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  1. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  2. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  3. Ability of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and fused (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI to assess striatal involvement in paediatric glioma.

    PubMed

    Morana, Giovanni; Puntoni, Matteo; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Massollo, Michela; Lopci, Egesta; Naseri, Merhdad; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico; Rossi, Andrea; Piccardo, Arnoldo

    2016-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and fused (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI in detecting striatal involvement in children with gliomas. This retrospective study included 28 paediatric patients referred to our institution for the presence of primary, residual or recurrent glioma (12 boys, 16 girls; mean age 10.7 years) and investigated with (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and brain MRI. Fused (18)F-DOPA PET/MR images were obtained and compared with PET/CT and MRI images. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) for striatal involvement were calculated for each diagnostic tool. Univariate and multivariate logistic analyses were applied to evaluate the associations between (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and fused (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI diagnostic results and tumour uptake outside the striatum, grade, dimension and site of striatal involvement (ventral and/or dorsal). Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100 % for MRI, 93 %, 89 %, 100 %, 100 % and 82 % for (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI, and 75 %, 74 %, 78 %, 88 % and 58 % for (18)F-DOPA PET/CT, respectively. (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI showed a trend towards higher accuracy compared with (18)F-DOPA PET/CT (p = 0.06). MRI showed significantly higher accuracy compared with (18)F-DOPA PET/CT (p = 0.01), but there was no significant difference between MRI and (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI. Both univariate and multivariate logistic analyses showed a significant association (OR 8.0 and 7.7, respectively) between the tumour-to-normal striatal uptake (T/S) ratio and the diagnostic ability of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT (p = 0.03). A strong significant association was also found between involvement of the dorsal striatum and the (18)F-DOPA PET/CT results (p = 0.001), with a perfect prediction of involvement of the dorsal striatum by (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI. Physiological striatal (18)F-DOPA uptake does not appear to be a main limitation in the evaluation of basal ganglia involvement.(18)F-DOPA PET/CT correctly detected involvement of the dorsal striatum in lesions with a T/S ratio >1, but appeared to be less suitable for evaluation of the ventral striatum. The use of fused (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI further improves the accuracy and is essential for evaluation of the ventral striatum.

  4. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females.

  5. FDOPA PET-CT of Nonenhancing Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bund, Caroline; Heimburger, Céline; Imperiale, Alessio; Lhermitte, Benoît; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Lefebvre, François; Kremer, Stéphane; Proust, François; Namer, Izzie-Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Primary brain tumor grading is crucial to rapidly determine the therapeutic impact and prognosis of a brain tumor as well as the tumors' aggressiveness profile. On magnetic resonance imaging, high-grade tumors are usually responsible for blood -brain barrier breakdowns, which result in tumor enhancement. However, this is not always the case. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDOPA PET in the assessment of primary brain tumor aggressiveness with no contrast enhancement on MRI. Fifty-three patients were prospectively included: 35 low-grade and 18 high-grade histologically proven gliomas, with no contrast enhancement. Each patient underwent static PET acquisitions at 30 minutes. All patients had MRSI with measurements of different metabolites ratio. FDOPA was useful in the subgroup of low-grade gliomas, discriminating between dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor and grade II oligodendroglioma (P < 0.01). An optimal threshold of the maximum standardized uptake value at 30 minutes (SUVmax (T/N)30) = 2.16 to discriminated low- from high-grade gliomas with a sensitivity of 60%, specificity of 100%, PPV of 100%, and NPV of 83.33% (P < 0.01). The nCho/Cr and nCho/NAA ratios were significantly higher in high- than in low-grade gliomas (P < 0.03 and P < 0.04, respectively). A significant positive correlation between MRSI ratios and SUVmax was found. Including data from amino acid metabolism used alone or in association with MRSI allows us to discriminate between dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor and grade II oligodendroglioma and between low- and high-grade gliomas with no contrast enhancement on MRI.

  6. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and MRI Findings in a Patient With Multiple Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Calabria, Eros N; Grillea, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-08-01

    A 56-year-old man was referred to our Department for a 2-year story of upper limb tremor, severe headache, and episodes of confusion. Brain F-DOPA PET/CT showed multiple areas of tracer uptake in the two hemispheres of the brain. Subsequent MRI displayed demyelinating foci with high contrast enhancement. Histological specimen confirmed the diagnosis of multiple meningiomas.

  7. 18F-DOPA PET/CT Physiological Distribution and Pitfalls: Experience in 215 Patients.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Jaffrain-Rea, Marielise L; Zinzi, Maddalena; Sannino, Pasqualina; Minniti, Giuseppe; Rubello, Domenico; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-10-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT is potentially helpful in the management of patients with low-grade brain tumors, movement disorders, and somatic neuroendocrine tumors. We describe the whole-body physiological distribution of F-DOPA uptake. We examined 215 patients with F-DOPA PET/CT. Among these, 161 had brain scans and 54 had whole-body scans. Physiological distribution was negligible in the brain, with the exception of basal ganglia, whereas greatest activity was noted in the liver, pancreas, other exocrine glands, and the urinary system. Incidental tracer uptake sites were identified in 5.5% of patients. Some of these findings were due to inflammation, whereas in most cases, uptake was seen in benign tumors of the brain or in the endocrine or exocrine glands. F-DOPA uptake may be seen in inflammatory tissue or benign tumors. Correlations with history, physical examination, laboratory examination, CT, MRI, and histology are necessary for optimal diagnosis.

  8. Functional characterization of non-metastatic paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma by 18F-FDOPA PET: focus on missed lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sophie; Blanchet, Elise M; Sebag, Frédéric; Chen, Clara C; Fakhry, Nicolas; Deveze, Arnaud; Barlier, Anne; Morange, Isabelle; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims and methods To evaluate the clinical value of 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET in relation to tumour localization and the patient’s genetic status in a large series of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PHEO/PGL) patients and to discuss in detail false-negative results. A retrospective study of PGL patients who were investigated with 18F-FDOPA PET or PET/CT imaging in two academic endocrine tumour centers was conducted (La Timone University Hospital, Marseilles, France and National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA). Results One hundred sixteen patients (39.7% harboring germline mutations in known disease susceptibility genes) were evaluated for a total of 195 PHEO/PGL foci. 18F-FDOPA PET correctly detected 179 lesions (91.8%) in 107 patients (92.2%). Lesion-based sensitivities for parasympathetic PGLs (head, neck, or anterior/middle thoracic ones), PHEOs, and extra-adrenal sympathetic (abdominal or posterior thoracic) PGLs were 98.2% [96.5% for Timone and 100% for NIH], 93.9% [93.8% and 93.9%], and 70.3% [47.1% and 90%], respectively (P<0.001). Sympathetic (adrenal and extra-adrenal) SDHx-related PGLs were at a higher risk for negative 18F-FDOPA PET than non-SDHx-related PGLs (14/24 vs 0/62, respectively, p<0.001). By contrast, the risk of negative 18F-FDOPA PET was lower for parasympathetic PGLs regardless of the genetic background (1/90 in SDHx vs 1/19 in non-SDHx tumours, p= 0.32). 18F-FDOPA PET failed to detect 2 head and neck PGLs (HNPGL), likely due to their small size, while most missed sympathetic PGL were larger and may have exhibited a specific 18F-FDOPA-negative imaging phenotype. 18F-FDG PET detected all the missed sympathetic lesions. Conclusions 18F-FDOPA PET appears to be a very sensitive functional imaging tool for HNPGL regardless of the genetic status of the tumours. Patients with false-negative tumours on 18F-FDOPA PET should be tested for SDHx mutations. PMID:23230826

  9. The sensitivity and specificity of F-DOPA PET in a movement disorder clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nevein; Kusmirek, Joanna; Struck, Aaron F; Floberg, John M; Perlman, Scott B; Gallagher, Catherine; Hall, Lance T

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Early PD may present a diagnostic challenge with broad differential diagnoses that are not associated with nigral degeneration or striatal dopamine deficiency. Therefore, the early clinical diagnosis alone may not be accurate and this reinforces the importance of functional imaging targeting the pathophysiology of the disease process. 18F-DOPA L-6-[18F] fluoro-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalnine (18F-DOPA) is a positron emission tomography (PET) agent that measures the uptake of dopamine precursors for assessment of presynaptic dopaminergic integrity and has been shown to accurately reflect the monoaminergic disturbances in PD. In this study, we aim to illustrate our local experience to determine the accuracy of 18F-DOPA PET for diagnosis of PD. We studied a total of 27 patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out for all patients that underwent 18F-DOPA PET brain scan for motor symptoms suspicious for PD between 2001-2008. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the scans were performed. The patient’s medical records were then assessed for length of follow-up, response to levodopa, clinical course of illness, and laterality of symptoms at time of 18F-DOPA PET. The eventual diagnosis by the referring neurologist, movement disorder specialist, was used as the reference standard for further analysis. Of the 28 scans, we found that one was a false negative, 20 were true positives, and 7 were true negatives. The resultant values are Sensitivity 95.4% (95% CI: 100%-75.3%), Specificity 100% (95% CI: 100%-59.0%), PPV 100% (95% CI 100%-80.7%), and NPV 87.5% (95% CI: 99.5%-50.5%). PMID:27069770

  10. Current status of 18F-DOPA PET imaging in the detection of brain tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Considering the intrinsic limits of fluorine-18-dfluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) for diagnosing brain tumors and tumor recurrence, several radiopharmaceuticals have been developed to detect brain tumor recurrence after treatment. Among others, a promising tracer is fluorine-18-desoxyphenylalanine (DOPA), due to its very low rate of physiological distribution in normal brain structures of white and grey matter. The aim of our study was to assess the feasibility of PET/CT with (18)F-DOPA in the detection of brain tumor recurrence after treatment, in comparison with MRI performance and other PET radiopharmaceuticals, currently employed in this field. The (18)F-DOPA PET/CT seems to be useful in the diagnosis of patients with suspected brain tumor recurrence, because of low signal ratio in normal brain white and grey matter, in particular as compared to (18)F-FDG PET/CT low performance. Related data are presented for other fluorinated amino acid tracers. Magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard of diagnosis and (18)F-DOPA PET/CT is adjuvant to diagnosis. Further studies are needed to enrich our knowledge about this promising tracer,(18)F-DOPA, especially on its possible role on semi-quantitative measurements in brain tumors.

  11. Radionecrosis versus disease progression in brain metastasis. Value of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT/MRI.

    PubMed

    Hernández Pinzón, J; Mena, D; Aguilar, M; Biafore, F; Recondo, G; Bastianello, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT with magnetic resonance imaging fusion and the use of visual methods and quantitative analysis helps to differentiate between changes post-radiosurgery vs. suspicion of disease progression in a patient with brain metastases from melanoma, thus facilitating taking early surgical action.

  12. Lateralisation of striatal function: evidence from 18F-dopa PET in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheesman, A; Barker, R; Lewis, S; Robbins, T; Owen, A; Brooks, D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aetiology of the cognitive changes seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) is multifactorial but it is likely that a significant contribution arises from the disruption of dopaminergic pathways. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of the dopaminergic system to performance on two executive tasks using 18F-6-fluorodopa positron emission tomography (18F-dopa PET) in PD subjects with early cognitive changes. Methods: 16 non-demented, non-depressed PD subjects were evaluated with the Tower of London (TOL) spatial planning task, a verbal working memory task (VWMT) and 18F-dopa PET, all known to be affected in early PD. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) localised brain regions in which 18F-dopa uptake covaried with performance scores. Frontal cortical resting glucose metabolism was assessed with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET. Results: SPM localised significant covariation between right caudate 18F-dopa uptake (Ki) and TOL scores and between left anterior putamen Ki and VWMT performance. No significant covariation was found between task scores and 18F-dopa Ki values in either limbic or cortical regions. Frontal cortical glucose metabolism was preserved in all cases. Conclusions: These findings support a causative role of striatal dopaminergic depletion in the early impairment of executive functions seen in PD. They suggest that spatial and verbal executive tasks require integrity of the right and left striatum, respectively, and imply that the pattern of cognitive changes manifest by a patient with PD may reflect differential dopamine loss in the two striatal complexes. PMID:16107352

  13. Current status and future challenges of brain imaging with (18)F-DOPA PET for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando Franco; Calabria, Eros; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder (ND) due to progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. The correct differential diagnosis of this disease with parkinsonian syndromes (PS) or with essential tremor (ET) is a diagnostic dilemma, considering that only PD is responsive to treatment with levodopa. Traditional imaging fails to diagnose PD because morphological alterations in the brain are usually detectable only at advanced stages. Single photon emission tomography (SPET) with cocaine analogues has recently been used in the early detection of PD. The fluoro-18-deoxyphenyl-alanine ((18)F-DOPA) is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer with selective in vivo affinity to the basal ganglia, due to the specific metabolism of substantia nigra. We assessed the effective use of (18)F-DOPA PET in brain imaging in order to describe the function of presynaptic disorders of PD, PS, ET and other movement disorders compared to SPET imaging and also discussed novel radiopharmaceuticals. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also discussed. (18)F-DOPA PET imaging is still the best diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of PD and other movement disorders. Fluorine-18-FDG PET can play a role in the differential diagnosis between PD and other PS. The hybrid (18)F-DOPA PET/MRI seems to be able to play an important additional role in early diagnosis of the above syndromes.

  14. Head-to-head comparison between (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Veillon, Francis; Taïeb, David; Goichot, Bernard; Riehm, Sophie; Petit-Thomas, Julie; Averous, Gerlinde; Cavalcanti, Marcela; Hubelé, Fabrice; Chabrier, Gerard; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Charpiot, Anne; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues are

  15. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  16. A retrospective comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Frech, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Url, Christoph; Widmann, Gerlig; Prommegger, Rupert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Fraedrich, Gustav; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-12-01

    (18)F-Fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by (68)Ga-DOTA-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100% in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100% and that of (18)F-DOPA PET was 56.0%. Overall, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and (18)F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100% (McNemar, P < 0.5), and that of (18)F-DOPA PET was 71.1% (McNemar, P < 0.001). The SUVmax (mean ± SD) of all 32 concordant lesions was 67.9 ± 61.5 for (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 11.8 ± 7.9 for (18)F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET may be superior to (18)F-DOPA PET and diagnostic CT in providing valuable information for pretherapeutic staging of extra-adrenal PGL, particularly in surgically inoperable tumours and metastatic or multifocal disease.

  17. Striatal FDOPA uptake and cognition in advanced non-demented Parkinson's disease: a clinical and FDOPA-PET study.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Marije; Portman, Axel T; Kiers, Henk A L; Maguire, Ralph P; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Koning, Marthe; Pruim, Jan; Leenders, Klaus L

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine the nature of the relationship between cognition and striatal dopaminergic functioning in 28 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) using fluorodopa Positron emission tomography (FDOPA-PET) and neuropsychological test scores. Mental flexibility was related to putamen activity while mental organization (executive memory and fluency) was related to caudate FDOPA uptake. Interestingly, the caudate may be more important in the mental components of executive functioning, while the putamen may be more important in the motor components of executive functioning.

  18. Relationship Between [18F]FDOPA PET Uptake, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), and Proliferation Rate in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Karavaeva, Elena; Harris, Robert J; Leu, Kevin; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Yong, William H; Pope, Whitney B; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Liau, Linda M; Chen, Wei; Czernin, Johannes; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-06-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 6-[(18)F]fluoro-L-dopa ([(18)F]FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) are used to interrogate malignant tumor microenvironment. It remains unclear whether there is a relationship between [(18)F]FDOPA uptake, diffusion MRI estimates of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and mitotic activity in the context of recurrent malignant gliomas, where the tumor may be confounded by the effects of therapy. The purpose of the current study is to determine whether there is a correlation between these imaging techniques and mitotic activity in malignant gliomas. We retrospectively examined 29 patients with recurrent malignant gliomas who underwent structural MRI, diffusion MRI, and [(18)F]FDOPA PET prior to surgical resection. Qualitative associations were noted, and quantitative voxel-wise and median measurement correlations between [(18)F]FDOPA PET, ADC, and mitotic index were performed. Areas of high [(18)F]FDOPA uptake exhibited low ADC and areas of hyperintensity T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) with low [(18)F]FDOPA uptake exhibited high ADC. There was a significant inverse voxel-wise correlation between [(18)F]FDOPA and ADC for all patients. Median [(18)F]FDOPA uptake and median ADC also showed a significant inverse correlation. Median [(18)F]FDOPA uptake was positively correlated, and median ADC was inversely correlated with mitotic index from resected tumor tissue. A significant association may exist between [(18)F]FDOPA uptake, diffusion MRI, and mitotic activity in recurrent malignant gliomas.

  19. Role of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and (131)I-MIBG planar scintigraphy in evaluating patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyaya, G P; Kumar, Abhishek; Kumari, Jyotsana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate role of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT and (131)I-MIBG planar scintigraphy in patients with pheochromocytoma. The patients with diagnosis of pheochromocytoma based on radiological and biochemical markers were retrospectively selected for the study. These patients had undergone both (131)I-MIBG scintigraphy and (18)F-DOPA PET/CT. The imaging findings were compared to patient histopathology reports, biochemical markers and clinical follow up whenever available to establish the diagnosis. (131)I-MIBG showed a sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 100%. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 100%. (18)F-DOPA was better at localizing and finding more no of lesions as compared to (131)I-MIBG scintigraphy. (18)F-DOPA also is a better study in evaluation of paragangliomas. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT seems to be a better modality in comparison to (131)I-MIBG scintigraphy in the evaluation of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma. At this point both these tracers seem to have mutually additive role in these patients and essential investigations with diagnosis and follow-up of this disease.

  20. Biopsy validation of 18F-DOPA PET and biodistribution in gliomas for neurosurgical planning and radiotherapy target delineation: results of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pafundi, Deanna H.; Laack, Nadia N.; Youland, Ryan S.; Parney, Ian F.; Lowe, Val J.; Giannini, Caterina; Kemp, Brad J.; Grams, Michael P.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Hoover, Jason M.; Hu, Leland S.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brinkmann, Debra H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delineation of glioma extent for surgical or radiotherapy planning is routinely based on MRI. There is increasing awareness that contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images (T1-CE) may not reflect the entire extent of disease. The amino acid tracer 18F-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F] fluoro-l-phenylalanine) has a high tumor-to-background signal and high sensitivity for glioma imaging. This study compares 18F-DOPA PET against conventional MRI for neurosurgical biopsy targeting, resection planning, and radiotherapy target volume delineation. Methods Conventional MR and 18F-DOPA PET/CT images were acquired in 10 patients with suspected malignant brain tumors. One to 3 biopsy locations per patient were chosen in regions of concordant and discordant 18F-DOPA uptake and MR contrast enhancement. Histopathology was reviewed on 23 biopsies. 18F-DOPA PET was quantified using standardized uptake values (SUV) and tumor-to-normal hemispheric tissue (T/N) ratios. Results Pathologic review confirmed glioma in 22 of 23 biopsy specimens. Thirteen of 16 high-grade biopsy specimens were obtained from regions of elevated 18F-DOPA uptake, while T1-CE was present in only 6 of those 16 samples. Optimal 18F-DOPA PET thresholds corresponding to high-grade disease based on histopathology were calculated as T/N > 2.0. In every patient, 18F-DOPA uptake regions with T/N > 2.0 extended beyond T1-CE up to a maximum of 3.5 cm. SUV was found to correlate with grade and cellularity. Conclusions 18F-DOPA PET SUVmax may more accurately identify regions of higher-grade/higher-density disease in patients with astrocytomas and will have utility in guiding stereotactic biopsy selection. Using SUV-based thresholds to define high-grade portions of disease may be valuable in delineating radiotherapy boost volumes. PMID:23460322

  1. Predictive and prognostic value of 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients affected by recurrent medullary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Evangelista, Laura; Saladini, Giorgio; Schillaci, Orazio; Vadrucci, Manuela; Scalorbi, Federica; Donner, Davide; Alongi, Pierpaolo

    2017-10-06

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a malignancy accounting for about 5-8% of thyroid cancers. Serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels are widely used to monitor disease progression. However, prognostic factors able to predict outcomes are highly desirable. We, therefore, aimed to assess the prognostic role of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with recurrent MTC. 60 patients (mean age 64 ± 13 years, range 44-82) with recurrent MTC were eligible from a multicenter database. All patients underwent a restaging (18)F-DOPA PET/CT, performed at least 6 months after surgery. CEA/calcitonin levels, local recurrences, nodal involvement and metastases at PET/CT were recorded. SUVmax, SUVmean (also normalized to mediastinal uptake) and metabolic tumor volume were automatically calculated for each lesion, by placing a volume of interest around the lesion with 40% of peak activity as threshold for the automatic contouring. The patients were clinically and radiologically followed up for 21 ± 11 months. Rate of progression-free survival (PFS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and incremental prognostic value of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT over conventional imaging modalities were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves and Log-Rank test. Cox regression univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for assessing predictors of prognosis. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT showed abnormal findings in 27 patients (45%) and resulted unremarkable in 33 (55%). PFS was significantly longer in patients with an unremarkable PET/CT scan (p = 0.018). Similarly, an unremarkable PET/CT study was associated with a significantly longer DSS (p = 0.04). (18)F-DOPA PET/CT added prognostic value over other imaging modalities both for PFS and for DSS (p < 0.001 and p = 0.012, respectively). Neither semiquantitative PET parameters nor clinical or laboratory data were predictive of a worse PFS and DSS in patients with recurrent MTC. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT scan has an important prognostic value in predicting disease progression and mortality rate.

