reduced KCC2 expression in the spinal cord, leading to sensitized pain behaviours and impaired inhibitory synaptic transmission in their spinal cords. Moreover, intrathecal HDAC inhibitor injection in CFA rats increased KCC2 expression, partially restoring the spinal inhibitory synaptic transmission and relieving the sensitized pain behaviour. These findings suggest that the transcription of spinal KCC2 is regulated by histone acetylation epigenetically following CFA. Persistent pain suppresses KCC2 expression through HDAC-mediated histone hypoacetylation and consequently impairs the inhibitory function of inhibitory interneurons. Drugs such as HDAC inhibitors that suppress the influences of

  12. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-03-07

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications.

  13. Super: a web server to rapidly screen superposable oligopeptide fragments from the protein data bank.

    PubMed

    Collier, James H; Lesk, Arthur M; Garcia de la Banda, Maria; Konagurthu, Arun S

    2012-07-01

    Searching for well-fitting 3D oligopeptide fragments within a large collection of protein structures is an important task central to many analyses involving protein structures. This article reports a new web server, Super, dedicated to the task of rapidly screening the protein data bank (PDB) to identify all fragments that superpose with a query under a prespecified threshold of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Super relies on efficiently computing a mathematical bound on the commonly used structural similarity measure, RMSD of superposition. This allows the server to filter out a large proportion of fragments that are unrelated to the query; >99% of the total number of fragments in some cases. For a typical query, Super scans the current PDB containing over 80,500 structures (with ∼40 million potential oligopeptide fragments to match) in under a minute. Super web server is freely accessible from: http://lcb.infotech.monash.edu.au/super.

  14. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications. PMID:28266533

  15. Synthetic oligopeptide substrates: their diagnostic application in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and other pathologic states

    SciTech Connect

    Huseby, R.M.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    This review article with 522 references, focuses on the use of synthetic oligopepide substrates to measure the activity of proteoytic enzymes in human physiology and pathology. A classification of proteinases based on their mechanism of action is presented. The application of these synthetic oligopeptide substrates to understand the disorders of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system is reviewed. Intracellular functioning proteinases were also assessed in relation to certain pathologies where their abnormal activity is recognized.

  16. Inclusion of Cu nano-cluster 1D arrays inside a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide via co-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ruiying; Li, Fei; Yang, Chunpeng; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside.A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside. Electronic

  17. Inhibition of Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporters Suppresses Kynurenic Acid Production Via Inhibition of Kynurenine Uptake in Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Kuroki, Yusuke; Urata, Tomomi; Mori, Noriyuki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increases of brain KYNA levels are involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and regulation of KYNA production has become a new target for treatment of these diseases. Kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is transported into astrocytes via large neutral amino acid transporters (LATs). In the present study, the effect of LATs regulation on KYN uptake and KYNA production was investigated in vitro and in vivo using an LATs inhibitor, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). In the in vitro study, cortical slices of rat brain were incubated with a physiological concentration of KYN and 3 µmol/L-3 mmol/L BCH. BCH inhibited KYNA production and KYN uptake in a dose-dependent manner, and their IC50 values were 90.7 and 97.4 µmol/L, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were administered KYN (50 mg/kg BW) orally and BCH (200 mg/kg BW) intravenously. Administration of KYN increased brain KYN and KYNA levels compared with the mice treated with vehicle, whereas additional administration of BCH suppressed KYN-induced elevations in KYN and KYNA levels to 50 and 70 % in the brain. These results suggest that inhibition of LATs prevented the increase of KYNA production via blockade of KYN uptake in the brain in vitro and in vivo. LATs can be a target to modulate brain function by regulation of KYNA production in the brain.

  18. Oligopeptides as full-length New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bingzheng; Zhu, Chengliang; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Gang; Song, Jinchun; Yu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    'Superbug' bacteria producing NDM-1 enzyme causing wide public concern were first detected in a patient who visited India in 2008. It's an effective approach to combining β-lactam antibiotics with NDM-1 inhibitor for treating NDM-1 producing strain infection. In our research, we designed ten oligopeptides, tested IC50 values against NDM-1 enzyme, determined the MIC values of synergistic antibacterial effect and explored the binding model. We found that the oligopeptides 2 (Cys-Phe) and 5 (Cys-Asp) respectively presented IC50 values of 113 μM and 68 μM and also displayed favorable synergistic effects of the inhibitors in combination with ertapenem against genetic engineering-host E. coli BL21 (DE3)/pET30a-NDM-1 and a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa with blaNDM-1. Flexible docking and partial charge study suggested the interaction between oligopeptide and NDM-1. Three types of action effects, hydrogen bond, electrostatic effect and π-π interaction, contributed to the inhibitory activities.

  19. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments.

  20. One-step formation of oligopeptide-like molecules from Glu and Asp in hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Shimahashi, Masanori

    2008-05-01

    Biopolymer accumulation in the absence of enzymes is an essential step for the chemical evolution of primitive life-like systems, and successful simulation experiments of prebiotic biopolymer formation have suggested that oligopeptides could have formed near submarine hydrothermal vent environments on primitive earth. However, the yield and length of oligopeptides—typically limited to 6-mers—seems to be inadequate. One reason is the rapid formation of diketopiperazines (DKPs) from dipeptides. In this study, using a hydrothermal microflow reactor, we show that the one-step synthesis of oligopeptide-like molecules of length up to 20-mers proceeds from Glu and Asp. Yields of up to 0.17-0.57% were obtained in an acidic solution within 183 s at 250-310°C, as evaluated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) analysis and different types of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. The present study indicates that Glu and Asp may have played important roles in the chemical evolution of oligopeptide-like molecules in hydrothermal vent environments on primitive earth.

  1. Tissue engineering based on electrochemical desorption of an RGD-containing oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Naoto; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Osaki, Tatsuya; Sadr, Nasser; Kachouie, Nezamoddin N; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Junji

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive approach for efficient detachment of cells adhered to a gold substrate via a specific oligopeptide. Detachment is effected by an electrical stimulus. The oligopeptide contains cysteine, which spontaneously forms a gold-thiolate bond on a gold surface. This chemical adsorption reaches > 95% equilibrium within 10 min after immersion of a gold-coated substrate in a solution containing the peptide. The peptide is reversibly desorbed from the surface within 5 min of application of a negative electrical potential. By taking advantage of this simple adsorption and desorption mechanism, cells can be grown on an oligopeptide-functionalized gold surface and can be efficiently detached as single cells or cell sheets by application of a negative electrical potential. This approach was also applied to the surface of gold-coated microrods. Capillary-like microchannels were formed in collagen gel by transferring endothelial cells to the internal surfaces of the microchannels. During subsequent perfusion culture, the enveloped endothelial cells migrated into the collagen gel and formed luminal structures, which sprouted from the microchannels. This technique has the potential to provide a fundamental tool for the engineering of thick cell sheets as well as vascularized tissues and organs.

  2. Prediction of jet mean flow structure in support of HSCT noise suppression concepts. [High Speed Civilian Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.; York, B. J.; Lee, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the application of techniques based on computational fluid dynamics to the simulation of jet flowfields. A solution code for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is supplemented by conventional two-equation turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation. The axisymmetric SCIPVIS code is enhanced with the PARCH and CRAFT codes to examine plug-jet flowfields and imperfectly expanded axisymmetric free round jets. The sensitivity of shock/boundary layer interactions is observed in simulations of the plug case, and the adaptive gridding in the disk region and turbulence levels generated at the triple point are identified as areas in the Mach case that require improvement. Jet-wave structure in the region beyond the first several shock cells can be predicted, and turbulence modeling can be undertaken with respect to improving compressibility, length scale, vorticity, and energy budget. The mean flow structure of imperfectly expanded jets can be studied to develop related noise suppression concepts for the High-Speed Civilian Transport (HSCT).

  3. Suppression pattern of neutral pions at high transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV and constraints on medium transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lim, H; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-12-05

    For Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV, we measure neutral pion production with good statistics for transverse momentum, pT, up to 20 GeV/c. A fivefold suppression is found, which is essentially constant for 5 < pT < 20 GeV/c. Experimental uncertainties are small enough to constrain any model-dependent parametrization for the transport coefficient of the medium, e.g., q in the parton quenching model. The spectral shape is similar for all collision classes, and the suppression does not saturate in Au + Au collisions.

  4. Limited stability of microcystins in oligopeptide compositions of Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanobacteria): implications in the definition of chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Agha, Ramsy; Cirés, Samuel; Wörmer, Lars; Quesada, Antonio

    2013-06-06

    The occurrence of diverse oligopeptides in cyanobacteria, including the cyanotoxins microcystins, has been recently used to classify individual clones into sub-specific oligopeptide chemotypes, whose composition and dynamics modulate microcystin concentrations in cyanobacterial blooms. Cyanobacterial chemotyping allows the study of the ecology of chemotypical subpopulations, which have been shown to possess dissimilar ecological traits. However, the stability of chemotypes under changing abiotic conditions is usually assumed and has not been assessed in detail. We monitored oligopeptide patterns of three strains of Microcystis aeruginosa under different nutrient and light conditions. MALDI-TOF MS revealed alterations in the microcystins signatures under N and P poor conditions and high light intensities (150 and 400 μmol photons m-2s-1). Variations in the general oligopeptide composition were caused by a gradual disappearance of microcystins with low relative intensity signals from the fingerprint. The extent of such variations seems to be closely related to physiological stress caused by treatments. Under identical clonal compositions, alterations in the oligopeptide fingerprint may be misinterpreted as apparent shifts in chemotype succession. We discuss the nature of such variations, as well as the consequent implications in the use of cyanobacterial chemotyping in studies at the subpopulation level and propose new guidance for the definition of chemotypes as a consistent subpopulation marker.

  5. Super-secondary structure of oligopeptide aggregates in an organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, H.; Yuuki, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Taga, K.; Yoshida, T.; Okabayashi, H.; Furusaka, M.; Kawasaki, K.; Kawakatsu, T.; Hirai, M.

    1995-02-01

    For N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid hexamer α,γ-benzyl ester (A6Z), synthesized by a stepwise procedure, the shape and size of an aggregate formed in dioxane has been investigated in connection with the super-secondary structure of oligopeptides by the SANS method. The results are summarized as follows. An A6Z aggregate in dioxane has a cylinder-like shape having a radius of 13 Å and a height of 135 Å, and the aggregation number is 36. Probably, the cylinder aggregate has a stacking structure of the A6Z β-sheets.

  6. Plasma confinement modification and convective transport suppression in the scrape-off layer using additional gas puffing in the STOR-M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M.; Hubeny, M.; Ding, Y.; Onchi, T.; Liu, Y.; Hthu, K.; Elgriw, S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of short gas puffing (GP) pulses on the scrape-off layer (SOL) transport is studied. Similar responses of ion saturation current and floating potential measured near the GP injection valve and in the 90° toroidally separated cross-section suggest that the GP influence on the SOL region should be global. A drop in plasma temperature and a decrease in the rotational velocity of the plasma are observed in the SOL region immediately after the GP pulse; however, an unexpected increase in electron and ion temperatures is observed in the second stage of the plasma response. The decrease in floating potential fluctuations indicates that the turbulent transport is dumped immediately after the GP pulse. The GP-induced modification of turbulence properties in the SOL points to a convective transport suppression in the STOR-M tokamak. A substantial decrease in the skewness and kurtosis of ion saturation current fluctuations is observed in the SOL region resulting in the probability distribution function (PDF) getting closer to the Gaussian distribution. The plasma potential reduction, the change in plasma rotation and the suppression of turbulent transport in the SOL region indicate that the plasma confinement is modified after the GP injection. Some features of the H-mode-like confinement in the plasma bulk also accompany the SOL observations after application of the additional sharp GP pulse.

  7. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  8. Viscoelastic Properties and Nano-scale Structures of Composite Oligopeptide-Polysaccharide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the co-assembly of mutually attractive but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the co-assembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G′ decreased from 90 kPa to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 % to 100 %). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formedless stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  9. Directed self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides for supramolecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Li, Songsong; Zhou, Yuecheng; Tovar, John; Wilson, William; Schroeder, Charles

    The directed mesoscale engineering of nanoscale building blocks holds enormous promise to catalyze a revolution in new functional materials for advanced electronics. Bio-inspired systems can play a key role in this effort due to their inherent ``programmable'' function. In this work, oligopeptide with defined flanking sequences was appended to π-conjugated units, thereby directing their assembly processes in a designed manner. By utilizing custom-designed microfluidic devices and controlled acid vapor diffusion, the self-assembly rate was directed and precisely tuned. Notably, the kinetics was found to play a key role in the morphology of self-assembled π-conjugated oligopeptides. The influence of flanking peptide sequences and π-conjugated core-core interactions on the self-assembly nanostructure was systematically investigated. Importantly, the electronic properties of the synthetic peptide assembly was explored by integration as the active layer of a field effect transistor. The presented study offers insights to the design and fabrication of supramolecular electronics.

  10. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme.

  11. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  12. Suppression of roll-off characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes by narrowing current injection/transport area to 50 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kyohei Inoue, Munetomo; Yoshida, Kou; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mikhnenko, Oleksandr; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Chihaya E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-02

    Using e-beam nanolithography, the current injection/transport area in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was confined into a narrow linear structure with a minimum width of 50 nm. This caused suppression of Joule heating and partial separation of polarons and excitons, so the charge density where the electroluminescent efficiency decays to the half of the initial value (J{sub 0}) was significantly improved. A device with a narrow current injection width of 50 nm exhibited a J{sub 0} that was almost two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of the unpatterned OLED.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally recognized... automatic, fire detection for the engine including the starter, transmission, hydraulic pumps and tanks... detection and actuation circuits shall be monitored and provided with status indicators showing power and...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally recognized... automatic, fire detection for the engine including the starter, transmission, hydraulic pumps and tanks... detection and actuation circuits shall be monitored and provided with status indicators showing power and...

  15. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  16. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  17. Generation of free radicals from lipid hydroperoxides by Ni2+ in the presence of oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Dalal, N S; Kasprzak, K S

    1992-11-15

    The generation of free radicals from lipid hydroperoxides by Ni2+ in the presence of several oligopeptides was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) utilizing 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. Incubation of Ni2+ with cumene hydroperoxide or t-butyl hydroperoxide did not generate any detectable free radical. In the presence of glycylglycylhistidine (GlyGlyHis), however, Ni2+ generated cumene peroxyl (ROO.) radical from cumene hydroperoxide, with the free radical generation reaching its saturation level within about 3 min. The reaction was first order with respect to both cumene hydroperoxide and Ni2+. Similar results were obtained using t-butyl hydroperoxide, but the yield of t-butyl peroxyl radical generation was about 7-fold lower. Other histidine-containing oligopeptides such as beta-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine), gamma-aminobutyryl-L-histidine (homocarnosine), and beta-alanyl-3-methyl-L-histidine (anserine) caused the generation of both cumene alkyl (R.) and cumene alkoxyl (RO.) radicals in the reaction of Ni2+ with cumene hydroperoxide. Similar results were obtained using t-butyl hydroperoxide. Glutathione also caused generation of R. and RO. radicals in the reaction of Ni2+ with cumene hydroperoxide but the yield was approximately 25-fold greater than that produced by the histidine-containing peptides, except GlyGlyHis. The ratio of DMPO/R. and DMPO/RO. produced with glutathione and cumene hydroperoxide was approximately 3:1. Essentially the same results were obtained using t-butyl hydroperoxide except that the ratio of DMPO/R. to DMPO/RO. was approximately 1:1. The free radical generation from cumene hydroperoxide reached its saturation level almost instantaneously while in the case of t-butyl hydroperoxide, the saturation level was reached in about 3 min. In the presence of oxidized glutathione, the Ni2+/cumene hydroperoxide system caused DMPO/.OH generation from DMPO without forming free hydroxyl radical. Since glutathione

  18. The effects of synthetic oligopeptide derived from enamel matrix derivative on cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Nobuhito; Kato, Hirohito; Taguchi, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Akio; Umeda, Makoto

    2014-08-13

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is widely used in periodontal tissue regeneration therapy. However, because the bioactivity of EMD varies from batch to batch, and the use of a synthetic peptide could avoid use from an animal source, a completely synthetic peptide (SP) containing the active component of EMD would be useful. In this study an oligopeptide synthesized derived from EMD was evaluated for whether it contributes to periodontal tissue regeneration. We investigated the effects of the SP on cell proliferation and osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are involved in tissue regeneration. MSCs were treated with SP (0 to 1000 ng/mL), to determine the optimal concentration. We examined the effects of SP on cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation indicators such as alkaline phosphatase activity, the production of procollagen type 1 C-peptide and osteocalcin, and on mineralization. Additionally, we investigated the role of extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK) in cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation induced by SP. Our results suggest that SP promotes these processes in human MSCs, and that ERK inhibitors suppress these effects. In conclusion, SP promotes cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human MSCs, probably through the ERK pathway.

  19. Suppression of NDA-Type Alternative Mitochondrial NAD(P)H Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana Modifies Growth and Metabolism, but not High Light Stimulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wallström, Sabá V.; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L.; Escobar, Matthew A.; Geisler, Daniela A.; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2014-01-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins. PMID:24486764

  20. Suppression of NDA-type alternative mitochondrial NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in arabidopsis thaliana modifies growth and metabolism, but not high light stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Wallström, Sabá V; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L; Escobar, Matthew A; Geisler, Daniela A; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2014-05-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)⁺ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins.

  1. Giant suppression of phononic heat transport in a quantum magnet BiCu2PO6

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Koteswararao, B.; Park, C. B.; Shu, G. J.; Riggs, S. C.; Moon, E. G.; Chung, S. B.; Chou, F. C.; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-11-15

    Thermal transport of quantum magnets has elucidated the nature of low energy elementary excitations and complex interplay between those excited states via strong scattering of thermal carriers. BiCu2PO6 is a unique frustrated spin-ladder compound exhibiting highly anisotropic spin excitations that contain both itinerant and localized dispersion characters along the b- and a-axes respectively. Here, we investigate thermal conductivity κ of BiCu2PO6 under high magnetic fields (H) of up to 30 tesla. A dip-feature in κ, located at ~15K at zero-H along all crystallographic directions, moves gradually toward lower temperature (T) with increasing H, thus resulting in giant suppression by a factor of ~30 near the critical magnetic field of Hc≅23.5 tesla. The giant H- and T-dependent suppression of κ can be explained by the combined result of resonant scattering of phononic heat carriers with magnetic energy levels and increased phonon scattering due to enhanced spin fluctuation at Hc, unequivocally revealing the existence of strong spin-phonon coupling. Moreover, we find an experimental indication that the remaining magnetic heat transport along the b-axis becomes almost gapless at the magnetic quantum critical point realized at Hc.

  2. Biosynthesis of rhizocticins, antifungal phosphonate oligopeptides produced by Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633

    PubMed Central

    Borisova, Svetlana A.; Circello, Benjamin T.; Zhang, Jun Kai; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Rhizocticins are phosphonate oligopeptide antibiotics containing the C-terminal non-proteinogenic amino acid (Z)-l-2-amino-5-phosphono-3-pentenoic acid (APPA). Here we report the identification and characterization of the rhizocticin biosynthetic gene cluster (rhi) in Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633. Rhizocticin B was heterologously produced in the non-producer strain Bacillus subtilis 168. A biosynthetic pathway is proposed based on bioinformatics analysis of the rhi genes. One of the steps during the biosynthesis of APPA is an unusual aldol reaction between phosphonoacetaldehyde and oxaloacetate catalyzed by an aldolase homolog RhiG. Recombinant RhiG was prepared and the product of an in vitro enzymatic conversion was characterized. Access to this intermediate allows for biochemical characterization of subsequent steps in the pathway. PMID:20142038

  3. FRET study in oligopeptide-linked donor-acceptor system in PVA matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sunil; Mandecki, Wlodek; Li, Ji; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Fudala, Rafal

    2016-12-01

    An oligopeptide: Lys-Gly-Pro-Arg-Ser-Leu-Ser-Gly-Lys-NH2, cleaved specifically by a matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) at the Ser-Leu bond, was labeled on the ɛ-NH2 groups of lysine with donor (5, 6 TAMRA) and acceptor (HiLyte647) dye. The donor control was a peptide labeled with 5, 6 TAMRA only on the C-terminal lysine, and the acceptor control was free HiLyte647. Following three products were studied by dissolving in 10% (w/w) poly(vinyl alcohol) and dried on glass slides forming 200 micron films. Absorption spectra of the films show full additivity of donor and acceptor absorptions. A strong Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) with an efficiency of about 85% was observed in the fluorescence emission and excitation spectra. The lifetime of the donor was shorter and heterogeneous compared with the donor control.

  4. Free Energy Landscapes of Alanine Oligopeptides in Rigid-Body and Hybrid Water Models.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Divya; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2015-08-27

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics is used to study the effect of different rigid-body (mTIP3P, TIP4P, SPC/E) and hybrid (H1.56, H3.00) water models on the conformational free energy landscape of the alanine oligopeptides (acAnme and acA5nme), in conjunction with the CHARMM22 force field. The free energy landscape is mapped out as a function of the Ramachandran angles. In addition, various secondary structure metrics, solvation shell properties, and the number of peptide-solvent hydrogen bonds are monitored. Alanine dipeptide is found to have similar free energy landscapes in different solvent models, an insensitivity which may be due to the absence of possibilities for forming i-(i + 4) or i-(i + 3) intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The pentapeptide, acA5nme, where there are three intrapeptide backbone hydrogen bonds, shows a conformational free energy landscape with a much greater degree of sensitivity to the choice of solvent model, though the three rigid-body water models differ only quantitatively. The pentapeptide prefers nonhelical, non-native PPII and β-sheet populations as the solvent is changed from SPC/E to the less tetrahedral liquid (H1.56) to an LJ-like liquid (H3.00). The pentapeptide conformational order metrics indicate a preference for open, solvent-exposed, non-native structures in hybrid solvent models at all temperatures of study. The possible correlations between the properties of solvent models and secondary structure preferences of alanine oligopeptides are discussed, and the competition between intrapeptide, peptide-solvent, and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonding is shown to be crucial in the relative free energies of different conformers.

  5. Functional characterization and RNAi-mediated suppression reveals roles for hexose transporters in sugar accumulation by tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, David W; Dibley, Stephen; Cahyanegara, Ricky; Martin, Antony; Patrick, John W

    2010-11-01

    Hexoses accumulate to high concentrations (∼ 200 mM) in storage parenchyma cells of tomato fruit. Hexoses are sourced from the fruit apoplasm as hydrolysis products of phloem-imported sucrose. Three hexose transporters (LeHT1, LeHT2, LeHT3), expressed in fruit storage parenchyma cells, may contribute to hexose uptake by these cells. An analysis of their full-length sequences demonstrated that all three transporters belong to the STP sub-family of monosaccharide transporters that localize to plasma membranes. Heterologous expression of LeHT1 (and previously LeHT2, Gear et al., 2000), but not LeHT3, rescued a hexose transport-impaired yeast mutant when raised on glucose or fructose as the sole carbon source. Biochemically, LeHT1, similarly to LeHT2, exhibited transport properties consistent with a high-affinity glucose/H(+) symporter. Significantly, LeHT1 and LeHT2 also functioned as low-affinity fructose/H(+) symporters with apparent K(m) values commensurate with those of fruit tissues. A substantial reduction (80-90%) in fruit expression levels of all LeHT genes by RNAi-mediated knockdown caused a 55% decrease in fruit hexose accumulation. In contrast, photoassimilate production by source leaves and phloem transport capacity to fruit were unaffected by transporter knockdown. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that LeHTs play key roles in driving accumulation of hexoses into storage parenchyma cells during tomato fruit development.

  6. Tea catechins with a galloyl moiety suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by delaying lymphatic transport of dietary fat in rats.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo; Tsuda, Koichi; Suzuki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Makoto; Unno, Tomonori; Tomoyori, Hiroko; Goto, Hitomi; Kawata, Yayoi; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Nozawa, Ayumu; Kakuda, Takami

    2005-02-01

    Tea catechins, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), have been shown to be epimerized to (-)-catechin (C), (-)-gallocatechin (GC), (-)-catechin gallate (CG), and (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG), respectively, during heat treatment. In this study, we examined the effect of tea catechins rich in ECG and EGCG and heat-treated tea catechins rich in CG and GCG on postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in rats. Both tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia. Lymphatic recovery of (14)C-trioleoylglycerol in rats cannulated in the thoracic duct was delayed by the administration of tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins. Tea catechins and heat-treated tea catechins had the same effect on all variables tested. These catechin preparations dose-dependently inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase in vitro. When purified catechins were used, only those with a galloyl moiety inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase. These results suggest that catechins with a galloyl moiety suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by slowing down triacylglycerol absorption through the inhibition of pancreatic lipase. Because postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, our results suggest that catechins with a galloyl moiety may prevent this disease.

  7. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., fuel tanks, exposed brake units, air compressors and battery areas on diesel-powered equipment and electric panels or controls used on fuel transportation units and other areas as necessary. (c) If... operative in the event of engine shutdown, equipment electrical system failure, or failure of any other...

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans P5B-type ATPase CATP-5 operates in polyamine transport and is crucial for norspermidine-mediated suppression of RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Heinick, Alexander; Urban, Katja; Roth, Stefan; Spies, Danica; Nunes, Frank; Phanstiel, Otto; Liebau, Eva; Lüersen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Physiological polyamines are required in various biological processes. In the current study, we used norspermidine, a structural analog of the natural polyamine spermidine, to investigate polyamine uptake in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Norspermidine was found to have two remarkable effects: it is toxic for the nematode, without affecting its food, Escherichia coli; and it hampers RNA interference. By characterizing a norspermidine-resistant C. elegans mutant strain that has been isolated in a genetic screen, we demonstrate that both effects, as well as the uptake of a fluorescent polyamine-conjugate, depend on the transporter protein CATP-5, a novel P5B-type ATPase. To our knowledge, CATP-5 represents the first P5-type ATPase that is associated with the plasma membrane, being expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells and the excretory cell. Moreover, genetic interaction studies using C. elegans polyamine synthesis mutants indicate that CATP-5 has a function redundant to polyamine synthesis and link reduced polyamine levels to retarded postembryonic development, reduced brood size, shortened life span, and small body size. We suggest that CATP-5 represents a crucial component of the pharmacologically important polyamine transport system, the molecular nature of which has not been identified so far in metazoa.—Heinick, A., Urban, K., Roth, S., Spies, D., Nunes, F., Phanstiel IV, O., Liebau, E., Lüersen, K. Caenorhabditis elegans P5B-type ATPase CATP-5 operates in polyamine transport and is crucial for norspermidine-mediated suppression of RNA interference. PMID:19762559

  9. Low-Protein Diet Supplemented with Keto Acids Is Associated with Suppression of Small-Solute Peritoneal Transport Rate in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Na; Qian, Jiaqi; Lin, Aiwu; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Weiming; Cao, Liou; Wang, Qin; Ni, Zhaohui; Yao, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We investigate whether low-protein diet would show benefits in suppressing peritoneal transport rate in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods. This is a supplemented analysis of our previously published trial, which randomized 60 PD patients to receive low- (LP: dietary protein intake of 0.6–0.8 g/kg/d), keto-acid-supplemented low- (sLP: 0.6–0.8 g/kg/d with 0.12 g/kg/d of keto acids), or high- (HP: 1.0–1.2 g/kg/d) protein diet and lasted for one year. In this study, the variations of peritoneal transport rate were assessed. Results. While baseline D/Pcr (dialysate-to-plasma concentration ratio for creatinine at 4 hour) and D/D0glu (dialysate glucose at 4 hour to baseline dialysate glucose concentration ratio) were similar, D/Pcr in group sLP was lower, and D/D0glu was higher than those in the other two groups (P < 0.05) at 12th month. D/D0glu increased (P < 0.05), and D/Pcr tended to decrease, (P = 0.071) in group sLP. Conclusions. Low-protein diet with keto acids may benefit PD patients by maintaining peritoneum at a lower transport rate. PMID:21747999

  10. Low-protein diet supplemented with keto acids is associated with suppression of small-solute peritoneal transport rate in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Na; Qian, Jiaqi; Lin, Aiwu; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Weiming; Cao, Liou; Wang, Qin; Ni, Zhaohui; Yao, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We investigate whether low-protein diet would show benefits in suppressing peritoneal transport rate in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods. This is a supplemented analysis of our previously published trial, which randomized 60 PD patients to receive low- (LP: dietary protein intake of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/d), keto-acid-supplemented low- (sLP: 0.6-0.8 g/kg/d with 0.12 g/kg/d of keto acids), or high- (HP: 1.0-1.2 g/kg/d) protein diet and lasted for one year. In this study, the variations of peritoneal transport rate were assessed. Results. While baseline D/P(cr) (dialysate-to-plasma concentration ratio for creatinine at 4 hour) and D/D0(glu) (dialysate glucose at 4 hour to baseline dialysate glucose concentration ratio) were similar, D/P(cr) in group sLP was lower, and D/D0(glu) was higher than those in the other two groups (P < 0.05) at 12th month. D/D0(glu) increased (P < 0.05), and D/P(cr) tended to decrease, (P = 0.071) in group sLP. Conclusions. Low-protein diet with keto acids may benefit PD patients by maintaining peritoneum at a lower transport rate.

  11. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  12. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  13. Suppression of spin transport in ferromagnet/oxide/semiconductor junctions by magnetic impurities in the tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiesser, Aurélie; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji; Jansen, Ron

    2016-10-01

    We have studied how the insertion of sub-monolayer amounts of Mn impurities in the middle of the oxide tunnel barrier of Fe/GeO2 on p-type Ge affects the spin transport, using three-terminal Hanle measurements. Strikingly, the magnitude of the Hanle spin voltage is strongly reduced by increasing the amount of Mn dopants and is even completely absent for devices having an amount of Mn impurities equivalent to a 0.2-nm-thick layer. This demonstrates that magnetic impurities in the tunnel barrier are detrimental to the spin transport in ferromagnet/oxide/semiconductor junctions, and that the localized states associated with such magnetic impurities do not produce three-terminal Hanle spin signals.