  2. 18F-DOPA PET/CT but not 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the underlying cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Ahonen, Aapo; Seppänen, Marko

    2012-09-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT but not Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome in a 61-year-old man. The patient presented with rapid weight gain, swollen legs, and sleep disturbances. Plasma potassium level was 2.7 mM (reference range, 3.3-4.9 mM), 24-hour urinary cortisol level was 13,124 nmol (reference range, 30-144 nmol), and plasma adrenocorticotropin level was 61 ng/L (reference range, <48 g/L). CT demonstrated prominent lymph nodes in the left lung hilus and hyperplastic adrenals but no primary tumor. Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, which is recommended as the first-line PET imaging, was performed, but it was not diagnostic. Imaging with F-DOPA PET/CT revealed the underlying cause.

  3. Quantitative analysis of normal and pathologic adrenal glands with 18F-FDOPA PET/CT: focus on pheochromocytomas.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Aurélie; Giraudet, Anne L; Kryza, David; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Bournaud, Claire; Mognetti, Thomas; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Combemale, Patrick; Giammarile, Francesco; Houzard, Claire

    2017-09-01

    Many studies have reported the high performance of 6-fluorine-18-fluorodihydroxyphenilalanine (F-FDOPA) PET/CT in the diagnosis of pheochromocytomas but nobody seems to have investigated physiological and pathological adrenal glands from a quantitative point of view. The purpose of the present study was to assess the quantitative F-FDOPA uptake of normal and pathologic adrenal glands and to establish thresholds to characterize pheochromocytomas. We were especially interested in characterizing the remaining adrenal glands captation after an adrenalectomy. We reviewed 112 F-FDOPA PET/CT scans taken for different indications. A total of 212 adrenal glands, of which 17 were pheochromocytomas, were analyzed on the basis of their functional and morphological features. The final diagnosis was based on histologic proof when available (six pheochromocytomas) or after synthesis of clinical, biological, morphological, and functional results. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mediastinum, and liver ratios in case of pheochromocytomas, adenomas, and solitary adrenal glands were determined and compared with those of healthy glands. Receiver operating characteristic curves were determined and areas under the curve were compared for different cutoffs of each index. Pheochromocytomas demonstrated a higher F-FDOPA uptake compared with normal adrenal glands (mean SUVmax: 7.5, SD 4.0, range: 3.5-20.0 vs. mean SUVmax: 2.6, SD: 0.8, range: 1.0-6.9) (P<0.0001). An SUVmax threshold of 4.2 has a sensitivity and specificity of 94 and 98%, respectively. The areas under the curve were 0.988, 0.991, and 0.987 for an SUVmax of 4.2, a mediastinum ratio of 3.0, and a liver ratio of 1.7, respectively. A large number of nonsecreting pheochromocytomas were noticed. On the basis of the SUVmax no statistically significant difference was found between secreting (SUVmax: 8.9, SD: 5.3) and nonsecreting pheochromocytomas (SUVmax: 5.1, SD: 0.9) (P=0.141). After unilateral adrenalectomy, solitary

  4. Use of [18F]FDOPA-PET for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We evaluated the utility of L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]fluoro-phenylalanine ([18F]FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) as a method for assessing the severity of dopaminergic dysfunction in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats by comparing it with quantitative biochemical, immunohistochemical, and behavioral measurements. Methods Different doses of 6-OHDA (0, 7, 14, and 28 μg) were unilaterally injected into the right striatum of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Dopaminergic functional activity in the striatum was assessed by [18F]FDOPA-PET, measurement of striatal dopamine (DA) and DA metabolite levels, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining, and methamphetamine-induced rotational testing. Results Accumulation of [18F]FDOPA in the bilateral striatum was observed in rats pretreated with both aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors. Unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA produced a significant site-specific reduction in [18F]FDOPA accumulation. The topological distribution pattern of [18F]FDOPA accumulation in the ipsilateral striatum agreed well with the pattern in TH-stained corresponding sections. A significant positive relationship was found between Patlak plot Ki values and striatal levels of DA and its metabolites (r = 0.958). A significant negative correlation was found between both Ki values (r = -0.639) and levels of DA and its metabolites (r = -0.719) and the number of methamphetamine-induced rotations. Conclusions Ki values determined using [18F]FDOPA-PET correlated significantly with the severity of dopaminergic dysfunction. [18F]FDOPA-PET makes it possible to perform longitudinal evaluation of dopaminergic function in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which is useful in the development of new drugs and therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD). PMID:22214344

  5. Persistent nigrostriatal dopaminergic abnormalities in ex-users of MDMA ('Ecstasy'): an 18F-dopa PET study.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yen F; Hoshi, Rosa; Brignell, Catherine M; Cohen, Lisa; Brooks, David J; Curran, H Valerie; Piccini, Paola

    2011-03-01

    Ecstasy (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA) is a popular recreational drug with known serotonergic neurotoxicity. Its long-term effects on dopaminergic function are less certain. Studying the long-term effects of ecstasy is often confounded by concomitant polydrug use and the short duration of abstinence. We used (18)F-dopa positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the long-term effects of ecstasy on nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a group of male ex-recreational users of ecstasy who had been abstinent for a mean of 3.22 years. We studied 14 ex-ecstasy users (EEs), 14 polydrug-using controls (PCs) (matched to the ex-users for other recreational drug use), and 12 drug-naive controls (DCs). Each participant underwent one (18)F-dopa PET, cognitive assessments, and hair and urinary analyses to corroborate drug-use history. The putamen (18)F-dopa uptake of EEs was 9% higher than that of DCs (p=0.021). The putamen uptake rate of PCs fell between the other two groups, suggesting that the hyperdopaminergic state in EEs may be due to the combined effects of ecstasy and polydrug use. There was no relationship between the amount of ecstasy used and striatal (18)F-dopa uptake. Increased putaminal (18)F-dopa uptake in EEs after an abstinence of >3 years (mean) suggests that the effects are long lasting. Our findings suggest potential long-term effects of ecstasy use, in conjunction with other recreational drugs, on nigrostriatal dopaminergic functions. Further longitudinal studies are required to elucidate the significance of these findings as they may have important public health implications.

  6. Persistent Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Abnormalities in Ex-Users of MDMA (‘Ecstasy'): An 18F-Dopa PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yen F; Hoshi, Rosa; Brignell, Catherine M; Cohen, Lisa; Brooks, David J; Curran, H Valerie; Piccini, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Ecstasy (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA) is a popular recreational drug with known serotonergic neurotoxicity. Its long-term effects on dopaminergic function are less certain. Studying the long-term effects of ecstasy is often confounded by concomitant polydrug use and the short duration of abstinence. We used 18F-dopa positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the long-term effects of ecstasy on nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a group of male ex-recreational users of ecstasy who had been abstinent for a mean of 3.22 years. We studied 14 ex-ecstasy users (EEs), 14 polydrug-using controls (PCs) (matched to the ex-users for other recreational drug use), and 12 drug-naive controls (DCs). Each participant underwent one 18F-dopa PET, cognitive assessments, and hair and urinary analyses to corroborate drug-use history. The putamen 18F-dopa uptake of EEs was 9% higher than that of DCs (p=0.021). The putamen uptake rate of PCs fell between the other two groups, suggesting that the hyperdopaminergic state in EEs may be due to the combined effects of ecstasy and polydrug use. There was no relationship between the amount of ecstasy used and striatal 18F-dopa uptake. Increased putaminal 18F-dopa uptake in EEs after an abstinence of >3 years (mean) suggests that the effects are long lasting. Our findings suggest potential long-term effects of ecstasy use, in conjunction with other recreational drugs, on nigrostriatal dopaminergic functions. Further longitudinal studies are required to elucidate the significance of these findings as they may have important public health implications. PMID:21160467

  7. Presynaptic Dopamine Capacity in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia Taking Clozapine: An [(18)F]DOPA PET Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euitae; Howes, Oliver D; Veronese, Mattia; Beck, Katherine; Seo, Seongho; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Yun-Sang; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2017-03-01

    Some patients with schizophrenia show poor response to first-line antipsychotic treatments and this is termed treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The differential response to first-line antipsychotic drugs may reflect a different underlying neurobiology. Indeed, a previous study found dopamine synthesis capacity was significantly lower in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. However, in this study, the treatment-resistant patients were highly symptomatic, whereas the responsive patients showed no or minimal symptoms. The study could not distinguish whether this was a trait effect or reflected the difference in symptom levels. Thus, we aimed to test whether dopaminergic function is altered in patients with a history of treatment resistance to first-line drugs relative to treatment responders when both groups are matched for symptom severity levels by recruiting treatment-resistant patients currently showed low symptom severity with the clozapine treatment. Healthy controls (n=12), patients treated with clozapine (n=12) who had not responded to first-line antipsychotics, and patients who had responded to first-line antipsychotics (n=12) were recruited. Participants were matched for age and sex and symptomatic severity level in patient groups. Participants' dopamine synthesis capacity was measured by using [(18)F]DOPA PET. We found that patients treated with clozapine show lower dopamine synthesis capacity than patients who have responded to first-line treatment (Cohen's d=0.9191 (whole striatum), 0.7781 (associative striatum), 1.0344 (limbic striatum), and 1.0189 (sensorimotor striatum) in line with the hypothesis that the dopaminergic function is linked to treatment response. This suggests that a different neurobiology may underlie treatment-resistant schizophrenia and that dopamine synthesis capacity may be a useful biomarker to predict treatment responsiveness.

  8. Nature or nurture? Determining the heritability of human striatal dopamine function: an [18F]-DOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Shotbolt, Paul; Mehta, Mitul A; Turkheimer, Eric; Benecke, Aaf; Copeland, Caroline; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver D

    2013-02-01

    Striatal dopamine function is important for normal personality, cognitive processes and behavior, and abnormalities are linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, no studies have examined the relative influence of genetic inheritance and environmental factors in determining striatal dopamine function. Using [18F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET), we sought to determine the heritability of presynaptic striatal dopamine function by comparing variability in uptake values in same sex monozygotic (MZ) twins to dizygotic (DZ) twins. Nine MZ and 10 DZ twin pairs underwent high-resolution [18F]-DOPA PET to assess presynaptic striatal dopamine function. Uptake values for the overall striatum and functional striatal subdivisions were determined by a Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. Heritability, shared environmental effects and non-shared individual-specific effects were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and a confirmatory parametric analysis. Overall striatal heritability estimates from the ROI and parametric analyses were 0.44 and 0.33, respectively. We found a distinction between striatal heritability in the functional subdivisions, with the greatest heritability estimates occurring in the sensorimotor striatum and the greatest effect of individual-specific environmental factors in the limbic striatum. Our results indicate that variation in overall presynaptic striatal dopamine function is determined by a combination of genetic factors and individual-specific environmental factors, with familial environmental effects having no effect. These findings underline the importance of individual-specific environmental factors for striatal dopaminergic function, particularly in the limbic striatum, with implications for understanding neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and addictions.

  9. Nature or Nurture? Determining the Heritability of Human Striatal Dopamine Function: an [18F]-DOPA PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Paul R A; Shotbolt, Paul; Mehta, Mitul A; Turkheimer, Eric; Benecke, Aaf; Copeland, Caroline; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver D

    2013-01-01

    Striatal dopamine function is important for normal personality, cognitive processes and behavior, and abnormalities are linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, no studies have examined the relative influence of genetic inheritance and environmental factors in determining striatal dopamine function. Using [18F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET), we sought to determine the heritability of presynaptic striatal dopamine function by comparing variability in uptake values in same sex monozygotic (MZ) twins to dizygotic (DZ) twins. Nine MZ and 10 DZ twin pairs underwent high-resolution [18F]-DOPA PET to assess presynaptic striatal dopamine function. Uptake values for the overall striatum and functional striatal subdivisions were determined by a Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. Heritability, shared environmental effects and non-shared individual-specific effects were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and a confirmatory parametric analysis. Overall striatal heritability estimates from the ROI and parametric analyses were 0.44 and 0.33, respectively. We found a distinction between striatal heritability in the functional subdivisions, with the greatest heritability estimates occurring in the sensorimotor striatum and the greatest effect of individual-specific environmental factors in the limbic striatum. Our results indicate that variation in overall presynaptic striatal dopamine function is determined by a combination of genetic factors and individual-specific environmental factors, with familial environmental effects having no effect. These findings underline the importance of individual-specific environmental factors for striatal dopaminergic function, particularly in the limbic striatum, with implications for understanding neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and addictions. PMID:23093224

  10. Best sensitivity of (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT to detect metastasis in one case of neuroendocrine tumour of the ileum.

    PubMed

    Testart Dardel, N; Montravers, F; Triviño-Ibañez, E; Gauthé, M; Houry, S; Talbot, J N

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are heterogeneous and frequently spread over the body, making their imaging difficult. With this aim, nuclear medicine imaging, using PET or SPECT with different tracers, has been proposed for decades, but there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate technique, even when only considering gastrointestinal NET. The case is presented of a 67year old woman with a well differentiated NET of the ileum with suspected recurrence, which was not detected by any imaging technique except (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT. Subsequent follow up showed disease progression, which confirmed the true positivity of (18)F-FDOPA. Using this case, we discuss and compare different radiotracers for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal NET, focusing on those embryologically originating from the mid-gut. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. Statistical parametric mapping with 18F-dopa PET shows bilaterally reduced striatal and nigral dopaminergic function in early Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Morrish, P; Rakshi, J; Uema, T; Ashburner, J; Bailey, D; Friston, K; Brooks, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To apply statistical parametric mapping to 18F-dopa PET data sets, to examine the regional distribution of changes in dopaminergic metabolism in early asymmetric Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—Thirteen normal volunteers (age 57.7 (SD 16.5) years; four women, nine men ) and six patients (age 50.3 (SD 13.5) years; three women, three men) with asymmetric (right sided) Parkinson's disease were studied. Images from each dynamic dopa PET dataset were aligned and parametric images of 18F-dopa influx (Ki) were created for each subject. The Ki images were transformed into standard stereotactic space. The Ki values of the caudate and putamen on spatially normalised images were compared with the Ki values before normalisation. The application of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) allowed statistical comparison of regional Ki values on a voxel by voxel basis between healthy volunteers and patients with Parkinson's disease.
RESULTS—There was a strong correlation between the Ki values before and after spatial normalisation (r=0.898, p=0.0001). Significant decreases in the Ki values were found for the Parkinson's desease group throughout the entire left putamen (p< 0.001) and focally in the dorsal right putamen (p< 0.001). Decreased Ki values were also shown bilaterally in the substantia nigra (p< 0.01).
CONCLUSION—Using (SPM) and 18F-dopa PET, reductions in both striatal and nigral brain dopaminergic function could be demonstrated in early Parkinson's disease.

 PMID:10329749

  12. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, F J; Acevedo-Báñez, I; Martínez-Castillo, R; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Pachón-Garrudo, V M; Álvarez-Pérez, R M; García-Jiménez, R; Rivas-Infante, E; García-Morillo, J S; Borrego-Dorado, I

    2015-08-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different presentations of the disease were observed in our casuistic: most indolent form was a cutaneous confined disease, presented in only one patient. Multifocal involvement with central nervous system (CNS) preservation was observed in two patients. Most aggressive form consisted in a systemic involvement with CNS infiltration, presented in three patients. In our experience neurological involvement, among one case with isolate pituitary infiltration, was associated with mortality in all cases. 18FDG-PET/CT and BS were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement; locate the site for biopsy and the treatment response evaluation. By our knowledge, 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seems useful in the initial staging of ECD. A baseline 18FDG-PET/CT and BS may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate treatment response.

  13. Sensitivity of kinetic macro parameters to changes in dopamine synthesis, storage, and metabolism: a simulation study for [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET by a model with detailed dopamine pathway.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keisuke; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Takuya; Endres, Christopher J; Minato, Kotaro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative interpretation of brain [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET data has been made possible by several kinetic modeling approaches, which are based on different assumptions about complex [¹⁸F]FDOPA metabolic pathways in brain tissue. Simple kinetic macro parameters are often utilized to quantitatively evaluate metabolic and physiological processes of interest, which may include DDC activity, vesicular storage, and catabolism from (18) F-labeled dopamine to DOPAC and HVA. A macro parameter most sensitive to the changes of these processes would be potentially beneficial to identify impaired processes in a neurodegenerative disorder such as Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study is a systematic comparison of several [¹⁸F]FDOPA macro parameters in terms of sensitivities to process-specific changes in simulated time-activity curve (TAC) data of [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET. We introduced a multiple-compartment kinetic model to simulate PET TACs with physiological changes in the dopamine pathway. TACs in the alteration of dopamine synthesis, storage, and metabolism were simulated with a plasma input function obtained by a non-human primate [¹⁸F]FDOPA PET study. Kinetic macro parameters were calculated using three conventional linear approaches (Gjedde-Patlak, Logan, and Kumakura methods). For simulated changes in dopamine storage and metabolism, the slow clearance rate (k(loss) ) as calculated by the Kumakura method showed the highest sensitivity to these changes. Although k(loss) performed well at typical ROI noise levels, there was large bias at high noise level. In contrast, for simulated changes in DDC activity it was found that K(i) and V(T), estimated by Gjedde-Patlak and Logan method respectively, have better performance than k(loss).

  14. Technical Performance of the Luxel Al2O3:C Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosemeter Element at Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Accident Dose Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Steven D.; Murphy, Mark K.

    2006-12-12

    The dose ranges typical for radiation oncology and nuclear accident dosimetry are on the order of 2?70 Gy and 0.1?5 Gy, respectively. In terms of solid-state passive dosimetry; thermoluminescent (TL) materials historically have been used extensively for these two applications, with silver-halide, leuco-dye, and BaFBr:Eu-based films being used on a more limited basis than TL for radiation oncology. This present work provides results on the performance of a film based on an aluminum oxide, Al2O3:C, for these dosimetry applications, using the optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) readout method. There have been few investigations of Al2O3:C performance at radiation oncology and nuclear accident dose levels, and these have included minimal dosimetric and environmental effects information. Based on investigations already published, the authors of this present study determined that overall improvements over film and TLDs for this Al2O3:C OSL technology at radiation oncology and nuclear accident dose levels may include (1) a more tissue-equivalent response to photons compared to X-ray film, (2) higher sensitivity, (3) ability to reread dosemeters, and (4) diagnostic capability using small-area imaging. The results of the present investigation indicate that additional favorable performance characteristics for the Al2O3:C dosemeter are a wide dynamic range(0.001 to 100 Gy), a response insensitive to temperature and moisture over a wide range, negligible dose rate dependence, and minimal change in post-irradiation response. As a radiation detection medium, this OSL phosphor offers an assortment of dosimetry properties that will permit it to compete with current radiation detection technologies such as silver-halide, leuco-dye, and photostimulable-phosphor based films, as well as TLDs.

  15. Technical performance of the Luxel Al(2)O(3):C optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter element at radiation oncology and nuclear accident dose levels.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Murphy, Mark K

    2007-01-01

    The dose ranges typical for radiation oncology and nuclear accident dosimetry are on the order of 2-70 Gy and 0.1-5 Gy, respectively. In terms of solid-state passive dosimetry, thermoluminescent (TL) materials historically have been used extensively for these two applications, with silver-halide, leuco-dye and BaFBr:Eu-based films being used on a more limited basis than TL for radiation oncology. This present work provides results on the performance of a film based on an aluminum oxide, Al(2)O(3):C, for these dosimetry applications, using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readout method. There have been few investigations of Al(2)O(3):C performance at radiation oncology and nuclear accident dose levels, and these have included minimal dosimetric and environmental effects information. Based on investigations already published, the authors of this present study determined that overall improvements over film and TLDs for this Al(2)O(3):C OSL technology at radiation oncology and nuclear accident dose levels may include (1) a more tissue-equivalent response to photons compared to X-ray film, (2) higher sensitivity, (3) ability to reread dosemeters and (4) diagnostic capability using small-area imaging. The results of the present investigation indicate that additional favourable performance characteristics for the Al(2)O(3):C dosemeter are a wide dynamic range (0.001-100 Gy), a response insensitive to temperature and moisture over a wide range, negligible dose rate dependence, and minimal change in post-irradiation response. As a radiation detection medium, this OSL phosphor offers an assortment of dosimetry properties that will permit it to compete with current radiation detection technologies such as silver-halide, leuco-dye and photostimulable-phosphor-based films, as well as TLDs.

  16. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  17. Computational oncology.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  18. Joint factor and kinetic analysis of dynamic FDOPA PET scans of brain cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dowson, N; Bourgeat, P; Rose, S; Daglish, M; Smith, J; Fay, M; Coulthard, A; Winter, C; MacFarlane, D; Thomas, P; Crozier, S; Salvado, O

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic analysis is an essential tool of Positron Emission Tomography image analysis. However it requires a pure tissue time activity curve (TAC) in order to calculate the system parameters. Pure tissue TACs are particularly difficult to obtain in the brain as the low resolution of PET means almost all voxels are a mixture of tissues. Factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing but is an underdetermined problem that can give arbitrary results. A joint factor and kinetic analysis is proposed whereby factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing of tissues. Hence, more meaningful parameters are obtained by the kinetic models, which also ensure a less ambiguous solution to the factor analysis. The method was tested using a cylindrical phantom and the 18F-DOPA data of a brain cancer patient.

  19. [Galen's oncology].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  20. Integrative Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gabriel; Mao, Jun J; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Integrative oncology helps support the health of patients with cancer and their caregivers through an evidence-informed approach to lifestyle and behavior modification and the use of complementary health therapies as part of conventional cancer care. Integrative approaches can provide patients relief from cancer and cancer treatment-related symptoms, leading to improvements in their physical and psychosocial health. An evidence-informed approach is important when recommending an integrative cancer plan. Efforts at enhancing communication between patients and health care providers, as well as between integrative practitioners and conventional health care teams, are critical to achieving optimal health and healing for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  3. The link between dopamine function and apathy in cannabis users: an [18F]-DOPA PET imaging study.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael A P; Morgan, Celia J A; Kapur, Shitij; Curran, H Valerie; Howes, Oliver D

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and regular use has been associated with reduced motivation, i.e. apathy. Regular long-term cannabis use has been associated with reduced dopamine synthesis capacity. The mesolimbic dopaminergic system mediates the processing of incentive stimuli by modifying their motivational value, which in turn is modulated by endocannabinoid signalling. Thus, it has been proposed that dopaminergic dysfunction underlies the apathy associated with chronic cannabis use. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dopaminergic function and subjective apathy in cannabis users. We measured dopamine synthesis capacity (indexed as the influx rate constant K i(cer)) via 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[(18)F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine positron emission tomography and subjective apathy using the self-rated Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S) in 14 regular cannabis users. All subjects scored in excess of 34 points on the AES-S (median [interquartile range] 59.5 [7.5]), indicative of significant apathy based on normative data. K i (cer) was inversely correlated to AES-S score in the whole striatum and its associative functional subdivision (Spearman's rho = -0.64, p = 0.015 [whole striatum]; rho = -0.69, p = 0.006 [associative]) but not in the limbic or sensorimotor striatal subdivisions. There were no significant relationships between AES-S and current cannabis consumption (rho = 0.28, p = 0.34) or age of first cannabis use (rho = 0.25, p = 0.40). These findings indicate that the reduction in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity associated with chronic cannabis use may underlie reduced reward sensitivity and a motivation associated with chronic cannabis use.

  4. [Al

    PubMed

    Purath; Köppe; Schnöckel

    1999-10-04

    A "naked" aluminum atom links two aluminum tetrahedra in the [Al(7){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(6)](-) ion (see picture), which results from the reaction of a metastable AlCl solution with LiN(SiMe(3))(2) and crystallizes with [Li(OEt(2))(3)](+) as cation. This unique structure among molecular metal atom clusters represents a small but characteristic section of cubic close-packed aluminum.

  5. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  6. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  7. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Account Login Cart Search the ONS website Continuing Nursing Education Courses and Activities Access Devices: The Virtual ... Vomiting Chemotherapy for Non-Oncology Conditions Clinical Trials Nursing 101 Cognitive Impairment Fundamentals of Blood and Marrow ...

  8. Imaging in interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Stephen B; Silverman, Stuart G

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging in interventional oncology is used differently than in diagnostic radiology and prioritizes different imaging features. Whereas diagnostic imaging prioritizes the highest-quality imaging, interventional imaging prioritizes real-time imaging with lower radiation dose in addition to high-quality imaging. In general, medical imaging plays five key roles in image-guided therapy, and interventional oncology, in particular. These roles are (a) preprocedure planning, (b) intraprocedural targeting, (c) intraprocedural monitoring, (d) intraprocedural control, and (e) postprocedure assessment. Although many of these roles are still relatively basic in interventional oncology, as research and development in medical imaging focuses on interventional needs, it is likely that the role of medical imaging in intervention will become even more integral and more widely applied. In this review, the current status of medical imaging for intervention in oncology will be described and directions for future development will be examined.

  9. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  10. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  11. Comparative oncology today.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, Melissa C; Khanna, Chand

    2007-11-01

    The value of comparative oncology has been increasingly recognized in the field of cancer research, including the identification of cancer-associated genes; the study of environmental risk factors, tumor biology, and progression; and, perhaps most importantly, the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics. The fruits of this effort are expected to be the creation of better and more specific drugs to benefit veterinary and human patients who have cancer. The state of the comparative oncology field is outlined in this article, with an emphasis on cancer in dogs.

  12. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Awad A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B; Chapman, Christina H; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Imaging in oncology.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Mukbil H; Nassar, Lara; Haydar, Mohamad; Hourany-Rizk, Roula G

    2009-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the management of cancer patients, and in screening of asymptomatic individuals for early detection of cancer. This paper will review the clinical applications of oncologic imaging in the diagnosis, staging and followup in cancer patients and screening for cancer.

  15. [Biosimilars in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sérgio; Coutinho, Jorge; Damasceno, Margarida; Dinis, José; Forjaz de Lacerda, João; Gervásio, Helena; Leal da Costa, Fernando; Marques Pereira, Ana; Parreira, António; Principe, Fernando; Rodrigues, Helena; Sá, Anabela; Teixeira, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    The development of biotechnology drugs represents one of the great advances in medical therapy and it was observed an exponential growth in its use. The resource to these drugs in Oncology and Hematology is no exception and it soon became an essential element of an integrated and directed therapy strategy. The expiry of the first biotechnology drugs patents has opened the door for the development and marketing of biosimilars, which entry in the Portuguese market was recently approved. This article was built on the analysis of the available state-of-the-art information on biotechnology drugs, biosimilars and current legislation and it expresses the opinion of Oncology and Hematology experts about the substituition of biological drugs by biosimilars in clinical practice.

  16. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  17. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  18. Biopsies in oncology.

    PubMed

    de Bazelaire, C; Coffin, A; Cohen, S; Scemama, A; de Kerviler, E

    2014-01-01

    Imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies in patients in oncology provide an accurate diagnosis of malignant tumors. Percutaneous biopsy results are improved by correct use of sampling procedures. The risks of percutaneous biopsy are low and its complications are generally moderate. These risks can be reduced using aids such as blund tip introducers, hydrodissection and correct patient positioning. The multidisciplinary team meetings dialogue between oncologist, surgeon and radiologist correctly defines the indications in order to improve the treatment strategies.

  19. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  20. [Depression in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, M

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to make a brief review of the main problematics raised by depression in oncology in terms of prevalence, semiology, screening, risk, prognosis factors and treatment. This reflection was based on recent literature data obtained through a PubMed search. Depressive disorders have frequently been encountered in cancer patients. During routine oncology daily care, depression screening, assessment and treatment are of paramount importance regarding psychosocial management. Depressive elements have a tremendous impact on the quality of life, tolerance and compliance with anticancer treatment. Moreover, depression morbidity and its possible influence on prognosis represent an important challenge in terms of prevention. A specific semiology for depressive disorders in the oncologic field might be more relevant with practical clinical implications. Optimal care of these mood disorders have to be implemented as soon as possible and be supported by the association of pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2010 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  2. Hybrid Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Maseeh uz; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Zaman, Unaiza; Shahid, Wajeeha; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    In oncology various imaging modalities play a crucial role in diagnosis, staging, restaging, treatment monitoring and follow up of various cancers. Stand-alone morphological imaging like computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide a high magnitude of anatomical details about the tumor but are relatively dumb about tumor physiology. Stand-alone functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are rich in functional information but provide little insight into tumor morphology. Introduction of first hybrid modality PET/CT is the one of the most successful stories of current century which has revolutionized patient care in oncology due to its high diagnostic accuracy. Spurred on by this success, more hybrid imaging modalities like SPECT/CT and PET/MR were introduced. It is the time to explore the potential applications of the existing hybrid modalities, developing and implementing standardized imaging protocols and train users in nuclear medicine and radiology. In this review we discuss three existing hybrid modalities with emphasis on their technical aspects and clinical applications in oncology.

  3. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested.

  4. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  5. Advances in viral oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 of Advances in Viral Oncology presents experimental approaches to multifactorial interactions in tumor development. Included are in-depth analyses of malignant phenotypes by oncogene complementation, as well as studies of complementary interactions among DNA viral oncogenes; multiple cell-derived sequences in single retroviral genomes; and sequences that influence the transforming activity and expression of the mos oncogene. The genetic regulation of tumorigenic expression in somatic cell hybrids, the inhibition of oncogenes by cellular genes, and the interaction of genes that favor and genes that suppress tumorigenesis are examined in detail. The book concludes with a study of the relationship of oncogenes to the evolution of the metastatic phenotype.

  6. Oncology disease management.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald E; Terry, Rachel

    2007-02-01

    Oncologic conditions are ubiquitous medical illnesses that present a particular challenge for medical management programs designed to address quality and cost issues in patient populations. Disease management strategies represent a reasonable and effective approach for employers and health plans in their arsenal of health management strategies. Multiple reasons exist for the development of specialized disease management programs that deal with cancer patients, some unique to this group of individuals. Health plans and/or employers have solid justification for addressing these issues directly through programs developed specifically to work with cancer patients. Whether developed within a health plan, or "carved out" to an external vendor, proper evaluation of outcomes is essential.

  7. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    PubMed

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology New York, New York, United ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center ...

  9. Oncology in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  10. Lesson in psycho-oncology.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jimmie C

    2002-01-01

    As a new subspecialty of oncology, psycho-oncology's emergent role reflects the growing interest and concern over the past 25 years, on the part of both oncologists and the general public, in the psychological, behavioral, and social factors related to cancer prevention and treatment. Today, total care of cancer patients must include concern for psychosocial well-being and management of distress must be fully integrated with the other aspects of the patient's treatment plan. Prevention efforts are rooted in the willingness and ability of individuals to change lifestyle and risk behaviors, and this has to be elucidated by research in psycho-oncology. Further, psycho-oncology advances theory and practice related to the effects of cancer on psychological function and provides expertise in the prevention of cancer. Thus, psycho-oncology has a unique role to play in cancer treatment and prevention.

  11. Stress in pediatric oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Hecktman, Hillary Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Although the onset of physiological and emotional stress can greatly affect outcomes for a child with cancer, the focus of this review targets pediatric oncology nurses and their daily occupation-related stress. Literature currently exists that discusses the etiology of stress in the oncology work environment as well as coping strategies and their effects on pediatric oncology nurses' stress levels. To date, however, no literature review has been assembled to comprehensively address practice implications and provide recommendations for pediatric oncology staff nurses. This review of literature seeks to provide a general overview of stress experienced in the pediatric oncology work environment and supportive interventions to decrease negative outcomes such as compassion fatigue and burnout. Recommendations and conclusions are made based on existing interventions, thus creating a framework for future research to be conducted to compare the effectiveness of these measures and optimize patient experiences through caregiver well-being.

  12. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  13. Clinical trials of interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuaki

    2012-08-01

    Interventional oncology has great potential to be a good treatment modality in the field of oncology, because its procedures are minimally invasive and fairly quick. However, except for a few procedures such as percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and trans-catheter arterial chemo-embolization that have been recognized as standard treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, most procedures have not been established as the standard treatment modality due to the limited number of clinical trials with compelling evidence. There are several common problems when performing clinical trials of interventional oncology. The first is that the outcomes of clinical trials are greatly influenced by the level of technical skill of the physicians. The second is that equipment and devices vary widely in countries and regions, and they also influence the outcomes. The third is that the methodology of clinical trials for techniques such as interventional oncology has not yet been established. The fourth is the difficulty of setting appropriate endpoints; quality of life is suitable for evaluating interventional oncology in palliative care, but it is not easy to set as the endpoint. The fifth is the difficulty of employing a blinded design, because the procedure cannot be performed without the physician's awareness. Despite such difficult situations, many multi-institutional clinical trials of interventional oncology have been carried out in Japan, with some challenging results. Establishing evidence is critical to making interventional oncology the standard treatment. Interventional radiologists should know the importance of clinical trials, and should move ahead in this direction in a step-by-step manner.

  14. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  15. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital.

  16. Radiation oncology (Vol. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Radiation Oncology series features update reports on the current status of primary therapy for lung cancer and the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hepatomas. Other articles describe the use of stereotaxic interstitial implantation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and discuss the indications for and results of radiation as the primary or adjuvant treatment of large bowel cancer. Reports on new technological developments examine the biological basis and clinical potential of local-regional hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy. Included are reviews of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of cancer and of three-dimensional treatment planning for high energy external beam radiotherapy.

  17. [Dermato-oncological rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Buhles, N; Sander, C

    2005-07-01

    National insurance companies in Germany support health cures for patients with malignant tumors (malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell tumor, malignant cutaneous lymphoma). The clinical requirements are an invasively growing tumor, problems of self-assurance, and dis-integration of the patient regarding his social and/or professional environment. The decision for a health cure is made by the treating dermatologist in the hospital. In this context, the following sociomedical criteria should be applied: impairment, disability, and handicap. Usually, rehabilitation starts after the patient is discharged from the hospital. The inpatient rehabilitation program should be performed at an institution capable of providing dermatological and psychological treatment. The dermatologist acts as a manager for the members of the rehabilitation team (psychologists, physiotherapists, social workers, and ergo-therapists). In conclusion, dermato-oncologic rehabilitation plays an important role in re-integrating the patient into his professional life to avoid retirement.

  18. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  19. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning.

  20. [Oncology at the Hotel-Dieu in Montreal].

    PubMed

    Latreille, J

    1993-01-01

    A review of various historical events in oncology at l'Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal is presented as well as a description of the services offered and the structural organization of the oncology center. The surgical and medical oncology subspecialties are very active in clinical research. Their contribution to various protocols is noted and a highlight of their conclusions is given. The research unit in epidemiology has expertise in the nutritional evaluation of patients with cancer. They have also published two atlas on the mortality and incidence of cancer by regions in the Province of Québec. The hospital has also a molecular pathology laboratory which helps physicians in pursuing the diagnosis and to understand the biology of cancers.

  1. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented.

  2. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  3. Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, James M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Dunnick, N. Reed; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2011-02-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring 'Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology.' Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia.

  4. Imaging opportunities in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Balter, James M; Haffty, Bruce G; Dunnick, N Reed; Siegel, Eliot L

    2011-02-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring "Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology." Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F.; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  6. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-12

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

  7. [Unproven methods in oncology].

    PubMed

    Jallut, O; Guex, P; Barrelet, L

    1984-09-08

    As in some other chronic diseases (rheumatism, multiple sclerosis, etc.), unproven methods of diagnosis and treatment have long been current in cancer. Since 1960 the American Cancer Society has published an abundant literature on these "unproven methods", which serves as a basis for a historical review: some substances (Krebiozen, Laetrile) have enjoyed tremendous if shortlived success. The present trend is back to nature and "mild medicine". The proponents of this so-called natural medicine are often disciples of a pseudoscientific religion using irrational arguments. Direct attacks on these erroneous theories and their public refutation fail to convince the adepts, who trust in these methods and are not amenable to a scientific approach. Study of their psychological motivations reveals that in fact they seek something more reassuring than plain medical explanation which is aware of its limits. They feel reassured by theories which often bear some resemblance to the old popular medicine. To protect patients against these dangerous methods and all the disillusionment they entail, the Swiss Society of Oncology and the Swiss Cancer League have decided to gather information and draw up a descriptive list of the commonest unproven methods in Switzerland (our File No. 2, "Total anti-cancer cure", is given as an example). The files are published in French, German and English and are available to physicians, nursing teams, and also patients who wish to have more objective information on these methods.

  8. [Economic limits in oncology].

    PubMed

    Hellriegel, K P

    2000-12-01

    Economic aspects require consideration even in oncology. However, they have to be seen in context with open questions concerning especially the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness, of methodology, and particularly of ethics. Medical procedures and achievements should primarily be measured against objective results, against effectiveness and benefits. Consequently, the suitability of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies has to be evaluated. Overall objective of medical achievements should be their optimalization, not their maximization. For a physician being aware of his responsibility, the optimal care for his patients always has highest priority. Medical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up are the basis for effective and economic patient care. They have to undergo economic evaluation and permanent updating. For systematic collection, documentation and evaluation, the clinical register is the appropriate instrument. For the assessment of medical care, a continuous monitoring of its processes has to be established. The documentation of medical care processes should lead to sustainable cost reductions together with an optimalization of the quality of care.