  14. Suppression of asymmetric acid efflux and gravitropism in maize roots treated with auxin transport inhibitors of sodium orthovanadate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    In gravitropically stimulated roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid WF9 x 38MS), there is more acid efflux on the rapidly growing upper side than on the slowly growing lower side. In light of the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism which states that gravitropic curvature results from lateral redistribution of auxin, the effects of auxin transport inhibitors on the development of acid efflux asymmetry and curvature in gravistimulated roots were examined. All the transport inhibitors tested prevented both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots. The results indicate that auxin redistribution may cause the asymmetry of acid efflux, a finding consistent with the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism. As further evidence that auxin-induced acid efflux asymmetry may mediate gravitropic curvature, sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of auxin-induced H+ efflux was found to prevent both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots.

  15. Remarkable difference of phase transition behaviors between Langmuir monolayers and aqueous bilayer vesicles of oligopeptide-carrying lipids.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Nakanishi, Takashi; Kawanami, Shin-ichi; Kosaka, Takatoshi; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi

    2006-06-01

    In this research, we synthesized six kinds of oligopeptide-carrying lipids which possessing glycine, diglycine, triglycine, alanine, dialanine, and trialanine residues (see Figure 1 for their formulae), and systematically investigated their phase transition behaviors both at the air-water interface and in aqueous bilayer vesicles. pi-A Isotherms of Langmuir monolayers of these lipids were measured at the air-water interfaces under varied temperature conditions and were analyzed based on compressibility of the monolayers. Above the specific temperature, the transition pressure from its expanded phase to condensed phase is not distinguishable with the collapse pressure of the monolayer, i.e., the monolayer collapses directly from the expanded phase without forming the condensed phase. This temperature was defined as the phase transition temperature of the monolayer, which was compared with the phase transition temperature of the corresponding bilayer vesicle in water. The phase transition temperatures of the oligoglycine-carrying lipids and oligoalanine-carrying lipids are significantly different at the air-water interface, while the corresponding difference is not obvious in their aqueous bilayer vesicles. Consideration based on molecular structures suggests necessity of the water mediation for effective formation of hydrogen bonding between the oligopeptide residues directly connected to dialkyl chains. Therefore, the differences in water accessibility to the films may cause the difference of the phase transition behaviors of the oligopeptide-carrying lipids between the Langmuir monolayers and the aqueous bilayer vesicles. Although the proposed mechanism is not fully supported by experimental evidences, the data presented here clearly demonstrated the presence of significant difference of the phase transition properties between the Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface and aqueous bilayer vesicles of the oligopeptide-carrying lipids.

  16. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  17. Investigation Into Efficiency of a Novel Glycol Chitosan-Bestatin Conjugate to Protect Thymopoietin Oligopeptides From Enzymatic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Feng, Jiao; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Chunlei; Shi, Nianqiu; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a novel glycol chitosan (GCS)-bestatin conjugate was synthesized and evaluated to demonstrate its efficacy in protecting thymopoietin oligopeptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation. Moreover, the mechanism and relative susceptibility of three thymopoietin oligopeptides, thymocartin (TP4), thymopentin (TP5), and thymotrinan (TP3), to enzymatic degradation were investigated and compared at the molecular level. Initial investigations indicated that formation of the GCS-bestatin conjugate, with a substitution degree of 7.0% (moles of bestatin per mole of glycol glucosamine unit), could significantly protect all 3 peptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The space hindrance and loss of one pair of hydrogen bonds, resulting from the covalent conjugation of chitosan with bestatin, did not affect the specific interaction between bestatin and aminopeptidase. Moreover, TP4 displayed a higher degradation clearance compared with those of TP5 and TP3 under the same experimental conditions. The varying levels of susceptibility of these 3 peptides to aminopeptidase (TP4 > TP5 > TP3) were closely related to differences in their binding energies to enzyme, which mainly involved Van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, as supported by the results of molecular dynamics simulations. These results suggest that GCS-bestatin conjugate might be useful in the delivery of thymopoietin oligopeptides by mucosal routes, and that TP3 and TP5 are better alternatives to TP4 for delivery because of their robust resistance against enzymatic degradation.

  18. Xeno-free culture of human pluripotent stem cells on oligopeptide-grafted hydrogels with various molecular designs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Meng-Pei; Li, Hsing-Fen; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, S Suresh; Ling, Qing-Dong; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Chang, Yung; Benelli, Giovanni; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2017-03-23

    Establishing cultures of human embryonic (ES) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells in xeno-free conditions is essential for producing clinical-grade cells. Development of cell culture biomaterials for human ES and iPS cells is critical for this purpose. We designed several structures of oligopeptide-grafted poly (vinyl alcohol-co-itaconic acid) hydrogels with optimal elasticity, and prepared them in formations of single chain, single chain with joint segment, dual chain with joint segment, and branched-type chain. Oligopeptide sequences were selected from integrin- and glycosaminoglycan-binding domains of the extracellular matrix. The hydrogels grafted with vitronectin-derived oligopeptides having a joint segment or a dual chain, which has a storage modulus of 25 kPa, supported the long-term culture of human ES and iPS cells for over 10 passages. The dual chain and/or joint segment with cell adhesion molecules on the hydrogels facilitated the proliferation and pluripotency of human ES and iPS cells.

  19. Simultaneous analysis of seven oligopeptides in microbial fuel cell by micro-fluidic chip with reflux injection mode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Zijian; Lin, Xiuli; Wang, ZongWen; Fu, FengFu

    2012-10-15

    In this work, a reflux injection mode for the cross form micro-fluidic chip was studied. This injection mode could flexibly control the length of sample plug from less than one channel width (<83 μm) to tens of channel widths (millimeter-sized) by adjusting the injection time. Namely, the separation resolution or sample detection sensitivity could be selectively improved by changing injection time. Composed of four steps, the reflux injection mode alleviated the electrophoretic sampling bias and prevented sample leakage successfully. On a micro-fluidic chip coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detector, the injection mode was applied to separate seven oligopeptides, namely GG, GL, RPP, KPV, VKK, WYD and YWS. All analytes were completely separated and detected within 12 min with detection limits of 25-625 nmol/L. At last, the proposed method had been successfully applied to detect oligopeptides consumed by bacillus licheniformis in anode chamber of microbial fuel cell (MFC) to study the effect of oligopeptides on the MFC running.

  20. Xeno-free culture of human pluripotent stem cells on oligopeptide-grafted hydrogels with various molecular designs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Meng-Pei; Li, Hsing-Fen; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, S. Suresh; Ling, Qing-Dong; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Chang, Yung; Benelli, Giovanni; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Establishing cultures of human embryonic (ES) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells in xeno-free conditions is essential for producing clinical-grade cells. Development of cell culture biomaterials for human ES and iPS cells is critical for this purpose. We designed several structures of oligopeptide-grafted poly (vinyl alcohol-co-itaconic acid) hydrogels with optimal elasticity, and prepared them in formations of single chain, single chain with joint segment, dual chain with joint segment, and branched-type chain. Oligopeptide sequences were selected from integrin- and glycosaminoglycan-binding domains of the extracellular matrix. The hydrogels grafted with vitronectin-derived oligopeptides having a joint segment or a dual chain, which has a storage modulus of 25 kPa, supported the long-term culture of human ES and iPS cells for over 10 passages. The dual chain and/or joint segment with cell adhesion molecules on the hydrogels facilitated the proliferation and pluripotency of human ES and iPS cells. PMID:28332572

  1. HIV-Protease Inhibitors Suppress Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Oxidation by Reducing CD36 and CPT-I Fatty Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Scott R.; Carper, Michael J.; Lei, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Sheng; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Ramanadham, Sasanka

    2010-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and treatment with HIV-protease inhibitor (PI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) is associated with dysregulated fatty acid and lipid metabolism. Enhanced lipolysis, increased circulating fatty acid levels, and hepatic and intramuscular lipid accumulation appear to contribute to insulin resistance in HIV-infected people treated with PI-based HAART. However, it is unclear whether currently prescribed HIV-PIs directly alter skeletal muscle fatty acid transport, oxidation, and storage. We find that ritonavir (r, 5 μmol/l) plus 20 μmol/l of atazanavir (ATV), lopinavir (LPV), or darunavir (DRV) reduce palmitate oxidation(16-21%) in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Palmitate oxidation was increased following exposure to high fatty acid media but this effect was blunted when myotubes were pre-exposed to the HIV-PIs. However, LPV/r and DRV/r, but not ATV/r suppressed palmitate uptake into myotubes. We found no effect of the HIV-PIs on FATP1, FATP4, or FABPpm but both CD36/FAT and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) were reduced by all three regimens though ATV/r caused only a small decrease in CPT1, relative to LPV/r or DRV/r. In contrast, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 was increased by all 3 HIV-PIs. These findings suggest that HIV-PIs suppress fatty acid oxidation in murine skeletal muscle cells and that this may be related to decreases in cytosolic- and mitochondrial-associated fatty acid transporters. HIV-PIs may also directly impair fatty acid handling and partitioning in skeletal muscle, and this may contribute to the cluster of metabolic complications that occur in people living with HIV. PMID:20117238

  2. Postdiffusion of oligo-peptide within exponential growth multilayer films for localized peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefei; Ji, Jian

    2009-10-06

    The multilayers of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were constructed by alternating deposition of PLL at high pH and HA at low pH. The exponential growth of the multilayer was proved to be amplified by increasing the pH difference between the two deposition solutions. The exponential growth multilayers of PLL/HA assembled at different pH were utilized as reservoirs for loading a trans-activating transcriptional factor (TAT) peptide. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results indicated that the FITC-labeled TAT could diffuse throughout the exponentially growing PLL/HA film. The amount of peptide embedded within multilayer could be adjusted by both multilayer assembly pH and the TAT loading pH. Compared with (PLL/HA 6.5/6.5)5 multilayer (PLL/HA a/b means that the multilayer film was constructed by using PLL at pH a and HA at pH b), the (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film can be loaded with more TAT peptide at the same loading pH 6.5. The excess of positively charged TAT peptide within (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film could not only be ascribed to its extraordinary thickness but also be attributed to its uncompensated negative charge density enhanced by the pH difference between film buildup and peptide loading process. Increasing of the TAT loading pH from 6.5 to 9.5, which increases the pH difference between multilayer assembly and peptide loading process, enhances the uncompensated charge density within (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film and elevates the peptide density from 13.8 to 25.0 microg/cm2. Compared with direct layer-by-layer assembly of TAT and HA, the postdiffusion of TAT into (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film was loaded much more peptide. The postdiffusion of peptide into a rapid growth multilayer can be more favorable to load and sustainedly release functional oligo-peptide. The cell culture results indicated that the TAT embedded within the film maintained the ability to traverse across the Hep G2 cell membrane. The functionalized (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 TAT 9.5 film was more

  3. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage.

  4. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early-stage self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-03-22

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate early-stage self-assembly. Under low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ≈ -25kBT. Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini (ΔF ≈ -5kBT). In simulations of hundreds of monomers over 70 ns we observe the spontaneous formation of up to undecameric aggregates under low-pH conditions. Modeling assembly as a continuous-time Markov process, we infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide sequence and aromatic core chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates.

  5. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early- stage self-assembly of pi-conjugated oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Bryce; Tovar, John; Ferguson, Andrew

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate self-assembly. At low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ~ - 25kB T . Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini. We model simulations of hundereds of monomers as a continuous-time Markov process. We infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Award DE-SC0004857. Molecular simulations partially conducted on University of Illinois Computational Science and Engineering Program parallel computing resources.

  6. Protective Effects and Mechanism of Meretrix meretrix Oligopeptides against Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fangfang; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Fangmiao; Yang, Zuisu; Ding, Guofang

    2017-01-01

    Meretrix meretrix oligopeptides (MMO) derived from shellfish have important medicinal properties. We previously obtained MMO from alcalase by hydrolysis processes. Here we examine the protective effects of MMO against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and explored the underlying mechanism. Human Chang liver cells were used in our experiments after exposure to palmitic acid at a final concentration of 15 μg/mL for 48 h to induce an overload of fatty acid as NAFLD model cells. Treatment with MMO for 24 h increased the viability of the NAFLD model cells by inhibiting apoptosis. MMO alleviated oxidative stress in the NAFLD model cells by preserving reactive oxygen species activity and increasing malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity. MMO improved mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing the activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase. In addition, MMO inhibited the activation of cell death-related pathways, based on reduced p-JNK, Bax expression, tumor necrosis factor-α, caspase-9, and caspase-3 activity in the NAFLD model cells, and Bcl-2 expression was enhanced in the NAFLD model cells compared with the control group. These findings indicate that MMO have antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects on NAFLD model cells and may thus exert protective effects against NAFLD. PMID:28216552

  7. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-05

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response.

  8. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  9. Sepia ink oligopeptide induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guoren; Xie, Peng; Ye, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    Sepia ink oligopeptide (SIO), as a tripeptide extracted from Sepia ink, could be used as an inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. We designed a cyclo-mimetic peptide of SIO by introducing a disulfide bond to stabilize the native peptide into beta turn structure, and produced a peptide with higher cell permeability and stability. Through labeling an FITC to the N-terminus of the peptide, the cell permeability was examined. Stabilized peptide showed enhanced cellular uptake than linear tripeptide as indicated by flow cytometry and cell fluorescent imaging. The high intracellular delivery of stable SIO could more efficiently inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was down-regulated, whereas pro-apoptotic proteins P53 and caspase-3 were up-regulated by stable SIO. In conclusion, our study is the first to use stable SIO to induce apoptosis in two lung cancer cells A549 and H1299. PMID:28423568

  10. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early-stage self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-03-22

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate early-stage self-assembly. Under low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ≈ -25kBT. Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini (ΔF ≈ -5kBT). In simulations of hundreds of monomers over 70 ns we observe the spontaneous formation of up to undecameric aggregates under low-pH conditions. Modeling assembly as a continuous-time Markovmore » process, we infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide sequence and aromatic core chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates.« less

  11. Organic Cation Transporter-Mediated Ergothioneine Uptake in Mouse Neural Progenitor Cells Suppresses Proliferation and Promotes Differentiation into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Takahiro; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Hosotani, Hiroshi; Masuo, Yusuke; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the functional expression and physiological role in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of carnitine/organic cation transporter OCTN1/SLC22A4, which accepts the naturally occurring food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine (ERGO) as a substrate in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of OCTN1 was much higher than that of other organic cation transporters in mouse cultured cortical NPCs. Immunocytochemical analysis showed colocalization of OCTN1 with the NPC marker nestin in cultured NPCs and mouse embryonic carcinoma P19 cells differentiated into neural progenitor-like cells (P19-NPCs). These cells exhibited time-dependent [3H]ERGO uptake. These results demonstrate that OCTN1 is functionally expressed in murine NPCs. Cultured NPCs and P19-NPCs formed neurospheres from clusters of proliferating cells in a culture time-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO or other antioxidants (edaravone and ascorbic acid) led to a significant decrease in the area of neurospheres with concomitant elimination of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Transfection of P19-NPCs with small interfering RNA for OCTN1 markedly promoted formation of neurospheres with a concomitant decrease of [3H]ERGO uptake. On the other hand, exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO markedly increased the number of cells immunoreactive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin, but decreased the number immunoreactive for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), with concomitant up-regulation of neuronal differentiation activator gene Math1. Interestingly, edaravone and ascorbic acid did not affect such differentiation of NPCs, in contrast to the case of proliferation. Knockdown of OCTN1 increased the number of cells immunoreactive for GFAP, but decreased the number immunoreactive for βIII-tubulin, with concomitant down-regulation of Math1 in P19-NPCs. Thus, OCTN1-mediated uptake of ERGO in NPCs inhibits cellular proliferation

  12. Meclofenamate elicits a nephropreventing effect in a rat model of ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing indoxyl sulfate production and restoring renal organic anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saigo, Chika; Nomura, Yui; Yamamoto, Yuko; Sagata, Masataka; Matsunaga, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Saito, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS), a putative low-molecular weight uremic toxin, is excreted in the urine under normal kidney function, but is retained in the circulation and tissues during renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. IS, which is one of the most potent inducers of oxidative stress in the kidney and cardiovascular system, is enzymatically produced in the liver from indole by cytochrome P450-mediated hydroxylation to indoxyl, followed by sulfotransferase-mediated sulfate conjugation. We used rat liver S9 fraction to identify inhibitors of IS production. After testing several compounds, including phytochemical polyphenols, we identified meclofenamate as a potent inhibitor of IS production with an apparent IC50 value of 1.34 μM. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of rat kidney caused a marked elevation in the serum IS concentration 48 hours after surgery. However, intravenous administration of meclofenamate (10 mg/kg) significantly suppressed this increase in the serum level of IS. Moreover, IS concentrations in both kidney and liver were dramatically elevated by renal I/R treatment, but this increase was blocked by meclofenamate. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were markedly elevated in rats after renal I/R treatment, but these increases were significantly restored by administration of meclofenamate. Renal expression of both basolateral membrane-localized organic anion transporters rOAT1 and rOAT3 was downregulated by I/R treatment. However, expression of rOAT1 and rOAT3 recovered after administration of meclofenamate, which is associated with the inhibition of I/R-evoked elevation of prostaglandin E2. Our results suggest that meclofenamate inhibits hepatic sulfotransferase-mediated production of IS, thereby suppressing serum and renal accumulation of IS. Meclofenamate also prevents the prostaglandin E2-dependent downregulation of rOAT1 and rOAT3 expression. In conclusion, meclofenamate was found to elicit a nephropreventive effect in

  13. Understanding Local Spatial Variation along the Care Continuum: The Potential Impact of Transportation Vulnerability on HIV Linkage to Care and Viral Suppression in High-Poverty Areas, Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Neela D.; Schmitz, Michelle M.; Sanchez, Travis; Dasgupta, Sharoda; Sullivan, Patrick; Cooper, Hannah; Rane, Deepali; Kelly, Jane; del Rio, Carlos; Waller, Lance A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Engagement in care is central to reducing mortality for HIV-infected persons and achieving the White House National AIDS Strategy of 80% viral suppression in the U.S. by 2020. Where an HIV-infected person lives impacts his or her ability to achieve viral suppression. Reliable transportation access for healthcare may be a key determinant of this place-suppression relationship. Methods ZIP code tabulation areas (ZCTAs) were the units of analysis. We used geospatial and ecologic analyses to examine spatial distributions of neighborhood-level variables (e.g. transportation accessibility) and associations with: (1) community linkage to care, and (2) community viral suppression. Among Atlanta ZCTAs with data for newly diagnosed HIV cases (2006-2010) we used Moran’s I to evaluate spatial clustering and linear regression models to evaluate associations between neighborhood variables and outcomes. Results In 100 ZCTAs with 8,413 newly diagnosed HIV-positive residents, a median of 60 HIV cases were diagnosed per ZCTA during the 5-year period. We found significant clustering of ZCTAs with low linkage to care and viral suppression (Moran’s I = 0.218, p<0.05). In high-poverty ZCTAs, a ten percentage point increase in ZCTA-level household vehicle ownership was associated with a four percentage point increase in linkage to care (p=0.02, R2=0.16). In low-poverty ZCTAs, a ten percentage point increase in ZCTA-level household vehicle ownership was associated with a 30 percentage point increase in ZCTA-level viral suppression (p=0.01, R2=0.08). Conclusions Correlations between transportation variables and community-level care linkage and viral suppression vary by area poverty level, and provide opportunities for interventions beyond individual-level factors. PMID:26630673

  14. Understanding Local Spatial Variation Along the Care Continuum: The Potential Impact of Transportation Vulnerability on HIV Linkage to Care and Viral Suppression in High-Poverty Areas, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Neela D; Schmitz, Michelle M; Sanchez, Travis; Dasgupta, Sharoda; Sullivan, Patrick; Cooper, Hannah; Rane, Deepali; Kelly, Jane; Del Rio, Carlos; Waller, Lance A

    2016-05-01

    Engagement in care is central to reducing mortality for HIV-infected persons and achieving the White House National AIDS Strategy of 80% viral suppression in the US by 2020. Where an HIV-infected person lives impacts his or her ability to achieve viral suppression. Reliable transportation access for healthcare may be a key determinant of this place-suppression relationship. ZIP code tabulation areas (ZCTAs) were the units of analysis. We used geospatial and ecologic analyses to examine spatial distributions of neighborhood-level variables (eg, transportation accessibility) and associations with: (1) community linkage to care, and (2) community viral suppression. Among Atlanta ZCTAs with data for newly diagnosed HIV cases (2006-2010), we used Moran I to evaluate spatial clustering and linear regression models to evaluate associations between neighborhood variables and outcomes. In 100 ZCTAs with 8413 newly diagnosed HIV-positive residents, a median of 60 HIV cases were diagnosed per ZCTA during the 5-year period. We found significant clustering of ZCTAs with low linkage to care and viral suppression (Moran I = 0.218, P < 0.05). In high-poverty ZCTAs, a 10% point increase in ZCTA-level household vehicle ownership was associated with a 4% point increase in linkage to care (P = 0.02, R = 0.16). In low-poverty ZCTAs, a 10% point increase in ZCTA-level household vehicle ownership was associated with a 30% point increase in ZCTA-level viral suppression (P = 0.01, R = 0.08). Correlations between transportation variables and community-level care linkage and viral suppression vary by area poverty level and provide opportunities for interventions beyond individual-level factors.

  15. Surface charge tunability as a powerful strategy to control electrostatic interaction for high efficiency silencing, using tailored oligopeptide-modified poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs).

    PubMed

    Dosta, Pere; Segovia, Nathaly; Cascante, Anna; Ramos, Victor; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an extended family of pBAEs that incorporate terminal oligopeptide moieties synthesized from both positive and negative amino acids. Polymer formulations of mixtures of negative and positive oligopeptide-modified pBAEs are capable of condensing siRNA into discrete nanoparticles. We have demonstrated that efficient delivery of nucleic acids in a cell-type dependent manner can be achieved by careful control of the pBAE formulation. In addition, our approach of adding differently charged oligopeptides to the termini of poly(β-amino ester)s is of great interest for the design of tailored complexes having specific features, such as tuneable zeta potential. We anticipate that this surface charge tunability may be a powerful strategy to control unwanted electrostatic interactions, while preserving high silencing efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  16. New proline-rich oligopeptides from the venom of African adders: Insights into the hypotensive effect of the venoms.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Roberto T; Cajado-Carvalho, Daniela; Kuniyoshi, Alexandre K; Kitano, Eduardo S; Tashima, Alexandre K; Barna, Barbara F; Takakura, Ana Carolina; Serrano, Solange M T; Dias-Da-Silva, Wilmar; Tambourgi, Denise V; Portaro, Fernanda V

    2015-06-01

    The snakes from the Bitis genus are some of the most medically important venomous snakes in sub Saharan Africa, however little is known about the composition and effects of these snake venom peptides. Considering that the victims with Bitis genus snakes have exacerbate hypotension and cardiovascular disorders, we investigated here the presence of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulators on four different species of venoms. The peptide fractions from Bitis gabonica gabonica, Bitis nasicornis, Bitis gabonica rhinoceros and Bitis arietans which showed inhibitory activity on angiotensin-converting enzyme were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Eight proline-rich peptides were synthetized and their potencies were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The MS analysis resulted in over 150 sequences, out of which 32 are new proline-rich oligopeptides, and eight were selected for syntheses. For some peptides, inhibition assays showed inhibitory potentials of cleavage of angiotensin I ten times greater when compared to bradykinin. In vivo tests showed that all peptides decreased mean arterial pressure, followed by tachycardia in 6 out of 8 of the tests. We describe here some new and already known proline-rich peptides, also known as bradykinin-potentiating peptides. Four synthetic peptides indicated a preferential inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme C-domain. In vivo studies show that the proline-rich oligopeptides are hypotensive molecules. Although proline-rich oligopeptides are known molecules, we present here 32 new sequences that are inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme and consistent with the symptoms of the victims of Bitis spp, who display severe hypotension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The oligopeptide DT-2 is a specific PKG I inhibitor only in vitro, not in living cells.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, Stepan; Butt, Elke; Kobsar, Anna; Geiger, Joerg; Rukoyatkina, Natalia; Parnova, Rimma; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Walter, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    cGMP is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes including cardiac and smooth muscle contractility, aldosterone synthesis and inhibition of platelet activation. Intracellular effects cGMP are mediated by cGMP-dependent PKs, cGMP-regulated PDEs and cGMP-gated ion channels. PKG inhibitors are widely used to discriminate PKG-specific effects. They can be divided into cyclic nucleotide-binding site inhibitors such as Rp-phosphorothioate analogues (Rp-cGMPS), ATP-binding site inhibitors such as KT5823, and substrate binding site inhibitors represented by the recently described DT-oligopeptides. As it has been shown that Rp-cGMPS and KT5823 have numerous non-specific effects, we analysed the pharmacological properties of the oligopeptide (D)-DT-2 described as a highly specific, membrane-permeable, PKG inhibitor. Specificity and potency of (D)-DT-2 to inhibit PKG activity was evaluated using biochemical assays in vitro and by substrate phosphorylation analysis in various cell types including human platelets, rat mesangial cells and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Despite potent inhibition of PKGI in vitro, (D)-DT-2 lost specificity for PKG in cell homogenates and particularly in living cells, as demonstrated by phosphorylation of different substrates. Instead, (D)-DT-2 modulated activity of other kinases including ERK, p38, PKB and PKC, thereby inducing unpredicted and often opposing functional effects. We conclude that DT-oligopeptides, as other inhibitors, cannot be used to specifically inhibit PKG in intact cells. Therefore, no specific pharmacological PKG inhibitors are available, and reliable studies of PKG signalling can only be made by using RNA knockdown or genetic deletion methods. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Effects of soya oligosaccharides and soya oligopeptides on lipid metabolism in hyperlipidaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shali; Zhu, Jundong; Zhang, Yanqi; Shi, Kai; Shi, Yuangang; Ma, Xiao

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of soya oligosaccharides (SOS) and soya oligopeptides (SOP) on blood lipid levels, release of vasoactive substances, antioxidant activity and faecal bile acid (FBA) excretion in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were evenly divided into five groups according to diets as follows: regular diet (control), HFD, HFD enriched with 2 % of SOS (SOS), HFD enriched with 3 % of SOP (SOP) and HFD enriched with 2 % SOS and 3 % SOP (SOSP). The results showed that SOS and SOP significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TAG, whereas HDL-cholesterol concentration was significantly increased. Furthermore, SOS and SOP reduced plasma apoB, apoE and the apoB:apoAI ratio, whereas apoAI was significantly increased. Moreover, SOS and SOP also reduced plasma thromboxane A₂ (TXA₂) and the TXA₂:prostacyclin (PGI₂) ratio, whereas plasma PGI₂ and nitric oxide were significantly increased. In addition, SOS and SOP significantly reduced serum and liver malondialdehyde concentrations and increased FBA excretion. However, we did not observe obvious influences of SOS and SOP on superoxide dismutase activities in the liver of HFD-fed rats. The combination of 2 % SOS and 3 % SOP showed a more marked effect than SOS or SOP alone in improving the lipid profile, release of vasoactive substances and increasing FBA excretion (P < 0.05). In summary, SOS and SOP might help prevent atherosclerosis through improving abnormal blood lipid levels, regulating vasoactive substances and protecting against oxidative stress.

  20. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  1. On the Generation of Transport Suppression Barriers by Externally Driven Alfvén Waves in D-Shaped, Low Aspect Ratio Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.; Komoshvili, K.

    We investigate quantitatively the possibility of turbulence suppression through the generation of transport barriers in pre-heated low aspect ratio tokamaks (LARTs) by the sheared electric fields generated by externally driven rf waves in the frequency range ωA ≃ ω < ωci (ωA and ωci are, respectively, the Alfvén and ion cyclotron frequencies). To this aim the following sequential steps are followed: (1) Solutions of the resistive two-fluid model full wave equation for a realistic LART configuration (D-shape cross-section and aspect ratio, R/a ≿ 1, as well as suitably located low field side, LFS, antenna) upon using a quite general dielectric tensor operator; (2) Calculation of the ponderomotive forces and their magnetic surface averages; (3) Solution of a strongly non-linear differential equation for the quasi-stationary radial electric field, including the particle orbit squeezing effects, based on the results of steps (1) and (2); and (4) Calculation of the radial flow shear, S⊥, for both banana and potato collisional regimes.

  2. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  3. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  4. Helical Oligopeptides of a Quaternized Amino Acid with Tunable Chiral-Induction Ability and an Anomalous pH Response.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joonil; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Aida, Takuzo

    2017-04-06

    A series of octamer (8-mer) and hexadecamer (16-mer) oligopeptides of 4-aminopiperidine-4-carboxylic acid (Api) with l-leucine as a chiral auxiliary at their N or C termini were synthesized. By using circular dichroism spectroscopy, the conformational profiles of the peptides were systematically studied, which revealed that the α-helix-formation ability of the peptides is determined by the combination of parameters, which includes peptide length, state of the piperidine groups in the Api units, and position of the chiral auxiliary. When the piperidines were in the free-base state, the peptides showed a low propensity to form helical structures. However, the protonation and acylation of the piperidines enhanced the formation of helical structures, such that the order for helix-formation ability was protonated>acylated>free base. In terms of peptide length, the 16-mers generally showed higher helix-formation ability than the corresponding 8-mers, and one of the 16-mers showed helicity at the highest level reported thus far for oligopeptides of a similar length. It was also found that the sensitivity of the helical structure towards the state of the piperidine groups changed drastically depending on the chiral auxiliary position; the N-terminal chiral peptides were more sensitive than the C-terminal chiral analogues.