  9. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly-Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Untreated Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma

  10. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT for assessment of response to induction chemotherapy in a child with high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Lopci, Egesta; Foppiani, Luca; Morana, Giovanni; Conte, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Functional imaging plays a crucial role in the assessment of neuroblastoma. The evaluation of response to induction chemotherapy is a cornerstone in scheduling proper treatment management in patients affected by high-risk neuroblastoma. (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine has been recognized as the radiopharmaceutical of choice in neuroblastoma assessment. To date, the clinical role of PET/CT in pediatric malignancy is not well established.(18)F-DOPA-PET/CT has been recently used in neuroblastoma, and compared with (123)I-MIBG-scan. Scant new data are available about the role of this tool in the evaluation of treatment response after induction chemotherapy. We investigate the role of (18)F-DOPA-PET/CT in characterizing the response to induction chemotherapy in a child affected by high-risk-neuroblastoma, in whom the rare association of (123)I-MIBG-negative primary tumor and MIBG-positive bone marrow metastases was observed.

  11. Oocyte cryopreservation in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Fabbri, Raffaella; Damiano, Giuseppe; Fratto, Rosita; Giunchi, Susanna; Venturoli, Stefano

    2004-04-05

    The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in oncological patients may reduce their reproductive potential. Sperm cryopreservation has been already used in men affected by neoplastic disease. Oocyte cryopreservation might be an important solution for these patients at risk of losing ovarian function. A program of oocyte cryopreservation for oncological patients is also present in our center. From June 1996 to January 2000, 18 patients awaiting chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoplastic disease were included in our oocyte cryopreservation program. Our experience documents that oocyte storage may be a concrete and pragmatic alternative for oncological patients. The duration of oocyte storage does not seem to interfere with oocyte survival as pregnancies occurred even after several years of gamete cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

  12. Integrative oncology imperative for nurses.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Wu, Susan; Decker, Georgia M

    2012-02-01

    To provide an overview of key issues and resources related to complementary and alternative medical (CAM) and integrative approaches in cancer care. Peer-reviewed publications and web sites of professional, federal, and academic institutions and organizations. The field of integrative oncology is growing and research evidence in this area is burgeoning. Many cancer patients are using and can benefit from CAM. There are many resources and educational opportunities available to oncology nurses to enhance their CAM knowledge and skills. Nurses must keep abreast of the growing evidence in integrative oncology that documents the safety and efficacy of different CAM approaches for cancer patients. It is critical that nurses be aware of reputable resources and legal implications related to use of CAM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ethical issues in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Golan, Ofra

    2008-08-01

    Integrative oncology relates to an emerging dialog between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) scholars, oncologists, family practitioners, and other health care providers who envision an extended and holistic patient-centered approach to oncology care. The multiple commitments of integrative oncology to a medical humanistic approach and to a strong evidence-based foundation may impose considerable ethical concerns and dilemmas. The authors use narrative ethics to present a case study that exemplifies the ethical challenges confronting physicians and health care providers who wish to provide an integrative approach for their patients. An ethical analysis of the narrative is provided to help clarify the ethical issues and conflicts within it. Finally, a framework that may transform ethical constraints to a communication tool is proposed.

  14. Emergencies in Hematology and Oncology.

    PubMed

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Hogan, William J; Madsen, Bo E

    2017-04-01

    The development of medical emergencies related to the underlying disease or as a result of complications of therapy are common in patients with hematologic or solid tumors. These oncological emergencies can occur as an initial presentation or in a patient with an established diagnosis and are encountered in all medical care settings, ranging from primary care to the emergency department and various subspecialty environments. Therefore, it is critically important that all physicians have a working knowledge of the potential oncological emergencies that may present in their practice and how to provide the most effective care without delay. This article reviews the most common oncological emergencies and provides practical guidance for initial management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  16. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Cancer.gov

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  17. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  18. Reconstruction of Peripelvic Oncologic Defects.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Katie E; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the anatomy of the peripelvic area. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of performing peripelvic reconstruction in patients undergoing oncologic resection. 3. Select the appropriate local, pedicled, or free-flap reconstruction based on the location of the defect and donor-site characteristics. Peripelvic reconstruction most commonly occurs in the setting of oncologic ablative surgery. The peripelvic area contains several distinct reconstructive regions, including vagina, vulva, penis, and scrotum. Each area provides unique reconstructive considerations. In addition, prior or future radiation therapy or chemotherapy along with cancer cachexia can increase the complexity of reconstruction.

  19. [Vitamins and Minerals in Oncology].

    PubMed

    Holch, Julian Walter; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Erickson, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    The use of vitamins and minerals to prevent cancer as well as their supportive use in oncological patients is widespread and often occurs without the knowledge of the treating physician. Beyond general recommendations with regard to a balanced and healthy diet, no evidence exists supporting the use of vitamins and minerals in the prevention of cancer. Furthermore, the diet of oncological patients should contain vitamins and minerals of the same quantity as for healthy individuals. In particular, there is currently no rationale for a high-dosage administration of antioxidants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Design of oncology clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Menon, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that occurs due to the uncontrolled multiplication of cells that invade nearby tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. An increased incidence of cancer in the world has led to an increase in oncology research and in the number of oncology trials. Well designed oncology clinical trials are a key part of developing effective anti-cancer drugs. This review focuses on statistical considerations in the design and analysis of oncology clinical trials.

  1. Advances in Statistical Approaches Oncology Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Rosner, Gary L.; Marchenko, Olga; Parke, Tom; Perevozskaya, Inna; Wang, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    We describe some recent developments in statistical methodology and practice in oncology drug development from an academic and an industry perspective. Many adaptive designs were pioneered in oncology, and oncology is still at the forefront of novel methods to enable better and faster Go/No-Go decision making while controlling the cost. PMID:25949927

  2. Two approaches to bridging the knowledge-practice gap in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Peek, Gloanna J

    2015-01-01

    The field of oncology nursing is continually changing. New drugs to aid in the fight against cancer are being developed, complementary therapies to ease symptoms are gaining prominence, and survivorship care is becoming a welcome yet challenging area of subspecialty. For oncology nurses to provide quality care and to develop improved care delivery systems, they must not only have access to the most current knowledge in the field, but also be equipped with the skills necessary to integrate that knowledge into practice for the benefit of patients and families (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). The importance of nursing research and its relationship to the practice of oncology nursing cannot be minimized (Moore & Badger, 2014). Oncology nurse researchers advance knowledge and, consequently, improve the quality of care for patients with cancer and their families. For example, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) regularly surveys its membership to identify key areas of research focus that then guide the work of nurse investigators (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014; ONS Research Agenda Team, 2009). Unfortunately, the shortage of nurse scientists, particularly in oncology nursing, continues to increase as senior doctoral faculty reach retirement age and doctoral education program development remains stagnant (Glasgow & Dreher, 2010; LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). This shortage has and will continue to lead to gaps in the generation and implementation of new knowledge, negatively affecting the quality of patient care. As a result, an urgent need exists for innovative and quality doctoral educational programs to develop nurse scientists (Moore & Badger, 2014).

  3. Stress in the professional practice of oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Muller, Melina; de Carvalho, Patricia Bachion; de Souza Melo, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses have been identified as a group at risk for stress. This project aimed at identifying stress-generating situations. There was an attempt at identifying stressful situations through the application of a stress evaluation scale (Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nursing) (Hinds et al, Cancer Nurs. 1990;13:354-360). In the opinion of 35 oncology nurses, 88.57% of whom were women and 73% of whom had more than 24 months of experience, 38 out of the 50 analyzed statements involving work situations were considered stressful in some way. Fifty-four percent of the statements disclosed a medium or high stressor capacity, and 22% were seen as extremely high stressors. These situations were included in the categories "work organization," "relationships among staff members," and "care restrictions." It is reiterated that the set of activities developed by oncology nurses is stressful, and that there is a need for institutional intervention, due to the narrow relation between work environment and care results.

  4. Future of oncologic photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Ron R; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Sibata, Claudio H

    2010-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a tumor-ablative and function-sparing oncologic intervention. The relative simplicity of photosensitizer application followed by light activation resulting in the cytotoxic and vasculartoxic photodynamic reaction has allowed PDT to reach a worldwide audience. With several commercially available photosensitizing agents now on the market, numerous well designed clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of PDT on various cutaneous and deep tissue tumors. However, current photosensitizers and light sources still have a number of limitations. Future PDT will build on those findings to allow development and refinement of more optimal therapeutic agents and illumination devices. This article reviews the current state of the art and limitations of PDT, and highlight the progress being made towards the future of oncologic PDT.

  5. [Oncological data elements in histopathology].

    PubMed

    Haroske, G; Kramm, T; Mörz, M; Oberholzer, M

    2010-09-01

    In order to cope with increasing demands to supply information to a variety of documentation systems outside pathology, pathologists need to set standards both for the content and the use of the information they generate. Oncological datasets based on a set vocabulary are urgently required for use both in pathology and in further processing. Data elements were defined according to German pathology report guidelines for colorectal cancers in line with ISO 11179 requirements for the relations between data element concepts and value domains, as well as for further formal conditions, which can be exported in XML together with metadata information. Tests on 100 conventionally written diagnoses showed their principal usability and an increasing degree of guideline conformity in diagnoses commensurate with training time. This set of oncological data elements is a valuable checklist tool for pathologists, enabling formatted information export for further use and saving documentation effort.

  6. Oncology pain and complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice; Turnbeaugh, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Half of all patients with cancer experience some level of pain, so pain management is an important topic for oncology nurses. Pharmacologic measures traditionally are the primary intervention for bone, visceral, neuropathic, and procedural pain; however, many patients are turning to an integrative approach of Western and complementary therapies for pain and symptom management. The authors explored the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of complementary therapies in relation to cancer pain and symptom control.

  7. Mentoring future Kenyan oncology researchers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of the 1st Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Oncology Institute research grant writing workshop organized in collaboration with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and held in Kisumu, Kenya from January 16th to 18th, 2013. The goal of this meeting was to mentor future Kenyan scientists and prioritize research topics that would lead to improved cancer care and survival for the citizens of Kenya. PMID:24099090

  8. Integrative oncology in North America.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Integrative oncology is an evolving evidence-based specialty that uses complementary therapies in concert with medical treatment to enhance its efficacy, improve symptom control, alleviate patient distress and reduce suffering. In North America the evolution of research into complementary therapies was delayed by the narrow focus of the Flexner Report. A government-funded research agenda and incorporation of complementary therapies into medical school curricula have been driven by early evidence of efficacy and patient demand. Integrative oncology focuses on the role of natural health products (botanicals, vitamins, and minerals), nutrition, acupuncture, meditation and other mind-body approaches, music therapy, touch therapies, fitness therapies, and more. Some natural health products, such as herbs and their constituent phytochemicals, may be biologic response modifiers that could increase cancer control. Current research stretches from the laboratory to health services. Institutions are exploring the effectiveness gap in their clinical services and are determining efficacy of complementary therapies through randomized controlled trials. Eventually, the goal is to establish practice guidelines through determining relative effectiveness and value through cost-utility studies. The aim of integrative oncology should be one medicine, not alternative; it should be patient-focused; it should be evidence-based; and it should provide the best care for cancer cure, prevention, symptom control, and quality of life.

  9. Advancing performance measurement in oncology.

    PubMed

    Campion, Francis X; Larson, Leanne R; Kadlubek, Pamela J; Earle, Craig C; Neuss, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    The American healthcare system, including the cancer care system, is under pressure to improve patient outcomes and lower the cost of care. Government payers have articulated an interest in partnering with the private sector to create learning communities to measure quality and improve the value of healthcare. In 2006, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) unveiled the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI), which has become a key component of the measurement system to promote quality cancer care. QOPI is a physician-led, voluntary, practice-based, quality-improvement program, using performance measurement and benchmarking among oncology practices across the United States. Since its inception, ASCO's QOPI has grown steadily to include 973 practices as of November 2010. One key area that QOPI has addressed is end-of-life care. During the most recent data collection cycle in the fall of 2010, those practices completing multiple data collection cycles had better performance on care of pain compared with sites participating for the first time (62.61% vs 46.89%). Similarly, repeat QOPI participants demonstrated meaningfully better performance than their peers in the rate of documenting discussions of hospice and palliative care (62.42% vs 54.65%) and higher rates of hospice enrollment. QOPI demonstrates how a strong performance measurement program can lead to improved quality and value of care for patients.

  10. Oncological resource allocation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Michael; Kath, Roland; Gundermann, Christin

    2008-03-01

    Oncology is a resource-intensive medical discipline where, so far, effectiveness rather than efficiency of a treatment has stood in the foreground. The aim of our study was, therefore, to determine the resource allocation and to assess the efficiency of oncology in Germany for the period of 2002-2004. With the aid of the official German Health Report, the expenditures for health in 2004 and the gain in years of life according to ICD 10 disease categories were analyzed. Based on the incremental costs and years of life gained, the cost calculation per year of life gained was made. Malignant neoplasms appear in 5th place in health expenditures at a cost of 15 billion 1. With costs per year of life gained of 140,750 1, malignant neoplasms range ahead of respiratory diseases (52,500 1)digestive diseases (27,455 1), and injuries (14,538 1). Costs involving malignant neoplasm per year of life gained range between 39,000 1(malignancies of the lip, oral cavity, and the pharynx), and 126,000 1(digestive organ cancer). In Germany, oncology incurs higher costs per year of life gained as compared to several other diseases. Also, in malignant neoplasm considerable differences can be observed regarding resource allocation and efficiency. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Orthodontic treatment in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The progress in oncological treatment has led to the current increase of childhood cancer survival rate to 80%. That is why orthodontists more and more frequently consult patients who had completed a successful anti-cancer therapy in childhood. Oncological treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or supportive immunosuppressive therapy cause numerous side effects in growing patients, connected i.a. with growth, the development of teeth or the viscerocranium. This is a special group of patients that needs an optimised plan of orthodontic treatment and often has to accept a compromise result. The purpose of the current work is to discuss the results of orthodontic treatment in patients after an anti-cancer therapy. Time of treatment was 12,5 months. In 6 patients (from 40 undergoing orthodontic therapy) we haven't reached a normocclusion, in 9 patients we should have stopped the therapy because of the recurrence. In 11 patients we found mucosa inflammation and in 1 patient the therapy stopped before the end because of very low oral hygiene level. Bearing in mind the limited number of original works on the above topic in Polish medical literature, the study has been carried out in order to make Polish orthodontists more acquainted with the topic and the standards of dealing with an oncological patient.

  12. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted.

  13. Organisational design for an integrated oncological department

    PubMed Central

    Meiss-de Haas, Ch.L.; Falkmann, H.; Douma, J.; van Gassel, J.G.; Peters, W.G.; van Mierlo, R.; van Turnhout, J.M.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Objective The outcomes of a Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threat (SWOT) analysis of three Integrated Oncological Departments were compared with their present situation three years later to define factors that can influence a successful implementation and development of an Integrated Oncological Department in- and outside (i.e. home care) the hospital. Research design Comparative Qualitative Case Study. Methods Auditing based on care-as-usual norms by an external, experienced auditing committee. Research setting Integrated Oncological Departments of three hospitals. Results Successful multidisciplinary care in an integrated, oncological department needs broad support inside the hospital and a well-defined organisational plan. PMID:16896411

  14. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... products (products to suppress clotting of blood) in children. Issues for discussion will...

  15. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... (Pub. L. 108-155) and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (Pub. L. 107-109) and their...

  16. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... will receive a presentation on pediatric provisions mandated by the Food and Drug Administration Safety...

  17. Symposium: "Oncology Leadership in Asia".

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-03-09

    The Symposium on "Oncology Leadership in Asia" was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asia Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future.

  18. Economics of new oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, Joseph A; Grabowski, Henry G

    2007-01-10

    Review existing studies and provide new results on the development, regulatory, and market aspects of new oncology drug development. We utilized data from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), company surveys, and publicly available commercial business intelligence databases on new oncology drugs approved in the United States and on investigational oncology drugs to estimate average development and regulatory approval times, clinical approval success rates, first-in-class status, and global market diffusion. We found that approved new oncology drugs to have a disproportionately high share of FDA priority review ratings, of orphan drug designations at approval, and of drugs that were granted inclusion in at least one of the FDA's expedited access programs. US regulatory approval times were shorter, on average, for oncology drugs (0.5 years), but US clinical development times were longer on average (1.5 years). Clinical approval success rates were similar for oncology and other drugs, but proportionately more of the oncology failures reached expensive late-stage clinical testing before being abandoned. In relation to other drugs, new oncology drug approvals were more often first-in-class and diffused more widely across important international markets. The market success of oncology drugs has induced a substantial amount of investment in oncology drug development in the last decade or so. However, given the great need for further progress, the extent to which efforts to develop new oncology drugs will grow depends on future public-sector investment in basic research, developments in translational medicine, and regulatory reforms that advance drug-development science.

  19. Molecular profiles in foregut oncology.

    PubMed

    Sukharamwala, Prashant; Hennessey, Daniel; Wood, Thomas; Singh, Shelly; Ryan, Carrie; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Oncology is and will continue to evolve resulting from a better understanding of the biology and intrinsic genetic profile of each cancer. Tumor biomarkers and targeted therapies are the new face of precision medicine, so it is essential for all physicians caring for cancer patients to understand and assist patients in understanding the role and importance of such markers and strategies to target them. This review was initiated in an attempt to identify, characterize, and discuss literature supporting clinically relevant molecular markers and interventions. The efficacy of targeting specific markers will be examined with data from clinical trials focusing on treatments for esophageal, gastric, liver, gallbladder, biliary tract, and pancreatic cancers.

  20. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. [The second opinion in oncology].

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Luciano; Felicetti, Viviana; Cristina, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The medical second opinion (MSO) means the process through which it is possible to consult any available medical institution or a single physician, to compare, confirm and/or review a first diagnosis and/or a proposed treatment. The MSO is of the utmost importance when patients are suffering serious and disabling diseases or when risking their lives. Oncology is a really complex discipline in which, daily, doctors and patients have to deal with new clinical, managerial and sociological problems. Most patients are now better informed-often having gathered information from the Web, newspapers, magazines.This information is often very mixed and confusing and the number of MSO is increasing.

  2. Report from the OECI Oncology Days 2014

    PubMed Central

    van Harten, WH; Stanta, G; Bussolati, G; Riegman, P; Hoefler, G; Becker, KF; Folprecht, G; Truini, M; Haybaeck, J; Buiga, R; Dono, M; Bagg, A; López Guerrero, JA; Zupo, S; Lemare, F; de Lorenzo, F; Goedbloed, N; Razavi, D; Lövey, J; Cadariu, PA; Rollandi, GA; Paparo, F; Pierotti, M; Ciuleanu, T; De Paoli, P; Weiner, G; Saghatchian, M; Lombardo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 OECI Oncology Days was held at the ‘Prof. Dr. Ion Chiricuta’ Oncology Institute in Cluj, Romania, from 12 to 13 June. The focus of this year’s gathering was on developments in personalised medicine and other treatment advances which have made the cost of cancer care too high for many regions throughout Europe. PMID:25624877

  3. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  4. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  5. Perceptions of Oncology as a Medical Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and prestige associated with oncology and assessed shifts in medical students' perceptions as a result of participation in an oncology course are explored. Respondents were asked to rate the prestige of eight specialities and asked to select characteristics "that best describe each type of specialist." (MLW)

  6. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients.…

  7. Perceptions of Oncology as a Medical Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and prestige associated with oncology and assessed shifts in medical students' perceptions as a result of participation in an oncology course are explored. Respondents were asked to rate the prestige of eight specialities and asked to select characteristics "that best describe each type of specialist." (MLW)

  8. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  9. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  10. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    PubMed

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  11. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  12. Vascular access in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Pittiruti, Mauro; Biffi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Adequate vascular access is of paramount importance in oncology patients. It is important in the initial phase of surgical treatment or chemotherapy, as well as in the chronic management of advanced cancer and in the palliative care setting. We present an overview of the available vascular access devices and of the most relevant issues regarding insertion and management of vascular access. Particular emphasis is given to the use of ultrasound guidance as the preferred technique of insertion, which has dramatically decreased insertion-related complications. Vascular access management has considerably improved after the publication of effective guidelines for the appropriate nursing of the vascular device, which has reduced the risk of late complications, such as catheter-related bloodstream infection. However, many areas of clinical practice are still lacking an evidence-based background, such as the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in each clinical situation, as well as prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device for the oncology patient, based on the literature available to date.