  5. Anti-Fatigue Effects of Small Molecule Oligopeptides Isolated from Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Cai, Xiaxia; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Bin; Li, Yong

    2016-12-13

    Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer (ginseng) is an edible and medicinal Chinese herb, which is often used in Asian countries for physical fitness. Ginseng is reported to have a wide range of biological activity and pharmaceutical properties. There were more studies on ginsenosides and polysaccharides, but fewer studies on ginseng oligopeptides (GOP), which are small molecule oligopeptides isolated from ginseng. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of GOP in mice and explore the possible underlying mechanism. Mice were randomly divided into four experimental sets for the detection of different indicators. Each set of mice were then divided into four groups. The control group was administered distilled water, and three GOP intervention groups were administered 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, of GOP by gavage each day. After 30 days of GOP treatment, it was observed that GOP could significantly increase the forced swimming time, enhance lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and hepatic glycogen levels, and retard the accumulation of serum urea nitrogen (SUN) and blood lactic acid (BLA) in mice. GOP also markedly ameliorated fatigue-induced alterations of inoxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes. Notably, GOP increased the mRNA expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondrial DNA content in skeletal muscles of mice. These results suggest that GOP possess anti-fatigue effects, which may be attributed to the inhibition of oxidative stress and the improvement of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscles. GOP could be a novel natural agent for relieving exercise fatigue.

  6. Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vater, Svenja M; Finlay, John; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Ederth, Thomas; Liedberg, Bo; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a 'normal' manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo 'pseudosettlement' whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a 'hit and stick' motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface.

  7. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  8. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  9. Diosgenin inhibits atherosclerosis via suppressing the MiR-19b-induced downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yun-cheng; Yang, Jing; Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei; Tang, Yan-yan; Ouyang, Xin-ping; He, Ping-ping; Tan, Yu-lin; Li, Liang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Chao-ke

    2015-05-01

    Diosgenin (Dgn), a structural analogue of cholesterol, has been reported to have the hypolipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Given the key roles of macrophages in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis, it is critical to investigate macrophage cholesterol efflux and development of atherosclerotic lesion after Dgn treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the potential effects of Dgn on macrophage cholesterol metabolism and the development of aortic atherosclerosis, and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Dgn significantly up-regulated the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein, but didn't affect liver X receptor α levels in foam cells derived from human THP-1 macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) as determined by western blotting. The miR-19b levels were markedly down-regulated in Dgn-treated THP-1 macrophages/MPM-derived foam cells. Cholesterol transport assays revealed that treatment with Dgn alone or together with miR-19b inhibitor notably enhanced ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux, resulting in the reduced levels of total cholesterol, free cholesterol and cholesterol ester as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The fecal 3H-sterol originating from cholesterol-laden MPMs was increased in apolipoprotein E knockout mice treated with Dgn or both Dgn and antagomiR-19b. Treatment with Dgn alone or together with antagomiR-19b elevated plasma high-density lipoprotein levels, but reduced plasma low-density lipoprotein levels. Accordingly, aortic lipid deposition and plaque area were reduced, and collagen content and ABCA1 expression were increased in mice treated with Dgn alone or together with antagomiR-19b. However, miR-19b overexpression abrogated the lipid-lowering and atheroprotective effects induced by Dgn. The present study demonstrates that Dgn enhances ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux and inhibits aortic atherosclerosis

  10. Green and black tea suppress hyperglycemia and insulin resistance by retaining the expression of glucose transporter 4 in muscle of high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiumi, Shin; Bessyo, Hiroaki; Kubo, Mayuko; Aoki, Yukiko; Tanaka, Akihito; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2010-12-22

    To investigate the preventive effects of tea on hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, male C57BL/6J mice were given a high-fat diet containing 29% lard and also green or black tea ad libitum for 14 weeks. Both teas suppressed body weight gain and deposition of white adipose tissue caused by the diet. In addition, they improved hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by stimulating glucose uptake activity accompanied by the translocation of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 to the plasma membrane in muscle. Long-term consumption of the high-fat diet reduced levels of insulin receptor β-subunit, GLUT4 and AMP-activated protein kinase α in muscle, and green and black tea suppressed these decreases. The results strongly suggest that green and black tea suppress high-fat diet-evoked hyperglycemia and insulin resistance by retaining the level of GLUT4 and increasing the level of GLUT4 on the plasma membrane in muscle.

  11. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  12. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  13. [The immune-enzyme analysis based on chimeric molecule and oligopeptide fragmentations to detect autoantibodies to beta-adrenergic receptor in patients with dilation cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, O I; Klesareva, E A; Efremov, E E; Sidorova, M V; Bespalova, Zh D; Levashov, P A; Ezhov, M V; Adamova, I Iu; Pokrovskiĭ, S N

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with specification of technique of immune-enzyme analysis to detect autoantibodies to beta-adrenergic receptors (beta1-AP) using compound of oligopeptids representing the fragmentations of extracellular sites beta1-AP and chimeric molecule of extracellular section of receptor This technique significantly exceeds the analogues defined in publications by its sensitivity and correlation with diagnosis.

  14. Separation of basic oligopeptides by ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenchun

    The present thesis consist of five chapters. Chapter I introduces background information on the ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography and liquid chromatography in the critical condition. Chapter II decribes our study on the isocratic separation of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) using a fixed content of acetonitrile (ACN) (23%) and different concentrations of HFBA in the mobile phase (0.6-30.6 mM) on a Waters XBridge Shield RP18® column. We found that the retention time of oligolysine increases as the dp increases, because of an increased number of HFBA bound to the peptides. Furthermore, when [HFBA] increased, the retention time increased at different rates. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. Based on a closed pairing model that presumes an equilibrium between an unpaired state and the paired state with a fixed number of HFBA molecules, an equation was derived for the retention factor of oligolysine. In Chapter III, we compare retention behaviors of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) and oligoarginine (dp = 2 to 8) when they are separated on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18® using fixed a ACN content (23%) and difference concentrations of HFBA (0.4-30.6 mM) in the mobile phase. The retention time of oligoarginine also increased at different rates as [HFBA] increased. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. The retention time of oligolysine is shorter than that of oligarginine having the dame dp. We applied Eq.1 to analyze the plot of ln k as a function of [HFBA] for each oligopeptide component to obtain the values for n, Kip,m, and βKd,ip. For oligolysine, n increases linearly as dp increase and oligoarginine exhibits an accelerated increase in n as dp rises. The plot of ln βKd,ip against dp followed a linear relationship for both peptides. In Chapter IV, we study the effect of mobile phase composition on the retention of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18 ®. The ACN content was changed from 20% to 33% and the HFBA concentration from 0.7 to

  15. Separation of oligopeptides, nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides using capillary electrophoresis/electrochromatography with sol-gel modified inner capillary wall.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, Jana; Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich; Král, Vladimír; Mikšík, Ivan

    2017-09-29

    The aim of this article is to study the modification of an inner capillary wall with sol-gel coating (pure silica sol-gel or silica sol-gel containing porphyrin-brucine conjugate) and determine its influence on the separation process using capillary electrophoresis/electrochromatography method. After modification of the inner capillary surface the separation of analytes was performed using two different phosphate buffers (pH 2.5 and 9.0) and finally the changes in electrophoretic mobilities of various samples were calculated. To confirm that the modification of the inner capillary surface was successful, the parts of the inner surfaces of capillaries were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The analytes used as testing samples were oligopeptides, nucleosides, nucleobases and finally nucleotides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spasmogenic activity of chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides: identity of structure--function relationships for chemotactic and spasmogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Marasco, W A; Fantone, J C; Ward, P A

    1982-12-01

    The chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides are potent spasmogenic agents for guinea pig ileum. Structure-activity studies with various N-formylated peptides suggest the presence of a specific receptor that resembles in specificity the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes. A competitive antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes also inhibits formyl peptide-induced ileum contraction, whereas the antihistamine diphenhydramine is without effect. The contractile response caused by the synthetic N-formylated peptides differs from those induced by acetylcholine, histamine, and substance P. In particular, a latent period after treatment with the N-formyl peptides is seen before the onset of the response, and a sustained contractile response is not maintained. In addition, tachyphylaxis does occur, but complete recovery of activity is seen after a 20- to 30-min rest period. These observations suggest broad biological roles of prokaryotic signal peptides from bacteria as acute inflammatory mediators.

  17. Anti-Fatigue Effects of Small Molecule Oligopeptides Isolated from Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lei; Cai, Xiaxia; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Bin; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer (ginseng) is an edible and medicinal Chinese herb, which is often used in Asian countries for physical fitness. Ginseng is reported to have a wide range of biological activity and pharmaceutical properties. There were more studies on ginsenosides and polysaccharides, but fewer studies on ginseng oligopeptides (GOP), which are small molecule oligopeptides isolated from ginseng. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of GOP in mice and explore the possible underlying mechanism. Mice were randomly divided into four experimental sets for the detection of different indicators. Each set of mice were then divided into four groups. The control group was administered distilled water, and three GOP intervention groups were administered 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, of GOP by gavage each day. After 30 days of GOP treatment, it was observed that GOP could significantly increase the forced swimming time, enhance lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and hepatic glycogen levels, and retard the accumulation of serum urea nitrogen (SUN) and blood lactic acid (BLA) in mice. GOP also markedly ameliorated fatigue-induced alterations of inoxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes. Notably, GOP increased the mRNA expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondrial DNA content in skeletal muscles of mice. These results suggest that GOP possess anti-fatigue effects, which may be attributed to the inhibition of oxidative stress and the improvement of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscles. GOP could be a novel natural agent for relieving exercise fatigue. PMID:27983571

  18. Jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  19. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  20. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide–CdSe nanoparticles’ (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100–200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated. PMID:27027885

  1. Probing the association between dexamethasone-induced cortisol suppression and serotonin transporter availability among drug-free patients with major depressive disorder--a small-sample SPECT study with [¹²³I]ADAM.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin Chun; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Chen, Kao Chin; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yao, Wei Jen; Chiu, Nan-Tsing; Lu, Ru-Band; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The association between hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and the serotonergic system could be involved in the mechanism of depression. However, neuroimaging evidence is scarce. The aim of the present study was to probe the association between dexamethasone suppression test response and serotonin transporter (SERT) availability in drug-free patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Seventeen MDD patients (five males and twelve females) were recruited. SPECT with [(123)I] ADAM was used to measure the midbrain SERT availability, and HPA axis function was measured by the dexamethasone suppression test (DST). The association was significant when considering all participants (ρ=0.69, p=0.002). This association may have clinical implications for the treatment of MDD.

  2. Roles of different peptide transporters in nutrient acquisition in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Nico; Hertlein, Tobias; Franz, Renate; Reuß, Oliver; Sasse, Christoph; Schäfer, Tina; Ohlsen, Knut; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Fungi possess two distinct proton-coupled peptide transport systems, the dipeptide/tripeptide transporters (PTR) and the oligopeptide transporters (OPT), which enable them to utilize peptides as nutrients. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, peptide transporters are encoded by gene families consisting of two PTR genes and eight OPT genes. To gain insight into the functions and importance of specific peptide transporters, we generated mutants lacking the two dipeptide/tripeptide transporters Ptr2 and Ptr22, as well as the five major oligopeptide transporters Opt1 to Opt5. These mutants were unable to grow in media containing peptides as the sole nitrogen source. Forced expression of individual peptide transporters in the septuple mutants showed that Ptr2 and Ptr22 could utilize all tested dipeptides as substrates but differed in their abilities to transport specific tripeptides. Interestingly, several oligopeptide transporters, which are thought to transport peptides consisting of more than three amino acids, also mediated the uptake of tripeptides. Opt1 especially turned out to be a highly flexible transporter that enabled growth on all tripeptides tested and could even utilize a dipeptide, a function that has never been ascribed to this family of peptide transporters. Despite their inability to grow on proteins or peptides, the opt1Δ opt2Δ opt3Δ opt4Δ opt5Δ ptr2Δ ptr22Δ septuple mutants had no in vivo fitness defect in a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization. Therefore, the nutritional versatility of C. albicans enables it to utilize alternative nitrogen sources in this host niche, which probably contributes to its success as a commensal and pathogen in mammalian hosts.

  3. Roles of Different Peptide Transporters in Nutrient Acquisition in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dunkel, Nico; Hertlein, Tobias; Franz, Renate; Reuß, Oliver; Sasse, Christoph; Schäfer, Tina; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Fungi possess two distinct proton-coupled peptide transport systems, the dipeptide/tripeptide transporters (PTR) and the oligopeptide transporters (OPT), which enable them to utilize peptides as nutrients. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, peptide transporters are encoded by gene families consisting of two PTR genes and eight OPT genes. To gain insight into the functions and importance of specific peptide transporters, we generated mutants lacking the two dipeptide/tripeptide transporters Ptr2 and Ptr22, as well as the five major oligopeptide transporters Opt1 to Opt5. These mutants were unable to grow in media containing peptides as the sole nitrogen source. Forced expression of individual peptide transporters in the septuple mutants showed that Ptr2 and Ptr22 could utilize all tested dipeptides as substrates but differed in their abilities to transport specific tripeptides. Interestingly, several oligopeptide transporters, which are thought to transport peptides consisting of more than three amino acids, also mediated the uptake of tripeptides. Opt1 especially turned out to be a highly flexible transporter that enabled growth on all tripeptides tested and could even utilize a dipeptide, a function that has never been ascribed to this family of peptide transporters. Despite their inability to grow on proteins or peptides, the opt1Δ opt2Δ opt3Δ opt4Δ opt5Δ ptr2Δ ptr22Δ septuple mutants had no in vivo fitness defect in a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization. Therefore, the nutritional versatility of C. albicans enables it to utilize alternative nitrogen sources in this host niche, which probably contributes to its success as a commensal and pathogen in mammalian hosts. PMID:23376942

  4. Tryptophan sidechain dynamics in hydrophobic oligopeptides determined by use of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, A J; Kemple, M D; Prendergast, F G

    1988-07-01

    Two oligopeptides, t-boc-LAWAL-OMe and t-boc-LALALW-OMe, were synthesized for the purpose of examining the sidechain dynamics of the tryptophan residue in hydrophobic environments by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both peptides, the tryptophan sidechain was greater than 95% enriched with 13C at the C delta 1 position. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data were obtained at 50.3 and 75.4 MHz for both peptides in CD3OD, and at 75.4 MHz for t-boc-LALALW-OMe in lysolecithin-D2O micelles. We have adapted the model-free approach of G. Lipari and A. Szabo (1982, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104:4546) to interpret the 13C-NMR data. Computer-generated curves based on experimental data obtained at a single frequency demonstrate relationships between an effective correlation time for tryptophan sidechain motion (tau e), a generalized order parameter (sigma) describing the extent of motional restriction, and an overall correlation time for the peptide (tau m). Assuming predominantly dipolar relaxation, least-squares fits of the dual frequency relaxation data provide values for these parameters for both peptides. The contribution of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), however, is also explicitly assessed in the data analysis, and is shown to perturb the predicted sigma, tau e, and tau m values and to decrease chi(2) values observed in nonlinear least-squares analysis of the data. Because of uncertainty in the contribution of CSA to the relaxation of the indole ring 13C delta 1 atom, nonlinear least-squares analysis of the relaxation data were performed with and without inclusion of a CSA term in the appropriate relaxation equations. Neglecting CSA, an overall peptide correlation time of 0.69 ns is predicted for t-boc-LAWAL-OMe in CD3OD at 20 degrees C compared with 1.28 ns for t-boc-LALALW-OMe. Given these tau m values and taking into account the effect of measurement error in the T1 and NOE data, the internal

  5. Studies of Transport Properties and Critical Temperature Suppression Mechanism in Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) Oxygen(x) Thin Films Irradiated with 20 TO 120 KEV Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiunn-Yuan

    1995-11-01

    We present comprehensive studies of the effects of 20 to 120 keV electron irradiation on rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{x} thin films. Above 60 keV, T_{c } of irradiated samples is suppressed accompanied by a significant increase in residual resistivity, while the carrier concentration remains relatively unchanged. The plane oxygen defects produced by irradiation are found to be responsible for T_{c} suppression. The II suppression mechanism is discussed within several theoretical frameworks. Though in qualitative agreement with d-wave pairing symmetry, our results show a T_{c} suppression rate three times as slow as predicted by the theory when resistivity data are used to extract the impurity scattering rate. Alternatively, phase fluctuations theory gives a qualitative description as well. The displacement energy of plane oxygen is found to be 8.3 eV, which corresponds to a threshold electron energy 58 keV. Finally, an empirical relation is proposed to describe the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient.

  6. High-performance liquid chromatography of N-terminal tyrosine-containing oligopeptides by pre-column fluorescence derivatization with hydroxylamine, cobalt (II) and borate reagents.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kai, M; Ohno, M; Ohkura, Y

    1987-12-18

    A pre-column fluorescence derivatization method is described for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of N-terminal tyrosine-containing oligopeptides involving methionine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin. The peptides are converted into fluorescent derivatives by heating in a weakly alkaline medium (pH 8.5) containing hydroxylamine, cobalt(II) ion and borate. The derivatives are separated on a reversed-phase column (TSKgel ODS-120T) by gradient elution of acetonitrile in a mobile phase containing borate buffer (pH 8.5) and tetra-n-butylammonium chloride, and then determined by fluorimetry. The derivatization provides a single fluorescent product for each N-terminal tyrosine-containing oligopeptide, but does not allow the production of fluorescent derivatives for peptides having no tyrosyl residue at the N-terminal. The method is selective and sensitive; the lower limits of detection for the N-terminal tyrosine-containing oligopeptides tested were 140-310 fmol per 100 microliters injected.

  7. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  8. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of turbofan cycle parameters and acoustical suppression on the noise and direct operating cost of a commercial Mach 0.85 transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of turbofan cycle parameters and the use of acoustic noise suppression material to quiet 200 passenger, Mach 0.85 trijets having design ranges of 2778, 4630, and 9260 kilometers (1500, 2500, and 5000 n. mi). Aircraft gross weight and direct operating cost, which varied with amount of suppression and cycle selection, are presented as functions of both EPNdB traded and 90 EPNdB contour footprint area. Noise levels 10.9 EPNdB below FAR 36 requirements result in a 5 percent increase in DOC for an aircraft designed for a range of 9260 kilometers (5000 n. mi.). An aircraft designed for a 2778 kilometer (1500 n. mi.) range would have an EPNdB level 14 below FAR 36 for this same economic penalty. In this range of noise level, fan-machinery noise is the principal source.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of bactericidal oligopeptides designed on the basis of an insect anti-bacterial peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Saido-Sakanaka, H; Ishibashi, J; Sagisaka, A; Momotani, E; Yamakawa, M

    1999-01-01

    Defensin from a beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma, is known to have anti-bacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. This peptide, which comprises 43 amino acid residues, was effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We identified the active site of beetle defensin by measuring anti-bacterial activity against S. aureus of 64 overlapping 12-mer peptides with either a free carboxylate or a free amide group at their C-termini. An LCAAHCLAIGRR-NH2 (19L-30R-NH2) fragment showed the greatest activity of the synthetic oligopeptides. The 19L-30R-NH2 fragment was effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. CD spectra showed that the 19L-30R-NH2 fragment formed an alpha-helical structure in the lipidic environment. The anti-bacterial effect of the 19L-30R-NH2 fragment was due to its interaction with bacterial membranes, judging from the leakage of liposome-entrapped glucose. Its anti-bacterial activity was increased when certain amino acid residues were replaced. Truncated peptides having had some amino acids removed from the N-terminus of the 19L-30R-NH2 fragment (8-10-mer peptides) still had strong anti-bacterial activity. Deleting some amino acids from the C-terminal region of the fragment dramatically reduced activity, indicating that the C-terminal region of the 19L-30R-NH2 fragment, i.e. RR-NH2, is important for exerting anti-bacterial activity. The AHCLAIGRR-NH2 (22A-30R-NH2) fragment and its analogues exhibited about 3-fold and 9-12-fold higher activity against S. aureus than did the 19L-30R-NH2 fragment, and these analogues were effective against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients. These oligopeptides showed no haemolytic activity and did not inhibit the growth of murine fibroblast cells. PMID:9931294

  11. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Strait, Edward J.; Nazikian, Raffi; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, David; Fenstermacher, Max E.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Haskey, Shaun R.; La Haye, Robert J.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Logan, Nikolas C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Park, Jong-Kyu; Shiraki, Daisuke; Turnbull, Alan D.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions (MHD), while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELM) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side (HFS) of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements, and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9 or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2 ~ 3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8 ~ 12%, which is close to the 13 ~ 14% measured between the ELMing and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling ballooning stability during resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) induced ELM suppression.

  12. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J.-K.; Shiraki, D.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9, or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2-3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%-12%, which is close to the 13%-14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  13. Antioxidant effect of a marine oligopeptide preparation from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) by enzymatic hydrolysis in radiation injured mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiyue; Wang, Junbo; Liu, Zhigang; Pei, Xinrong; Han, Xiaolong; Li, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Marine oligopeptide preparation (MOP) obtained from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) by the method of enzymatic hydrolysis, has been found to possess a radioprotective property through stimulation of the radiation-induced immunosuppression. The current study aimed to further investigate the free radicals scavenging and antioxidant effects of MOP in radiation injured mice. Female ICR mice (6-8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 5 groups, i.e., blank control, irradiation control and MOP (0.225, 0.450 and 1.350 g/kg body weight) plus an irradiation-treated group. The result revealed that MOP significantly increased the white blood cell counts after irradiation, and lessened the radiation-induced oxidative damage. These effects may be caused by augmentation of the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GSH-Px, reduction of the lipid peroxidation (MDA level) in liver, and protection against radiation-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we propose that MOP be used as an ideal antioxidant to alleviate radiation-induced oxidation damage in cancer patients.

  14. Influence of Free Amino Acids, Oligopeptides, and Polypeptides on the Formation of Pyrazines in Maillard Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Gustavo Luis Leonardo; Cucu, Tatiana; De Kimpe, Norbert; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-10

    Pyrazines are specific Maillard reaction compounds known to contribute to the unique aroma of many products. Most studies concerning the generation of pyrazines in the Maillard reaction have focused on amino acids, while little information is available on the impact of peptides and proteins. The present study investigated the generation of pyrazines in model systems containing whey protein, hydrolyzed whey protein, amino acids, and glucose. The impact of thermal conditions, ratio of reagents, and water activity (a(w)) on pyrazine formation was measured by headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS. The presence of oligopeptides from hydrolyzed whey protein contributed significantly to an increased amount of pyrazines, while in contrast free amino acids generated during protein hydrolysis contributed to a lesser extent. The generation of pyrazines was enhanced at low a(w) (0.33) and high temperatures (>120 °C). This study showed that the role of peptides in the generation of pyrazines in Maillard reaction systems has been dramatically underestimated.

  15. Pilot-scale production of soybean oligopeptides and antioxidant and antihypertensive effects in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mu-Yi; Gu, Rui-Zeng; Li, Chen-Yue; Ma, Yong; Dong, Zhe; Liu, Wen-Ying; Jin, Zhen-Tao; Lu, Jun; Yi, Wei-Xue

    2014-09-01

    Soybean oligopeptides (SOP) with low molecular weights were prepared by two-step enzymatic hydrolysis on a pilot-scale. Peptide and free amino acid contents of SOP were 82.5 ± 1.13 % and 3.7 ± 0.28 % respectively. The molecular weight distribution of SOP was mainly bellow 1,000 Da (85.4 %), 56.7 % of which were 140-500 Da. SOP showed strong stability to proteolytic digestion by pepsin and trypsin. The antioxidant activities and in vitro and in vivo antihypertensive effects of SOP were evaluated. Results showed that SOP exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging effect (IC50 = 4.5 ± 0.13 mg/mL), and significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation in linoleic acid oxidation system (IC50 = 1.2 ± 0.09 mg/mL). SOP had potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity (IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.06 mg/mL), and antihypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats at a dose of 200 mg/kg. This study indicated that SOP could be a natural antioxidative or antihypertensive compound in the medicine and food industries.

  16. Multi-responsive Hydrogels Derived from the Self-assembly of Tethered Allyl-functionalized Racemic Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuwu; Li, Richen; Pollack, Kevin A.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Zou, Jiong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-responsive triblock hydrogelator oligo(dl-allylglycine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-oligo(dl-allylglycine) (ODLAG-b-PEG-b-ODLAG) was synthesized facilely by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of DLAG N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) with a diamino-terminated PEG as the macroinitiator. This system exhibited heat-induced sol-to-gel transitions and either sonication- or enzyme-induced gel-to-sol transitions. The β-sheeting of the oligopeptide segments was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The β-sheets further displayed tertiary ordering into fibrillar structures that, in turn generated a porous and interconnected hydrogel matrix, as observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reversible macroscopic sol-to-gel transitions triggered by heat and gel-to-sol transitions triggered by sonication were correlated with the transformation of nanostructural morphologies, with fibrillar structures observed in gel and spherical aggregates in sol, respectively. The enzymatic breakdown of the hydrogels was also investigated. This allyl-functionalized hydrogelator can serve as a platform for the design of smart hydrogels, appropriate for expansion into biological systems as bio-functional and bio-responsive materials. PMID:25485113

  17. Isolation and purification of oligopeptides from Ruditapes philippinarum and its inhibition on the growth of DU‑145 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuisu; Zhao, Yuqin; Yan, Haiqiang; Xu, Lv; Ding, Guofang; Yu, Di; Sun, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Ruditapes philippinarum is a member of the Veneridae family of marine bivalve molluscs. RPOI‑1 (Ruditapes philippinarum oligopeptide) is a tetrapeptide that can be extracted from Ruditapes philippinarum by means of enzymolysis. This study showed that RPOI‑1 strongly inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in DU‑145 human prostate cancer cells. When cells were treated with varying concentrations of RPOI‑1, significant inhibition of proliferation was detected by an MTT assay, and sub‑G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest was observed using flow cytometric (FCM) analysis. Furthermore, morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis and an increase in the proportion of apoptotic cells were observed using double sequential acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, FCM analysis and transmission election microscopy. FCM studies showed that exposing DU‑145 cells to 10, 20 and 30 mg/ml RPOI‑1 for 24 h increased the percentage of cells in the early‑stages of apoptotis in a dose‑dependent manner, with the numbers rising from 3.01% in the control group to 13.40% in the group treated with the highest dose.

  18. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  19. Effect of tryptophan oligopeptides on the size distribution of POPC liposomes: a dynamic light scattering and turbidimetric study.

    PubMed

    Stano, Pasquale; Bufali, Simone; Domazou, Anastasia S; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2005-01-01

    A chemical regulation of POPC liposome size distribution was investigated, based on the affinity of indole-containing compounds for phosphocholine membranes. In particular, tryptophan oligopeptides have shown interesting properties of size regulation, both when liposomes were formed in their presence and when the peptides were added to a preformed liposome suspension. Combining dynamic light scattering (DLS) and turbidimetric data, it was possible to show how such peptides had an influence on the size distribution of spontaneously formed liposomes prepared by the thin film hydration, reverse-phase evaporation and ethanol (or methanol) injection methods. In the presence of Trp-Trp or Trp-Trp-Trp, a disappearance of large vesicle aggregates was observed, as suggested also by light microscopy analysis. On the contrary, no effect was detected using extruded vesicles. Turbidimetric titration allowed the determination of the relative efficacy of the size regulators, Trp-Trp-Trp being about 20 times more powerful than the dimer, while the monomer had no effect. In addition, other indole-containing compounds and the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin were tested, showing similar behaviours. Discussing the results according to the current knowledge about the preference of Trp residues for interfacial regions in lecithin bilayers, this study confirms the relevant role of tryptophan in the biomembrane binding properties of many peptides and introduces a new behavior in the field of liposomes-peptides interactions.

  20. Oligopeptides impairing the Myc-Max heterodimerization inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation by reducing Myc transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    D'Agnano, Igea; Valentini, Alessandra; Gatti, Giuliana; Chersi, Alberto; Felsani, Armando

    2007-01-01

    Deregulated CMYC gene causes cell transformation and is often correlated with tumor progression and a worse clinical outcome of cancer patients. The transcription factor Myc functions by heterodimerizing with its partner, Max. As a strategy to inhibit Myc activity, we have synthesized three small peptides corresponding to segments of the leucine zipper (LZ) region of Max. The purpose of these peptides is to occupy the site of recognition between Myc and Max located in the LZ and inhibit-specific heterodimerization between these proteins. We have used the synthesized oligopeptides in two lung cancer cell lines with different levels of Myc expression. Results demonstrate that: (i) the three peptides resulted equally effective in competing the interaction between Myc and Max in vitro; (ii) they were efficiently internalized into the cells and significantly inhibited cell growth in the cells showing the highest Myc expression; (iii) one specific peptide, only nine aminoacids long, efficiently impaired the transcriptional activity of Myc in vivo, showing a more stable interaction with this protein. Our results are relevant to the development of novel anti-tumoral therapeutic strategies, directed to Myc-overexpressing tumors.

  1. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-04-15

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  2. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    King, J. D.; Strait, Edward J.; Nazikian, Raffi; ...

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions (MHD), while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELM) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side (HFS) of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born lockedmore » to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements, and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9 or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2 ~ 3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8 ~ 12%, which is close to the 13 ~ 14% measured between the ELMing and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling ballooning stability during resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) induced ELM suppression.« less

  3. Renal tumours in a Tsc1+/- mouse model show epigenetic suppression of organic cation transporters Slc22a1, Slc22a2 and Slc22a3, and do not respond to metformin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Kalogerou, Maria; Gallacher, John; Sampson, Julian R; Shen, Ming Hong

    2013-04-01

    Metformin, a substrate of several poly-specific organic cation transporters, is a widely used biguanide for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent studies suggest that metformin attenuates mTORC1 signalling by the activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the presence or absence of a functional hamartin/tuberin (TSC1/TSC2) complex. Metformin has also been reported to inhibit mTORC1 independent of AMPK through p53-dependent regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 (REDD1) or by inhibiting Rag GTPases. These observations suggest that metformin could have therapeutic potential for tuberous sclerosis, an inherited disorder characterised by the aberrant activation of mTORC1 and the development of tumours in many organs, including the kidneys. In this study, we investigated the effect of metformin on renal lesions in a Tsc1(+/-) mouse model of tuberous sclerosis. Continuous treatment of metformin for 9 months at doses of up to 600 mg/kg/day had no significant effect on renal lesions in nine treated mice compared to 10 controls. Metformin treatment appeared to attenuate mTORC1 signalling in Tsc1(+/-) kidney tissues but not in renal tumours. Surprisingly, the expression of the organic cation transporters Slc22a1, Slc22a2 and Slc22a3 essential for the cellular uptake of metformin was highly suppressed in renal tumours. Treatment of cultured cells derived from a Tsc1-associated renal tumour with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine or trichostatin A greatly increased the expression of these genes. These data suggest that the epigenetic suppression of the organic cation transporters in Tsc-associated mouse renal tumours may contribute to the lack of response to metformin treatment.