  13. Big data in oncologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Regge, Daniele; Mazzetti, Simone; Giannini, Valentina; Bracco, Christian; Stasi, Michele

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and unfortunately understanding how the components of the cancer system work does not help understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the words of the Greek philosopher Aristotle "the whole is greater than the sum of parts." To date, thanks to improved information technology infrastructures, it is possible to store data from each single cancer patient, including clinical data, medical images, laboratory tests, and pathological and genomic information. Indeed, medical archive storage constitutes approximately one-third of total global storage demand and a large part of the data are in the form of medical images. The opportunity is now to draw insight on the whole to the benefit of each individual patient. In the oncologic patient, big data analysis is at the beginning but several useful applications can be envisaged including development of imaging biomarkers to predict disease outcome, assessing the risk of X-ray dose exposure or of renal damage following the administration of contrast agents, and tracking and optimizing patient workflow. The aim of this review is to present current evidence of how big data derived from medical images may impact on the diagnostic pathway of the oncologic patient.

  14. Psychiatric oncology: Cancer in mind

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology is an upcoming area of interest, which deals with numerous psychiatric, psychological, and social aspects of malignancies. Psychiatric oncology relates to some of the common psychological and emotional problems encountered in persons with malignancy and their formal and informal caregivers. This oration will discuss the importance of this field of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, with a focus on the research and practice in the Indian setting. This presentation will also share the findings and researches of the presenter. All these range from studies on cancer pain and palliative care, screening for psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, communication skills for health professionals in breaking bad news and handling difficult questions, and counseling. The findings on researches on somatization and illness behavior in cancer patients would highlight newer challenges in this field. Caregivers of persons with cancer are as important as the patient, but usually ignored. The stress, strain, burden, positive emotions, and coping in the context of care giving for persons with cancer are being increasingly realized. Professional caregivers should be aware of caregiver difficulties and support them through their ordeal. Lastly, the importance of dealing with staff stress and burnout among health professionals looking after families with cancer patients and survivors will be emphasized. PMID:22988317

  15. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  16. Oncology and pharmacogenetics in 2007.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Justin Stebbing is a member of the Royal College of Physicians, American Board of Internal Medicine and the Royal College of Pathologists. Originally, Justin trained in medicine at Trinity College Oxford (Oxford, UK), obtaining a triple first class degree. After completion of junior doctor posts in Oxford, he undertook a residency (junior doctor) training at The Johns Hopkins Hospital (MD, USA), before returning to London to continue his training in oncology at The Royal Marsden. Justin then undertook a PhD, funded by the medical research council, investigating the interplay between the immune system and cancer. Specifically, the role of heat shock proteins in tumorigenesis was examined, leading to the development of a cancer vaccine that is currently in clinical trials. Justin has published over 200 papers and book chapters, in journals such as the Lancet, New England Journal, Blood, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Annals of Internal Medicine, the majority as first or last author. They mainly focus on early and late stage trials of new drugs, mechanisms of disease and prognostic indicators. He is on the editorial board of a number of journals and regularly serves as a referee. Justin's main focus is now in breast cancer, and helping patients with early and late stage disease get better.

  17. Optical imaging probes in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Cristina; Dico, Alessia Lo; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management. Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation. The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27145373

  18. Surgical Oncology Nursing: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patrick C; Selanders, Louise

    2017-02-01

    To provide a historical perspective in the development of oncology nursing and surgical oncology as critical components of today's health care system. Review of the literature and Web sites of key organizations. The evolution of surgical oncology nursing has traversed a historical journey from that of a niche subspecialty of nursing that had very little scientific underpinning, to a highly sophisticated discipline within a very short time. Nursing continues to contribute its expertise to the encyclopedic knowledge base of surgical oncology and cancer care, which have helped improve the lives of countless patients and families who have had to face the difficulties of this diagnosis. An understanding of the historical context for which a nursing specialty such as surgical oncology nursing evolves is critical to gaining an appreciation for the contributions of nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  20. Oncology Communication Skills Training: Bringing Science to the Art of Delivering Bad News.

    PubMed

    Stovall, Mady C

    2015-01-01

    Review of "Effect of communication skills training program for oncologists based on patient preferences for communication when receiving bad news: A randomized controlled trial" by Fujimori et al. (2014), Journal of Clinical Oncology, 32, 2166-2172. For a further discussion of survey research, please see the related article by Julie Ponto starting on page 168.

  1. Oncology Communication Skills Training: Bringing Science to the Art of Delivering Bad News

    PubMed Central

    Stovall, Mady C.

    2015-01-01

    Review of "Effect of communication skills training program for oncologists based on patient preferences for communication when receiving bad news: A randomized controlled trial" by Fujimori et al. (2014), Journal of Clinical Oncology, 32, 2166–2172. For a further discussion of survey research, please see the related article by Julie Ponto starting on page 168. PMID:26649249

  2. Educating medical students about radiation oncology: initial results of the oncology education initiative.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Singh, Deeptej; Ozonoff, Al; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2007-10-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer care requires the integration of teaching across established educational boundaries. Because exposure to oncology and radiation oncology is limited in the undergraduate medical curriculum, the authors introduced an oncology education initiative at their institution. They report on the addition of structured multidisciplinary oncology education to the required radiology core clerkship. An institutional-based cohort study of fourth-year medical students rotating through a required clerkship in radiology at Boston University School of Medicine was conducted, beginning with the class of 2007. An educational questionnaire measuring the perceived quality of oncology education before and after exposure to a structured didactic program was administered. Of the 149 fourth-year students, 121 (81%) have completed the didactics of the initiative. Although 68 of 121 (56%) students reported having limited exposure to cancer care in the clinical years, 107 of 121 (88%) were motivated to learn more about the subject, and 100 of 121 (83%) reported a better understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of cancer care after this oncology education initiative. One hundred ten of 121 (91%) felt that the radiology clerkship was an opportune time to receive oncology and radiation oncology teaching. As a result of the initiative, 32% of the students pursued advanced training in radiation oncology. Of students who before the initiative were not planning on taking oncology electives, 70 of 99 (71%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to learn more about the subject, and 43 of 99 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to take oncology electives. Systematic exposure to multidisciplinary oncology education as part of a radiology core clerkship provides an excellent opportunity for the integrated teaching of oncologic principles and patient management. This type of experience addresses an important yet underrepresented

  3. Nutrition support in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2009-01-01

    This review article, the second in a series of articles to examine the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition support in surgical oncology patients. Cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may be indicated in malnourished cancer patients undergoing surgery, depending on individual patient characteristics. As with the first article in this series, this article provides background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients, as well as discusses the role of nutrition support in the care of surgical cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the clinical guidelines as they relate to recommendations made for surgical patients, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequently published studies.

  4. Psychological factors affecting oncology conditions.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Biancosino, Bruno; Marmai, Luciana; Rossi, Elena; Sabato, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The area of psychological factors affecting cancer has been the object of research starting from the early 1950s and consolidating from the 1970s with the development of psychooncology. A series of problems in the DSM and ICD nosological systems, such as the difficult application of the criteria for psychiatric diagnoses (i.e. major depression, adjustment disorders) and the scarce space dedicated to the rubric of psychosocial implications of medical illness (i.e. Psychological Factors Affecting a Medical Condition under 'Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention' in the DSM-IV) represent a major challenge in psycho-oncology. The application of the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) has been shown to be useful in a more precise identification of several psychological domains in patients with cancer. The DCPR dimensions of health anxiety, demoralization and alexithymia have been shown to be quite frequent in cancer patient (37.7, 28.8 and 26%, respectively). The overlap between a formal DSM-IV diagnosis and the DCPR is low, with 58% of patients being categorized as non-cases on the DSM-IV having at least one DCPR syndrome. The specific quality of the DCPR in characterizing psychosocial aspects secondary to cancer is also confirmed by the fact that some dimensions of coping (e.g. Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer subscale hopelessness) correlate with the DCPR dimension of demoralization, while a quantitative approach on symptom assessment (e.g. stress symptoms on the Brief Symptom Inventory) is not useful in discriminating the patients with and without DCPR syndromes. More research is needed in order to understand the relationship between DCPR constructs (e.g. alexithymia) and psychosocial factors which have been shown to be significant in oncology (e.g. emotional repression and avoidance). The role of specific DCPR constructs in influencing the course of illness is also an area that should be investigated.

  5. Pharmacy Instruction in Medical Oncology: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cersosimo, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey concerning oncology instruction in pharmacy schools found it taught primarily as part of a course in medicinal chemistry/pharmacology or therapeutics. Twenty-one schools offer an oncology course, with others planning them. Oncology clerkships are currently available in 42 schools. Increased emphasis on oncology instruction is encouraged.…

  6. Pharmacy Instruction in Medical Oncology: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cersosimo, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey concerning oncology instruction in pharmacy schools found it taught primarily as part of a course in medicinal chemistry/pharmacology or therapeutics. Twenty-one schools offer an oncology course, with others planning them. Oncology clerkships are currently available in 42 schools. Increased emphasis on oncology instruction is encouraged.…

  7. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  8. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence.

  9. The impact of genomics on oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Laura Curr; Linder, Lauri; Wu, Bohua; Eggert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, genetics and genomics information has led to exciting new diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment options in oncology practice. Profiling of cancers offers providers insight into treatment and prognostic factors. Germline testing provides an individual with information for surveillance or therapy that may help them prevent cancer in their lifetime and options for family members as yet untouched by malignancy. This offers a challenge for oncology nurses and other oncology health care providers to become comfortable with incorporating education about genetics/genomics into their clinical practice and patient education.

  10. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology-oncology fellows.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies' publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows' evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners' educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology–oncology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies’ publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows’ evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners’ educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  12. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies Advertising Sponsorship Support of CME Committee Policies, Responsibilities, and Resources Conflict of Interest and Disclosure for ... toward Equity Children's Oncology Group (COG) Outcomes Research Social Media: The Good, The Bad, and Beyond Sickle ...

  13. [Interests of applied anthropology to oncology].

    PubMed

    Soum-Pouyalet, Fanny; Hubert, Annie; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    From now on the introduction of social and human sciences studies in the field of oncology has not always been conclusive. This article aims to analyze the bounds that border the meeting and the understanding between physicians, patients and anthropologists. It also treats the problems due to the introduction of applied anthropology in the field of oncology and points up the interests and practical contributions that this disciplinary bring and could bring.

  14. [Information technology in gynecological oncology today].

    PubMed

    Kupka, M S; Richter, O; Tutschek, B

    2003-11-01

    Information technology has been integrated in gynecological oncology treatment. Therefore, new software has been established in hospitals and out-patient clinics. A German law concerning data collection in oncology has attempted to unify different strategies. All intentions to establish new documentation systems for tumor diseases need a standardized basic data set. Nevertheless, local governmental health organizations are not yet prepared to implement a global information system such as prenatal and perinatal care databases. Financial support and political work is therefore needed.

  15. Medicare coverage for oncology services.

    PubMed

    Bagley, G P; McVearry, K

    1998-05-15

    Medicare's mission is to assure health care security for our beneficiaries. Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) provides the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) with the authority to fulfill this mission. Although Medicare is considered a defined benefit program, the Act vested Medicare with the discretionary authority to make specific policy decisions when necessary. HCFA's discretionary authority, which is found at section 1862(a)(1)(A) of the Act, enables HCFA to provide coverage for services that are reasonable and necessary for the treatment and diagnosis of illness or injury or to improve the functioning of a malformed body member. To determine whether a service is reasonable and necessary, HCFA relies on authoritative evidence. This evidence includes, but is not limited to, approvals from appropriate federal agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration, and systematic evaluations of scientific literature via technology assessments. HCFA also may decide that a service warrants a unique type of coverage policy, which is referred to as coverage with conditions. This form of coverage is a middle ground between strict noncoverage and general coverage for a medical service that appears promising, but still is evolving. All these policy specifications effect Medicare coverage of oncology services. This means that reasonable and necessary diagnostic and therapeutic cancer-related services that are not otherwise prohibited by Medicare's statute, regulations, and manual instructions are covered and paid for by the program. Prior to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA '97), Medicare provided coverage for some beneficiaries to undergo mammography and Papanicolaou smear screening. As a result of BBA '97, Congress has mandated expanding coverage for these services as well as adding coverage for pelvic examinations, prostate cancer screening, colorectal screening, and antiemetic drugs used as part of an anticancer chemotherapy regimen. Other

  16. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bosscher, Marianne R F; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2015-01-01

    For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  17. Secondary traumatic stress in oncology staff.

    PubMed

    Quinal, Leonida; Harford, Stephanie; Rutledge, Dana N

    2009-01-01

    As empathetic caregivers, oncology staff may be prone to secondary traumatic stress (STS). Secondary traumatic stress results from exposure to persons who have experienced trauma and from giving care to such persons. The presence of STS among oncology staff has not been documented. This correlational descriptive study examined STS among oncology staff at a 500-bed Magnet-designated community hospital by determining the presence of individual symptoms and frequency with which diagnostic criteria for STS are met. Also determined were associations between STS demographic characteristics and specific stress-reduction activities.In this study, 43 staff members from an inpatient oncology unit completed mailed surveys. The Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale assessed the frequency of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms associated with STS; also assessed were use/helpfulness of stress-reduction activities. In this first study to document the prevalence of STS among oncology staff, prevalence ranged from 16% (Bride's method) to 37% (cutoff-score method). Most common symptoms were difficulty sleeping, intrusive thoughts about patients, and irritability. Least common were avoidance of people, places, and things and disturbing dreams about patients. Current use of massage was significantly predictive of not having STS. Ethnicity of staff member was related to having STS. Further research is warranted evaluating STS prevalence in different groups of oncology staff along with the effect of STS on burnout and job retention.

  18. The art of pediatric oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric oncology nursing practice must incorporate both the science and the art of the discipline to foster positive physical and psychosocial treatment outcomes for pediatric oncology patients, especially those outcomes related to their health-related quality of life. In this article, the art of nursing care is described within the context of scientifically based care, and the art of nursing practice is evident in the implementation of the scientific principles and standards for pediatric oncology nursing practice. The author proposes that the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice ought to be evident in care activities that the nurse provides within a therapeutic relationship that is steeped in nursing presence. Although the art of nursing care and the nature of an effective therapeutic relationship is tacit, valued knowledge among pediatric oncology nurses, as well as children and adolescents with cancer and their families, it is difficult to describe and challenging to quantify its effect on patient care outcomes. This article discusses the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice and its influence on treatment outcomes.

  19. Exploring resilience in paediatric oncology nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Zander, Melissa; Hutton, Alison; King, Lindy

    2013-01-01

    Resilience has been suggested as an important coping strategy for nurses working in demanding settings, such as paediatric oncology. This qualitative study explored paediatric oncology nurses' perceptions of their development of resilience and how this resilience underpinned their ability to deal with work-related stressors. Five paediatric oncology nurses were interviewed about their understanding of the concept of resilience, their preferred coping mechanisms, and their day-today work in paediatric oncology. Using thematic analysis, the interviews were subsequently grouped together into seventeen initial themes. These themes were then grouped into seven major aspects that described how the participants perceived resilience underpinned their work. These "seven aspects of forming resilience" contributed to an initial understanding of how paediatric oncology nurses develop resilience in the face of their personal and professional challenges. Several key strategies derived from the findings, such as improved rostering, support to a nurse's friend and family, and a clinical support nursing role, could be implemented at an organizational level to support resilience development within the paediatric oncology setting.

  20. Clinical ethics consultation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Montas, Sacha M; Barnosky, Andrew R; Smith, Lauren B; Fins, Joseph J; McCabe, Mary S

    2013-09-01

    There is limited empirical research exploring the nature of clinical ethical consultations within the oncology population. Our objective was to review and describe clinical ethics consultations at two National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers to identify opportunities for systems improvement in clinical care and opportunities for staff education. This case series is derived from two institutional prospectively maintained clinical ethics consultation databases. All ethics consultations from 2007 through 2011 that related to adult patients with cancer were included. A total of 208 eligible patient cases were identified. The most common primary issues leading to ethics consultation were code status and advance directives (25%), surrogate decision making (17%), and medical futility (13%). Communication lapses were identified in 45% of patient cases, and interpersonal conflict arose in 51%. Before ethics consultation, 26% of patients had do-not-resuscitate orders, which increased to 60% after ethics consultation. Palliative care consultation occurred in 41% of patient cases. Ethics consultations among patients with cancer reflect the complexities inherent to their clinical management. Appropriately honoring patients' wishes within the context of overall goals of care is crucial. Thoughtful consideration of the role of and relationship with palliative care experts, communication barriers, sources of interpersonal conflict, symptom control, and end-of-life care is paramount to optimal management strategies in this patient population.

  1. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  2. Oncology information on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasushi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-05-01

    Owing to new developments in Internet technologies, the amount of available oncology information is growing. Both patients and caregivers are increasingly using the Internet to obtain medical information. However, while it is easy to provide information, ensuring its quality is always a concern. Thus, many instruments for evaluating the quality of health information have been created, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The increasing importance of online search engines such as Google warrants the examination of the correlation between their rankings and medical quality. The Internet also mediates the exchange of information from one individual to another. Mailing lists of advocate groups and social networking sites help spread information to patients and caregivers. While text messages are still the main medium of communication, audio and video messages are also increasing rapidly, accelerating the communication on the Internet. Future health information developments on the Internet include merging patients' personal information on the Internet with their traditional health records and facilitating the interaction among patients, caregivers and health-care providers. Through these developments, the Internet is expected to strengthen the mutually beneficial relationships among all stakeholders in the field of medicine.

  3. Oncologic imaging: kidney and ureter

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.; Balfe, D.M.

    1983-11-01

    Malignant cancers of the kidney and ureter account for only 2 to 3% of all neoplasms in man. However, early diagnosis and treatment can have a profound effect on patient prognosis and survival. This article seeks to amalgamate a large body of information related to the pathology of primary renal tumors and metastatic disease with current imaging strategies to assist the clinician and enhance his understanding of the wide variety of modern imaging techniques available. Current tumor staging classifications are presented and the various imaging strategies are keyed to detection, definition and treatment options for tumors of the renal parenchyma and ureter. The strengths and limitations of all available imaging modalities are reviewed. An optimal approach to the imaging workup is developed with regard to availability, evolving technology and most importantly, cost efficacy. The controversies and conflicts in imaging and treatment options are explored while constructing a step by step approach that will be both flexible and utilitarian for the clinician faced with daily oncologic management choices.

  4. Nanotechnology Applications in Surgical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sunil; Nie, Shuming; Wang, May D.

    2010-01-01

    Surgery is currently the most effective and widely used procedure in treating human cancers, and the single most important predictor of patient survival is a complete surgical resection. Major opportunities exist to develop new and innovative technologies that could help the surgeon to delineate tumor margins, to identify residual tumor cells and micrometastases, and to determine if the tumor has been completely removed. Here we discuss recent advances in nanotechnology and optical instrumentation, and how these advances can be integrated for applications in surgical oncology. A fundamental rationale is that nanometer-sized particles such as quantum dots and colloidal gold have functional and structural properties that are not available from either discrete molecules or bulk materials. When conjugated with targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules, these nanoparticles can be used to target malignant tumor cells and tumor microenvironments with high specificity and affinity. In the “mesoscopic” size range of 10–100 nm, nanoparticles also have large surface areas for conjugating to multiple diagnostic and therapeutic agents, opening new possibilities in integrated cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:20059343

  5. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  6. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  7. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein.