  4. Intrauterine inhibition of prostaglandin transporter protein blocks release of luteolytic PGF2alpha pulses without suppressing endometrial expression of estradiol or oxytocin receptor in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lee, JeHoon; McCracken, John A; Banu, Sakhila K; Arosh, Joe A

    2013-08-01

    In ruminants, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2(alpha)) is synthesized and released in a pulsatile pattern from the endometria luminal epithelial (LE) cells during the process of luteolysis. Prostaglandin transporter (PGT) is a 12-transmembrane solute carrier organic anion transporter protein that facilitates transport of PGF2(alpha). The present study determined the effects of inhibition of PGT protein on pulsatile release of luteolytic PGF2(alpha) and the underlined cell-signaling mechanisms. The results indicate that intrauterine inhibition of the PGT protein inhibits the pulsatile release of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium and maintains a functional corpus luteum. Surprisingly, inhibition of PGT-mediated luteolytic pulses is not associated with spatial regulation of estrogen and oxytocin receptors in the LE of the endometrium and is also not accompanied by decreased biosynthesis of PGF2(alpha) or increased catabolism of PGF2(alpha) by the endometrium. Importantly, PGT inhibitor increases expression of pERK1/2 proteins in the LE of the endometrium. Knock down of ERK1/2 genes in LE cells reverses the inhibitory effects of PGT inhibitor on release of PGF2(alpha). In conclusion, intrauterine inhibition of PGT inhibits the pulsatile release of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium without modulating spatial expressions of estrogen and oxytocin receptor proteins and metabolism of PGF2(alpha) at the time of luteolysis. Activation of ERK1/2 pathways and interactions between ERK1/2 and PGT protein appear to be important cell-signaling mechanisms that control PGT-mediated efflux transport function. PGT emerges as an important final component in the luteolytic machinery that controls the release of luteolytic pulses of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium in sheep.

  5. PKCε inhibits isolation and stemness of side population cells via the suppression of ABCB1 transporter and PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK signaling in renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Fu, Shun Jun; Fan, Wen Zhe; Wang, Zhong Hua; Chen, Ze Bin; Guo, Sheng Jie; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2016-06-28

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a member of the novel PKC family, is known to be a transforming oncogene and tumor biomarker for many human solid cancers including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We isolated side population (SP) cells from the RCC 769P cell line, and proved that those cells possess cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics. In this study, to identify the function of PKCε in cancer stemness of 769P SP cells, we reduced the expression of PKCε in those cells, following the results demonstrated that PKCε depletion had a negative correlation with the existence of SP cells in 769P cell line. Down-regulation of PKCε also suppresses the CSC potential of sorted 769P SP cells in several ways: proliferation potential, resistance to chemotherapeutics and in vivo tumor formation ability. Our study also reveals that PKCε is associated with ABCB1 and this association probably contributed to the SP cells isolation from 769P cell line. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 is directly regulated by PKCε. Additionally, after the depletion of PKCε, the phosphorylation of pAkt, pStat3 and pERK was apparently suppressed in 769P SP cells, whereas PKCε overexpression could promote the phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3 and ERK in 769P Non-SP cells. Overall, PKCε down-regulation suppresses sorting and the cancer stem-like phenotype of RCC 769P SP cells through the regulation of ABCB1 transporter and the PI3K/Akt, Stat3 and MAPK/ERK pathways that are dependent on the phosphorylation effects. Thus, PKCε may work as an important mediator in cancer stem cell pathogenesis of renal cell cancer.

  6. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki K; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-03-11

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser(615) and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm(-1) s(-1), optimal pH was 7-8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met(16)-Glu(101)). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met(16)-Ala(126), which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu(127)-Met(495) (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala(496)-Phe(736) (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides.

  7. Interaction of the Hydrophobic Tip of an Atomic Force Microscope with Oligopeptides Immobilized Using Short and Long Tethers.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Derek; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Wang, Chenxuan; Gellman, Samuel H; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-03-29

    We report an investigation of the adhesive force generated between the hydrophobic tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and surfaces presenting oligopeptides immobilized using either short (∼1 nm) or long (∼60 nm) tethers. Specifically, we used either sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SSMCC) or 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) end-functionalized with maleimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide groups to immobilize helical oligomers of β-amino acids (β-peptides) to mixed monolayers presenting tetraethylene glycol (EG4) and amine-terminated EG4 (EG4N) groups. When SSMCC was used to immobilize the β-peptides, we measured the adhesive interaction between the AFM tip and surface to rupture through a single event with magnitude consistent with the interaction of a single β-peptide with the AFM tip. Surprisingly, this occurred even when, on average, multiple β-peptides were located within the interaction area between the AFM tip and surface. In contrast, when using the long 10 kDa PEG tether, we observed the magnitude of the adhesive interaction as well as the dynamics of the rupture events to unmask the presence of the multiple β-peptides within the interaction area. To provide insight into these observations, we formulated a simple mechanical model of the interaction of the AFM tip with the immobilized β-peptides and used the model to demonstrate that adhesion measurements performed using short tethers (but not long tethers) are dominated by the interaction of single β-peptides because (i) the mechanical properties of the short tether are highly nonlinear, thus causing one β-peptide to dominate the adhesion force at the point of rupture, and (ii) the AFM cantilever is mechanically unstable following the rupture of the adhesive interaction with a single β-peptide. Overall, our study reveals that short tethers offer the basis of an approach that facilitates measurement of adhesive interactions with single molecules presented at

  8. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides*

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Takayuki K.; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser615 and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm−1 s−1, optimal pH was 7–8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met16–Glu101). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met16–Ala126, which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu127–Met495 (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala496–Phe736 (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides. PMID:26733202

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans P5B-type ATPase CATP-5 operates in polyamine transport and is crucial for norspermidine-mediated suppression of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Heinick, Alexander; Urban, Katja; Roth, Stefan; Spies, Danica; Nunes, Frank; Phanstiel, Otto; Liebau, Eva; Lüersen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Physiological polyamines are required in various biological processes. In the current study, we used norspermidine, a structural analog of the natural polyamine spermidine, to investigate polyamine uptake in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Norspermidine was found to have two remarkable effects: it is toxic for the nematode, without affecting its food, Escherichia coli; and it hampers RNA interference. By characterizing a norspermidine-resistant C. elegans mutant strain that has been isolated in a genetic screen, we demonstrate that both effects, as well as the uptake of a fluorescent polyamine-conjugate, depend on the transporter protein CATP-5, a novel P(5B)-type ATPase. To our knowledge, CATP-5 represents the first P(5)-type ATPase that is associated with the plasma membrane, being expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells and the excretory cell. Moreover, genetic interaction studies using C. elegans polyamine synthesis mutants indicate that CATP-5 has a function redundant to polyamine synthesis and link reduced polyamine levels to retarded postembryonic development, reduced brood size, shortened life span, and small body size. We suggest that CATP-5 represents a crucial component of the pharmacologically important polyamine transport system, the molecular nature of which has not been identified so far in metazoa.

  10. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p < 0.001; pyruvate oxidation, -28 +/- 2% and -55 +/- 4%, p < 0.001 each) and increased lactate release (+28 +/- 4% and +58 +/- 9%, p < 0.005 each), which indicated inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory function. Impairment of cell respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p < 0.03). Further experiments dealt with the underlying mechanisms and revealed a rapid mode of action (50 mumol/l progesterone, reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation after 30 min: -29 +/- 7%, p < 0.01) not affected by blockers of gene expression or the nuclear progesterone receptor. Progesterone inhibits cell respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  11. Downregulation of eIF4G by microRNA-503 enhances drug sensitivity of MCF-7/ADR cells through suppressing the expression of ABC transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xia; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zang, Jinglei; Zhang, Si; Huang, Nan; Guan, Xinxin; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhihui; Li, Xi; Lei, Xiaoyong

    2017-06-01

    Overexpression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transport protein is emerging as a critical contributor to anticancer drug resistance. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex, the key modulator of mRNA translation, is regulated by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in anticancer drug-resistant tumors. The present study demonstrated the roles of ABC translation protein alterations in the acquisition of the Adriamycin (ADM)-resistant phenotype of MCF-7 human breast cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were applied to examine the differences in mRNA and protein levels, respectively. It was found that the expression of the ABC sub-family B member 1, ABC sub-family C member 1 and ABC sub-family G member 2 transport proteins were upregulated in MCF-7/ADR cells. An MTT assay was used to detect the cell viability, from the results MCF-7/ADR cells were less sensitive to ADM, tamoxifen (TAM) and taxol (TAX) treatment compared with MCF-7 cells. We predicted that the 3'-untranslated region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-γ 1 (eIF4G) contains a potential miRNA binding site for microRNA (miR)-503 through using computational programs. These binding sites were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. eIF4G mRNA degradation was accelerated in cells transfected with miR-503 mimics. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that eIF4G and ABC translation proteins were significantly downregulated in MCF-7/ADR cells after transfection with miR-503. It was found that miR-503 mimics could sensitize the cells to treatment with ADM, TAM and TAX. These findings demonstrated for the first time that eIF4G acted as a key factor in MCF-7/ADR cells, and may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing multi-drug resistance in breast cancer.

  12. Sulfonate group-modified FePtCu nanoparticles as a selective probe for LDI-MS analysis of oligopeptides from a peptide mixture and human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Akira, Tarui; Watanabe, Takehiro; Nozaki, Kazuyoshi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2009-11-01

    Bare FePtCu nanoparticles (NPs) are first prepared for laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (LDI-MS) analysis as affinity probes to selectively trap oppositely charged analytes from a sample solution. Our present results demonstrate bare FePtCu NPs to be a potentially useful matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (SALDI-MS), for the analysis of small proteins and peptides. The upper detectable mass range of peptides was approximately 5 kDa, and the detection limit for peptides approximately 5 fmol. Sulfonate group-modified FePtCu nanoparticles (FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs), with ionization being independent of the solution pH, can interact with a positively charged analyte, and the analyte-bound NPs can be separated from the reaction supernatant by centrifugation or an external magnetic field. An oligopeptide, Gly-Gly-Tyr-Arg (GGYR) from an oligopeptide mixture containing Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp (DDDD), Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly (GGGG) and GGYR, was detected using SALDI-MS with FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs employing electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs can detect lysozyme (Lyz) in human serum through the electrostatic attraction between positively charged Lyz and FePtCu-SO(3)(-) NPs at pH 8, while detection of negatively charged albumin in human serum is not possible.

  13. Co-delivery of paclitaxel and anti-survivin siRNA via redox-sensitive oligopeptide liposomes for the synergistic treatment of breast cancer and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyan; Zhang, Yidi; Tang, Chunming; Tian, Chunli; Sun, Qiong; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Yin, Yifan; Ju, Caoyun; Zhang, Can

    2017-08-30

    The overexpression of survivin in breast cancer cells is an important factor of paclitaxel (PTX) resistance in breast cancer. To overcome PTX resistance and improve the antitumor effect of PTX, we developed a novel liposome-based nanosystem (PTX/siRNA/SS-L), composed of a redox-sensitive cationic oligopeptide lipid (LHSSG2C14) with a proton sponge effect, natural soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC), and cholesterol for co-delivery of PTX and anti-survivin siRNA, which could specifically downregulate survivin overexpression. PTX/siRNA/SS-L exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and rapid redox-responsive release of both PTX and siRNA. Moreover, in vitro studies on the 4T1 breast cancer cells revealed that PTX/siRNA/SS-L offered significant advantages over other experimental groups, such as higher cellular uptake, successful endolysosomal escape, reduced survivin expression, the lowest cell viability and wound healing rate, as well as the highest apoptosis rate. In particular, in vivo evaluation of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed that PTX/siRNA/SS-L had lower toxicity and induced a synergistic inhibitory effect on tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Collectively, the collaboration of anti-survivin siRNA and PTX via redox-sensitive oligopeptide liposomes provides a promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer and metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC4 impairs neuroblastoma tumour growth and sensitises to irinotecan in vivo.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jayne; Valli, Emanuele; Yu, Denise M T; Truong, Alan M; Gifford, Andrew J; Eden, Georgina L; Gamble, Laura D; Hanssen, Kimberley M; Flemming, Claudia L; Tan, Alvin; Tivnan, Amanda; Allan, Sophie; Saletta, Federica; Cheung, Leanna; Ruhle, Michelle; Schuetz, John D; Henderson, Michelle J; Byrne, Jennifer A; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle; Fletcher, Jamie I

    2017-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC4 (multidrug resistance protein 4, MRP4) mRNA level is a strong predictor of poor clinical outcome in neuroblastoma which may relate to its export of endogenous signalling molecules and chemotherapeutic agents. We sought to determine whether ABCC4 contributes to development, growth and drug response in neuroblastoma in vivo. In neuroblastoma patients, high ABCC4 protein levels were associated with reduced overall survival. Inducible knockdown of ABCC4 strongly inhibited the growth of human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and impaired the growth of neuroblastoma xenografts. Loss of Abcc4 in the Th-MYCN transgenic neuroblastoma mouse model did not impact tumour formation; however, Abcc4-null neuroblastomas were strongly sensitised to the ABCC4 substrate drug irinotecan. Our findings demonstrate a role for ABCC4 in neuroblastoma cell proliferation and chemoresistance and provide rationale for a strategy where inhibition of ABCC4 should both attenuate the growth of neuroblastoma and sensitise tumours to ABCC4 chemotherapeutic substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Repetitive Oligopeptide Sequences Modulate Cytopathic Potency but Are Not Crucial for Cellular Uptake of Clostridium difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Olling, Alexandra; Goy, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Florian; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is primarily linked to secretion of the intracellular acting toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) which monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate Rho GTPases of host cells. Although the molecular mode of action of TcdA and TcdB is well understood, far less is known about toxin binding and uptake. It is acknowledged that the C-terminally combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROPs) of the toxins function as receptor binding domain. The current study evaluates the role of the CROP domain with respect to functionality of TcdA and TcdB. Therefore, we generated truncated TcdA devoid of the CROPs (TcdA1–1874) and found that this mutant was still cytopathic. However, TcdA1–1874 possesses about 5 to 10-fold less potency towards 3T3 and HT29 cells compared to the full length toxin. Interestingly, CHO-C6 cells even showed almost identical susceptibility towards truncated and full length TcdA concerning Rac1 glucosylation or cell rounding, respectively. FACS and Western blot analyses elucidated these differences and revealed a correlation between CROP-binding to the cell surface and toxin potency. These findings refute the accepted opinion of solely CROP- mediated toxin internalization. Competition experiments demonstrated that presence neither of TcdA CROPs nor of full length TcdA reduced binding of truncated TcdA1–1874 to HT29 cells. We assume that toxin uptake might additionally occur through alternative receptor structures and/or other associated endocytotic pathways. The second assumption was substantiated by TER measurements showing that basolaterally applied TcdA1–1874 exhibits considerably higher cytotoxic potency than apically applied mutant or even full length TcdA, the latter being almost independent of the side of application. Thus, different routes for cellular uptake might enable the toxins to enter a broader repertoire of cell types leading to the observed multifarious pathogenesis of C. difficile. PMID:21445253

  16. Melatonin transport into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M; González-Menéndez, Pedro; Hevia, David; Cernuda-Cernuda, Rafael

    2017-08-21

    Melatonin is a well-known, nighttime-produced indole found in bacteria, eukaryotic unicellulars, animals or vascular plants. In vertebrates, melatonin is the major product of the pineal gland, which accounts for its increase in serum during the dark phase, but it is also produced by many other organs and cell types. Such a wide distribution is consistent with its multiple and well-described functions which include from the circadian regulation and adaptation to seasonal variations to immunomodulatory and oncostatic actions in different types of tumors. The discovery of its antioxidant properties in the early 1990s opened a new field of potential protective functions in multiple tissues. A special mention should be made regarding the nervous system, where the indole is considered a major neuroprotector. Furthermore, mitochondria appear as one of the most important targets for the indole's protective actions. Melatonin's mechanisms of action vary from the direct molecular interaction with free radicals (free radical scavenger) to the binding to membrane (MLT1A and MLT1B) or nuclear receptors (RZR/RORα). Receptor binding has been associated with some, but not all of the indole functions reported to date. Recently, two new mechanisms of cellular uptake involving the facilitative glucose transporters GLUT/SLC2A and the proton-driven oligopeptide transporter PEPT1/2 have been reported. Here we discuss the potential importance that these newly discovered transport systems could have in determining the actions of melatonin, particularly in the mitochondria. We also argue the relative importance of passive diffusion vs active transport in different parts of the cell.

  17. Suppression of placental metallothionein 1 and zinc transporter 1 mRNA expressions contributes to fetal heart malformations caused by maternal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaobin; He, Xiaoyu; Hong, Xinru; Kang, Fenhong; Chen, Suqing; Wang, Qing; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Hu, Dian; Sun, Qinghua

    2014-12-01

    Zinc has been implicated to have a protective role against heart malformations during fetal development. Metallothionein 1 (MT-1) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT-1) are two major metabolic factors that are associated with zinc metabolism. The present work aimed to investigate the association of placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 expressions with fetal heart malformations resulting from maternal zinc deficiency. Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into five groups of extremely low-zinc, low-zinc, moderately low-zinc, marginally low-zinc and normal zinc (n = 9-12), and were fed diets with controlled zinc content at 1.0 ± 0.3, 8.4 ± 1.8, 15.4 ± 2.8, 22.4 ± 4.1 and 29.4 ± 5.3 [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] mg of zinc/kg, respectively, from day 25 of preconception until day 19 of gestation. The female rats were bred, their fetuses were harvested at day 19 of gestation after killing the dams, and fetal hearts were morphologically examined. Zinc concentration and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in maternal venous blood sera were tested, and MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions in the placenta were assayed. Zinc concentrations and ALP activities in the blood were low in all zinc-deficient diet groups in a dose-dependent fashion. The incidences of heart malformations were increased, and the levels of placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions were decreased in the extremely low-zinc, low-zinc and moderately low-zinc groups compared with the normal zinc group. Specifically, mRNA levels of placental MT-1 or ZnT-1 were significantly decreased and were lower than the specific threshold values in the fetuses with heart malformations but not in the fetuses without heart malformations in all the groups. These data indicate that maternal zinc deficiency resulted in an elevated incidence of fetal heart malformations, which was associated with significant decreases in placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions to the levels below the threshold values that may be a

  18. Diverse incidences of individual oligopeptides (dipeptidic to hexapeptidic) in proteins of human, bakers' yeast, and Escherichia coli origin registered in the Swiss-Prot data base.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, H; Kitajima, M; Watanabe, I; Kikuchi, Y; Matsuzawa, F; Aikawa, S; Takiguchi, K; Ohno, S

    1995-01-01

    Oligopeptidic permutations of the 20 amino acid residues give rise to proteins of diverse functions. Our long-term goal is to produce a lexicon of oligopeptides, classifying them into at least five categories: (i) ubiquitous, (ii) function specific, (iii) group specific, (iv) species specific, and (v) nonexistent. To begin with, we report on the varying frequencies of individual oligopeptides (dipeptidic to hexapeptidic in length) found among 2862 human proteins, 1942 Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins, and 2672 Escherichia coli proteins registered in the Swiss-Prot data base (version 29.0, released in June 1994). At all lengths (dipeptides to hexapeptides), homooligopeptides were very prominent among the most frequently occurring varieties in proteins of human and bakers' yeast origins. However, this was not the case with E. coli. While all of the expected 20(3) varieties of tripeptides were found among human proteins, three tripeptides (Cys-Cys-Trp, Trp-Trp-Cys, and Trp-Trp-His) were missing from the bakers' yeast proteins. Three tripeptides (Cys-Ile-Trp, Cys-Met-Tyr, and Cys-Trp-Trp) were also absent from E. coli proteins. Inasmuch as the Swiss-Prot data base already contained 67% of the expected total of 4000 E. coli proteins, it is virtually certain that 96,000 varieties of hexapeptides containing at least one or another of the three missing tripeptides noted above shall be nonexistent in E. coli. Furthermore, the observation of missing tripeptides in the bakers' yeast proteins suggests that nonexistent hexapeptides shall be highly phylum specific. Because of the sample size, only a small fraction of the 20(6) varieties of hexapeptides were expected to be encountered in the present survey. Indeed, only 1.2-1.5% of the possible hexapeptides were found, and the average copy number of observed hexapeptides varied between 1.06 and 1.25. Nevertheless, 33 varieties of hexapeptides occurred in 102-169 copies among human proteins. Furthermore, 15 of the 33 varieties

  19. Peptidyl prolyl cis/trans-isomerases: comparative reactivities of cyclophilins, FK506-binding proteins, and parvulins with fluorinated oligopeptide and protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Golbik, Ralph; Yu, Chao; Weyher-Stingl, Elisabeth; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis; Budisa, Nediljko; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2005-12-13

    Peptidyl prolyl cis/trans-isomerases catalyze the cis-trans isomerization of prolyl bonds in oligopeptides and various folding states of proteins. The proline residue in PPIase substrates at the P1' subsite, which follows the isomerizing peptide bond, appears to be the common recognition element for all subfamilies of this enzyme class. The molecular principles that govern substrate specificity at the P1' subsite were analyzed using 4-fluoroproline-containing tetrapeptide 4-nitroanilides and barstar Cys40Ala/Cys82Ala/Pro27Ala/Pro48-->4-fluoroproline quadruple variants. Generally, PPIase catalysis demonstrated stereospecificity for monofluoro substitutions at the 4-position of the pyrrolidine ring. However, the replacement of hydrogens with fluoro atoms did not impair productive interactions for the majority of PPIase-substrate complexes. Comparison of specificity constants for oligopeptide and protein substrates revealed striking differences in the 4-fluoroproline substituent effects between members of the PPIase families. Introduction of 4(R)-fluoroproline resulted in an oligopeptide substrate completely resistant to catalytic effects of FKBP-like PPIases. By contrast, the 4(R)-fluoroproline barstar variant demonstrated only slightly reduced or even better catalytic susceptibility when compared to the parent barstar Cys40Ala/Cys82Ala/Pro27Ala/Pro48 substrate. On the other hand, Suc-Ala-Ser-4(S)-FPro-Phe-pNA exhibits a discriminating specificity toward the prototypic parvulin, the Escherichia coli Par10. The E. coli trigger factor, in the extreme, catalyzes Cys40Ala/Cys82Ala/Pro27Ala/4-F(2)Pro48 with a more than 20-fold higher efficiency when compared to the proline-containing congener. These findings support the combined subsite concept for PPIase catalysis in which the positioning of a substrate in the active cleft must activate a still unknown number of remote subsites in the transition state of the reaction. The number of critical subsites was shown to vary

  20. Improvement of osteogenesis in dental pulp pluripotent-like stem cells by oligopeptide-modified poly(β-amino ester)s.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Toldrà, Raquel; Dosta, Pere; Montori, Sheyla; Ramos, Víctor; Atari, Maher; Borrós, Salvador

    2017-04-15

    Controlling pluripotent stem cell differentiation via genetic manipulation is a promising technique in regenerative medicine. However, the lack of safe and efficient delivery vehicles limits this application. Recently, a new family of poly(β-amino ester)s (pBAEs) with oligopeptide-modified termini showing high transfection efficiency of both siRNA and DNA plasmid has been developed. In this study, oligopeptide-modified pBAEs were used to simultaneously deliver anti-OCT3/4 siRNA, anti-NANOG siRNA, and RUNX2 plasmid to cells from the dental pulp with pluripotent-like characteristics (DPPSC) in order to promote their osteogenic differentiation. Results indicate that transient inhibition of the pluripotency marker OCT3/4 and the overexpression of RUNX2 at day 7 of differentiation markedly increased and accelerated the expression of osteogenic markers. Furthermore, terminally-differentiated cells exhibited higher matrix mineralization and alkaline phosphatase activity. Finally, cell viability and genetic stability assays indicate that this co-delivery system has high chromosomal stability and minimal cytotoxicity. Therefore, we conclude that such co-delivery strategy is a safe and a quick option for the improvement of DPPSC osteogenic differentiation. Controlling pluripotent stem cell differentiation via genetic manipulation is a promising technique in regenerative medicine. However, the lack of safe and efficient delivery vehicles limits this application. In this study, we propose the use of a new family of oligopeptide-modified pBAEs developed in our group to control the differentiation of dental pulp pluripotential stem cells (DPPSC). In order to promote their osteogenic differentiation. The strategy proposed markedly increased and accelerated the expression of osteogenic markers, cell mineralization and alkaline phosphatase activity. Finally, cell viability and genetic stability assays indicated that this co-delivery system has high chromosomal stability and

  1. Kaempferol suppresses lipid accumulation in macrophages through the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 and the upregulation of scavenger receptor class B type I and ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ying; Kong, Ling-Xi; Li, Juan; He, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Yuan-Da

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions is a hallmark of early-stage atherosclerosis. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake by macrophages; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully investigated. In this study, we shown that treatment with kaempferol markedly suppresses oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, which occurs due to a decrease in lipid accumulation and an increase in cholesterol efflux from THP-1-derived macrophages. Additionally, the kaempferol treatment of macrophages led to the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) protein levels, the upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and ABCG1 protein levels, while no effects on scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression were observed. Kaempferol had similar effects on the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1, SR-BI, SR-A, CD36 and ABCG1. The reduced CD36 expression following kaempferol treatment involved the inhibition of c-Jun-activator protein-1 (AP-1) nuclear translocation. The inhibition of AP-1 using the inhibitor, SP600125, confirmed this involvement, as the AP-1 inhibition significantly augmented the kaempferol-induced reduction in CD36 expression. Accordingly, the kaempferol-mediated suppression of lipid accumulation in macrophages was also augmented by SP600125. The increased expression of ABCA1, SR-BI and ABCG1 following kaempferol treatment was accompanied by the enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This increase was reversed following the knockdown of the HO-1 gene using small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Moreover, the kaempferol-mediated attenuation of lipid accumulation and the promotion of cholesterol efflux was also inhibited by HO-1 shRNA. In conclusion, the c-Jun-AP‑1-dependent downregulation of CD36 and the HO-1-dependent upregulation of ABCG1, SR-BI and ABCA1 may mediate the beneficial effects of

  2. Cheese peptidomics: a detailed study on the evolution of the oligopeptide fraction in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from curd to 24 months of aging.

    PubMed

    Sforza, S; Cavatorta, V; Lambertini, F; Galaverna, G; Dossena, A; Marchelli, R

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we performed a detailed evaluation of the evolution of the oligopeptide fractions in samples of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from the curd up to 24 mo of aging. The samples were taken from wheels produced the same day, in the same factory, from the same milk, during the same caseification process, thus simplifying the natural variability of a whey-based starter fermentation. This unique and homogeneous sampling plan, never reported before in the literature, provided a detailed study of the peptides produced by enzymatic events during Parmigiano-Reggiano aging. Given the large dimensions of the 35-kg wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano, samples were taken from both the internal and external parts of the cheese, to evidence eventual differences in the oligopeptide composition of the different parts. Fifty-seven peptides were considered, being among the most abundant during at least one of the periods of ripening considered, and their semiquantification indicated that the peptide fraction of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese constantly evolves during the aging period. Five trends in its evolution were outlined, which could be clearly correlated to the enzymatic activities present in the cheese, making it possible to discriminate cheeses according to their aging time. Several known bioactive peptides were also found to be present in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese samples, and for the first time, the age at which they are most abundant has been identified. Aged cheeses have been shown to be dominated by nonproteolytic aminoacyl derivatives, a new class of peptide-like molecules recently reported. Finally, the changing peptide pattern may be related to the changing enzymatic activities occurring inside the cheeses during the aging period, which, in turn, are also related to the microbiological composition.

  3. Bacterial transport suppressed by fluid shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria often live in dynamic fluid environments and flow can affect fundamental microbial processes such as nutrient uptake and infection. However, little is known about the consequences of the forces and torques associated with fluid flow on bacteria. Through microfluidic experiments, we show that fluid shear produces strong spatial heterogeneity in suspensions of motile bacteria, characterized by up to 70% cell depletion from low-shear regions due to `trapping’ in high-shear regions. Two mathematical models and a scaling analysis accurately capture these observations, including the maximal depletion at mean shear rates of 2.5-10 s-1, and reveal that trapping by shear originates from the competition between the cell alignment with the flow and the stochasticity in the swimming orientation. We show that this shear-induced trapping directly impacts widespread bacterial behaviours, by hampering chemotaxis and promoting surface attachment. These results suggest that the hydrodynamic environment may directly affect bacterial fitness and should be carefully considered in the study of microbial processes.