  9. The National Oncology Working Group (NOW) initiative: payer and provider collaborations in oncology benefits management.

    PubMed

    Soper, Aileen M; Reeder, C E; Brown, Loreen M; Stojanovska, Ana; Lennert, Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Payers recognize the need to expand benefits management for oncology but struggle to find effective solutions amid the complexity of available therapies and skepticism from oncologists, who are facing their own set of economic pressures. An effort called the National Oncology Working Group (NOW) Initiative is trying to change the sometimes adversarial relationship between payers and oncologists through a collaborative model. The group, which is supported by pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis, is developing patient-centered strategies for successful and sustainable oncology benefits management. The focus includes finding consensus between payers and providers and devising solutions for oncology management such as decreasing variability of cancer care and improving end-of-life care for patients with terminal illness. NOW is designing tools that will be tested in small-scale regional demonstration projects, which NOW participants anticipate will set an example for successful oncology benefits management that can be replicated and expanded.

  10. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  11. [Clinical prediction in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Predictive factors (PF) are variables that give information about survival, treatment response or toxicity and future complications on cancer patients. The foremost utility of PF takes root in the possibility to furnish an individualized treatment schedule with higher succeeding options. They include clinical characteristics of the patient, tumour features, treatment administrated, classical pathological and new molecular data obtained from patients clinical samples. Clinical parameters comprise age, sex, underlying diseases and performance status among others, and in concurrence with tumour pathology and clinical stage (TNM) usually define the best treatment options. Also, chemotherapy response can modify natural history of several tumours, and thus is a PF. Modifications in evolving PF typically induce a variation in patient outcome. Hence, surgical tumour size reduction or neoadjuvant down-staging improve survival in several cancers. In the other side, treatment adjustment to steady PF should offers better outcome than "standard therapies". Recent advances on cancer research have generated a great deal of biological data that help us to search new treatment and diagnostic modalities. Biotechnology offers a great amount of possibilities in the next future and probably a true individualized therapy. Conversely, there are a small amount of molecular evidences that imply a creal variation in current clinical practice. Hence, more scientific and financial efforts are necessary to exploit to the full knowledge spurting up from basic science. In summary, the prediction in oncology is a hard task derived from clinical observation, tumour behaviour, treatment schedules and biological evidences that must offer realistic predictions on a concrete cancer patient. Oncologists have a duty to know all these variables to accomplish this thorny assignment. This review will focus on classical and recent biological PF in cancer.

  12. Precision oncology: origins, optimism, and potential.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Fojo, Tito; Brada, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result--an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets--set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

  13. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don . E-mail: donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.

  14. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  15. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  16. The evolving role of neurological imaging in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Fontana, E J; Benzinger, T; Cobbs, C; Henson, J; Fouke, S J

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging has played a critical role in the management of patients with neurological disease, since the first ventriculogram was performed in 1918 by Walter Dandy (Mezger et al. Langenbecks Arch Surg 398(4):501-514, 2013). Over the last century, technology has evolved significantly, and within the last decade, the role of imaging in the management of patients with neuro-oncologic disease has shifted from a tool for gross identification of intracranial pathology, to an integral part of real-time neurological surgery. Current neurological imaging provides detailed information about anatomical structure, neurological function, and metabolic and metabolism-important characteristics that help clinicians and surgeons non-invasively manage patients with brain tumors. It is valuable to review the evolution of neurological imaging over the past several decades, focusing on its role in the management of patients with intracranial tumors. Novel neuro-imaging tools and developing technology with the potential to further transform clinical practice will be discussed, as will the key role neurological imaging plays in neurosurgical planning and intraoperative navigation. With increasingly complex imaging modalities creating growing amounts of raw data, validation of techniques, data analysis, and integrating various pieces of imaging data into individual patient management plans, remain significant challenges for clinicians. We thus suggest mechanisms that might ultimately allow for evidence based integration of imaging in the management of patients with neuro-oncologic disease.

  17. Life's final journey: the oncology nurse's role.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Cheryl A; Paice, Judith A

    2005-10-01

    Despite advances in technology and science, many people diagnosed with cancer are likely to die from the disease. Because of the long-term relationships that oncology nurses develop with patients and their families during lengthy treatment periods, they are the most appropriate clinicians to provide care across the continuum and through the final journey. Care of patients in the final days of life requires a comprehensive knowledge of common syndromes, skillful assessment, and adept clinical management. Nurses cannot focus solely on the needs of patients; family members often are unaware of the dying process. Oncology nurses are uniquely qualified to provide education and support to families at the bedside witnessing the final days and hours of their loved ones. Finally, oncology nurses involved in the care of dying patients are at risk for burnout and need to provide care for their own needs to find balance between their professional and personal lives.

  18. The Servier oncology pipeline in 2017.

    PubMed

    Therasse, Patrick; Perron, Beatrice; Novack, Sarah A; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease that for years has been the focus of intensive research efforts to explore both the molecular and biological mechanisms involved and the development of novel agents to target these pathways. Servier is an independent French pharmaceutical company with a focus on oncology. Currently, Servier's commercial portfolio includes agents used to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and metastatic colorectal cancer; Servier's oncology pipeline involves agents for the treatment of both solid and hematological tumors. The main areas of future research focus on the development of therapeutics targeting apoptosis or the active immune components involved in tumour development/maintenance. Servier intends to continue its focus on cutting-edge oncology innovation by collaborating with both industry and academia, and maintaining its strong patient-centered approach.

  19. [Acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Arias, F; Manterola, A; Domínguez, M A; Martínez, E; Villafranca, E; Romero, P; Vera, R

    2004-01-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most frequent syndromes in patients with tumours of the head and neck, and the oesophagus. This can be the initial symptom or, more frequently, related to the oncological treatment. We review the most important therapeutic and physio-pathological aspects of acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Deglutition is a complex process in which numerous muscular-skeletal structures intervene under the neurological control of different cranial nerves. The complex neuro-muscular coordination needed for a correct deglutition can be affected by numerous situations, both from the effect of the tumours and from their treatment, basically surgery or radiotherapy. In conclusion, it can be affirmed that for a suitable treatment of oncological dysphagia, a correct initial evaluation and an active treatment are required, since not only the patient's quality of life but, on numerous occasions, the possibility of continuing the treatment and thus maintaining the possibilities of a cure depend on control of the dysphagia.

  20. [Imaging in oncology: terms and definitions].

    PubMed

    Brader, P; Menu, Y; Kreuzer, S; Polanec, S; Mayerhoefer, M; Herold, C J

    2013-04-01

    Oncologic imaging includes the morphological description of the primary tumor region for an accurate classification of the tumor and lymph node stage and whether distant metastases have occurred according to the TNM staging system. Knowing the stage of the disease helps to plan the treatment and to estimate the prognosis. In clinical routine this is accomplished by conventional imaging techniques, such as ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, oncologic imaging is essential in treatment monitoring to visualize and quantify the effect of cancer therapy according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. The tremendous development in oncology and technical innovations in imaging represent a particular challenge for radiology.

  1. [Bipolar disorders in oncology: Characteristics and management].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Kotecki, Nuria

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar disorders belong to the spectrum of mood disorders and represent a serious psychiatric comorbidity. Behaviors adopted by bipolar patients can foster cancer occurrence but also impact its management, especially during acute depressive or manic episode. Oncologists must adapt their protocols in order to obtain the best compliance for treatment and avoid any possible mood destabilization, with the inherent risk of suicidal attempt. Potential interactions between mood-stabilizing agents (lithium, divalproate, atypical antipsychotics, and anticonvulsivants) and oncologic treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, corticotherapy) will be particularly watched. To do so, a closely collaboration with the oncopsychiatrist but also with the referent or liaison psychiatry team is necessary during the patient's oncologic care. Some clinical vignettes will illustrate the modalities of care of bipolar disorders in oncology. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  3. Current Management of Surgical Oncologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. Method A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. Results In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. Conclusion In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy. PMID:25933135

  4. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals-most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These contemporary figures may be useful to medical students

  5. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    endoscopic diagnosis is likely to be impacted by a combination of biomarkers and technology, and 'endoscopic molecular imaging' should be defined as "visualization of molecular characteristics with endoscopy". These innovations will allow us not only to locate a tumor or dysplastic lesion but also to visualize its molecular characteristics (e.g., DNA mutations and polymorphisms, gene and/or protein expression), and the activity of specific molecules and biological processes that affect tumor behavior and/or its response to therapy. In the near future, these methods should be promising technologies that will play a central role in gastrointestinal oncology.

  6. Genetics in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Martuza, R L

    1983-01-01

    could be identified and studied in the meningioma, the findings could be important not only in the treatment of patients with this tumor but also in the treatment of tumors of other hormonally modulated tissues such as breast and uterus. Finally, neurofibromatosis was chosen as the most common of the phakomatoses and as one which can offer significant insights into many areas of neuro-oncology. The NF gene occurs in at least two forms (VRNF, BANF), and it can be associated with virtually all of the tumors known to neurosurgeons--gliomas, neurofibromas, schwannomas, and meningiomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Oncological emergencies associated with gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Prenen, Klaas; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Oncological emergencies are defined as acute life-threatening conditions in cancer patients either as a result of the malignancy or as a result of its treatment. In this review, we focus on oncological emergencies associated with gastrointestinal tumors. They can be categorized by their system of origin as hematologic, neurologic or metabolic. Furthermore, we discuss mechanical emergencies such as intestinal obstruction and vena cava superior syndrome as well as acute gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary embolism. The patients’ performance status as well as prognosis are essential during decision making for optimal treatment. PMID:26424367

  8. [Role of laparoscopy in uro-oncology].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Novák, K; Dvorácek, J

    2005-01-01

    The article reviews problems of laparoscopic surgery in uro-oncology. Examples supporting and opposing the laparoscopic alternative are given. Original objections against the use of the method for the treatment of malignancies are discussed from the retrospective position. According to the predominant views it looks that laparoscopic treatment by a highly educated team with good technical background, respecting oncologic and functional aspects, does not have worse short-term and long-lasting results. The improving diagnostics and possibility to identify malignancies in early stage of development will enable wider use of the laparoscopic surgery.

  9. Fish Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Nadeau, Marie-Eve; Groff, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    The scientific literature contains a wealth of information concerning spontaneous fish neoplasms, although ornamental fish oncology is still in its infancy. The occurrence of fish neoplasms has often been associated with oncogenic viruses and environmental insults, making them useful markers for environmental contaminants. The use of fish, including zebrafish, as models of human carcinogenesis has been developed and knowledge gained from these models may also be applied to ornamental fish, although more studies are required. This review summarizes information available about fish oncology pertaining to veterinary clinicians.

  10. Managing oncology agents: an HMO's perspective.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The only way to accomplish the goals discussed is for health plans to collaborate more constructively with the oncologist community. We have reached out to providers, but there is still plenty of room for improvement. It is critical for both our success and that of the oncology community, because no one benefits from an adversarial relationship. We have not really sat down as partners with care providers to talk about what both parties see as emerging issues and how to best address them. We are at a point in oncology where we have this opportunity.

  11. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  12. Immunotherapy Administration: Oncology Nursing Society Recommendations
.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kathleen; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Wall, Lisa; Baldwin-Medsker, Abigail; Nguyen, Kim; Marsh, Lisa; Baniewicz, Diane

    2017-04-01

    As the use of immunotherapeutic agents increases in single-agent and multimodality treatment regimens, oncology nurses face the challenge of administering and caring for patients receiving new and unique agents. Oncology Nursing Society clinical staff and clinical nurses collaborated to produce a set of recommendations to educate nurses involved with the monitoring of patients receiving immunotherapy on administration procedures and safe handling of these agents to ensure patient and staff safety and to reduce risk of error. The recommendations are meant to provide clinical nurses with a framework on which to build policies and procedures for administering new treatment modalities.
.

  13. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented.

  14. Potential role for metformin in urologic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sayyid, Rashid Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. It is currently considered first-line pharmacological agent for management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Recent studies have suggested that metformin may have further benefits, especially in the field of urologic oncology. Use of metformin has been shown to be associated with decreased incidence and improved outcomes of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. These studies suggest that metformin does have a future role in the prevention and management of urologic malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in this field and its implications on the management of urologic oncology patients. PMID:27195314

  15. 75 FR 81283 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory... of December 6, 2010 (75 FR 75680). On February 9, 2011, the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  16. The application of qualitative research findings to oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Colleen Ann; Moules, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has established an ambitious research agenda and professional priorities based on a survey by LoBiondo-Wood et al. (2014). With the overall goal to "improve cancer care and the lives of individuals with cancer" (Moore & Badger, 2014, p. 93) through research activities, translating those research findings to direct clinical practice can be overwhelming. As clinicians, understanding how to critique research for quality prior to incorporating research findings into practice is important. The ultimate goal in this critique is to ensure that decisions made about patient care are based on strong evidence. However, the process for appraisal of qualitative research can be ambiguous and often contradictory as a result of the elusive aspect of quality in qualitative research methods (Seale, 1999). In addition, with more than 100 tools available to evaluate qualitative research studies (Higgins & Green, 2011), a lack of consensus exists on how to critically appraise research findings.

  17. ISGIO's Role in the Global Advancement of GI Oncology: Will We be Ready for the Future?

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B

    2008-01-01

    As the world's population expands, the need for GI oncologists will become critical. Unless new paradigms of clinical research are explored, the prospects of making important inroads in curing disease seem remote. What steps can ISGIO take to ensure that the future needs of GI oncology are met and patient access to quality care ensured? ISGIO President Al B. Benson, III believes the Society needs to start planning now and reveals some of his ideas for Society initiatives.

  18. Natural Language Processing in Oncology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yim, Wen-Wai; Yetisgen, Meliha; Harris, William P; Kwan, Sharon W

    2016-06-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) has the potential to accelerate translation of cancer treatments from the laboratory to the clinic and will be a powerful tool in the era of personalized medicine. This technology can harvest important clinical variables trapped in the free-text narratives within electronic medical records. Natural language processing can be used as a tool for oncological evidence-based research and quality improvement. Oncologists interested in applying NLP for clinical research can play pivotal roles in building NLP systems and, in doing so, contribute to both oncological and clinical NLP research. Herein, we provide an introduction to NLP and its potential applications in oncology, a description of specific tools available, and a review on the state of the current technology with respect to cancer case identification, staging, and outcomes quantification. More automated means of leveraging unstructured data from daily clinical practice is crucial as therapeutic options and access to individual-level health information increase. Research-minded oncologists may push the avenues of evidence-based research by taking advantage of the new technologies available with clinical NLP. As continued progress is made with applying NLP toward oncological research, incremental gains will lead to large impacts, building a cost-effective infrastructure for advancing cancer care.

  19. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  20. Major Oncologic Surgery at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Hollyann; Benyamini, Pouya

    2017-01-01

    There is a national trend to refer patients requiring complex oncologic surgery to tertiary high-volume cancer centers. However, this presents major access challenges to Hawai‘i patients seeking care. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that complex oncologic surgery can be safely performed at community hospitals like those in Hawai‘i. From July 2007 to December 2014, 136 patients underwent complex oncologic procedures at a community hospital in Hawai'i by a single general surgeon. Cases included esophagogastric, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, rectal, and retroperitoneal resections. A database of patients was created from information extracted from the EPIC database. Complications were evaluated using the Clavien-Dindo grading system. There was 0.7% mortality rate (grade V complication). The major morbidity rate was 12.5%, including 10.3% grade III complications and 2.2% grade IV complications. The median length of stay for all operations was 8 days. The mean estimated blood loss for all operations was 708 cc. There was a 2.9% hospital readmission rate within 30 days of initial discharge, and a 5.1% reoperation rate. Complex oncologic procedures can be safely performed at a low-volume community hospital, with outcomes similar to those from high-volume cancer centers. PMID:28210527

  1. Direct-to-consumer advertising in oncology.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Penson, Richard T; Joffe, Steven; Schapira, Lidia; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to patients and support to caregivers while encouraging the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum in which caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. Increasingly, cancer patients are subjected to advertisements related to oncologic therapies and other cancer-related products in the popular media. Such direct-to-consumer advertising is controversial: while it may inform, educate, and perhaps even empower patients, it also has the ability to misinform patients, and strain their relationships with oncology providers. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that direct-to-consumer advertising provide a balanced presentation of a product's benefits, risks, and side effects, but this can be difficult to achieve. Through a discussion of this topic by an oncology fellow, ethicist, cancer survivor, and senior oncologist, the role of direct-to-consumer advertising and its often subtle effects on clinical practice in oncology are explored. Although sparse, the medical literature on this increasingly prevalent type of medical communication is also reviewed.

  2. [Analysis of hepato-digestive oncology practices].

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Florence; Cornu, Chloé; Marterer, Justine; Thegarid, Héléne

    2014-09-01

    Help nursing students and new professionals to understand the different facets of care is at the heart of the managerial and pedagogical process coordinated by the health framework. The formalisation and use of learning situations promote the identification of opportunities for learning, modelling and the assessment of practices. Feedback from the hepato-digestive oncology service.

  3. Origins of the quality oncology practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Simone, Joseph V

    2009-11-01

    In 2002, the ASCO Board of Directors reviewed a proposal for a new approach to promoting high-quality cancer care. Today, the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative has 500 participating practices that report data on approximately 35,000 medical records annually.

  4. Generic oncology drugs: are they all safe?

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Nagai, Sumimasa; Chen, Brian K; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lebby, Akida A; Kessler, Samuel; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Raisch, Dennis W; Sartor, Oliver; Hermanson, Terhi; Kane, Robert C; Hrushesky, William J; Riente, Joshua J; Norris, LeAnn B; Bobolts, Laura R; Armitage, James O; Bennett, Charles L

    2016-11-01

    Although the availability of generic oncology drugs allows access to contemporary care and reduces costs, there is international variability in the safety of this class of drugs. In this Series paper, we review clinical, policy, safety, and regulatory considerations for generic oncology drugs focusing on the USA, Canada, the European Union (EU), Japan, China, and India. Safety information about generic formulations is reviewed from one agent in each class, for heavy metal drugs (cisplatin), targeted agents (imatinib), and cytotoxic agents (docetaxel). We also review regulatory reports from Japan and the USA, countries with the largest pharmaceutical expenditures. Empirical studies did not identify safety concerns in the USA, Canada, the EU, and Japan, where regulations and enforcement are strong. Although manufacturing problems for generic pharmaceuticals exist in India, where 40% of all generic pharmaceuticals used in the USA are manufactured, increased inspections and communication by the US Food and Drug Administration are occurring, facilitating oversight and enforcement. No safety outbreaks among generic oncology drugs were reported in developed countries. For developing countries, oversight is less intensive, and concerns around drug safety still exist. Regulatory agencies should collaboratively develop procedures to monitor the production, shipment, storage, and post-marketing safety of generic oncology drugs. Regulatory agencies for each country should also aim towards identical definitions of bioequivalence, the cornerstone of regulatory approval. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tobacco control policies of oncology nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Sarna, Linda; Bialous, Stella Aguinaga

    2004-05-01

    Nurses, the largest group of health care professionals, and the policies of nursing organizations, have tremendous potential to promote health and tobacco control. Policies addressing tobacco use have been implemented by a variety of national and international nursing organizations. This article reviews existing tobacco control policies in oncology nursing organizations.