  4. Kyotorphin transport and metabolism in rat and mouse neonatal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianming; Jiang, Huidi; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Keep, Richard F

    2010-08-06

    Neuropeptide inactivation is generally thought to occur via peptidase-mediated degradation. However, a recent study found increased analgesia after L-kyotorphin (L-Tyr-L-Arg; L-KTP) administration in mice lacking an oligopeptide transporter, PEPT2. The current study examines the role of PEPT2 in L-KTP uptake by astrocytes and compares it to astrocytic L-KTP degradation. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was measured in primary cultures of neonatal astrocytes from rats and from Pept2(+/+) and Pept2(-/-) mice. Uptake was further characterized using potential inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP degradation was examined in primary astrocyte cultures from Pept2(-/-) mice by following the formation of L-[(3)H]tyrosine. The uptake of L-[(3)H]KTP in both rat and Pept2(+/+) mouse neonatal astrocytes was inhibited by known PEPT2 inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was also reduced in Pept2(-/-) astrocytes as compared to those from Pept2(+/+) mice. Kinetic analysis indicated the presence of a high affinity (K(m) approximately 50 microM) transporter for L-[(3)H]KTP, identified as Pept2, and a low affinity transporter (K(m) approximately 3-4 mM), inhibited by amastatin, bestatin and tyrosine. Astrocytes also degraded L-KTP through a low affinity peptidase (K(m) approximately 2 mM). Astrocytic clearance of L-KTP occurs via both peptidase activity and transport. These processes occur at similar rates and may be linked. This supports the contention that oligopeptide transport may have an impact on the extracellular clearance (and potentially activity) of certain neuropeptides. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  6. Attenuation of hemorrhage-associated lung injury by adjuvant treatment with C23, an oligopeptide derived from cold-inducible RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangming; Yang, Weng-Lang; Brenner, Max; Wang, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is an important cause of mortality. HS is associated with an elevated incidence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, significantly contributing to HS morbidity and mortality. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is released into the circulation during HS and can cause lung injury. C23 is a CIRP-derived oligopeptide that binds with high affinity to the CIRP receptor and inhibits CIRP-induced phagocyte secretion of TNF-α. This study was designed to determine whether C23 is able to attenuate HS-associated lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to controlled hemorrhage leading to a mean arterial pressure of 25 ± 3 mm Hg for 90 minutes. Mice were then volume-resuscitated for 30 minutes with normal saline solution alone (vehicle) or plus adjuvant treatment with C23 (8 mg/kg BW). At 4.5 hours after resuscitation, the blood and lungs were harvested. Serum levels of organ injury markers lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase were significantly elevated in hemorrhaged mice receiving vehicle and were reduced by 51.3% and 52.2% in mice adjuvantly treated with C23, respectively. Similarly, lung mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6, and lung myeloperoxidase activity were elevated after HS and reduced by 66.1%, 54.4%, 69.7%, and 24.3%, respectively, in mice treated with C23. Adjuvant treatment with C23 also decreased the lung histology score by 33.9%, lung extravasation of albumin carrying Evans blue dye by 36.8%, and the protein level of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and indicator of vascular endothelial cell activation, by 40.3%. Together, these results indicate that adjuvant treatment with the CIRP-derived oligopeptide C23 is able to improve lung inflammation and vascular endothelial activation secondary to HS, lending support to the development of CIRP-targeting adjuvant treatments to minimize lung injury after HS.

  7. CONDITIONS FOR CSR MICROBUNCHING GAIN SUPPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Cheng Ying; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; di Mitri, Simone

    2016-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport arcs, may result in phase space degradation. On one hand, the CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beamline, causing emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching gain enhancement. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed* to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Similarly, several scenarios have been introduced** to suppress CSR-induced microbunching gain, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we try to provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching gain along a transport arc, analogous to*. Several example lattices are presented, with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our semi-analytical Vlasov solver***. The simulation results show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. We expect this analysis can shed light on lattice design approach that could suppress the CSR-induced microbunching gain.

  8. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  9. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  10. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-23

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  11. Beneficial Effects of Small Molecule Oligopeptides Isolated from Panax ginseng Meyer on Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction and Death in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Sun, Bin; Li, Di; Mao, Ruixue; Li, Hui; Li, Yong; Wang, Junbo

    2017-09-26

    To determine whether treatment with ginseng oligopeptides (GOPs) could modulate hyperglycemia related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rats induced by high-fat diet and low doses of alloxan, type 2 diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by injecting them once with 105 mg/kg alloxan and feeding them high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet with or without GOP administration (0.125, 0.5, and 2.0 g/kg Body Weight) for 7, 24, and 52 weeks. Oral glucose test tolerance (OGTT), plasma glucose, serum insulin, level of antioxidant, and beta cell function were measured. Morphological observation and immunohistochemistry study of insulin of islets was performed by light microscopy. The insulin level and the expression of NF-κB and Bcl-2 family in pancreatic islets were also detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, survival time and survival rate were observed. After the treatment, the abnormal OGTT were partially reversed by GOPs treatment in diabetic rats. The efficacy of GOPs was manifested in the amelioration of pancreatic damage, as determined by microscopy analysis. Moreover, GOPs treatment increased the normal insulin content and decreased the expression of the NF-κB-signaling pathway. Compared with those in the control model, the survival time and rate were significantly longer. It is suggested that GOPs exhibit auxiliary therapeutic potential for diabetes.

  12. Cell surface-engineered yeast displaying a histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) has enhanced adsorption of and tolerance to heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, K; Shibasaki, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    2001-12-01

    A histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) with the ability to chelate divalent heavy metal ions was displayed on the yeast cell surface for the purpose of enhanced adsorption of heavy metal ions. We genetically fused a hexa-His-encoding gene with the gene encoding the C-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin that includes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment signal sequence and attached the hexa-His peptide on the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This surface-engineered yeast adsorbed three to eight times more copper ions than the parent strain and was more resistant to copper (4 mM) than the parent (below 1 mM at pH 7.8). It was possible to recover about a half of the copper ions adsorbed by whole cells with EDTA treatment without disintegrating the cells. Thus, we succeeded in constructing a novel yeast cell with both tolerance to toxic contaminants and enhanced adsorption of metal ions onto the cell surface.

  13. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  14. Fire Suppression, District 5

    Treesearch

    Roy Headley

    1916-01-01

    The increasing effectiveness of suppression practice is shown by the fact that in 1915 fire suppression cost one-third as much as in 1914, and damage to Government property was kept down to one-fourth the 1914 figure. The seasons were approximately equal in danger. Is further progress to be expected?

  15. Fusion of an Oligopeptide to the N Terminus of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica Simultaneously Improves the Enzyme's Catalytic Efficiency, Thermal Stability, and Resistance to Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Lu, Xinyao; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Du, Guocheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed and expressed six fusion proteins composed of oligopeptides attached to the N terminus of the alkaline α-amylase (AmyK) from Alkalimonas amylolytica. The oligopeptides had various effects on the functional and structural characteristics of AmyK. AmyK-p1, the fusion protein containing peptide 1 (AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK), exhibited improved specific activity, catalytic efficiency, alkaline stability, thermal stability, and oxidative stability compared with AmyK. Compared with AmyK, the specific activity and catalytic constant (kcat) of AmyK-p1 were increased by 4.1-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively. The following properties were also improved in AmyK-p1 compared with AmyK: kcat/Km increased from 1.8 liter/(g·min) to 9.7 liter/(g·min), stable pH range was extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 7.0 to 12.0, optimal temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, and the half-life at 60°C increased by ∼2-fold. Moreover, AmyK-p1 showed improved resistance to oxidation and retained 54% of its activity after incubation with H2O2, compared with 20% activity retained by AmyK. Finally, AmyK-p1 was more compatible than AmyK with the commercial solid detergents tested. The mechanisms responsible for these changes were analyzed by comparing the three-dimensional (3-D) structural models of AmyK and AmyK-p1. The significantly enhanced catalytic efficiency and stability of AmyK-p1 suggests its potential as a detergent ingredient. In addition, the oligopeptide fusion strategy described here may be useful for improving the catalytic efficiency and stability of other industrial enzymes. PMID:23455344

  16. Probing the dynamic reversibility and generation of dynamic combinatorial libraries in the presence of bacterial model oligopeptides as templating guests of tetra-carbohydrazide macrocycles using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nour, Hany F; Islam, Tuhidul; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-12-30

    Over the past few decades, bacterial resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a real threat to human health. Accordingly, there is an urgent demand for the development of innovative strategies for discovering new antibiotics. We present the first use of tetra-carbohydrazide cyclophane macrocycles in dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and molecular recognition as chiral hosts binding oligopeptides, which mimic bacterial cell wall. This study introduces an innovative application of electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) to oligopeptides recognition using DCC. A small dynamic library composed of eight functionalised macrocycles has been generated in solution and all members were characterised by ESI-TOF MS. We also probed the dynamic reversibility and mechanism of formation of tetra-carbohydrazide cyclophanes in real-time using ESI-TOF MS. Dynamic reversibility of tetra-carbohydrazide cyclophanes is favored under thermodynamic control. The mechanism of formation of tetra-carbohydrazide cyclophanes involves key dialdehyde intermediates, which have been detected and assigned according to their high-resolution m/z values. Three members of the dynamic library bind efficiently in the gas phase to a selection of oligopeptides, unique to bacteria, allowing observation of host/guest complex ions in the gas phase. We probed the mechanism of the [2+2]-cyclocondensation reaction forming library members, proved dynamic reversibility of tetra-carbohydrazide cyclophanes and showed that complex ions formed between library members and hosts can be observed in the gas phase, allowing the solution of an important problem of biological interest. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) oligopeptides regulate innate and adaptive immune responses in mice via increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity, NK cell activity and Th cells secretion.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Ren, Jin-Wei; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qi-He; Zhao, Jian; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Jun-Bo; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Li, Yong

    2017-09-06

    Traditionally used as a restorative medicine, ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) has been the most widely used and acclaimed herb in Chinese communities for thousands of years. To investigate the immune-modulating activity of ginseng oligopeptides (GOP), 420 healthy female BALB/c mice were intragastrically administered distilled water (control), whey protein (0.15 g per kg body weight (BW)), and GOP 0.0375, 0.075, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 g per kg BW for 30 days. Blood samples from mice were collected from the ophthalmic venous plexus and then sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Seven assays were conducted to determine the immunomodulatory effects of GOP on innate and adaptive immune responses, followed by flow cytometry to investigate spleen T lymphocyte sub-populations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays to investigate serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels, and ELISA to investigate intestinally secreted immunoglobulin to study the mechanism of GOP affecting the immune system. Our results showed that GOP was able to enhance innate and adaptive immune responses in mice by improving cell-mediated and humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity. Notably, the use of GOP revealed a better immune-modulating activity compared to whey protein. We conclude that the immune-modulating activity might be due to the increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity, and the enhancement of T and Th cells, as well as IL-2, IL-6 and IL-12 secretion and IgA, IgG1 and IgG2b production. These results indicate that GOP could be considered a good candidate that may improve immune functions if used as a dietary supplement, with a dosage that ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 g per kg BW.

  18. Chitosan/nHAC/PLGA microsphere vehicle for sustained release of rhBMP-2 and its derived synthetic oligopeptide for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanhui; Wang, Mingbo; Liu, Weiqiang; Chen, Changsheng; Cui, Wei; Sun, Tingfang; Feng, Qingling; Guo, Xiaodong

    2016-11-10

    Both of the osteogenic factor and the suitable delivery system in bone tissue engineering are essential for bone regeneration. In this study, we manufactured two kinds of composite vehicles for sustained release of rhBMP-2 and its derived synthetic oligopeptide (Peptide-24, abbreviated as P24) for osteogenesis and bone defect repair. The composite vehicle was based on cross-linked chitosan, nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC), and poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid microsphere. The physicochemical properties of the composite vehicles (abbreviated as CS/nHAC/PLGA-MS) were investigated. The rhBMP-2 and P24 release kinetics from the vehicles were examined and the secondary structure of rhBMP-2 and P24 after 28 days' release process was analyzed. In vitro cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and rat calvarial defect repair were evaluated. The results proved that the composite vehicle had favorable compressive strength, elastic modulus, the porosity, and the bulk density. The secondary structures of rhBMP-2 and P24 kept stability during microencapsulation and release process. P24 from the vehicle kept a geared-up release and rhBMP-2 from the vehicle kept a three-stage mode release process. The results of in vitro cell detection showed that the composite vehicle had good biocompatibility and osteoinduction. In vivo rat calvarial defect repair demonstrated that both groups of vehicles with rhBMP2 and P24 exhibited satisfied bone defect repair. This research showed that the composite vehicle could exhibit sustained release of osteogenic factors. CS/nHAC/PLGA-MS loading rhBMP-2 or P24 could be a novel and ideal scaffold for bone regeneration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito . E-mail: zakay@ri.imcj.go.jp

    2005-12-23

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application.

  20. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... drink anything. You then drink a solution containing glucose (sugar). You may be told to drink slowly ...

  1. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry...

  2. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry...

  3. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460.13 Section 460.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry...

  4. A redox-sensitive, oligopeptide-guided, self-assembling, and efficiency-enhanced (ROSE) system for functional delivery of microRNA therapeutics for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qida; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xu; Li, Yang; Fu, Qihan; Liang, Tingbo; Tang, Guping

    2016-10-01

    Lack of efficient adjuvant therapy contributes to a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A novel therapeutic is required for adjuvant treatment of HCC. We developed a polymer-based nanosystem (ROSE) for functional gene therapy by synthesizing a supramolecular complex self-assembled from polycations and functional adamantyl modules. The ROSE system condensing tumor suppressor microRNA-34a (miR-34a) therapeutics becomes ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles that could facilitate gene transfection in HCC cells with satisfied stability and efficiency, possibly due to proton sponge effect by polycations, PEGlyation protection, and controlled release by breakdown of disulfide bonds. Meanwhile, modification with a targeting oligopeptide SP94 in ROSE/miR-34a enables approximately higher affinity for LM3 HCC cells than hepatocytes in vitro and greater HCC specificity in vivo. Furthermore, ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, representing a notable effect improvement over conventional gene delivery strategies. ROSE/miR-34a, featuring redox-responsiveness, oligopeptide-guided specificity, self-assembly, and enhanced transfection, is therefore a potential therapeutic agent in future adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment.

  5. A novel nuclear DnaJ protein, DNAJC8, can suppress the formation of spinocerebellar ataxia 3 polyglutamine aggregation in a J-domain independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Norie; Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Nakanishi, Katsuya; Sokolovskya, Alice; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yasuaki; Murai, Aiko; Yamamoto, Eri; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Kochin, Vitaly; Chiba, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-06-10

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases comprise neurodegenerative disorders caused by expression of expanded polyQ-containing proteins. The cytotoxicity of the expanded polyQ-containing proteins is closely associated with aggregate formation. In this study, we report that a novel J-protein, DNAJ (HSP40) Homolog, Subfamily C, Member 8 (DNAJC8), suppresses the aggregation of polyQ-containing protein in a cellular model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), which is also known as Machado-Joseph disease. Overexpression of DNAJC8 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells significantly reduced the polyQ aggregation and apoptosis, and DNAJC8 was co-localized with the polyQ aggregation in the cell nucleus. Deletion mutants of DNAJC8 revealed that the C-terminal domain of DNAJC8 was essential for the suppression of polyQ aggregation, whereas the J-domain was dispensable. Furthermore, 22-mer oligopeptide derived from C-termilal domain could suppress the polyQ aggregation. These results indicate that DNAJC8 can suppress the polyQ aggregation via a distinct mechanism independent of HSP70-based chaperone machinery and have a unique protective role against the aggregation of expanded polyQ-containing proteins such as pathogenic ataxin-3 proteins.

  6. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  7. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  8. Control of the Ferric Citrate Transport System of Escherichia coli: Mutations in Region 2.1 of the FecI Extracytoplasmic-Function Sigma Factor Suppress Mutations in the FecR Transmembrane Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Alfred; Mahren, Susanne; Ochs, Martina; Schindler, Petra T.; Enz, Sabine; Braun, Volkmar

    2001-01-01

    Transcription of the ferric citrate transport genes is initiated by binding of ferric citrate to the FecA protein in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. Bound ferric citrate does not have to be transported but initiates a signal that is transmitted by FecA across the outer membrane and by FecR across the cytoplasmic membrane into the cytoplasm, where the FecI extracytoplasmic-function (ECF) sigma factor becomes active. In this study, we isolated transcription initiation-negative missense mutants in the cytoplasmic region of FecR that were located at four sites, L13Q, W19R, W39R, and W50R, which are highly conserved in FecR-like open reading frames of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Caulobacter crescentus genomes. The cytoplasmic portion of the FecR mutant proteins, FecR1–85, did not interact with wild-type FecI, in contrast to wild-type FecR1–85, which induced FecI-mediated fecB transport gene transcription. Two missense mutations in region 2.1 of FecI, S15A and H20E, partially restored induction of ferric citrate transport gene induction of the fecR mutants by ferric citrate. Region 2.1 of ς70 is thought to bind RNA polymerase core enzyme; the residual activity of mutated FecI in the absence of FecR, however, was not higher than that of wild-type FecI. In addition, missense mutations in the fecI promoter region resulted in a twofold increased transcription in fecR wild-type cells and a partial restoration of fec transport gene transcription in the fecR mutants. The mutations reduced binding of the Fe2+ Fur repressor and as a consequence enhanced fecI transcription. The data reveal properties of the FecI ECF factor distinct from those of ς70 and further support the novel transcription initiation model in which the cytoplasmic portion of FecR is important for FecI activity. PMID:11114913

  9. Sensory suppression during feeding

    PubMed Central

    Foo, H.; Mason, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Feeding is essential for survival, whereas withdrawal and escape reactions are fundamentally protective. These critical behaviors can compete for an animal's resources when an acutely painful stimulus affects the animal during feeding. One solution to the feeding-withdrawal conflict is to optimize feeding by suppressing pain. We examined whether rats continue to feed when challenged with a painful stimulus. During feeding, motor withdrawal responses to noxious paw heat either did not occur or were greatly delayed. To investigate the neural basis of sensory suppression accompanying feeding, we recorded from brainstem pain-modulatory neurons involved in the descending control of pain transmission. During feeding, pain-facilitatory ON cells were inhibited and pain-inhibitory OFF cells were excited. When a nonpainful somatosensory stimulus preactivated ON cells and preinhibited OFF cells, rats interrupted eating to react to painful stimuli. Inactivation of the brainstem region containing ON and OFF cells also blocked pain suppression during eating, demonstrating that brainstem pain-modulatory neurons suppress motor reactions to external stimulation during homeostatic behaviors. PMID:16275919

  10. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  11. Giant suppression of flux-flow resistivity in heavy-ion irradiated Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films - Influence of linear defects on vortex transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Suenaga, M.; Liou, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A large shift of the onset of flux-flow resistivity and the irreversibility line H(irr)(T) to higher temperatures is observed in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing linear defects created by Ag(+21) ion irradiation. The H(irr)(T), which has a characteristic L shape in highly anisotropic Tl and Bi based cuprates, becomes more like that of YBa2Cu3O7 in the presence of these defects. The Jc at 77 K also shows a large increase as a result of flux localization at the defects. The transport data indicate that in the H-T plane above H(irr)(T) of the unirradiated material, an ensemble of unoccupied defects is required for effective pinning of each flux line in the system.

  12. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  13. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  14. Drug Insight: appetite suppressants.

    PubMed

    Bray, George A

    2005-02-01

    The term 'appetite suppressant' is used to denote drugs that act primarily on the neurochemical transmitters of the central nervous system to reduce food intake. In addition to drugs that release or mimic the effect of norepinephrine (noradrenaline), this could include drugs that inhibit: reuptake of norepinephrine or 5-hydroxytryptamine (also known as serotonin); bind to the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors or the cannabinoid receptors; and some peptides that reduce food intake. The sympathomimetic drugs phentermine, diethylpropion, benzphetamine, and phendimetrazine--so named because they mimic many effects of norepinephrine--are only approved in a few countries, and then only for short-term use. Sibutramine, a norepinephrine-5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitor, is approved for long-term use. Several new mechanisms for drug action are under investigation. Appetite suppressants should be viewed as useful adjuncts to diet and physical activity and might help selected patients to achieve and maintain weight loss.

  15. Learning motion discrimination with suppressed and un-suppressed MT.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; Liu, Zili

    2006-06-01

    Perceptual learning of motion direction discrimination is generally thought to rely on the middle temporal area of the brain (MT/V5). A recent study investigating learning of motion discrimination when MT was psychophysically suppressed found that learning was possible with suppressed MT, but only when the task was sufficiently easy [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. We investigated whether this effect was indeed due to MT suppression or whether it could be explained by task difficulty alone. By comparing learning of motion discrimination when MT was suppressed vs. un-suppressed, at different task difficulties, we found that task difficulty alone could not explain the effects. At the highest difficulty, learning was not possible with suppressed MT, confirming [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. In comparison, learning was possible with un-suppressed MT at the same difficulty level. At the intermediate task difficulty, there was a clear learning disadvantage when MT was suppressed. Only for the easiest level of difficulty, did learning become equally possible for both suppressed and un-suppressed conditions. These findings suggest that MT plays an important role in learning to discriminate relatively fine differences in motion direction.

  16. Suppression Workshop Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    the sodium is just about as effective as potassium in accelerating the OH decay rates . These results can be used to validate the kinetic suppression... rate of reaction of the combustibles. It represents the proportion of combustibles in the breech. It was found that a very strong effect on the blast...accelerating the CH decay rate decreased with continued potassium addition. They also found that, for a Fg c amount of potassium added to the flames, the

  17. Tremor suppression in ECG

    PubMed Central

    Dotsinsky, Ivan A; Mihov, Georgy S

    2008-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram recordings are very often contaminated by high-frequency noise usually power-line interference and EMG disturbances (tremor). Specific method for interference cancellation without affecting the proper ECG components, called subtraction procedure, was developed some two decades ago. Filtering out the tremor remains a priori partially successful since it has a relatively wide spectrum, which overlaps the useful ECG frequency band. Method The proposed method for tremor suppression implements the following three procedures. Contaminated ECG signals are subjected to moving averaging (comb filter with linear phase characteristic) with first zero set at 50 Hz to suppress tremor and PL interference simultaneously. The reduced peaks of QRS complexes and other relatively high and steep ECG waves are then restored by an introduced by us procedure called linearly-angular, so that the useful high frequency components are preserved in the range specified by the embedded in the ECG instrument filter, usually up to 125 Hz. Finally, a Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter is applied for supplementary tremor suppression outside the QRS complexes. Results The results obtained show a low level of the residual EMG disturbances together with negligible distortion of the wave shapes regardless of rhythm and morphology changes. PMID:19019218

  18. Specific anti-integrase abzymes from HIV-infected patients: a comparison of the cleavage sites of intact globular HIV integrase and two 20-mer oligopeptides corresponding to its antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Elena S; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2013-03-01

    HIV-infected patients possess anti-integrase (IN) IgGs and IgMs that, after isolation by chromatography on IN-Sepharose, unlike canonical proteases, specifically hydrolyze only IN but not many other tested proteins. Hydrolysis of intact globular IN first leads to formation of many long fragments of protein, while its long incubation with anti-IN antibodies, especially in the case of abzymes (Abzs) with a high proteolytic activity, results in the formation of short and very short oligopeptides (OPs). To identify all sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis corresponding to known AGDs of integrase, we have used a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography to analyze the cleavage products of two 20-mer OPs corresponding to these AGDs. Both OPs contained 9-10 mainly clustered major, medium, and minor sites of cleavage. The main superficial cleavage sites of the AGDs in the intact IN and sites of partial or deep hydrolysis of the peptides analyzed do not coincide. The active sites of anti-IN Abzs are localized on their light chains, whereas the heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of Abzs provide high specificity of IN hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-IN Abzs for intact integrase was ~1000-fold higher than for the OPs. The data suggest that both OPs interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal Abzs of the total pool of IgGs, which possesses lower affinity for substrates; and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific and remarkably different in comparison with the cleavage of intact globular IN.

  19. Contributions of the Histidine Side Chain and the N-terminal α-Amino Group to the Binding Thermodynamics of Oligopeptides to Nucleic Acids as a Function of pH

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, Jeff D.; Prevas, James P.; Ross, Christina R.; Toth, Eric A.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Interactions of histidine with nucleic acid phosphates and histidine pKa shifts make important contributions to many protein-nucleic acid binding processes. To characterize these phenomena in simplified systems, we quantified binding of a histidine-containing model peptide HWKK (+NH3-His-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2) and its lysine analog KWKK (+NH3-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2) to a single-stranded RNA model, polyuridylate (polyU), by changes in tryptophan fluorescence as a function of salt concentration and pH. For both HWKK and KWKK, equilibrium binding constants, Kobs, and magnitudes of log-log salt derivatives SKobs ≡ (∂logKobs/∂log[Na+]), decreased with increasing pH in the manner expected for a titration curve model in which deprotonation of the histidine and α-amino groups weakens binding and reduces its salt-dependence. Fully protonated HWKK and KWKK exhibit the same Kobs and SKobs within uncertainty, and these SKobs values are consistent with limiting-law polyelectrolyte theory for +4 cationic oligopeptides binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. The pH-dependence of HWKK binding to polyU provides no evidence for pKa shifts nor any requirement for histidine protonation, in stark contrast to the thermodynamics of coupled protonation often seen for these cationic residues in the context of native protein structure where histidine protonation satisfies specific interactions (e.g., salt-bridge formation) within highly complementary binding interfaces. The absence of pKa shifts in our studies indicates that additional Coulombic interactions across the nonspecific-binding interface between RNA and protonated histidine or the α-amino group are not sufficient to promote proton uptake for these oligopeptides. We present our findings in the context of hydration models for specific versus nonspecific nucleic acid binding. PMID:20108951

  20. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  1. Enhancing thought suppression with hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Wimalaweera, Subodha

    2006-10-01

    Much research indicates that attempts to suppress thoughts lead to increased accessibility of those thoughts, especially when additional cognitive load is present. On the premise that hypnosis may permit more effective management of cognitive load, it was hypothesized that hypnosis may enhance more effective thought suppression. The present research examined whether the obstacle of cognitive load could be bypassed using hypnosis to facilitate successful thought suppression. Thirty-nine high and 40 low hypnotizable participants were hypnotized and received either a suppression instruction or no instruction for a memory of an embarrassing experience and subsequently completed a sentence-unscrambling task that indexed accessibility of embarrassing thoughts. Whereas lows instructed to suppress displayed a delayed increase in suppressed thoughts, highs did not. These findings support the proposition that hypnosis facilitates thought suppression.

  2. Suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    Comparing two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can establish differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population dependent manner. There are different methods for identifying differentially expressed genes. These methods include microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and quantitative Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Herein, the protocol describes an easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under examination. It is specifically relevant when low levels of RNA starting material are available. This protocol describes the use of Switching Mechanism At RNA Termini Polymerase Chain Reaction (SMART-PCR) to amplify cDNA from small amounts of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-PCR). SSH-PCR is a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The resulting products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly overrepresented transcripts in either of the two input RNAs. These cDNA populations can then be cloned to generate subtracted cDNA library. Microarrays made with clones from the subtracted forward and reverse cDNA libraries are then screened for differentially expressed genes using targets generated from tester and driver total RNAs.

  3. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  4. The organic anion transport polypeptide 1d1 (Oatp1d1) mediates hepatocellular uptake of phalloidin and microcystin into skate liver

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Abt, F.; Hammann-Haenni, A.; Stieger, B.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L. . E-mail: james.boyer@yale.edu

    2007-02-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp; human OATP) mediate cellular uptake of numerous organic compounds including xenobiotic toxins into mammalian hepatocytes. In the little skate Leucoraja erinacea a liver-specific Oatp (Oatp1d1, also called sOatp) has been identified and suggested to represent an evolutionarily ancient precursor of the mammalian liver OATP1B1 (human), Oatp1b2 (rat), and OATP1B3 (human). The present study tested whether Oatp1d1 shares functional transport activity of the xenobiotic oligopeptide toxins phalloidin and microcystin with the mammalian liver Oatps/OATPs. The phalloidin analogue [{sup 3}H]-demethylphalloin was taken up into skate hepatocytes with high affinity (Km {approx} 0.4 {mu}M), and uptake could be inhibited by phalloidin and a variety of typical Oatp/OATP substrates such as bromosulfophthalein, bile salts, estrone-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A and high concentrations of microcystin-LR (Ki {approx} 150 {mu}M). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Oatp1d1 increased uptake of demethylphalloin (Km {approx} 2.2 {mu}M) and microcystin-LR (Km {approx} 27 {mu}M) 2- to 3-fold over water-injected oocytes, whereas the alternative skate liver organic anion transporter, the dimeric Ost{alpha}/{beta}, exhibited no phalloidin and only minor microcystin-LR transport. Also, the closest mammalian Oatp1d1 orthologue, the human brain and testis OATP1C1, did not show any phalloidin transport activity. These results demonstrate that the evolutionarily ancient Oatp1d1 is able to mediate uptake of cyclic oligopeptide toxins into skate liver. The findings support the notion that Oatp1d1 is a precursor of the liver-specific mammalian Oatps/OATPs and that its transport properties are closely associated with certain forms of toxic liver injury such as for example protein phosphatase inhibition by the water-borne toxin microcystin.

  5. Pharmacology of appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Halford, J C; Blundell, J E

    2000-01-01

    Despite a rising worldwide epidemic of obesity there is currently only a very small number of anti-obesity drugs available to manage the problem. Large numbers of differing pharmacological agents reliably produce a reduction in food intake when administered acutely to animals, and when administered chronically they result in a significant decrease in body mass. Behavioural analysis of drug-induced anorexia in animals demonstrates that various compounds profoundly effect feeding behaviour in differing ways. This indicates the variety of mechanisms by which pharmacological agents can induce changes in food intake, body weight and eventually body composition. Some of the same drugs produce decreases in food intake and weight loss in humans. Some of these drugs do so by modifying the functioning of the appetite system as measured by subjective changes in feelings of hunger and fullness (indices of satiety). Such drugs can be considered as "appetite suppressants" with clinical potential as anti-obesity agents. Other drugs induce changes in food intake and body weight through various physiological mechanisms inducing feelings of nausea or even by side effect related malaise. Of the drugs considered suitable candidates for appetite suppressants are agents which act via peripherally satiety peptide systems (such as CCK, Bombesin/GRP, Enterostatin and GLP-1), or alter the CNS levels of various hypothalamic neuropeptides (NPY, Galanin, Orexin and Melanocortins) or levels of the key CNS appetite monoamine neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA). Recently, the hormone leptin has been regarded as a hormonal signal linking adipose tissue status with a number of key central nervous system circuits. The peptide itself stimulates leptin receptors and it links with POMC and MC-4 receptors. These receptors may also provide drug targets for the control of appetite. Any changes induced by a potential appetite suppressant should be considered in terms of the (i

  6. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre.