  6. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2015 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Jay; Chen, Zhe; Chetty, Indrin J; Dieterich, Sonja; Doemer, Anthony; Dominello, Michael M; Howell, Rebecca M; McDermott, Patrick; Nalichowski, Adrian; Prisciandaro, Joann; Ritter, Tim; Smith, Chadd; Schreiber, Eric; Shafman, Timothy; Sutlief, Steven; Xiao, Ying

    2016-07-15

    The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Physics Core Curriculum Subcommittee (PCCSC) has updated the recommended physics curriculum for radiation oncology resident education to improve consistency in teaching, intensity, and subject matter. The ASTRO PCCSC is composed of physicists and physicians involved in radiation oncology residency education. The PCCSC updated existing sections within the curriculum, created new sections, and attempted to provide additional clinical context to the curricular material through creation of practical clinical experiences. Finally, we reviewed the American Board of Radiology (ABR) blueprint of examination topics for correlation with this curriculum. The new curriculum represents 56 hours of resident physics didactic education, including a 4-hour initial orientation. The committee recommends completion of this curriculum at least twice to assure both timely presentation of material and re-emphasis after clinical experience. In addition, practical clinical physics and treatment planning modules were created as a supplement to the didactic training. Major changes to the curriculum include addition of Fundamental Physics, Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, and Safety and Incidents sections, and elimination of the Radiopharmaceutical Physics and Dosimetry and Hyperthermia sections. Simulation and Treatment Verification and optional Research and Development in Radiation Oncology sections were also added. A feedback loop was established with the ABR to help assure that the physics component of the ABR radiation oncology initial certification examination remains consistent with this curriculum. The ASTRO physics core curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated in an effort to identify the most important physics topics for preparing residents for careers in radiation oncology, to reflect changes in technology and practice since the publication of previous recommended curricula, and

  7. Precision medicine in oncology: New practice models and roles for oncology pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Walko, Christine; Kiel, Patrick J; Kolesar, Jill

    2016-12-01

    Three different precision medicine practice models developed by oncology pharmacists are described, including strategies for implementation and recommendations for educating the next generation of oncology pharmacy practitioners. Oncology is unique in that somatic mutations can both drive the development of a tumor and serve as a therapeutic target for treating the cancer. Precision medicine practice models are a forum through which interprofessional teams, including pharmacists, discuss tumor somatic mutations to guide patient-specific treatment. The University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, and Moffit Cancer Center have implemented precision medicine practice models developed and led by oncology pharmacists. Different practice models, including a clinic, a clinical consultation service, and a molecular tumor board (MTB), were adopted to enhance integration into health systems and payment structures. Although the practice models vary, commonalities of three models include leadership by the clinical pharmacist, specific therapeutic recommendations, procurement of medications for off-label use, and a research component. These three practice models function as interprofessional training sites for pharmacy and medical students and residents, providing an important training resource at these institutions. Key implementation strategies include interprofessional involvement, institutional support, integration into clinical workflow, and selection of model by payer mix. MTBs are a pathway for clinical implementation of genomic medicine in oncology and are an emerging practice model for oncology pharmacists. Because pharmacists must be prepared to participate fully in contemporary practice, oncology pharmacy residents must be trained in genomic oncology, schools of pharmacy should expand precision medicine and genomics education, and opportunities for continuing education in precision medicine should be made available to practicing pharmacists. Copyright © 2016 by the

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Forte, Gaetano J; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N; Mulvey, Therese M

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future.

  9. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic.

  10. Is disease management right for oncology?

    PubMed

    Kash, Kathryn M; Sharma, Smiriti; Goldfarb, Neil I

    2009-12-01

    The disease management (DM) model for the treatment of chronic conditions has been around for many years and has been found to be effective for diseases of high prevalence and high cost (eg, diabetes, asthma, heart disease). With an increasing number of people living with cancer and the continual escalation of treatment costs, DM vendors have begun to implement DM concepts into cancer care. However, the multitude of cancer types, treatment options, and adverse effects have all presented barriers to oncology DM, and data reflecting the effectiveness of oncology DM have remained scarce. Oncology costs, the lack of congruence between provider and patient expectations of treatment, the lack of prevention and early detection for many cancers, and, most importantly, the inability of people to adhere to healthy lifestyles are additional obstacles that must be overcome. Moreover, when designing an oncology DM program, it is imperative to look at cancers individually as the etiology, treatment, and impact of cancer can be markedly different from one patient to the next. An effective oncology DM program is one that acts to decrease fatigue, reduces nosocomial infections, deals with dehydration and pain, manages anemia, identifies and treats skin infections, recognizes and treats depression and other psychological distress, provides patients access to palliative care services, facilitates informed decision making and end-of-life transitions, and promotes communication between patients and their providers as well as between physicians. Moving forward, DM vendors and health insurance companies capable of incorporating DM with medical management will be in the best position to provide optimal cancer care.

  11. Drug development in oncology: a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Augustus, Stella

    2011-07-01

    The ultimate goal of any drug development, including that in oncology, is to register the new medicinal product. A number of challenges remain in this field, primarily in demonstrating the efficacy of the new oncology products to the satisfaction of the regulatory authorities worldwide. Key aspects of clinical trial design, conduct, and analysis that require careful consideration by the sponsors before initiation of drug development programs in oncology include the choice of primary and secondary end points, the choice of comparators, the necessity for independent radiologic review of a disease-related end point such as progression-free survival and tumor response, and the relative value of the independently reviewed and investigator-assessed clinical end points. Many of these aspects, including the choice of comparators and choice of primary/secondary end points, may have a crucial impact on both the eventual registrability of the new medicine and on the feasibility of conducting the clinical trials in the first place. Although both the industry and the regulators share a common goal of developing promising new oncology products that make a tangible contribution to the care of patients with cancer, more harmonized expectations for "proof of efficacy" and more pragmatic, clinically driven decision-making approaches from regulatory authorities would go a long way in making oncology drug development process less fraught with uncertainties and will result in a more efficient path from clinical trials to the clinic for new medicines. An open dialogue and greater collaboration between the industry and the regulators may help in achieving clarity around these goals and in bringing these to fruition.

  12. Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Fradgley, Elizabeth; Regan, Timothy; Hobden, Breanne; Ackland, Stephen P

    2015-05-17

    Translational biomedical research relies on the availability of human tissue to explore disease aetiology and prognostic factors, with the objective of developing better targeted treatments. The establishment of biobanks poses ongoing ethical considerations in relation to donors. This is a quantitative study exploring medical oncology patients' preferences for contributing to tissue biobanks. The objectives of this study were to explore oncology patients' preferences about tissue banking, including: 1) willingness to donate; 2) factors influencing donation decisions; 3) preferences about the use of donated tissue including permission systems, data linkage, and communication about research findings to donors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two tertiary oncology outpatient clinics. Eligible patients were approached by volunteers to complete a touchscreen survey in waiting rooms or while receiving intravenous therapy. Consenting participants completed demographic questions and received up to 12 previously validated items exploring preferences for donating tissue. 224 oncology outpatients participated over a ten month period (69.1 % consent rate; 64.4 % completion rate). Most participants were female (54 %), were a mean age of 62 years, and diagnosed with breast (26 %) and bowel (20 %) cancer. Most participants indicated willingness to donate tissue (84 %) and for their sample to be stored for future use (96 %). Participants preferred a blanket consent approach (71 %), samples to be linked to medical records (62 %) and for general results of the research (79 %) to be provided to them. Factors influencing willingness to donate tissue included personal (85 %) or familial health benefits (88 %) and a sense of duty to future patients (82 %). The overwhelming majority of oncology patients are willing to participate in a tissue bank, providing some support to explore 'opt-out' models of consent. To enhance patient acceptability, tissue banking programs should: (i

  13. Evaluation of burnout syndrome in oncology employees.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Senem; Yildirim, Yasemin Kuzeyli; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Uslu, Ruchan; Yalman, Deniz; Aras, Arif B

    2010-09-01

    Burnout is an important occupational problem for health care workers. We aimed to assess the burnout levels among oncology employees and to evaluate the sociodemographic and occupational factors contributing to burnout levels. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, which is designed to measure the three stages of burnout-emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA), was used. The study sample consisted of 90 participants with a median age of 34 (range 23-56). The mean levels of burnout in EE, DP and PA stages were 23.80 +/- 10.98, 5.21 +/- 4.99, and 36.23 +/- 8.05, respectively, for the entire sample. Among the 90 participants, 42, 20, and 35.6% of the employees had high levels of burnout in the EE, DP, and PA substage, respectively. Sociodemographic and occupational factors associated with higher levels of burnout included age of less than 35, being unmarried, being childless, >40 work hours per week, working on night shifts, and <10 years experience in the medicine/oncology field. Within all oncology clinics, medical oncology employees had the highest levels of burnout. Furthermore, employees who are not pleased with working in oncology field, who would like to change their specialty if they have an opportunity, and whose family and social lives have been negatively affected by their work experienced higher levels of burnout. Burnout syndrome may influence physical and mental health of the employee and affects the quality of health care as well. Therefore, several individual or organizational efforts should be considered for dealing with burnout.

  14. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  15. Impact of anastomotic leakage on long-term oncologic outcome and its related factors in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Gyoung Tae; Ann, Yeo Shen; Cheong, Chinock; Han, Jeonghee; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a well-known cause of morbidity after low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer, but its impact on oncologic outcome is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of AL on long-term oncologic outcome and to identify factors associated with AL that may affect prognosis after LAR for rectal cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer without diverting stoma was performed. To investigate AL related factors that may be associated with oncologic outcome, Clavien-Dindo grades, prognostic nutritional indices (PNI) and inflammatory indices were included. One hundred and one patients out of a total of 1258 patients developed postoperative AL, giving an AL rate of 8.0%. Patients with AL showed poorer disease-free survival (DFS), than patients without AL (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.1–2.5; P = 0.01). In patients who developed AL, age over 60 (HR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.7; P = 0.033), advanced pathologic stage (HR = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4–4.0; P = 0.001), suppressed neutrophil-proportion (≤80%) (HR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2–5.8; P = 0.019) and PNI <36 (HR = 3.5; 95% CI: 1.2–9.6; P = 0.018) were associated with poorer DFS. AL was associated with poorer DFS. In patients with AL, a suppressed neutrophil-proportion and decreased PNI below 36 were associated with tumor recurrence. PMID:27472726

  16. Quantitatively and qualitatively augmenting medical student knowledge of oncology and radiation oncology: an update on the impact of the oncology education initiative.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Handal, Roxane; Daniels, Janeen; Levin-Epstein, Rebecca; Denunzio, Nicholas J; Dillon, Johanne; Shaffer, Kitt; Bishop, Pauline Mulleady

    2012-02-01

    The Oncology Education Initiative was established in 2007 in an effort to advance oncology and radiation oncology education at the undergraduate level. As a continuation of the initiative, the aim of this study was to determine whether these structured didactics would continue to increase overall medical student knowledge about oncologic topics. Preclerkship and postclerkship tests examining concepts in general oncology, radiation oncology, breast cancer, and prostate cancer were administered. The 21-question, multiple-choice examination was administered at the beginning and end of the radiology clerkship, during which a 1.5-hour didactic session was given by an attending radiation oncologist. Changes in individual question responses, student responses, and overall categorical responses were analyzed. All hypothesis tests were two tailed with a significance level of .05. In the 2009-2010 academic year, 155 third-year and fourth-year students had average examination score improvements from 62% to 68.9% (P < .0001). Every topic (100%) showed improvement in scores, with the largest absolute improvement seen in the radiation oncology category, which increased from 56.5% to 71.8% (P < .0001). As the year proceeded, average examination scores increased among third-year students and decreased among fourth-year students. In the successive years since its inception, the Oncology Education Initiative continues to show a significant improvement in medical students' knowledge of cancer. The initiative has also succeeded in providing radiation oncology education to all graduating medical students at the authors' institution. Dedicated oncology education in the undergraduate medical curriculum provides students with a better understanding of multidisciplinary oncology management. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care.

  18. Value: a framework for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A; Steinberg, Michael L

    2014-09-10

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment.

  19. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  20. Veterinary oncology clinical trials: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Thamm, Douglas H; Vail, David M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a recent increase in interest among veterinarians and the larger biomedical community in the evaluation of novel cancer therapies in client-owned (pet) animals with spontaneous cancer. This includes novel drugs designed to be veterinary therapeutics, as well as agents for which data generated in animals with tumors may inform human clinical trial design and implementation. An understanding of the process involved in moving a therapeutic agent through the stages of clinical evaluation is critical to the successful implementation of clinical investigations, as well as interpretation of the veterinary oncology literature. This review outlines considerations in the design and conduct of the various phases of oncology clinical trials, along with recent adaptations/modifications of these basic designs that can enhance the generation of timely and meaningful clinical data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Limb salvage in musculoskeletal oncology: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of musculoskeletal sarcomas has made vast strides in the last few decades. From an era where amputation was the only option to the current day function preserving resections and complex reconstructions has been a major advance. The objectives of extremity reconstruction after oncologic resection include providing skeletal stability where necessary, adequate wound coverage to allow early subsequent adjuvant therapy, optimising the aesthetic outcome and preservation of functional capability with early return to function. This article highlights the concepts of surgical margins in oncology, discusses the principles governing safe surgical resection in these tumors and summarises the current modalities and recent developments relevant to reconstruction after limb salvage. The rationale of choice of a particular resection modality, the unique challenges of reconstruction in skeletally immature individuals and the impact of adjuvant modalities like chemotherapy and radiotherapy on surgical outcomes are also discussed. PMID:25190911

  2. Value: A Framework for Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment. PMID:25113759

  3. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  4. 2015 SNMMI Highlights Lecture: Oncology, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    From the Newsline Editor: The Highlights Lecture, presented at the closing session of each SNMMI Annual Meeting, was originated and delivered for more than 30 years by Henry N. Wagner, Jr., MD. Beginning in 2010, the duties of summarizing selected significant presentations at the meeting were divided annually among 4 distinguished nuclear and molecular medicine subject matter experts. The 2015 Highlights Lectures were delivered on June 10 at the SNMMI Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Umar Mahmood, MD, PhD, a professor of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), spoke on oncology highlights from the meeting’s sessions. Because of its length, the oncology presentation will be divided between 2 Newsline issues. Note that in the following summary, numerals in brackets represent abstract numbers as published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine [2015;56:suppl 3). PMID:26526798

  5. Puget sound oncology nursing education cooperative.

    PubMed

    Whipple, V T; Hogeland-Drummond, S; Purrier, M; Tofthagen, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Leadership & Professional Development feature is to provide readers with information, ideas, and exemplars of leadership competencies and professional roles in oncology nursing. Manuscripts submitted to the Leadership & Professional Development feature should be prepared according to the Information for Authors published in the Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) but limited to six to eight double-spaced typed pages. Submit two copies of the manuscript using IBM-compatible software along with a computer disk copy, or submit a copy of the manuscript as an e-mail attachment to Joan Such Lockhart, PhD, RN, CORLN, ONF Associate Editor, 1365 Simona Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15201; lockhart /duq.edu (e-mail). Manuscripts should be referenced and include tables, figures, or illustrations as appropriate. Ideas for possible manuscripts are welcome.

  6. Informatics Enabled Behavioral Medicine in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bradford W.; Suls, Jerry M.

    2011-01-01

    For the practicing physician, the behavioral implications of preventing, diagnosing, and treating cancer are many and varied. Fortunately, an enhanced capacity in informatics may help create a redesigned ecosystem in which applying evidence-based principles from behavioral medicine will become a routine part of care. Innovation to support this evolution will be spurred by the “meaningful use” criteria stipulated by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, and by focused research and development efforts within the broader health information ecosystem. The implications for how to better integrate evidence-based principles in behavioral medicine into oncology care through both spheres of development are discussed within the framework of the cancer control continuum. The promise of using the data collected through these tools to accelerate discovery in psycho-oncology is also discussed. If nurtured appropriately, these developments should help accelerate successes against cancer by altering the behavioral milieu. PMID:21799329

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging in Oncology Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R J A; Bunch, J; McGinnity, D F

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been integrated in to many areas of drug discovery and development. It can have significant impact in oncology drug discovery as it allows efficacy and safety of compounds to be assessed against the backdrop of the complex tumour microenvironment. We will discuss the roles of MSI in investigating compound and metabolite biodistribution and defining pharmacokinetic -pharmacodynamic relationships, analysis that is applicable to all drug discovery projects. We will then look more specifically at how MSI can be used to understand tumour metabolism and other applications specific to oncology research. This will all be described alongside the challenges of applying MSI to industry research with increased use of metrology for MSI. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Methodology of economic assessment: example in oncology].

    PubMed

    Jaisson-Hot, Isabelle; Schott, Anne-Marie; Clippe, Christine; Ganne, Christell; Hajri, Touria; Poncet, Bénédicte; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Colin, Cyrille

    2003-11-01

    The increasing costs of care make it important to identify those strategies of greatest value from both an effectiveness and cost perspective. Economic analysis is characterized by a simultaneous consideration of alternatives costs and outcomes, and can provide useful data for managerial decision making. In this paper, methods of economic evaluations in general and in cancer in particular is reviewed. In cancer treatment, preventive, curative or palliative strategies can be concerned. Economic evaluation have become increasingly important in oncology because of the proliferation of expensive new treatments. Furthermore, considering quality of life effects is particularly important in oncology, where many treatments obtain modest improvements in response or survival. Quality of life measurements are also reviewed.

  9. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined.

  10. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  11. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Martel, Mary K.; Jaffray, David A.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A.; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Wong, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. As these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology”, which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, on June 13-14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, as well as information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically-advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments pre-disposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research were clearly identified as synergistic. PMID:26460989

  12. Uptake Carriers and Oncology Drug Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) family of transporters are responsible for the cellular influx of a broad range of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics in multiple tissues. Many of these transporters are highly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and kidney and are considered to be of particular importance in governing drug absorption, elimination, and cellular sensitivity of specific organs to a wide variety of oncology drugs. Although the majority of studies on the interaction of oncology drugs with SLC have been restricted to the use of exploratory in vitro model systems, emerging evidence suggests that several SLCs, including OCT2 and OATP1B1, contribute to clinically important phenotypes associated with those agents. Recent literature has indicated that modulation of SLC activity may result in drug-drug interactions, and genetic polymorphisms in SLC genes have been described that can affect the handling of substrates. Alteration of SLC function by either of these mechanisms has been demonstrated to contribute to interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics and toxicity associated with several oncology drugs. In this report, we provide an update on this rapidly emerging field. PMID:24378324

  13. Oncology Nurse Participation in Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Oncology nurses are playing an important role in the provision of survivorship care. Their involvement includes educating and coordinating multidiscipline teams to initiate and provide care to patients and families. Oncology nurses participate in this evolving model of care in a variety of ways. Using the IOM report recommendations for the provision of quality cancer care nurses provide care based on the specific characteristics of individual health care settings and the populations they serve. Evaluating the settings resources and goals for desired survivorship activities as part of the planning process can be the difference between success and failure. Collaborating with local and national resources for cancer survivors can help expand services for a setting in an efficient and cost effective manner. Models of care vary and resources and communication differs among cancer care settings. Survivorship care differs as a result, across different models. Nurses are key to the dissemination and coordination of survivorship activities and are critical in facilitating communication between health care providers, the patients and caregivers. Nurses have a significant role in the dissemination and coordination of information between the patient and other health care providers. Oncology care does not end when treatment ends. PMID:21112849

  14. Workplace Bullying in Radiology and Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Jay R; Harolds, Jay A; Bluth, Edward I

    2017-08-01

    Workplace bullying is common in health care and has recently been reported in both radiology and radiation oncology. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of bullying and its potential consequences in radiology and radiation oncology. Bullying behavior may involve abuse, humiliation, intimidation, or insults; is usually repetitive; and causes distress in victims. Workplace bullying is more common in health care than in other industries. Surveys of radiation therapists in the United States, student radiographers in England, and physicians-in-training showed that substantial proportions of respondents had been subjected to workplace bullying. No studies were found that addressed workplace bullying specifically in diagnostic radiology or radiation oncology residents. Potential consequences of workplace bullying in health care include anxiety, depression, and health problems in victims; harm to patients as a result of victims' reduced ability to concentrate; and reduced morale and high turnover in the workplace. The Joint Commission has established leadership standards addressing inappropriate behavior, including bullying, in the workplace. The ACR Commission on Human Resources recommends that organizations take steps to prevent bullying. Those steps include education, including education to ensure that the line between the Socratic method and bullying is not crossed, and the establishment of policies to facilitate reporting of bullying and support victims of bullying. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Current challenges in European oncology pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten

    2010-03-01

    The demand for pharmacy cancer services is expected to at least double over the next 10 years, as the population ages and new treatments are introduced. Safe and efficient handling of cytotoxic products minimises risks to staff and reduces medication errors. To identify and describe strategies for coping safely and effectively with heavier workloads in the hospital oncology pharmacy, currently and in the future. The PubMed database was searched for literature on approaches to safe handling of antineoplastic agents and to decreasing medication errors in the hospital pharmacy. Articles that were judged to be of prime importance to the hospital oncologist were reviewed. These safety concepts are put into the context of contemporary hospital oncology pharmacy practice through discussion of key issues, including increased demand, the role of the pharmacist in determining the hospital formulary, and growth in patient preferences for oral chemotherapy. Recommendations on best practices are also provided, based on relevant literature and author experience. Efficient, safe hospital pharmacy operations can be aided by capacity planning, dose banding, and knowledge of novel products and procedures that can reduce risks to health while increasing the number of patients who are safely treated. Consideration may also be given to the economic role of oncology pharmacists in formulary development.