  7. Ultrasonic Frost Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Saiki, Kazushi; Sato, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro

    2003-02-01

    The authors have observed the accumulation of frost on the surface of a rectangular aluminum alloy (duralumin) plate flexurally vibrating at approximately 37 kHz in an atmosphere of almost 100% relative humidity at 2°C. The plate surface, which had been prepolished with abrasive slurry for maintaining its average surface roughness of about 100 nm, was refrigerated at a temperature of -20°C with cold carbon-dioxide gas as coolant. Experiments have been conducted with and without fine silver oxide powder spread on the plate surface so as to examine the effect of artificial ice crystal nuclei. Ultrasonic vibrations with an amplitude of 3.4 μm (rms) are found to suppress frost accumulation by approximately 60%. The phenomenon cannot be ascribed directly to the heat generation caused by high-amplitude vibration, but may have a complex mechanical and/or acoustical effect on small ice crystals.

  8. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  9. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  10. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  11. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  12. The site of saccadic suppression.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Kai V; Santoro, Loredana; Walsh, Vincent; Blakemore, Colin

    2004-01-01

    During rapid eye movements, or saccades, stable vision is maintained by active reduction of visual sensitivity. The site of this saccadic suppression remains uncertain. Here we show that phosphenes--small illusory visual perceptions--induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the human occipital cortex are immune to saccadic suppression, whereas phosphenes induced by retinal stimulation are not, thus providing direct physiological evidence that saccadic suppression occurs between the retina and the occipital visual cortex.

  13. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  14. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, Gary M.; Kinsey, Jon E.; Belli, Emily A.; Candy, Jefferey; Waltz, Ronald E.; Greenfield, Charles M.; Lao, Lang L.; Smith, Sterling P.; Grierson, Brain A.; Chrystal, Colin

    2014-05-02

    Here, the Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model, which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E × B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E × B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  15. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    DOE PAGES

    Staebler, Gary M.; Kinsey, Jon E.; Belli, Emily A.; ...

    2014-05-02

    Here, the Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model, which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E × B velocity shear.more » The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E × B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.« less

  16. Normal-state anomalies in the transport and magnetic properties in the (La1-xPrx)1.85Sr0.15CuO4 system and their correlation with Tc suppression: A signature of the effects of orthorhombic distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, J. E.; García, S.; Rothier de Amaral, M., Jr.; Salim de Amorim, H.; Giordanengo, B.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.; Pagliuso, P. J. G.; Rettori, C.; Yelon, W. B.; Malik, S. K.

    1999-03-01

    The correlation between the normal-state anomalies observed in the magnetic and transport properties of the (La1-xPrx)1.85Sr0.15CuO4 system with 0<=x<=0.5 was studied. The x-ray-diffraction patterns revealed a linear increase of the (a-b) orthorhombic parameter with the Pr content. The resistivity curves showed an increasing deviation from linearity below ~100 K. This anomaly was properly accounted by a logarithmic term, whose coefficient C linearly increases with x. Superconducting quantum interference device measurements of the normal-state magnetic susceptibility evidenced a deviation from the Pr3+ Curie-Weiss behavior in the same temperature range for which the resistivity anomaly occurs. This behavior is explained in terms of an induced magnetic moment at the CuO2 layers under strain. A Dzialoshinsky-Moriya interaction, associated to the orthorhombic distortions, is proposed to be the source of a weak canted ferromagnetic component, which develops in conjunction with an enhancement of the antiferromagnetic correlations. A comprehensive picture of the conduction mechanism for the whole system is presented in terms of a Kondo-like scattering of the mobile holes by the spin fluctuations at the conduction planes. Tc suppression was found to correlate with C, suggesting that the excitation which interacts with the carriers in the normal state is relevant for superconductivity.

  17. Cytokinin Transporters: GO and STOP in Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joohyun; Lee, Youngsook; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Martinoia, Enrico

    2017-03-31

    Cytokinins are phytohormones essential for cytokinesis and many other physiological and developmental processes in planta. Long-distance transport and intercellular transport have been postulated. For these processes, the existence of cytokinin transporters has been suggested. Recently, a transporter loading the xylem (AtABCG14) and another for cellular import (AtPUP14) have been discovered. AtABCG14 participates in the xylem loading process of cytokinins and contributes to the positive regulation of shoot growth. The cellular importer AtPUP14 is required to suppress cytokinin signaling. A role of a transporter as stop signal is a new paradigm for a hormone transporter.

  18. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  19. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  20. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  1. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  2. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  3. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  4. Suppressing Display Cockpit Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Rudolf

    1987-09-01

    Modern aircraft displays with relatively high visual brightness levels present day and night sensor images (generated by electro-optical systems) to crew members for navigation and fire control purposes. A heads out display (HOD) on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen, while effective for one crew member, may distract or irritate another crew member if the image is reflected off a canopy panel into his eyes, particularly at night. This paper presents one solution applied to canopy reflection suppression encountered in the U.S. Army's APACHE Advanced Attack Helicopter where the co-pilot's HOD reflections interfered with the pilot's vision. When the co-pilot would move his head away from the screen, the reflected image path to the pilot, sitting above and behind the co-pilot, would no longer be blocked and distract him. A variety of polarizers were studied and the problem was solved by placing a linear polarizer over the CRT with its axis crossed relative to the skipping vector of the reflection, letting the canopy panel act as an analyzer. Reflected luminance was reduced by more than 25 times.

  5. Painful consequences of anger suppression.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Burns, John W

    2007-05-01

    The authors experimentally examined the effects of anger suppression on pain perception. On the basis of ironic process theory, they proposed that efforts to suppress experiential or expressive components of anger may paradoxically enhance cognitive accessibility of anger-related thoughts and feelings, thereby contaminating perception of succeeding pain in an anger-congruent manner. Participants were randomly assigned to nonsuppression or experiential or expressive suppression conditions during mental arithmetic with or without harassment. A cold-pressor task followed. Results revealed that participants instructed to suppress experiential or expressive components of emotion during harassment not only reported the greatest pain levels, but also rated the anger-specific dimensions of pain uniquely strong. Results suggest that attempts to suppress anger may amplify pain sensitivity by ironically augmenting perception of the irritating and frustrating qualities of pain.

  6. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  7. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Dewey H.

    The purpose of this NEFP satellite study is to provide an overview of pupil transportation. The first phase of the study discusses the early legal and financial bases for student transportation, the second the current status of student transportation, and the third the future status of student transportation needs and financing for 1980.…

  8. Human transporters, PEPT1/2, facilitate melatonin transportation into mitochondria of cancer cells: an implication of the therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaokui; Wang, Chao; Yu, Zhenlong; Peng, Yulin; Wang, Shumei; Feng, Shengnan; Zhang, Shouji; Tian, Xiangge; Sun, Chengpeng; Liu, Kexin; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2017-01-18

    Melatonin is present in virtually all organisms from bacteria to mammals, and it exhibits a broad spectrum of biological functions, including synchronization of circadian rhythms and oncostatic activity. Several functions of melatonin are mediated by its membrane receptors but others are receptor-independent. For the latter, melatonin is required to penetrate membrane and enters intracellular compartments. However, the mechanism by which melatonin enters cells remains debatable. In the current study, it was identified that melatonin and its sulfation metabolites were the substrates of oligopeptide transporter (PEPT) 1/2 and organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, respectively. The docking analysis showed that the binding of melatonin to PEPT1/2 was attributed to their low binding energy and suitable binding conformation in which melatonin was embedded in the active site of PEPT1/2 and fitted well with the cavity in three-dimensional space. PEPT1/2 transporters play a pivotal role in melatonin uptake in cells. Melatonin's membrane transportation via PEPT1/2 renders its oncostatic effect in malignant cells. For the first time, PEPT1/2 were identified to localize in the mitochondrial membrane of human cancer cell lines of PC3 and U118. PEPT1/2 facilitated the transportation of melatonin into mitochondria. Melatonin accumulation in mitochondria induced apoptosis of PC3 and U118 cells. Thus, PEPT1/2 can potentially be used as a cancer cell-targeted melatonin delivery system to improve the therapeutic effects of melatonin in cancer treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Exponential Suppression of Thermal Conductance using Coherent Transport and Heterostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    transfer is carried only by photons. The dielectric can be silicon n= nSi =3.42. For photon frequen- cies within the blackbody spectrum at room temperature...a simple angle filter that blocks out thermal radiation with a large angle of incidence. As a simple illustration, restricting the integration range

  10. Effect of a strong interfacial electric field on the orientation of the dipole moment of thiolated aib-oligopeptides tethered to mercury on either the N- or C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Guryanov, Ivan; Maran, Flavio; Guidelli, Rolando

    2010-05-05

    Four oligopeptides consisting of a sequence of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues, thiolated at either the N- or C-terminus by means of a -(CH(2))(2)-SH anchor, were self-assembled on mercury, which is a substrate known to impart a high fluidity to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The surface dipole potential of these peptide SAMs was estimated in 0.1 M KCl aqueous solution at a negatively charged electrode, where the interfacial electric field is directed toward the metal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first estimate of the surface dipole potential of peptide SAMs in aqueous solution. The procedure adopted consisted in measuring the charge involved in the gradual expansion of a peptide-coated mercury drop and then combining the resulting information with an estimate of the charge density experienced by diffuse layer ions. The dipole moment of the tethered thiolated peptides was found to be directed toward the metal, independent of whether they were thiolated at the C- or N-terminus. This result was confirmed by the effect of these SAMs on the kinetics and thermodynamics of the Eu(III)/Eu(II) redox couple. The combined outcome of these studies indicates that a strong interfacial electric field orients the dipole moment of peptide SAMs tethered to mercury, even against their "natural" dipole moment.

  11. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    . This was a considerable improvement, considering that uncoated CoSb3 had been found to decompose to form the lowest antimonide at the surface at only 600 C. Evidently, because the mean free path of Sb at the given temperature and pressure was of the order of tens of centimeters, any barrier closer than tens of centimeters (as was the niobium foil) would have suppressed transport of Sb vapor, thereby suppressing sublimation of Sb

  12. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described. PMID:21287333

  13. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  14. Transport: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, William; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1992-01-01

    Space transportation requirements for the NASA baseline scenario for future space missions are discussed. Spacecraft/propulsion technologies required for surface-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and surface (lunar) transportation are addressed.

  15. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  16. Line defect induced conductance suppression in graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Li, Ruixue; Yu, Qiongyan; Kang, Xiubao; Ding, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Line defect induced conductance suppression in graphene nanojunction is investigated by means of Landauer-Bütikker formula and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. With the increase of the longitudinal size of the device region, the conductance value decreases and tends to form two conductance valleys. Then we prove that the line defect can lead to localize states in the device region, which contributes to conductance valley at the point far away from Dirac point. And the zero conductance at the Dirac point is associated with the edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the nanojunctions. The staggered potential can change energy spectrum structure of the device region, and produce strong conductance suppression. The line defect can efficiently enhance the conductance suppression, which can be utilized to realize the electron transport manipulation.

  17. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  18. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  19. Peptide bond formation in gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of amino acids: a novel proposal for the synthesis of prebiotic oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Wincel, H; Fokkens, R H; Nibbering, N M

    2000-01-01

    There is a general fascination with regard to the origin of life on Earth. There is an intriguing possibility that prebiotic precursors of life occurred in the interstellar space and were then transported to the early Earth by comets, asteroids and meteorites. It is probable that some part of the prebiotic molecules may have been generated by gas-phase ion/molecule reactions. Here we show experimentally that gaseous ion/molecule reactions of the amino acids, Glu and Met, may promote the synthesis of protonated dipeptides such as (Glu-Glu)H(+) and (Glu-Met)H(+) and their chemical growth to larger protonated peptides. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1975-01-01

    Application of the aerodynamic energy approach to some problems of flutter suppression and gust alleviation were considered. A simple modification of the control-law is suggested for achieving the required pitch control in the use of a leading edge - trailing edge activated strip. The possible replacement of the leading edge - trailing edge activated strip by a trailing edge - tab strip is also considered as an alternate solution. Parameters affecting the performance of the activated leading edge - trailing edge strip were tested on the Arava STOL Transport and the Westwind Executive Jet Transport and include strip location, control-law gains and a variation in the control-law itself.

  1. Spin-Dependent Transport through Chiral Molecules Studied by Spin-Dependent Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular spintronics (spin + electronics), which aims to exploit both the spin degree of freedom and the electron charge in molecular devices, has recently received massive attention. Our recent experiments on molecular spintronics employ chiral molecules which have the unexpected property of acting as spin filters, by way of an effect we call “chiral-induced spin selectivity” (CISS). In this Account, we discuss new types of spin-dependent electrochemistry measurements and their use to probe the spin-dependent charge transport properties of nonmagnetic chiral conductive polymers and biomolecules, such as oligopeptides, L/D cysteine, cytochrome c, bacteriorhodopsin (bR), and oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles (NPs) hybrid structures. Spin-dependent electrochemical measurements were carried out by employing ferromagnetic electrodes modified with chiral molecules used as the working electrode. Redox probes were used either in solution or when directly attached to the ferromagnetic electrodes. During the electrochemical measurements, the ferromagnetic electrode was magnetized either with its magnetic moment pointing “UP” or “DOWN” using a permanent magnet (H = 0.5 T), placed underneath the chemically modified ferromagnetic electrodes. The spin polarization of the current was found to be in the range of 5–30%, even in the case of small chiral molecules. Chiral films of the l- and d-cysteine tethered with a redox-active dye, toludin blue O, show spin polarizarion that depends on the chirality. Because the nickel electrodes are susceptible to corrosion, we explored the effect of coating them with a thin gold overlayer. The effect of the gold layer on the spin polarization of the electrons ejected from the electrode was investigated. In addition, the role of the structure of the protein on the spin selective transport was also studied as a function of bias voltage and the effect of protein denaturation was revealed. In addition to

  2. Spin-Dependent Transport through Chiral Molecules Studied by Spin-Dependent Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Fontanesi, Claudio; Waldeck, David H; Naaman, Ron

    2016-11-15

    Molecular spintronics (spin + electronics), which aims to exploit both the spin degree of freedom and the electron charge in molecular devices, has recently received massive attention. Our recent experiments on molecular spintronics employ chiral molecules which have the unexpected property of acting as spin filters, by way of an effect we call "chiral-induced spin selectivity" (CISS). In this Account, we discuss new types of spin-dependent electrochemistry measurements and their use to probe the spin-dependent charge transport properties of nonmagnetic chiral conductive polymers and biomolecules, such as oligopeptides, L/D cysteine, cytochrome c, bacteriorhodopsin (bR), and oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles (NPs) hybrid structures. Spin-dependent electrochemical measurements were carried out by employing ferromagnetic electrodes modified with chiral molecules used as the working electrode. Redox probes were used either in solution or when directly attached to the ferromagnetic electrodes. During the electrochemical measurements, the ferromagnetic electrode was magnetized either with its magnetic moment pointing "UP" or "DOWN" using a permanent magnet (H = 0.5 T), placed underneath the chemically modified ferromagnetic electrodes. The spin polarization of the current was found to be in the range of 5-30%, even in the case of small chiral molecules. Chiral films of the l- and d-cysteine tethered with a redox-active dye, toludin blue O, show spin polarizarion that depends on the chirality. Because the nickel electrodes are susceptible to corrosion, we explored the effect of coating them with a thin gold overlayer. The effect of the gold layer on the spin polarization of the electrons ejected from the electrode was investigated. In addition, the role of the structure of the protein on the spin selective transport was also studied as a function of bias voltage and the effect of protein denaturation was revealed. In addition to "dark" measurements, we also describe

  3. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    To provide a Canadian consensus document for health care providers with recommendations for menstrual suppression in patients with physical and/or cognitive challenges or those who are undergoing cancer treatment in whom menstruation may have a deleterious effect on their health. This document reviews the options available for menstrual suppression, its specific indications, contraindications, and side effects, both immediate and long-term, and the investigations and monitoring necessary throughout suppression. Clinicians will be better informed about the options and indications for menstrual suppression in patients with cognitive and/or physical disabilities and patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, or other treatments for cancer. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, OVID, and the Cochrane Library using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (heavy menstrual bleeding, menstrual suppression, chemotherapy/radiation, cognitive disability, physical disability, learning disability). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observation studies, and pilot studies. There were no language or date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and new material was incorporated into the guideline until September 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). There is a need for specific guidelines on menstrual suppression in at-risk populations for health care providers. Recommendations 1. Menstrual suppression and therapeutic amenorrhea should be considered safe and viable options for women who need or want to have

  4. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARG)–responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68+ macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr−/− mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr−/− mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  5. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  6. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds.

  7. Combined use of two formulations containing diacetyl boldine, TGF-β1 biomimetic oligopeptide-68 with other hypopigmenting/exfoliating agents and sunscreen provides effective and convenient treatment for facial melasma. Either is equal to or is better than 4% hydroquinone on normal skin.

    PubMed

    Pratchyapurit, Walai-Orn

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of melasma remains a challenge and involves multistep approach. Diacetyl boldine (DAB) stabilizes tyrosinase in its inactive form while TGF-β1 biomimetic oligopeptide-68 inhibits tyrosinase activity. (1) to study the efficacy and safety of the combination use of two formulae containing two principal ingredients: DAB and TGF-β1 biomimetic oligopeptide-68 on facial melasma, and (2) to compare their efficacy with 2% and 4% hydroquinone cream (HQ) on sun-protected normal skin. A randomized, double-blind, 12-week comparative study of pre-/post-treatment was conducted in 40 females. Melasma was evaluated by manual MASI score and MASI score with instrumentally graded darkness at baseline, 6th week, and 12th week. The author also compared their effect with HQ on the arms, assessed their safety profile throughout the study. Thirty-eight subjects have completed the study. Their melasma showed improvement at the 6th week and 12th week as compared with baseline (P < 0.05). None developed severe reaction. Most subjects had temporary, mild skin reaction. About 2.6% of subjects graded themselves markedly improved, 76.3% moderately improved, and 21.1% slightly improved. Each formula showed either more efficacy or exerted faster action on pigment reduction than HQ. Combination of DAB serum at night and DAB/TGF-β1 biomimetic oligopeptide-68/sunscreen cream in the morning and at noon was effective and safe for facial melasma. They were superior to HQ in pigment reduction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Slurry transport medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, W.; Schiffman, L.

    1980-06-03

    This invention provides for an improvement in slurry transport systems, especially coal slurry lines. Instead of the usual use of fresh water resources which, in some geographic areas, are scarce for slurry transport, concentrated brine is used which is prepared from abundant salt water resources. Because of the higher density of this concentrated brine, it is a superior carrier of pulverized material. It diminishes the separation and settling tendency of slurry components during transport and particularly during shutdown. Other advantages in the use of concentrated brine include: freezing point depression which permits ease of transport during winter and at lower temperatures; dust suppression of stored coal; avoidance of spontaneous combustion of stored coal; inhibit freeze packing of dewatered pipeline coal; and diminished extent of corrosion in ferrous metal pipelines as compared to that which might occur with lower concentration brines. Important in the economy of the process is that the concentrated brine can be recycled. An inexpensive method for producing the concentrated brine is given.

  9. Isoform-selective Inhibition of Facilitative Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  10. Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes by a tetravalent guanylhydrazone

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    An overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines by activated macrophages/monocytes mediates the injurious sequelae of inflammation, septic shock, tissue injury, and cachexia. We recently synthesized a tetravalent guanylhydrazone compound (CNI-1493) that inhibits cytokine- inducible arginine transport and nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages, and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia and carrageenan-induced inflammation. During these investigations we noticed that CNI-1493 effectively prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced NO production, even when added in concentrations 10-fold less than required to competitively inhibit L-arginine uptake, suggesting that the suppressive effects of this guanylhydrazone compound might extend to other LPS-induced responses. Here, we report that CNI-1493 suppressed the LPS-stimulated production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukins 1beta and 6, macrophage inflammatory proteins 1alpha and 1beta) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cytokine suppression was specific, in that CNI-1493 did not inhibit either the constitutive synthesis of transforming growth factor beta or the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). In contrast to the macrophage suppressive actions of dexamethasone, which are overridden in the presence of IFN-gamma, CNI-1493 retained its suppressive effects even in the presence of IFN-gamma. The mechanism of cytokine- suppressive action by CNI-1493 was independent of extracellular L- arginine content and NO production and is not restricted to induction by LPS. As a selective inhibitor of macrophage activation that prevents TNF production, this tetravalent guanylhydrazone could be useful in the development of cytokine-suppressive agents for the treatment of diseases mediated by overproduction of cytokines. PMID:8642296

  11. The multiple conformational charge states of zinc(II) coordination by 2His-2Cys oligopeptide investigated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, density functional theory and theoretical collision cross sections.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Stephanie M; Deeconda, Manogna; Cumpian, Kayleah L; Ortiz, Rafael; Chinthala, Swetha; Angel, Laurence A

    2016-12-01

    Whether traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), B3LYP/LanL2DZ density functional theory, and ion size scaled Lennard-Jones (LJ) collision cross sections (CCS) from the B3LYP optimized structures could be used to determine the type of Zn(II) coordination by the oligopeptide acetyl-His1 -Cys2 -Gly3 -Pro4 -Tyr5 -His6 -Cys7 (amb5 ) was investigated. The IM-MS analyses of a pH titration of molar equivalents of Zn(II):amb5 showed that both negatively and positively charged complexes formed and coordination of Zn(II) increased as the His and Cys deprotonated near their pKa values. The B3LYP method was used to generate a series of alternative coordination structures to compare with the experimental results. The method predicted that the single negatively charged complex coordinated Zn(II) in a distorted tetrahedral geometry via the 2His-2Cys substituent groups, whereas, the double negatively charged and positively charged complexes coordinated Zn(II) via His, carbonyl oxygens and the C-terminus. The CCS of the B3LYP complexes were calculated using the LJ method and compared with those measured by IM-MS for the various charge state complexes. The LJ method provided CCS that agreed with five of the alternative distorted tetrahedral and trigonal bipyramidal coordinations for the doubly charged complexes, but provided CCS that were 15 to 31 Å(2) larger than those measured by IM-MS for the singly charged complexes. Collision-induced dissociation of the Zn(II) complexes and a further pH titration study of amb5B , which included amidation of the C-terminus, suggested that the 2His-2Cys coordination was more significant than coordinations that included the C-terminus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The effects of media on pharmaceutically relevant transporters in the human HT-29 adenocarcinoma cell line: does culture media need to be controlled?

    PubMed

    Lindley, David J; Roth, Wyatt J; Carl, Stephen M; Knipp, Gregory T

    2012-04-01

    The HT-29 cell line forms a confluent monolayer with tight junctions, but displays different phenotypes when cultured for 21 days in galactose-supplemented media (differentiated) versus glucose-supplemented media (dedifferentiated). This study is aimed at elucidating how media differences might affect selected drug transporter expression and peptide-based substrate transport toward reducing this variability. A vial of HT-29 cells was amplified and cultured over several passages in four different mediums (American Type Culture Collection recommended McCoy's 5A versus Dulbecco's modified Eagle's media containing glucose, galactose, or neither carbohydrate) with normal supplementation. Transporter mRNA expression was characterized at days 5 and 21 postseeding utilizing SABiosciences quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) drug transporter arrays. Transport studies using [H]histidine, [(3) H]glycylsarcosine, [(3) H]valacyclovir, and [(3) H]carnosine were performed to assess the functional effects of oligopeptide transporter expression changes in HT-29 cells grown in each media. qRT-PCR arrays illustrated variable, media-dependent transporter expression between both the initial and differentiated time points. Permeability studies illustrated considerable media-dependent differences in both paracellular and transcellular substrate fluxes. The results demonstrate that these cells exhibit differing monolayer characteristics and genotypic/phenotypic profile properties when cultured under different media. The results suggest a need for standardization of culture methodologies for reducing inter- and intralaboratory variability. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A dipeptide transporter from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis is upregulated in the intraradical phase

    PubMed Central

    Belmondo, Simone; Fiorilli, Valentina; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ferrol, Nuria; Marmeisse, Roland; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which form an ancient and widespread mutualistic symbiosis with plants, are a crucial but still enigmatic component of the plant micro biome. Nutrient exchange has probably been at the heart of the success of this plant-fungus interaction since the earliest days of plants on land. To characterize genes from the fungal partner involved in nutrient exchange, and presumably important for the functioning of the AM symbiosis, genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained from the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis were exploited. A gene sequence, showing amino acid sequence and transmembrane domains profile similar to members of the PTR2 family of fungal oligopeptide transporters, was identified and called RiPTR2. The functional properties of RiPTR2 were investigated by means of heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in either one or both of its di/tripeptide transporter genes PTR2 and DAL5. These assays showed that RiPTR2 can transport dipeptides such as Ala-Leu, Ala-Tyr or Tyr-Ala. From the gene expression analyses it seems that RiPTR2 responds to different environmental clues when the fungus grows inside the root and in the extraradical phase. PMID:25232358

  14. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  15. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  16. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  17. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery.

  18. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  19. Quantum Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-15

    Notre Dame was concerned with a variety of quantum transport in mesoscopic structures. This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific...Research under Grant No. AFOSR-91-0211. The major issues examined included quantum transport in high magnetic fields and modulated channels, Coulomb...lifetimes in quasi-1D structures, quantum transport experiments in metals, the mesoscopic photovoltaic effect, and new techniques for fabricating quantum structures in semiconductors.

  20. Glycans in the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 contribute to function and protect from proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, Tamara; Geillinger-Kästle, Kerstin Elisabeth; Stolz, Jürgen; Daniel, Hannelore

    2017-03-23

    Despite the fact that many membrane proteins carry extracellular glycans, little is known about whether the glycan chains also affect protein function. We recently demonstrated that the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) in the intestine is glycosylated at six asparagine residues (N50, N406, N439, N510, N515, N532). Mutagenesis-induced disruption of the individual N-glycosylation site N50, which is highly conserved among mammals, was detected to significantly enhance the PEPT1 mediated inward transport of peptides. Here, we show for the murine protein, that the inhibition of glycosylation at sequon N50 by substituting N50 with glutamine, lysine or cysteine, or by replacing S52 with alanine, equally altered PEPT1 transport kinetics in oocytes. Further, we provide evidence that the uptake of [(14)C]-glycyl-sarcosine in immortalized murine small intestinal (Mode-K) or colonic epithelial (PTK-6) cells stably expressing the PEPT1 transporter N50Q is also significantly increased relative to the wild type protein. By using electrophysiological recordings and tracer flux studies, we further demonstrate that the rise in transport velocity observed for PEPT1 N50Q is bidirectional. In line with these findings, we show that attachment of biotin derivatives, comparable in weight to 2-4 monosaccharides, to the PEPT1 N50C transporter slows down the transport velocity. In addition, our experiments provide strong evidence that glycosylation of PEPT1 confers resistance against proteolytic cleavage by proteinase K, while a remarkable intrinsic stability against trypsin, even in absence of N-linked glycans, was detected.

  1. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  2. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  3. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A special report on school transportation covers the following topics: (1) a school bus safety update; (2) equipping school buses with motion detectors; (3) state training requirements for school bus drivers; (4) recruiting and retaining drivers; (5) regulations covering underground fuel-storage tanks; and (6) a transportation directory. (MLF)

  5. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  6. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  7. Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Samtaney

    2003-03-21

    We present numerical evidence from two dimensional simulations that the growth of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. A bifurcation occurs during the refraction of the incident shock on the density interface which transports baroclinically generated vorticity away from the interface to a pair of slow or intermediate magnetosonic shocks. Consequently, the density interface is devoid of vorticity and its growth and associated mixing is completely suppressed.

  8. Essential letters in the fungal alphabet: ABC and MFS transporters and their roles in survival and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Perlin, Michael H; Andrews, Jared; Toh, Su San

    2014-01-01

    Fungi depend heavily on their ability to exploit resources that may become available to them in their myriad of possible lifestyles. Whether this requires simple uptake of sugars as saprobes or competition for host-derived carbohydrates or peptides, fungi must rely on transporters that effectively allow the fungus to accumulate such nutrients from their environments. In other cases, fungi secrete compounds that facilitate their interactions with potential hosts and/or neutralize their competition. Finally, fungi that find themselves on the receiving end of insults, from hosts, competitors, or the overall environment are better served if they can get rid of such toxins or xenobiotics. In this chapter, we update studies on the most ubiquitous transporters, the ABC and MFS superfamilies. In addition, we discuss the importance of subsets of these proteins with particular relevance to plant pathogenic fungi. The availability of ever-increasing numbers of sequenced fungal genomes, combined with high-throughput methods for transcriptome analysis, provides insights previously inaccessible prior to the -omics era. As examples of such broader perspectives, we point to revelations about exploitive use of sugar transporters by plant pathogens, expansion of trichothecene efflux pumps in fungi that do not produce these mycotoxins, and the discovery of a fungal-specific oligopeptide transporter class that, so far, is overrepresented in the plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic elevation of Sphingosine 1-phosphate suppresses dystrophic muscle phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja, Mario; Fischer, Karin A.; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Reyes, Morayma; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease characterized by the loss of muscle integrity and function over time. Using Drosophila, we show that dystrophic muscle phenotypes can be significantly suppressed by a reduction of wunen, a homolog of lipid phosphate phosphatase 3, which in higher animals can dephosphorylate a range of phospholipids. Our suppression analyses include assessing the localization of Projectin protein, a titin homolog, in sarcomeres as well as muscle morphology and functional movement assays. We hypothesize that wunen-based suppression is through the elevation of the bioactive lipid Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which promotes cell proliferation and differentiation in many tissues, including muscle. We confirm the role of S1P in suppression by genetically altering S1P levels via reduction of S1P lyase (Sply) and by upregulating the serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase catalytic subunit gene lace, the first gene in the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway and find that these manipulations also reduce muscle degeneration. Furthermore, we show that reduction of spinster (which encodes a major facilitator family transporter, homologs of which in higher animals have been shown to transport S1P) can also suppress dystrophic muscle degeneration. Finally, administration to adult flies of pharmacological agents reported to elevate S1P signaling significantly suppresses dystrophic muscle phenotypes. Our data suggest that localized intracellular S1P elevation promotes the suppression of muscle wasting in flies. PMID:23154413

  10. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate ‘weak links’ where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors.

  11. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-27

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors.

  12. Obstetric Transport.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Obstetric transport is a specialized medical transport for maternal, fetal, and neonatal concerns. Perinatal regionalization of care provides a broader geographic availability of obstetric services with defined levels of maternal and neonatal care so that women can be transported to centers with increased resources and capabilities to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act provides regulatory guidance for care of laboring women who require transfer to a higher level of care. The Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation communication can identify key pieces of medical information with recommendations given for mutual expectations of next steps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  14. Heat transfer enhancement accompanying Leidenfrost state suppression at ultrahigh temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Arjang; Wurz, Jillian; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2014-10-14

    The well-known Leidenfrost effect is the formation of a vapor layer between a liquid and an underlying hot surface. This insulating vapor layer severely degrades heat transfer and results in surface dryout. We measure the heat transfer enhancement and dryout prevention benefits accompanying electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state. Interfacial electric fields in the vapor layer can attract liquid toward the surface and promote wetting. This principle can suppress dryout even at ultrahigh temperatures exceeding 500 °C, which is more than 8 times the Leidenfrost superheat for organic solvents. Robust Leidenfrost state suppression is observed for a variety of liquids, ranging from low electrical conductivity organic solvents to electrically conducting salt solutions. Elimination of the vapor layer increases heat dissipation capacity by more than 1 order of magnitude. Heat removal capacities exceeding 500 W/cm(2) are measured, which is 5 times the critical heat flux (CHF) of water on common engineering surfaces. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate can be electrically controlled by the applied voltage. The underlying science is explained via a multiphysics analytical model which captures the coupled electrostatic-fluid-thermal transport phenomena underlying electrostatic Leidenfrost state suppression. Overall, this work uncovers the physics underlying dryout prevention and demonstrates electrically tunable boiling heat transfer with ultralow power consumption.

  15. Suppression of superconductivity and resistivity anomaly in Rh17S15 by cobalt substitution.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ramzy; Berthebaud, David; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-02-22

    The chalcogenide superconductor Rh17S15 is known for having an upper critical field of nearly twice the Pauli limit and an unusual temperature dependence of the resistivity. When doped with small amounts of cobalt, superconductivity in Rh17-x Co x S15 (0  <  x  <  3) is systematically suppressed. We explore the evolution of the electrical transport properties from 2-300 K as a function of x. We identify three temperature regimes which are differently affected by doping. The disappearance of an electron-like contribution to the transport at low temperature is correlated with the suppression of superconductivity.

  16. Suppression of superconductivity and resistivity anomaly in Rh17S15 by cobalt substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Ramzy; Berthebaud, David; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-02-01

    The chalcogenide superconductor Rh17S15 is known for having an upper critical field of nearly twice the Pauli limit and an unusual temperature dependence of the resistivity. When doped with small amounts of cobalt, superconductivity in Rh17-x Co x S15 (0  <  x  <  3) is systematically suppressed. We explore the evolution of the electrical transport properties from 2-300 K as a function of x. We identify three temperature regimes which are differently affected by doping. The disappearance of an electron-like contribution to the transport at low temperature is correlated with the suppression of superconductivity.

  17. Altered srf expression in Bacillus subtilis resulting from changes in culture pH is dependent on the Spo0K oligopeptide permease and the ComQX system of extracellular control.

    PubMed

    Cosby, W M; Vollenbroich, D; Lee, O H; Zuber, P

    1998-03-01

    The expression of the srf operon of Bacillus subtilis, encoding surfactin synthetase and the competence regulatory protein ComS, was observed to be reduced when cells were grown in a rich glucose- and glutamine-containing medium in which late-growth culture pH was 5.0 or lower. The production of the surfactin synthetase subunits and of surfactin itself was also reduced. Raising the pH to near neutrality resulted in dramatic increases in srf expression and surfactin production. This apparent pH-dependent induction of srf expression required spo0K, which encodes the oligopeptide permease that functions in cell-density-dependent control of sporulation and competence, but not CSF, the competence-inducing pheromone that regulates srf expression in a Spo0K-dependent manner. Both ComP and ComA, the two-component regulatory pair that stimulates cell-density-dependent srf transcription, were required for optimal expression of srf at low and high pHs, but ComP was not required for pH-dependent srf induction. The known negative regulators of srf, RapC and CodY, were found not to function significantly in pH-dependent srf expression. Late-growth culture supernatants at low pH were not active in inducing srf expression in cells of low-density cultures but were rendered active when their pH was raised to near neutrality. ComQ (and very likely the srf-inducing pheromone ComX) and Spo0K were found to be required for the extracellular induction of srf-lacZ at neutral pH. The results suggest that srf expression, in response to changes in culture pH, requires Spo0K and another, as yet unidentified, extracellular factor. The study also provides evidence consistent with the hypothesis that ComP acts both positively and negatively in the regulation of ComA and that both activities are controlled by the ComX pheromone.

  18. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  19. Directional Phonon Suppression Function as a Tool for the Identification of Ultralow Thermal Conductivity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    2017-03-01

    Boundary-engineering in nanostructures has the potential to dramatically impact the development of materials for high- efficiency conversion of thermal energy directly into electricity. In particular, nanostructuring of semiconductors can lead to strong suppression of heat transport with little degradation of electrical conductivity. Although this combination of material properties is promising for thermoelectric materials, it remains largely unexplored. In this work, we introduce a novel concept, the directional phonon suppression function, to unravel boundary-dominated heat transport in unprecedented detail. Using a combination of density functional theory and the Boltzmann transport equation, we compute this quantity for nanoporous silicon materials. We first compute the thermal conductivity for the case with aligned circular pores, confirming a significant thermal transport degradation with respect to the bulk. Then, by analyzing the information on the directionality of phonon suppression in this system, we identify a new structure of rectangular pores with the same porosity that enables a four-fold decrease in thermal transport with respect to the circular pores. Our results illustrate the utility of the directional phonon suppression function, enabling new avenues for systematic thermal conductivity minimization and potentially accelerating the engineering of next-generation thermoelectric devices.

  20. Directional Phonon Suppression Function as a Tool for the Identification of Ultralow Thermal Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Giuseppe; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    2017-01-01

    Boundary-engineering in nanostructures has the potential to dramatically impact the development of materials for high- efficiency conversion of thermal energy directly into electricity. In particular, nanostructuring of semiconductors can lead to strong suppression of heat transport with little degradation of electrical conductivity. Although this combination of material properties is promising for thermoelectric materials, it remains largely unexplored. In this work, we introduce a novel concept, the directional phonon suppression function, to unravel boundary-dominated heat transport in unprecedented detail. Using a combination of density functional theory and the Boltzmann transport equation, we compute this quantity for nanoporous silicon materials. We first compute the thermal conductivity for the case with aligned circular pores, confirming a significant thermal transport degradation with respect to the bulk. Then, by analyzing the information on the directionality of phonon suppression in this system, we identify a new structure of rectangular pores with the same porosity that enables a four-fold decrease in thermal transport with respect to the circular pores. Our results illustrate the utility of the directional phonon suppression function, enabling new avenues for systematic thermal conductivity minimization and potentially accelerating the engineering of next-generation thermoelectric devices. PMID:28338003

  1. Suppression of edge-localized modes by magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2010-11-15

    Transport bursts in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in tokamaks are suppressed by the application of magnetic field perturbations. The amplitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations is characterized by a stochasticity parameter S. When S>1, magnetic flux surfaces are destroyed and the magnetic field lines diffuse in minor radius. As S increases in the simulations, the magnitude of the ELM bursts decreases. The size of bursts is reduced to a very small value while S is still less than unity and most of the magnetic flux surfaces are still preserved. Magnetic field line stochasticity is not a requirement for the stabilization of ELMs by the magnetic field perturbations. The magnetic field perturbations act by suppressing the growth of the resistive ballooning instability that underlies the ELM bursts.

  2. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles.

    PubMed

    Pop, Ioan M; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Glazman, Leonid I; Devoret, Michel H

    2014-04-17

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  3. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Ioan M.; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Glazman, Leonid I.; Devoret, Michel H.

    2014-04-01

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  4. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Beale, John H; Parker, Joanne L; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W; Newstead, Simon

    2015-10-06

    Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells.

  5. UCP2 knockout suppresses mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Jackson, Kasey; Shen, Xingui; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Kevil, Christopher G; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling (uncouples electron transport from ATP production) has recently been proposed as a novel survival mechanism for cancer cells, and reduction in free radical generation is the accepted mechanism of action. However, there is no direct evidence supporting that uncoupling proteins promote carcinogenesis. Herein, we examined whether mitochondrial uncoupling affects mouse skin carcinogenesis using uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) homozygous knockout and wild-type mice. The results indicate that knockout of Ucp2 significantly reduced the formation of both benign (papilloma) and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) tumors. UCP2 knockout did not cause increases in apoptosis during skin carcinogenesis. The rates of oxygen consumption were decreased only in the carcinogen-treated UCP2 knockout mice, whereas glycolysis was increased only in the carcinogen-treated wild-type mice. Finally, the levels of metabolites pyruvate, malate, and succinate showed different trends after carcinogen treatments between the wild-type and UCP2 knockout mice. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Ucp2 knockout suppresses carcinogenesis in vivo. Together with early studies showing that UCP2 is overexpressed in a number of human cancers, UCP2 could be a potential target for cancer prevention and/or therapy. Cancer Prev Res; 8(6); 487-91. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. A nitrite transporter associated with nitrite uptake by higher plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Miwa; Georgescu, Mihaela N; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Chloroplasts take up cytosolic nitrite during nitrate assimilation. In this study we identified a nitrite transporter located in the chloroplasts of higher plants. The transporter, CsNitr1-L, a member of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family, was detected during light-induced chloroplast development in de-etiolating cucumber seedlings. We detected a CsNitr1-L-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in the chloroplasts of leaf cells and found that an immunoreactive 51 kDa protein was present in the isolated inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. CsNitr1-L has an isoform, CsNitr1-S, with an identical 484 amino acid core sequence; however, in CsNitr1-S the 120 amino acid N-terminal extension is missing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing CsNitr1-S absorbed nitrite from an acidic medium at a slower rate than mock-transformed control cells, and accumulated nitrite to only one-sixth the concentration of the control cells, suggesting that CsNitr1-S enhances the efflux of nitrite from the cell. Insertion of T-DNA in a single CsNitr1-L homolog (At1g68570) in Arabidopsis resulted in nitrite accumulation in leaves to more than five times the concentration found in the wild type. These results show that it is possible that both CsNitr1-L and CsNitr1-S encode efflux-type nitrite transporters, but with different subcellular localizations. CsNitr1-L may possibly load cytosolic nitrite into chloroplast stroma in the chloroplast envelope during nitrate assimilation. The presence of genes homologous to CsNitr1-L in the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice indicates that facilitated nitrite transport is of general physiological importance in plant nutrition.

  7. Effect of heat stress on protein utilization and nutrient transporters in meat-type chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habashy, Walid S.; Milfort, Marie C.; Fuller, Alberta L.; Attia, Youssef A.; Rekaya, Romdhane; Aggrey, Samuel E.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat stress (HS) on digestibility of protein and fat and the expression of nutrient transporters in broilers. Forty-eight male Cobb500 chicks were used in this study. At day 14, birds were randomly divided into two groups and kept under either constant normal temperature (25 °C) or high temperature (35 °C) in individual cages. Five birds per treatment at 1 and 12 days post-treatment were euthanized, and Pectoralis major (P. major) and ileum were sampled for gene expression analysis. At day 33, ileal contents were collected and used for digestibility analysis. The total consumption and retention of protein and fat were significantly lower in the HS group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, the retention of crude protein per BWG was significantly higher in the HS group compared to the control group. In P. major and ileum tissues at day 1, transporters FATP1 and SGLT1 were down-regulated in the HS group. Meanwhile, FABP1 and PepT1 were down-regulated only in the ileum of the HS group. The converse was shown in P. major. The nutrient transporter FABP1 at day 12 post-HS was down-regulated in the P. major and ileum, but GLUT1 and PepT2 were down-regulated only in the ileum, and PepT1 was down-regulated only in the P. major compared with the control group. These changes in nutrient transporters suggest that high ambient temperature might change the ileum and P. major lipids, glucose, and oligopeptide transporters.

  8. Suppression of operant vs consummatory behavior.

    PubMed

    DeCosta, M J; Ayres, J J

    1971-07-01

    The magnitude and variability of conditioned suppression of bar pressing and dipper licking were compared. In two steady-state experiments, suppression of bar pressing was more profound and more stable from day to day. The two measures of suppression were uncorrelated as indexed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients computed for adjacent trials. Correlations within measures (internal consistency) were somewhat higher for the bar-press system except when a high proportion of rats completely suppressed on one of the correlated trials. In a transient state experiment in which possible adventitious punishment of both response systems was eliminated, suppression of bar pressing was again more profound and considerably slower to extinguish.

  9. Wakefield suppression using beatwave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Kim, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    A proposed method of suppressing transverse wakefields in an accelerating structure makes use of the fact that superposition of long-range wakes excited by an electron bunch transversing a series of accelerating cells with different transverse frequencies can produce interference cancellation, thereby significantly reducing the magnitudes of the harmful wake potentials. Analytic calculations as well as time-domain and modal sum simulations are performed to the beatwave effects produced by detuned, disk-loaded cavities as function of their transverse frequency spread and the population density.

  10. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  11. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  12. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  13. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557) heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite energetic particle modes (or fishbones), and toroidal, global or compressional Alfvén eigenmodes. These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of high harmonic fast wave heating.

  14. Controlling ratchet transport via a finite kicked environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulack, S. A.; Beims, M. W.; Lopes, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of a finite kicked environment (bath) composed of N harmonic oscillators on the particle transport in a weakly dissipative quasisymmetric potential system. The small spatial asymmetry is responsible for the appearance of directed particle transport without a net bias, known as the ratchet transport. The whole dynamics is governed by a generalized map where dissipation in the system emerges due to its interaction with the kicked environment. Distinct spectral densities are imposed to the bath oscillators and play an essential role in such models. By changing the functional form of the spectral density, we observe that the transport can be optimized or even suppressed. We show evidences that the transport optimization is related to stability properties of periodic points of the ratchet system and depends on the bath temperature. In a Markovian approach, transport can be increased or suppressed depending on the bath influence.

  15. Orientation-tuned suppression in binocular rivalry reveals general and specific components of rivalry suppression.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Sjoerd M; Cass, John; Paffen, Chris L E; Alais, David

    2009-10-16

    During binocular rivalry (BR), conflicting monocular images are alternately suppressed from awareness. During suppression of an image, contrast sensitivity for probes is reduced by approximately 0.3-0.5 log units relative to when the image is in perceptual dominance. Previous studies on rivalry suppression have led to controversies concerning the nature and extent of suppression during BR. We tested for feature-specific suppression using orthogonal rivaling gratings and measuring contrast sensitivity to small grating probes at a range of orientations in a 2AFC orientation discrimination task. Results indicate that suppression is not uniform across orientations: suppression was much greater for orientations close to that of the suppressed grating. The higher suppression was specific to a narrow range around the suppressed rival grating, with a tuning similar to V1 orientation bandwidths. A similar experiment tested for spatial frequency tuning and found that suppression was stronger for frequencies close to that of the suppressed grating. Interestingly, no tuned suppression was observed when a flicker-and-swap paradigm was used, suggesting that tuned suppression occurs only for lower-level, interocular rivalry. Together, the results suggest there are two components to rivalry suppression: a general feature-invariant component and an additional component specifically tuned to the rivaling features.

  16. Glucose Suppression of Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Le Marchand, Sylvain J.; Piston, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon is released from α-cells present in intact pancreatic islets at glucose concentrations below 4 mm, whereas higher glucose levels inhibit its secretion. The mechanisms underlying the suppression of α-cell secretory activity are poorly understood, but two general types of models have been proposed as follows: direct inhibition by glucose or paracrine inhibition from non-α-cells within the islet of Langerhans. To identify α-cells for analysis, we utilized transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins targeted specifically to these cells. Measurements of glucagon secretion from pure populations of flow-sorted α-cells show that contrary to its effect on intact islets, glucose does stimulate glucagon secretion from isolated α-cells. This observation argues against a direct inhibition of glucagon secretion by glucose and supports the paracrine inhibition model. Imaging of cellular metabolism by two-photon excitation of NAD(P)H autofluorescence indicates that glucose is metabolized in α-cells and that glucokinase is the likely rate-limiting step in this process. Imaging calcium dynamics of α-cells in intact islets reveals that inhibiting concentrations of glucose increase the intracellular calcium concentration and the frequency of α-cell calcium oscillations. Application of candidate paracrine inhibitors leads to reduced glucagon secretion but did not decrease the α-cell calcium activity. Taken together, the data suggest that suppression occurs downstream from α-cell calcium signaling, presumably at the level of vesicle trafficking or exocytotic machinery. PMID:20231269

  17. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  18. Methods of suppressing automotive interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, H. E.

    1981-11-01

    Automotive manufacturers utilize several techniques to reduce EMI emanating from the vehicle. The techniques include resistor spark plugs, resistor spark plug cables, use of silicone lubricant in the distributor, use of capacitors as filters, placement of grounding straps at key locations, conductive fan belt discharge, and tire static-charge reduction. If even further reduction is needed to obtain the maximum capability of a specific mobile communication system, additional suppression techniques are discussed which are effective at frequencies from approximately 30 to 1000 MHz. Measurement results show that the EMI from a new production-line automobile, measured in accordance with SAE Standard J551g, can be reduced as much as 10 to 15 dB by employing these suppression techniques. The amount of degradation to a mobile narrow-band FM receiver, such as the type used by law enforcement agencies, can be measured using the measurement technique described. This same technique can then be used as a tool to further reduce EMI from the vehicle components.

  19. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  20. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  1. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  2. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  3. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  4. Anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverry, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    This article is concerned with the relativistic Vlasov equation, for collisionless axisymmetric plasmas immersed in a strong magnetic field, like in tokamaks. It provides a consistent kinetic treatment of the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics. It shows that the turbulent transport can be completely described through WKB expansions.

  5. Momentum injection in tokamak plasmas and transitions to reduced transport.

    PubMed

    Parra, F I; Barnes, M; Highcock, E G; Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C

    2011-03-18

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  6. Momentum Injection in Tokamak Plasmas and Transitions to Reduced Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, F. I.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.

    2011-03-18

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  7. Hidden Symmetries, Instabilities, and Current Suppression in Brownian Ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubero, David; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    The operation of Brownian motors is usually described in terms of out-of-equilibrium and symmetry-breaking settings, with the relevant spatiotemporal symmetries identified from the analysis of the equations of motion for the system at hand. When the appropriate conditions are satisfied, symmetry-related trajectories with opposite current are thought to balance each other, yielding suppression of transport. The direction of the current can be precisely controlled around these symmetry points by finely tuning the driving parameters. Here we demonstrate, by studying a prototypical Brownian ratchet system, the existence of hidden symmetries, which escape identification by the standard symmetry analysis, and which require different theoretical tools for their revelation. Furthermore, we show that system instabilities may lead to spontaneous symmetry breaking with unexpected generation of directed transport.

  8. Quantum Transport Enhancement by Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Zimborás, Zoltán; Faccin, Mauro; Kádár, Zoltán; Whitfield, James D.; Lanyon, Ben P.; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics still provides new unexpected effects when considering the transport of energy and information. Models of continuous time quantum walks, which implicitly use time-reversal symmetric Hamiltonians, have been intensely used to investigate the effectiveness of transport. Here we show how breaking time-reversal symmetry of the unitary dynamics in this model can enable directional control, enhancement, and suppression of quantum transport. Examples ranging from exciton transport to complex networks are presented. This opens new prospects for more efficient methods to transport energy and information. PMID:23917452

  9. Quantum transport enhancement by time-reversal symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Zimborás, Zoltán; Faccin, Mauro; Kádár, Zoltán; Whitfield, James D; Lanyon, Ben P; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics still provides new unexpected effects when considering the transport of energy and information. Models of continuous time quantum walks, which implicitly use time-reversal symmetric Hamiltonians, have been intensely used to investigate the effectiveness of transport. Here we show how breaking time-reversal symmetry of the unitary dynamics in this model can enable directional control, enhancement, and suppression of quantum transport. Examples ranging from exciton transport to complex networks are presented. This opens new prospects for more efficient methods to transport energy and information.

  10. Tailoring the volatility and stability of oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Schätti, J.; Sezer, U.; Pedalino, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Mayor, M.

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids are essential building blocks of life, and fluorinated derivatives have gained interest in chemistry and medicine. Modern mass spectrometry has enabled the study of oligo‐ and polypeptides as isolated entities in the gas phase, but predominantly as singly or even multiply charged species. While laser desorption of neutral peptides into adiabatically expanding supersonic noble gas jets is possible, UV–VIS spectroscopy, electric or magnetic deflectometry as well as quantum interferometry would profit from the possibility to prepare thermally slow molecular beams. This has typically been precluded by the fragility of the peptide bond and the fact that a peptide would rather ‘fry’, i.e. denature and fragment than ‘fly’. Here, we explore how tailored perfluoroalkyl functionalization can reduce the intermolecular binding and thus increase the volatility of peptides and compare it to previously explored methylation, acylation and amidation of peptides. We show that this strategy is essential and enables the formation of thermal beams of intact neutral tripeptides, whereas only fragments were observed for an extensively fluoroalkyl‐decorated nonapeptide. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28608445

  11. Role for apyrases in polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Wu, Jian; Clark, Greg; Lundy, Stacey; Lim, Minhui; Arnold, David; Chan, Jing; Tang, Wenqiang; Muday, Gloria K; Gardner, Gary; Roux, Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that extracellular nucleotides regulate plant growth. Exogenous ATP has been shown to block auxin transport and gravitropic growth in primary roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Cells limit the concentration of extracellular ATP in part through the activity of ectoapyrases (ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases), and two nearly identical Arabidopsis apyrases, APY1 and APY2, appear to share this function. These findings, plus the fact that suppression of APY1 and APY2 blocks growth in Arabidopsis, suggested that the expression of these apyrases could influence auxin transport. This report tests that hypothesis. The polar movement of [(3)H]indole-3-acetic acid in both hypocotyl sections and primary roots of Arabidopsis seedlings was measured. In both tissues, polar auxin transport was significantly reduced in apy2 null mutants when they were induced by estradiol to suppress the expression of APY1 by RNA interference. In the hypocotyl assays, the basal halves of APY-suppressed hypocotyls contained considerably lower free indole-3-acetic acid levels when compared with wild-type plants, and disrupted auxin transport in the APY-suppressed roots was reflected by their significant morphological abnormalities. When a green fluorescent protein fluorescence signal encoded by a DR5:green fluorescent protein construct was measured in primary roots whose apyrase expression was suppressed either genetically or chemically, the roots showed no signal asymmetry following gravistimulation, and both their growth and gravitropic curvature were inhibited. Chemicals that suppress apyrase activity also inhibit gravitropic curvature and, to a lesser extent, growth. Taken together, these results indicate that a critical step connecting apyrase suppression to growth suppression is the inhibition of polar auxin transport.

  12. Ion transporters in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Damin; Zhu, Wen; Kuo, John S.; Hu, Shaoshan; Sun, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    Ion transporters are important in regulation of ionic homeostasis, cell volume, and cellular signal transduction under physiological conditions. They have recently emerged as important players in cancer progression. In this review, we discussed two important ion transporter proteins, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC-1) and sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant tumors. NKCC-1 is a Na+-dependent Cl− transporter that mediates the movement of Na+, K+, and Cl− ions across the plasma membrane and maintains cell volume and intracellular K+ and Cl− homeostasis. NHE-1 is a ubiquitously expressed cell membrane protein which regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular microdomain pH (pHe) homeostasis and cell volume. Here, we summarized recent pre-clinical experimental studies on NKCC-1 and NHE-1 in GBM and other malignant tumors, such as breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. These studies illustrated that pharmacological inhibition or down-regulation of these ion transporter proteins reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of cancer cells. These new findings reveal the potentials of these ion transporters as new targets for cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25620102

  13. OPT3 Is a Phloem-Specific Iron Transporter That Is Essential for Systemic Iron Signaling and Redistribution of Iron and Cadmium in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Zhiyang; Gayomba, Sheena R.; Jung, Ha-il; Vimalakumari, Nanditha K.; Piñeros, Miguel; Craft, Eric; Rutzke, Michael A.; Danku, John; Lahner, Brett; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Salt, David E.; Kochian, Leon V.; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for both plant growth and human health and nutrition. Knowledge of the signaling mechanisms that communicate iron demand from shoots to roots to regulate iron uptake as well as the transport systems mediating iron partitioning into edible plant tissues is critical for the development of crop biofortification strategies. Here, we report that OPT3, previously classified as an oligopeptide transporter, is a plasma membrane transporter capable of transporting transition ions in vitro. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana show that OPT3 loads iron into the phloem, facilitates iron recirculation from the xylem to the phloem, and regulates both shoot-to-root iron signaling and iron redistribution from mature to developing tissues. We also uncovered an aspect of crosstalk between iron homeostasis and cadmium partitioning that is mediated by OPT3. Together, these discoveries provide promising avenues for targeted strategies directed at increasing iron while decreasing cadmium density in the edible portions of crops and improving agricultural productivity in iron deficient soils. PMID:24867923

  14. How to suppress undesired synchronization.

    PubMed

    Louzada, V H P; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  15. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network. PMID:22993685

  16. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  17. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  18. Multiple treg suppressive modules and their adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Wing, James B.; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a constitutively immunosuppressive cell type critical for the control of autoimmunity and inflammatory pathology. A range of mechanisms of Treg suppression have been identified and it has not always been clear how these different mechanisms interact in order to properly suppress autoimmunity and excessive inflammation. In recent years it has become clear that, while all Tregs seem to share some core suppressive mechanisms, they are also able to adapt to their surroundings in response to a variety of stimuli by homing to the sites of inflammation and exerting ancillary suppressive functions. In this review, we discuss the relevance and possible modes of Treg adaptability and put forward a modular model of Treg suppressive function. Understanding this flexibility may hold the key to understanding the full spectrum of Treg suppressive behavior. PMID:22754556

  19. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Masakazu; Hidaka, Souta

    2013-01-01

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimulation can suppress the percept of visual stimuli: Visual orientation discrimination performance was degraded when a tactile vibration was applied to the observer's index finger of hands. We also demonstrated that this tactile suppression effect on visual perception occurred primarily when the tactile and visual information were spatially and temporally consistent. The current findings would indicate that neural signals could closely and directly interact with each other, sufficient to induce the perceptual suppression effect, even across sensory modalities. PMID:24336391

  20. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Ide, Masakazu; Hidaka, Souta

    2013-12-13

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimulation can suppress the percept of visual stimuli: Visual orientation discrimination performance was degraded when a tactile vibration was applied to the observer's index finger of hands. We also demonstrated that this tactile suppression effect on visual perception occurred primarily when the tactile and visual information were spatially and temporally consistent. The current findings would indicate that neural signals could closely and directly interact with each other, sufficient to induce the perceptual suppression effect, even across sensory modalities.

  1. Flexible oligocholate foldamers as membrane transporters and their guest-dependent transport mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyong; Zhao, Yan

    2012-01-14

    Dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric oligocholates with flexible 4-aminobutyroyl spacers caused the efflux of hydrophilic molecules such as carboxyfluorescein (CF) and glucose from POPC/POPG liposomes. Transport was greatly suppressed across higher-melting DPPC membranes. Lipid-mixing assays and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that the liposomes were intact during the transport. Kinetic analysis supported the involvement of monomeric species in the rate-limiting step of CF transport, consistent with a carrier-based mechanism. Glucose transport, on the other hand, displayed a highly unusual zero-order dependence on the oligocholate concentration at low loading of the transporter. Different selectivity was observed in the oligocholate transporters depending on the guest involved.

  2. Model of ELM suppression by RMPs in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Nazikian, R.; Ferraro, N. M.; Beidler, M. T.; Hegna, C. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments explored effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) near the minimum applied n=2 RMP amplitude required for ELM suppression in ITER-relevant low collisionality pedestals. Comprehensive tokamak forced magnetic reconnection (FMR) theory is used to describe and quantify the many physical processes involved in stages of RMP effects and an ELM crash response that lead to bifurcation into an ELM-suppressed state: 1) in ELMing equilibrium, flow-screening is strong with little magnetic reconnection; 2) the RMP at q=8/2 penetrates via FMR induced by an ELM crash and locks toroidal flow to the lab frame (like error field mode locking); 3) the ELM crash provides a 8/2 seed island (like NTMs) governed by a modified Rutherford equation; 4) if the total 8/2 RMP is large enough the internal tearing response and flow bifurcate and grow; and 5) flutter transport reduces pedestal top gradients which stabilizes P-B modes and hence suppresses ELMs. This analysis is for discharge 158115 in DIII-D; its potential universality is yet to be determined. Work supported by OFES/DOE under DE-FG02-92ER54139, DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  4. Shot noise suppression in avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Wang, Shuling; Campbell, Joe C

    2005-10-21

    We identify a new shot noise suppression mechanism in a thin (approximately 100 nm) heterostructure avalanche photodiode. In the low-gain regime the shot noise is suppressed due to temporal correlations within amplified current pulses. We demonstrate in a Monte Carlo simulation that the effective excess noise factors can be < 1, and reconcile the apparent conflict between theory and experiments. This shot noise suppression mechanism is independent of known mechanisms such as Coulomb interaction, or reflection at heterojunction interfaces.

  5. Two Techniques For Suppressing Vibrations In Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Garba, John A.; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    Two techniques intended to be used together to suppress vibrations in large, complicated truss structure involve combination of active and passive damping. Based on bridge feedback and criterion for placement of actuators. Research continues to develop system using these and other techniques to suppress vibrations in, and help control shape of, truss structure in outer space that supports precise, segmented reflector of communication antenna. On Earth, developmental techniques applicable to suppression of vibrations in bridges and tall buildings.

  6. A Computer Model of Saccadic Suppression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    suppression could be produced by "normal" saccadic eye movements and by "saccading" the visual image across the retina during eye fixation. Mitrari...Visual Threshold by Displacement of Retinal Image ," Nature, 225, 90-92, 1970. Matin, E., "Saccadic Suppression: A Review and an Analysis," Psychol., Bull...1975. Stark, L., Kong, R., Scnwartz, S., Hendry, D., Bridgemen, B., "Saccadic Suppression of Image Displacement," Vis. Res., 16, 1185-1187, 1976

  7. Two Techniques For Suppressing Vibrations In Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Garba, John A.; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    Two techniques intended to be used together to suppress vibrations in large, complicated truss structure involve combination of active and passive damping. Based on bridge feedback and criterion for placement of actuators. Research continues to develop system using these and other techniques to suppress vibrations in, and help control shape of, truss structure in outer space that supports precise, segmented reflector of communication antenna. On Earth, developmental techniques applicable to suppression of vibrations in bridges and tall buildings.

  8. Morphogen transport

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Rogers, Katherine W.; Yu, Shuizi R.; Brand, Michael; Schier, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    The graded distribution of morphogens underlies many of the tissue patterns that form during development. How morphogens disperse from a localized source and how gradients in the target tissue form has been under debate for decades. Recent imaging studies and biophysical measurements have provided evidence for various morphogen transport models ranging from passive mechanisms, such as free or hindered extracellular diffusion, to cell-based dispersal by transcytosis or cytonemes. Here, we analyze these transport models using the morphogens Nodal, fibroblast growth factor and Decapentaplegic as case studies. We propose that most of the available data support the idea that morphogen gradients form by diffusion that is hindered by tortuosity and binding to extracellular molecules. PMID:23533171

  9. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  10. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  11. Transient noise suppression algorithm in speech system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Keyu; Wang, Mingjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, I mainly introduce the algorithm of transient noise suppression in speech system. Firstly, it divides into impulsive noise and other types of transient noise according to the characteristics of transient noise. In the impulse noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the averaging energy threshold method to detect the impulse noise, and then I use the amplitude threshold method to reduce the impulse noise which was detected. In the other types of transient noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the Optimally Modified-Log Spectral Amplitude estimation (OM-LSA) algorithm and the Minimum Control Recursive Average (MCRA) algorithm to suppress the transient noise.

  12. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  13. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  14. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Heidi A.; Pham, Antony; Hald, Helle; Kastrup, Jette S.; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2009-11-06

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC{sub 50} value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC{sub 50} values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  15. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  16. Transport experiments with Dirac electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkelsky, Joseph George

    This thesis presents transport experiments performed on solid state systems in which the behavior of the charge carriers can be described by the Dirac equation. Unlike the massive carriers in a typical material, in these systems the carriers behave like massless fermions with a photon-like dispersion predicted to greatly modify their spin and charge transport properties. The first system studied is graphene, a crystalline monolayer of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The band structure calculated from the hexagonal lattice has the form of the massless Dirac Hamiltonian. At the charge neutral Dirac point, we find that application of a magnetic field drives a transition to an insulating state. We also study the thermoelectric properties of graphene and find that the states near the Dirac point have a unique response compared to those at higher charge density. The second system is the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3, where a Dirac-like dispersion for states on the 2D surface of the insulating 3D crystal arises as a result of the topology of the 3D bands and time reversal symmetry. To access the transport properties of the 2D states, we suppress the remnant bulk conduction channel by chemical doping and electrostatic gating. In bulk crystals we find strong quantum corrections to transport at low temperature when the bulk conduction channel is maximally suppressed. In microscopic crystals we are able better to isolate the surface conduction channel properties. We identify in-gap conducting states that have relatively high mobility compared to the bulk and exhibit weak anti-localization, consistent with predictions for protected 2D surface states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  17. Attentional selection by distractor suppression.

    PubMed

    Caputo, G; Guerra, S

    1998-03-01

    Selective attention was studied in displays containing singletons popping out for their odd form or color. The target was defined as the form-singleton, the distractor as the color-singleton. The task was to discriminate the length of a longer line inside the target. Target-distractor similarity was controlled using a threshold measurement as dependent variable in experiments in which distractor presence vs absence, bottom-up vs top-down selection (through knowledge of target features), and target-distractor distance were manipulated. The results in the bottom-up condition showed that length threshold was elevated when a distractor was present and that this elevation progressively increased as the number of distractors was increased from one to two. This set-size effect was not accounted by the hypothesis that selective attention intervenes only at the stage of decision before response. Selective attention produced a suppressive surround in which discriminability of neighboring objects was strongly reduced, and a larger surround in which discriminability was reduced by an approximately constant amount. Different results were found in the top-down condition in which target discriminability was unaffected by distractor presence and no effect of target-distractor distance was found. On the other hand, response times in both bottom-up and top-down conditions were slower the shorter the target-distractor distance was. On the basis of the experimental results, selective attention is a parallel process of spatial filtering at an intermediate processing level operating after objects have been segmented. This filtering stage explores high level interactions between objects taking control on combinatorial explosion by operating over only a limited spatial extent: it picks out a selected object and inhibits the neighboring objects; then, non-selected objects are suppressed across the overall image. When no feature-based selection is available in the current behavior, this

  18. Growth suppression caused by corticosteroid eye drops.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, Ole D

    2011-01-01

    Scarce data on systemic activity of corticosteroid eye drops are available in children. Two weeks treatment with fluorometholone eye drops in a case series of five children caused growth suppression detected by knemometry. The suppression had no impact on height growth during the following year.

  19. Simulation analysis of a wildfire suppression system

    Treesearch

    Abílio Pereira Pacheco; João Claro; Tiago. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Rekindles and false alarms are unusually high in the Portuguese wildfire management system, representing a high burden on suppression resources in particular, and fire management resources in general. In 20,049 occurrences that the suppression system handled in the summer of 2010, 12.5% were false alarms and 15.0% were rekindles. We present a discreteevent simulation...

  20. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  1. Foam as a Fire Suppressant: An Evaluation

    Treesearch

    Paul Schlobohm; Ron Rochna

    1987-01-01

    The ability of fire suppressant foams to improve ground-applied fire control efforts was evaluated. Foaming agents and foam-generating systems were examined. Performance evaluations were made for direct attack, indirect attack, and mop-up. Foam was determined to suppress and repel fire in situations where water did not. Cost comparisons of mop-up work showed straight...

  2. Suppressive soils: back on the radar screen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Suppressive soils are those in which a pathogen does not establish or persist, establishes but causes little or no damage, or establishes and causes disease for a while but thereafter the disease is less important, although the pathogen may persist in the soil (Weller, 2002). ‘General suppression,’ ...

  3. New approaches to hard bubble suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. D.; Besser, P. J.; Warren, R. G.; Whitcomb, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a new double-layer method for the suppression of hard bubbles that is more versatile than previously reported suppression techniques. It is shown that it may be possible to prevent hard bubble generation without recourse to exchange coupling of multilayer films.

  4. The hidden consequences of fire suppression

    Treesearch

    Carol Miller

    2012-01-01

    Wilderness managers need a way to quantify and monitor the effects of suppressing lightning-caused wildfires, which can alter natural fire regimes, vegetation, and habitat. Using computerized models of fire spread, weather, and fuels, it is now possible to quantify many of the hidden consequences of fire suppression. Case study watersheds in Yosemite and Sequoia-Kings...

  5. Multicopy Suppression Underpins Metabolic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Wayne M.; Quandt, Erik M.; Swartzlander, Dan B.; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the origins of new metabolic functions is based upon anecdotal genetic and biochemical evidence. Some auxotrophies can be suppressed by overexpressing substrate-ambiguous enzymes (i.e., those that catalyze the same chemical transformation on different substrates). Other enzymes exhibit weak but detectable catalytic promiscuity in vitro (i.e., they catalyze different transformations on similar substrates). Cells adapt to novel environments through the evolution of these secondary activities, but neither their chemical natures nor their frequencies of occurrence have been characterized en bloc. Here, we systematically identified multifunctional genes within the Escherichia coli genome. We screened 104 single-gene knockout strains and discovered that many (20%) of these auxotrophs were rescued by the overexpression of at least one noncognate E. coli gene. The deleted gene and its suppressor were generally unrelated, suggesting that promiscuity is a product of contingency. This genome-wide survey demonstrates that multifunctional genes are common and illustrates the mechanistic diversity by which their products enhance metabolic robustness and evolvability. PMID:17884825

  6. Polypyrrole actuators for tremor suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaarup, Steen; Mogensen, Naja; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    2003-07-01

    Neurological tremor affecting limbs can be divided into at least 6 different types with frequencies ranging from 2 to about 20 Hz. In order to alleviate the symptoms by suppressing the tremor, sensing and actuation systems able to perform at these frequencies are needed. Electroactive polymers exemplify "soft actuator" technology that may be especially suitable for use in conjunction with human limbs. The electrochemical and mechanical properties of polypyrrole dodecyl benzene sulphonate actuator films have been studied with this application in mind. The results show that the time constants for the change of length and for the stiffness change are significantly different; the stiffness change being about 10 times faster. Both force measurements and Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance measurements indicate that the actuation process is complex and involves at least two different processes. The EQCM results make it possible to formulate a hypothesis for the two different time constants: Sodium ions enter the polymer correlated with a fast mass change that probably involves a few (~4) strongly bound water molecules as well. On further reduction, about 10 additional water molecules enter the polymer in a slower process driven by osmotic pressure. Earlier work has tended to focus on achieving the maximum length change, therefore taking the time needed to include all processes. However, since the slower process described above is associated with the lowest strength of the actuator, concentrating on the faster stiffness change results in only a small reduction in the work done by the actuator. This may make actuation at higher frequencies feasible.

  7. Supersonic Transport Noise Reduction Technology Program - Phase 2. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    transport aircraft . In addition, PNL and EPNL con- tributions made by each major engine component ( jet , turbine , combustor and compressor) were... Turbine noise was studied using a J85 engine with massive Inlet suppressor and open nozzle to unmask the turbine . Second-stage turbine blade /nozzle...17. Kty Words (Suggnted by Author(tl) Jet Noise, High Velocity Suppression, Aircraft Engine Suppression, Turbomachlnery Noise, Hybrid Inlet

  8. Anticipatory signatures of voluntary memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Leipold, Philipp; Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-04

    Voluntary memory suppression can keep unwanted memories from entering consciousness, inducing later forgetting of the information. In the present study, we searched for the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating such voluntary memory suppression. Using the think/no-think paradigm, subjects received a cue whether to prepare to think of a previously studied cue-target pair or whether to not let a previously studied cue-target pair enter consciousness. Examining event-related potentials, we identified two electrophysiological processes of voluntary memory suppression: (1) an early anticipatory process operating before the memory cue for a to-be-suppressed memory was provided, and (2) a later process operating after memory cue presentation. Both ERP effects were due to a decreased right frontal and left parietal positivity. They were positively related and predicted later forgetting. The results point to the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating voluntary memory suppression.

  9. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  10. Light-hormone interaction in the red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ansuman; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-03-01

    Red light perceived by the shoot bottom suppresses photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings mediated by phytochrome A. Shoots of these seedlings grown in red light having their shoot bottom exposed were deficient in chlorophyll and accumulated high concentration of trans-zeatin riboside. However, reduced presence of isopentynyl adenosine, dihydrozeatin riboside was observed in shoots of red-light-grown non-green seedlings in comparison to green seedling. The message abundance of cytokinin receptor (OsHK5), transporters (OsENT1, OsENT2), and response regulators (OsRR4, OsRR10) was downregulated in these red-light-grown non-green seedlings. Attenuation of greening process was reversed by application of exogenous cytokinin analogue, benzyladenine, or supplementing red light with blue light. In the same vein, the suppression of gene expression of cytokinin receptor, transporters, and type-A response regulators was reversed in red-light-grown seedlings treated with benzyladenine suggesting that the disarrayed cytokinin (CK) signaling cascade is responsible for non-greening of seedlings grown in red light. The reversal of red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis by blue light and benzyladenine demonstrates the interaction of light and cytokinin signaling cascades in the regulation of photomorphogenesis. Partial reversal of greening process by exogenous application of benzyladenine suggests, apart from CKs perception, transportation and responsiveness, other factors are also involved in modulation of suppression of photomorphogenesis by red light.

  11. -----SPACE TRANSPORTATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-07

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  12. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  13. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  14. Suppression of dark current through barrier engineer for solution-processed colloidal quantum-dots infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Liu, Yan; Mo, Chen; Wang, Li; Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Liu, Jie; Kurhade, Kandhar K.; Xu, Jian E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Wenjun; You, Guanjun; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-31

    In an attempt to suppress the dark current, the barrier layer engineer for solution-processed PbSe colloidal quantum-dot (CQD) photodetectors has been investigated in the present study. It was found that the dark current can be significantly suppressed by implementing two types of carrier blocking layers, namely, hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, sandwiched in between two active PbSe CQD layers. Meanwhile no adverse impact has been observed for the photo current. Our study suggests that this improvement resides on the transport pathway created via carrier recombination at intermediate layer, which provides wide implications for the suppression of dark current for infrared photodetectors.

  15. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls - Review of developments and applications based on the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of the aerodynamic energy concept, involving the use of active controls for flutter suppression, is reviewed. Applications of the concept include the suppression of external-store flutter of three different configurations of the YF-17 flutter model using a single trailing edge control surface activated by a single fixed-gain control law. Consideration is also given to some initial results concerning the flutter suppression of the 1/20 scale low speed wind-tunnel model of the Boeing 2707-300 supersonic transport using an activated trailing edge control surface.

  16. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  17. Phosphorylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2016-11-09

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane phosphoprotein that actively translocates extracellular dopamine (DA) into presynaptic neurons. The transporter is the primary mechanism for control of DA levels and subsequent neurotransmission, and is the target for abused and therapeutic drugs that exert their effects by suppressing reuptake. The transport capacity of DAT is acutely regulated by signaling systems and drug exposure, providing neurons the ability to fine-tune DA clearance in response to specific conditions. Kinase pathways play major roles in these mechanisms, and this review summarizes the current status of DAT phosphorylation characteristics and the evidence linking transporter phosphorylation to control of reuptake and other functions. Greater understanding of these processes may aid in elucidation of their possible contributions to DA disease states and suggest specific phosphorylation sites as targets for therapeutic manipulation of reuptake.

  18. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  19. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  20. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Melissa S.; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Meagher, Richard B.; Smith, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator. PMID:23108027

  1. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  2. -----SPACE TRANSPORTATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  3. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  4. Psychopathology and Thought Suppression: A Quantitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Joshua C.; Harden, K. Paige; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  5. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The derived generalization of thought suppression.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Nic; Saunders, Jo; McHugh, Louise

    2010-05-01

    Thought suppression appears to be a relatively ineffective and even counterproductive strategy for dealing with unwanted thoughts. However, the psychological processes responsible for unsuccessful suppression are still underspecified. One process that may be implicated is derived stimulus relations, which may underlie the formation of unintentional relations that act to hamper suppression attempts. To test this prediction, participants were trained and tested for the formation of three derived equivalence relations using a match-to-sample procedure. Subsequently, they were instructed to suppress all thoughts of a particular target word that was a member of one of the three relations and were also allowed to selectively remove words that appeared on a computer screen in front of them by pressing the space bar. Results showed, as predicted, that participants not only removed the to-be-suppressed stimulus, but also removed words in derived relations with that stimulus, thus showing transformation of suppression/interference functions via derived equivalence. The theoretical implications of this demonstration, including its potential as a model for a key psychological process involved in unsuccessful thought suppression, are discussed.

  7. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  8. Autonomic regulation of mucociliary transport rate in the oesophagus of the frog, Rana temporaria.

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J; Sanjar, S

    1984-01-01

    Transport of lead particles along the mucosal surface of the frog oesophagus has been measured by direct observation with the aid of video recording. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve increased the rate of particle transport. This acceleration was suppressed by atropine or by hexamethonium. Acetylcholine and other parasympathomimetic agents accelerated particle transport rate. Such acceleration was abolished by atropine. Nicotine increased the rate of particle transport and this effect was suppressed by hexamethonium or by atropine. Atropine did not significantly alter basal particle transport rate. Neither basal particle transport rate nor the response to vagal nerve stimulation were affected by eserine. Adrenaline, noradrenaline or isoprenaline did not affect basal particle transport rate. Adrenaline or noradrenaline were without effect on the increased particle transport rate due to electrical stimulation of the vagus. PMID:6332901

  9. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  10. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  11. Suppression of immune response to Listeria monocytogenes: mechanism(s) of immune complex suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, H W; Wittenberg, G F; Bancroft, G J; Unanue, E R

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated possible mechanisms underlying immune complex suppression of resistance to Listeria monocytogenes. Inhibition of resistance was found when immune complexes were formed in vivo in immune mice or in nonimmune mice adoptively transferred with specific antibody. Suppression was also found when nonimmune mice were injected with immune complexes preformed in vitro. We investigated the role of complement by decomplementing mice with cobra venom factor purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Complete depletion of serum C3 did not eliminate immune complex suppression of resistance to L. monocytogenes, suggesting that complement activation is not required for immune complex suppression. Infection-induced changes in the surface phenotype and functional properties of macrophages from normal and immune complex-suppressed mice were also investigated. Macrophage expression of both H-2K and Ia molecules increased during the response of normal mice to L. monocytogenes. However, these changes were not found in immune complex-suppressed mice. In contrast, membrane interleukin 1 expression was increased in macrophages from suppressed mice compared with macrophages from normal mice. Macrophages from L. monocytogenes-infected normal and immune complex-suppressed mice expressed cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. We conclude that immune complexes do not inhibit resistance to L. monocytogenes by activation of complement or decreasing macrophage cytotoxic activity. Rather, defects in Ia expression by macrophages from suppressed mice might be one component responsible for immune complex suppression of resistance to L. monocytogenes. PMID:3932204

  12. Effects of tic suppression: ability to suppress, rebound, negative reinforcement, and habituation to the premonitory urge.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Woods, Douglas W; Nicotra, Cassandra M; Kelly, Laura M; Ricketts, Emily J; Conelea, Christine A; Grados, Marco A; Ostrander, Rick S; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) represents a safe, effective non-pharmacological treatment for Tourette's disorder that remains underutilized as a treatment option. Contributing factors include the perceived negative consequences of tic suppression and the lack of a means through which suppression results in symptom improvement. Participants (n = 12) included youth ages 10-17 years with moderate-to-marked tic severity and noticeable premonitory urges who met Tourette's or chronic tic disorder criteria. Tic frequency and urge rating data were collected during an alternating sequence of tic freely or reinforced tic suppression periods. Even without specific instructions regarding how to suppress tics, youth experienced a significant, robust (72%), stable reduction in tic frequency under extended periods (40 min) of contingently reinforced tic suppression in contrast to periods of time when tics were ignored. Following periods of prolonged suppression, tic frequency returned to pre-suppression levels. Urge ratings did not show the expected increase during the initial periods of tic suppression, nor a subsequent decline in urge ratings during prolonged, effective tic suppression. Results suggest that environments conducive to tic suppression result in reduced tic frequency without adverse consequences. Additionally, premonitory urges, underrepresented in the literature, may represent an important enduring etiological consideration in the development and maintenance of tic disorders.

  13. TGF-β Suppresses Ift88 Expression in Chondrocytic ATDC5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Makiri; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Notomi, Takuya; Izu, Yayoi; Noda, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    Ift88 is an intraflagella transport protein, critical for the cilium, and has been shown to be required for the maintenance of chondrocytes and cartilage. However, how Ift88 is controlled by cytokines that play a role in osteoarthritis is not well understood. Therefore, we examined the effects of TGF-β on the expression of Ift88. We used ATDC5 cells as chondrocytes and analyzed the effects of TGF-β on gene expression. TGF-β treatment suppresses the levels of Ift88 mRNA in a dose-dependent manner starting from as low as 0.5 ng/mL and reaching the nadir at around 2 ng/mL. TGF-β treatment also suppresses the protein levels of Ift88. TGF-β suppression of Ift88 is still observed when the cells are cultured in the presence of a transcriptional inhibitor while the TGF-β suppression is weakened in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. TGF-β treatment suppresses the levels of Ift88 mRNA stability suggesting the presence of posttranscriptional regulation. TGF-β treatment reduces the number of cilia positive cells and suppresses average length of cilia. Knockdown of Ift88 by siRNA enhances TGF-β-induced increase in type II collagen mRNA expression in ATDC5 cells revealing the suppressive role of Ift88 on TGF-β-induced regulation of extracellular matrix protein expression. TGF-β also suppresses Ift88 mRNA expression in primary culture of rib chondrocytes. These data indicate that TGF-β regulates Ift88 gene expression at least in part via posttrascriptional manner.

  14. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2010-11-01

    Now that new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut.

  15. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  16. Nearly complete isobar suppression by photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, P.; Lindahl, A. O.; Hanstorp, D.; Havener, C. C.; Liu, Yun; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of selective suppression of negative ions by photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler was investigated with a new detection method. A neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser beam at 1064 nm was used to remove Co- ions in the radio frequency quadrupole cooler and the remaining ions were then probed by photodetachment and neutral particle detection. More than 99.99% suppression of the Co- ions was observed. Under identical conditions, only 20% of a Ni- beam was suppressed. The results demonstrate that this isobar suppression technique can lead to nearly complete elimination of certain isobaric contaminants in negative ion beams, opening up new experimental possibilities in nuclear and atomic research and accelerator mass spectrometry.

  17. Anger suppression, ironic processes and pain.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Yoon, K Lira; Burns, John W

    2007-12-01

    Whether anger suppression exerts a causal influence on pain experience, and the mechanisms of such an influence, are not well understood. We report two experimental studies that examine the hypothesis that anger suppression paradoxically increases cognitive accessibility of anger, in turn coloring perceptions of succeeding pain in an anger-congruent fashion. The results of two experimental studies largely confirmed these predictions. Study 1 revealed that participants instructed to suppress emotions during anger-provocation experienced greater cold-pressor pain than those in the control condition. This difference was confined to perception of anger-specific qualities of pain. Study 2 replicated key findings of Study 1, but also provided partial evidence for increased cognitive accessibility of anger tied to anger suppression through self-report and modified dot-probe methodologies. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.

  18. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  19. Adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Francis, Prudence A; Regan, Meredith M; Fleming, Gini F; Láng, István; Ciruelos, Eva; Bellet, Meritxell; Bonnefoi, Hervé R; Climent, Miguel A; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Burstein, Harold J; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Geyer, Charles E; Walley, Barbara A; Coleman, Robert; Kerbrat, Pierre; Buchholz, Stefan; Ingle, James N; Winer, Eric P; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Colleoni, Marco; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gelber, Richard D

    2015-01-29

    Suppression of ovarian estrogen production reduces the recurrence of hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer in premenopausal women, but its value when added to tamoxifen is uncertain. We randomly assigned 3066 premenopausal women, stratified according to prior receipt or nonreceipt of chemotherapy, to receive 5 years of tamoxifen, tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, or exemestane plus ovarian suppression. The primary analysis tested the hypothesis that tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression would improve disease-free survival, as compared with tamoxifen alone. In the primary analysis, 46.7% of the patients had not received chemotherapy previously, and 53.3% had received chemotherapy and remained premenopausal. After a median follow-up of 67 months, the estimated disease-free survival rate at 5 years was 86.6% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group and 84.7% in the tamoxifen group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.04; P=0.10). Multivariable allowance for prognostic factors suggested a greater treatment effect with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression than with tamoxifen alone (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.98). Most recurrences occurred in patients who had received prior chemotherapy, among whom the rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 82.5% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group and 78.0% in the tamoxifen group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.02). At 5 years, the rate of freedom from breast cancer was 85.7% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence vs. tamoxifen, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.87). Adding ovarian suppression to tamoxifen did not provide a significant benefit in the overall study population. However, for women who were at sufficient risk for recurrence to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal, the addition of ovarian suppression improved disease outcomes. Further

  20. Maritime Intelligent Transport Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzykowski, Zbigniew

    The concept of intelligent transport systems, developed since 1980s, includes all modes of transport. Relevant developments in road transport are the most advanced. Recently water transport, particularly maritime transport, has gained more attention in this respect, in connection with building and further developments of maritime intelligent transport systems. The present state and directions of development of telematic systems in maritime transport will be discussed, with a focus on marine navigation.

  1. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  2. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise is described. Observations of wave refraction in duct flows and measurements of the increase in effectiveness of acoustic linings due to refraction have suggested methods for the design of engine inlet ducts which can either suppress noise internally or direct it to where it causes less annoyance.

  3. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  4. Marihuana smoking suppresses luteinizing hormone in women.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, J H; Mello, N K; Ellingboe, J; Skupny, A S; Lex, B W; Griffin, M

    1986-06-01

    Smoking a single 1-g marihuana cigarette containing 1.8% delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a 30% suppression of plasma luteinizing hormone levels (P less than .02) in women during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. After marihuana placebo cigarette smoking, no luteinizing hormone suppression was observed in the same women under double-blind conditions. Marihuana may have adverse effects upon reproductive function during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle as a consequence of gonadotropin inhibition.

  5. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities.

  6. Method for Transducer Transient Suppression. I. Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Vol. 92, No. 3, September 1992 Method for transducer transient suppression. I: Theory Jean C. Piquette Naval Research Laboratory. Underwater Sound...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Method for transducer transient suppression. I: Theo:y PE - 61153N TA - RROII-08-42 WU - DN220-161 6. AUTHOR(S) Jean...STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The problem of driving a transducer in

  7. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  8. Suppression sours sacrifice: emotional and relational costs of suppressing emotions in romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Impett, Emily A; Kogan, Aleksandr; English, Tammy; John, Oliver; Oveis, Christopher; Gordon, Amie M; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-06-01

    What happens when people suppress their emotions when they sacrifice for a romantic partner? This multimethod study investigates how suppressing emotions during sacrifice shapes affective and relationship outcomes. In Part 1, dating couples came into the laboratory to discuss important romantic relationship sacrifices. Suppressing emotions was associated with emotional costs for the partner discussing his or her sacrifice. In Part 2, couples participated in a 14-day daily experience study. Within-person increases in emotional suppression during daily sacrifice were associated with decreases in emotional well-being and relationship quality as reported by both members of romantic dyads. In Part 3, suppression predicted decreases in relationship satisfaction and increases in thoughts about breaking up with a romantic partner 3 months later. In the first two parts of the study, authenticity mediated the costly effects of suppression. Implications for research on close relationships and emotion regulation are discussed.

  9. The temporal frequency tuning of continuous flash suppression reveals peak suppression at very low frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shui’er; Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a psychophysical technique where a rapidly changing Mondrian pattern viewed by one eye suppresses the target in the other eye for several seconds. Despite the widespread use of CFS to study unconscious visual processes, the temporal tuning of CFS suppression is currently unknown. In the present study we used spatiotemporally filtered dynamic noise as masking stimuli to probe the temporal characteristics of CFS. Surprisingly, we find that suppression in CFS peaks very prominently at approximately 1 Hz, well below the rates typically used in CFS studies (10 Hz or more). As well as a strong bias to low temporal frequencies, CFS suppression is greater for high spatial frequencies and increases with increasing masker contrast, indicating involvement of parvocellular/ventral mechanisms in the suppression process. These results are reminiscent of binocular rivalry, and unifies two phenomenon previously thought to require different explanations. PMID:27767078

  10. ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbation in high-performance, stationary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Evans, T. E.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C C.; Snyder, P. B.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2010-01-01

    The method of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) has been shown to suppress edge-localized modes (ELMs) in the high-performance, stationary (or 'hybrid') scenario in the DIII-D tokamak. Calculations of stability to peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes are shown to be consistent with the observed suppression of type-I ELMs, while the ELM suppression, dependence on edge safety factor and density pump-out are similar for hybrids and standard H-mode discharges. However, other small ELMs can appear when the edge safety factor is outside the resonance window or when the H-mode pedestal is perturbed, which are not related to P-B stability. The role of the edge bootstrap current in determining stochastic heat transport during RMP is discussed.

  11. Extensions to PIFCGT: Multirate output feedback and optimal disturbance suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    New control synthesis procedures for digital flight control systems were developed. The theoretical developments are the solution to the problem of optimal disturbance suppression in the presence of windshear. Control synthesis is accomplished using a linear quadratic cost function, the command generator tracker for trajectory following and the proportional-integral-filter control structure for practical implementation. Extensions are made to the optimal output feedback algorithm for computing feedback gains so that the multirate and optimal disturbance control designs are computed and compared for the advanced transport operating system (ATOPS). The performance of the designs is demonstrated by closed-loop poles, frequency domain multiinput sigma and eigenvalue plots and detailed nonlinear 6-DOF aircraft simulations in the terminal area in the presence of windshear.

  12. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE PAGES

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore » Wave heating.« less

  13. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  14. MPLM fire detection and suppression: architecture and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balocco, P.; Potenza, F.; Cafero, E. |

    1993-12-31

    The Mini Pressurized Logistics Module (MPLM) is a servicer of the Space Station Freedom (SSF), whose purpose is to provide location for both subsystems and payload racks (active racks i.e. namely a freezer and a freezer/refrigerator, is to be serviced, and passive racks). The MPLM will be used to supply and return a pressurized cargo to and from the SSF via the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), optimizing the NSTS cargo capabilities. Being a pressurized module, the MPLM is characterized by an Environmental Control System that consists of two sections: The Enviromental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). The ECLSS is constituted by other subsections, among which is the Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS) Subsystem. The fire suppression method, selected at SSF level, is the CO2 discharge and diffusion in the affected enclosed areas. As far as the mathematical simulation of the FDS aspects is concerned, a big effort has been made and is still on-going. The related mathematical modelization is quite complex, involving two-phase phenomena, chocked flow and gas diffusion: this means the implementation and running of dedicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The diffusion analysis is particularly time-consuming, due to the complexity of the geometry with respect to modelization capability.

  15. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie [North Hollywood, CA; Rader, Jeffrey A [North Hollywood, CA; Saunders, Timothy W [North Hollywood, CA

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  16. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  17. The transport anisotropy effect in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Silin, V. P.

    1982-12-01

    The theory of transport phenomena in a plasma with developed ion-acoustic turbulence is formulated. The transport anisotropy effect, caused by a temperature gradient, is observed. The corresponding fluxes across the effective force vector which generates the turbulence are substantially larger than longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a comparatively low degree of nonisothermality. In a strongly nonisothermal plasma, the suppression of transverse fluxes occurs, corresponding to an increase in the thermal insulation of current-carrying plasma columns.

  18. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  19. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088