  16. Moral justification of Phase 1 oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Dubov, Alex

    2014-06-01

    This article attempts to answer the following normative questions: Can one consider the design of Phase 1 trials ethically appropriate due to the unfavorable ratio of risks and benefits? What are some ethical safeguards for Phase 1 oncology research? A comparative review of literature contributed to the consolidation of the proposed ethical framework for Phase 1 oncology trials. This framework gives a special attention to issues of therapeutic misconception and vulnerability. The benefits and dangers associated with the enrollment in trials are described as well as the absence of alternatives, treatment-specific optimism, and vagueness in factual presentation during the informed consent process. The notion of therapeutic misconception is contrasted with optimism despite realism that stems from psychological, cultural, and religious factors and not necessarily from the lack of information. Close attention is given to the possible ways in which the inherent uncertainty and resulting cognitive biases may affect the informed consent process and the definition of therapeutic misconception. The article ends with recommendations for an ethical way of enrolling palliative patients in early stages of oncology research, giving special attention to provision of adequate consent, protection of vulnerability, and avoidance of therapeutic misconception.

  17. [The role of emotional labour in oncology].

    PubMed

    Szluha, Kornélia; Lazányi, Kornélia; Molnár, Péter

    2007-01-01

    Oncologists and related health care professionals (HCPs) do not only have to follow professional protocols in their everyday work, but also have to communicate proper attitudes towards patients suffering from malignant diseases. This task is often a heavier load than the implementation of professional activities themselves. The present article is based on a survey on HCP work motivation, employment parameters and correlations with emotional labour. Fifty oncology HCPs at Debrecen University Medical Health Sciences Centre volunteered to participate in this survey containing 20 simple-choice questions. More than 90 percent of HCPs make an effort to hide their emotional state, giving way to possible negative side effects. The survey showed significant differences between the level of emotional labour of those working in the field of oncology longer or shorter than ten years. Surface and deep emotional labour is more frequent among professionals already working in oncology for a longer period of time. This can serve us with explanation to the burn-out syndrome so frequent in this profession. To diminish the load of emotional labour, healthcare institutes have to aim at hiring employees that spontaneously fit the emotional and behavioural norms facing them, and do not need officially prescribed behavioural norms for everyday work. Their constant need for respect and appreciation of their values must be kept in mind, because the capability of genuine emotional labour diminishes parallel to the number of years spent in work.

  18. Update on genomics in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Breen, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    The release of an annotated human genome sequence assembly and the emergence of genomics technologies have led to significant advances in our understanding of many human diseases including cancers. As DNA sequencing technology has become less costly, the field of comparative genomics has progressed rapidly and attention has turned now to generating whole genome assemblies and dedicated genomics resources for veterinary species. Such progress brings a whole new series of opportunities to advance veterinary medicine. Many human and animal diseases share a pathogenetic basis, and although veterinary species need advances in biomedical research in their own right, the consideration of companion animals also as good comparative models for human disease saw the emergence of the "one medicine" concept. The future of many areas of human and veterinary biomedical research is very much interdependent, with one of the closest associations being in oncology. It is inevitable that veterinary oncology will benefit enormously from data derived from genomics and that this era will see a huge shift in the ways in which companion animal cancer patients are evaluated and subsequently treated. Here, we will review some of the advancements of genomics as they relate to veterinary oncology.

  19. [Oncologic pathology at an internal medicine service].

    PubMed

    de Miranda, M I; da Luz, R; Gonçalves, F M; Monteiro, J S; da Costa, J N

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective survey of the patients with oncological disease admitted to our Department of Internal Medicine in 1987 was conducted to determine its prevalence and to draw a descriptive profile of these patients' admissions. The results show that oncological diseases were the second cause of hospital admissions that year (12%) only exceeded by cardiovascular diseases. About 60% of the patients had neoplasms already diagnosed elsewhere and were admitted for complications or with therapeutic purposes; in 40% of cases the disease was diagnosed in our Department. A wide variety of hematological and non-hematological tumors was found. There were some difficulties in interdisciplinary coordination in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. More than 50% of the patients had advanced disease, limiting medical intervention to supportive measures. In about 60% of them were oriented to primary care physicians after physicians after discharged from Hospital. These results suggest the dispersion of the available resources for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of oncological diseases in our population. A better cancer patients' assistance in Portugal will depend on the promotion of national cancer registers as well as the improvement of cancer prevention and early detection programs, according to the directives of EEC and WHO. We also emphasize the need of investment on undergraduate and postgraduate education programs, specially for primary care physicians.

  20. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. Study population DNOR has registered clinical data on diagnostics and treatment of all adult patients diagnosed with glioma since January 1, 2009, which numbers approximately 400 patients each year. Main variables The database contains information about symptoms, presurgical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, performance status, surgical procedures, residual tumor on postsurgical MRI, postsurgical complications, diagnostic and histology codes, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Descriptive data DNOR publishes annual reports on descriptive data. During the period of registration, postoperative MRI is performed in a higher proportion of the patients (Indicator II), and a higher proportion of patients have no residual tumor after surgical resection of the primary tumor (Indicator IV). Further data are available in the annual reports. The indicators reflect only minor elements of handling brain tumor patients. Another advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. Conclusion The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research. PMID:27822109

  1. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  2. Neuro-oncology: a selected review of ASCO 2016 abstracts.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-10-01

    ASCO 2016, 29 May-2 June 2016, Chicago, IL, USA The largest annual clinical oncology conference the American Society of Clinical Oncology is held in the USA and gives researchers and other key opinion leaders the opportunity to present new cancer clinical trials and research data. The CNS tumors section of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 covered various aspects of neuro-oncology including metastatic CNS diseases and primary brain tumors, presented via posters, oral talks and over 100 abstracts. This brief review selectively highlights presentations from this meeting in an organizational manner that reflects clinically relevant aspects of a large and multifaceted meeting.

  3. An increase in medical student knowledge of radiation oncology: a pre-post examination analysis of the oncology education initiative.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Mulleady Bishop, Pauline; Dad, Luqman; Singh, Deeptej; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2009-03-15

    The Oncology Education Initiative was created to advance oncology and radiation oncology education by integrating structured didactics into the existing core radiology clerkship. We set out to determine whether the addition of structured didactics could lead to a significant increase in overall medical student knowledge about radiation oncology. We conducted a pre- and posttest examining concepts in general radiation oncology, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. The 15-question, multiple-choice exam was administered before and after a 1.5-hour didactic lecture by an attending physician in radiation oncology. Individual question changes, overall student changes, and overall categorical changes were analyzed. All hypothesis tests were two-tailed (significance level 0.05). Of the 153 fourth-year students, 137 (90%) took the pre- and posttest and were present for the didactic lecture. The average test grade improved from 59% to 70% (p = 0.011). Improvement was seen in all questions except clinical vignettes involving correct identification of TNM staging. Statistically significant improvement (p oncology significantly improves medical students' knowledge of the topic. Despite perceived difficulty in teaching radiation oncology and the assumption that it is beyond the scope of reasonable knowledge for medical students, we have shown that even with one dedicated lecture, students can learn and absorb general principles regarding radiation oncology.

  4. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  5. Oncologic Outcomes After Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Moo, Tracy Ann; Pinchinat, Tiffany; Mays, Simone; Landers, Alyssa; Christos, Paul; Alabdulkareem, Hanan; Tousimis, Eleni; Swistel, Alexander; Simmons, Rache

    2016-10-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is increasingly used as an alternative to traditional mastectomy because it provides improved aesthetic results. The data on its oncologic safety are limited. The authors' institution has performed NSM during the past 10 years for both oncologic and prophylactic indications. This study aimed to examine oncologic outcomes after NSM for breast cancer. The study retrospectively examined all NSM cases managed between July 2007 and July 2013. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study cohort. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to estimate recurrence-free survival, specifically the 36-month recurrence-free survival proportion. A total of 721 nipple-sparing mastectomies were performed for 413 patients: 45 (10.9 %) to reduce risk and 368 (89.1 %) for breast cancer. In the breast cancer group, 29.8 % of the patients had ductal carcinoma in situ, and 70.2 % had invasive cancer. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range 0.01-90.2 months). In the breast cancer group, the Kaplan-Meier 3-year recurrence-free survival rate was 93.6 % (95 % confidence interval, 89.9-96.0 %). Eight patients (2.2 %) had locoregional recurrences, including one in the nipple. Nine patients (2.4 %) had distant recurrence, and six patients (1.6 %) had a diagnosis of both local and distant recurrences. The findings showed a locoregional recurrence rate of 2.2 %, with an overall recurrence rate of 6.3 % for patients undergoing NSM for the treatment of breast cancer. The majority of these recurrences were distant, with one recurrence at the nipple. These results are promising, but a longer follow-up evaluation of this cohort is necessary.

  6. [Donatori di Musica: when oncology meets music].

    PubMed

    Graiff, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Donatori di Musica is a network of musicians - both physicians and volunteers - that was initially founded in 2009 with the aim to set up and coordinate classical music concerts in hospitals. This activity was initially started and led by the Oncology Departments at Carrara and Bolzano Hospitals, where high profile professional musicians make themselves available for concerts in support of Oncological in/out-patients of that specific Hospital. A live classical music performance is a deeply touching experience - particularly for those who live a critical condition like cancer. Main characteristics of Donatori di Musica concerts are: continuity (concerts are part of a regular and non-stopping music season); quality (concerts are held by well-established professional musicians); philanthropic attitude (musicians do not wear a suit and usually chat with patients; they also select an easy-to-listen program; a convivial event is usually organized after the performance with the aim of overcoming distinctions and barriers between physician and patient); no profit: musicians perform for free - travel expenses and/or overnight staying only can be claimed; concerts have free access for patients, their families and hospital staff.Patients and musicians therefore do get in close contact and music is able to merge each other experiences - with patients being treated by the beauty of music and musicians being treated theirselves by patients daily-life feedback. The Donatori di Musica experience is therefore able to help Medicine to retrieve its very first significance - the medical act regain that human and cultural dimension that seems to be abandoned in the last decades in favour of a mere technicism. This is the spirit and the deep significance of Donatori di Musica - «[…] the hope that Music can become a key support to medical treatments in every Oncology department» (by Gian Andrea Lodovici).

  7. [Proposal for radio-oncologic needs planning].

    PubMed

    Sauer, R

    1986-10-01

    The demand planning for radio-oncologic treatment considers the population density and structure of the region served by the hospital, the geographic conditions of this region, the medical prescriptions of the hospital institution, the incidence of cancer, the part of radiotherapy in the treatment of the tumor, hospital-specific factors and, finally, the minimum requirements for technical equipment and staff of a radiotherapeutic functional unit. The most important factors are certainly the incidence of cancer and the number of tumor patients actually receiving a radiotherapy. For the Federal Republic of Germany, an incidence of annually 300 to 320 new cancers per 100,000 inhabitants is determined, based on the mortality statistics of the Federal Republic of Germany, England, Wales and Norway as well as the cancer incidence statistics of Hamburg, Baden-Württemberg, Saarland and the very reliable registers of Scandinavia and the German Democratic Republic. The part of radiotherapy is probably between 32 and 35% of primary treatments, repeated treatments must be added. With respect to technical equipment and staff, some minimum requirements have to be fulfilled by a radiotherapeutic functional unit if its work shall be satisfactory in the medical and economical domain. A concentration of radiotherapeutic resources is recommended. The number of beds required for a radio-oncologic hospital applying modern techniques and combined methods is 40 to 45% of the number of patients irradiated per day. A three-category system for radio-oncologic treatment is presented. Future planning, however, should only be based on two categories.

  8. Advance care planning in the oncology settings.

    PubMed

    Samara, Juliane; Larkin, David; Chan, Choi Wan; Lopez, Violeta

    2013-06-01

    Self-determination and patient choice of end-of-life care are emphasised in palliative care. Advance care planning (ACP) is an approach to enabling patients' choices. The use of ACP has not been extensively studied in our current context. Little is known about oncology care nurses' views and the barriers they face in the implementation of ACP. The aims of this study were to assess the uptake of ACP by health professionals and explore nurses' perceived barriers for implementing ACP. This study employed a pre- and post-implementation audit design using the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) and Getting Research into Practice (GRIP) programs. An education programme on ACP was provided between pre-and post-implementation audits. Nurses and medical professionals (pre-audit, n = 32; post-audit, n = 30) working in oncology departments were invited to complete a questionnaire based on the audit criteria. A convenience sample of 25 nurses participated in the focus group interview. Interview data were analysed by content analysis. The post-audit results were lower than the pre-audit results with a range of decreased compliance from 1% for criterion 5 to 14% for criterion 6. Lack of time to implement ACP was the most frequently raised barrier by oncology nurses. The study findings were disappointing, but this first audit is significant to provide insights for future dissemination and implementation of ACP interventions. An ongoing mandatory professional development programme in ACP for healthcare staff is promising to promote the uptake of ACP in healthcare settings. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  9. Symposium: “Oncology Leadership in Asia”

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P. Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The symposium on “Oncology Leadership in Asia” was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association with International Cancer Conference. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in Western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asian Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future. PMID:28279063

  10. [Induced drug prescription in oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Mas Arcas, C; Pascual Plá, F; Escrivá Muñz, J J; Boscas Mayans, R

    2004-01-01

    To study drug prescription generated by cancer patients treated at the Emergency Service (ES) of the Instituto Valenciano de Oncología (IVO) in their Primary Health Care Centre (PHCC). A descriptive prospective study has been carried out with patients treated and discharged from the ES of the IVO in November (n=207) and December (n=239) of 2001. 446 patients were treated and discharged; one out of five patients was contacted by telephone 48 hours after discharge to confirm drug prescriptions from the ES. In November, drug prescription was based on brand-name products, while, in December, generic drugs were prescribed. All patients were discharged with a detailed report that included: patient's medical records, consultation reason, physical exploration performed, diagnostic test results, discharge diagnosis and prescribed treatment. When a brand-name drug was prescribed, the majority of patients received the same product at the PHCC (92.5%), while the rest of them received the same active drug with a different brand name. When a generic drug was prescribed, patients received a prescription for the same active substance at the PHCC in 98% of cases (46% generic drug and 54% brand-name). As to length of treatment, 96% were short treatments (less than 2 weeks), while the rest of them were on-going. 80% needed one prescription; 15%, two, and 5% three or more prescriptions. In terms of therapeutic groups, the most commonly prescribed drugs were anti-infectious, analgesics, digestive-metabolism, respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and miscellaneous. 1. There is a high level of induced drug prescription at PHCC in cancer patients, since primary care physicians usually maintain active substances prescribed by the ES of IVO, with few variations. 2. Promoting a good relationship between Hospital Care and Primary Health Care Centres helps control and reduce pharmaceutical costs. 3. A high correlation can be found between most frequently prescribed drugs in oncological

  11. Nanopharmacology in translational hematology and oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Braicu, Cornelia; Irimie, Alexandra; Craciun, Lucian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have displayed considerable promise for safely delivering therapeutic agents with miscellaneous therapeutic properties. Current progress in nanotechnology has put forward, in the last few years, several therapeutic strategies that could be integrated into clinical use by using constructs for molecular diagnosis, disease detection, cytostatic drug delivery, and nanoscale immunotherapy. In the hope of bringing the concept of nanopharmacology toward a viable and feasible clinical reality in a cancer center, the present report attempts to present the grounds for the use of cell-free nanoscale structures for molecular therapy in experimental hematology and oncology. PMID:25092977

  12. Assessment of comorbidities in surgical oncology outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Parul; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F

    2014-10-01

    The impact of comorbidities on treatment, postoperative complications, survival, prognosis, and quality of life, makes comorbidities' assessment essential in surgically managed cancer patients. Multiple indices exist to measure the presence and severity of comorbidities, of which the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 are the most widely employed. Incorporation of comorbidity data in cancer registries facilitates surgical oncology research conduct with an objective to improve cancer care through better-informed patient counseling and treatment planning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nuclear oncology: From genotype to patient care

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty best suited to translate the exploding body of knowledge obtained from research in genetics and molecular biology into the care of patients. This fourth annual nuclear oncology conference will address how this can be done and how positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be used in the care of patients with cancer or with increased genetic risk of developing cancer. The course will include illustrative patient studies showing how PET and SPECT can help in diagnosis, staging and treatment planning and monitoring of patients with cancer.

  14. Psychosocial Impact of Personalized Therapies in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Georgia; Schulz-Kindermann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a keyword in modern oncology summarizing biomarker-driven targeted therapies. Those novel agents enhance our therapeutic portfolio and offer new options for our patients. But the term is often misleading and implicates a tailored therapy to the individual person, but it rather means a treatment stratified on genetic characteristics of the tumor. Molecular therapies raise expectations of curability or long-term treatments making former life-threatening diseases to more chronic ones but this is true only for some patients. So we have to carefully communicate with our patients about the options and limitations of those modern therapies not to trigger disappointments.

  15. [The problems of informing oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, H

    1979-01-01

    The "phase-model" of Kübler-Ross represents useful auxiliary means, which however prove correct only in a portion of the cases. The information of the diagnosis of a malign disease constitutes one of the most difficult medical problems and requires certain basic conditions. As a rule it cannot be delegated but must be solved within the realm of oncology. In the future it will be necessary to inform the patients concerning their malign disease very much more than is is presently done.

  16. The Johns Hopkins Oncology Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Lenhard, Raymond E.; Blum, Bruce I.; Sunderland, Jeffery M.; Braine, Hayden G.; Saral, Rein

    1982-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has developed and maintains a clinical information system to support patient care, education, research and administrative functions. It operates on a dedicated mini-computer (PDP-11) programmed in MUMPS. Clinical information collelcted includes patient medical status and laboratory values. Data are used daily in patient care and also in support of retrospective and prospective research. The use of the system to manage a large blood product pheresis program and to study and treat infectious disease is described. Administrative functions include patient and personnel scheduling, program evaluation and projects directed toward control of costs.

  17. Advanced MR Imaging in Neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    The value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the clinical management of brain tumour patients has greatly increased in recent years through the introduction of functional MR sequences. Previously, MR imaging for brain tumours relied for the most part on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences but today with the help of advanced functional MR sequences, the pathophysiological aspects of tumour growth can be directly visualised and investigated. This article will present the pathophysiological background of the MR sequences relevant to neuro-oncological imaging as well as potential clinical applications. Ultimately, we take a look at possible future developments for ultra-high-field MR imaging.

  18. Rabbit Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    van Zeeland, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Neoplasia has long been reported as a rare finding in rabbits, but over the past decades the number of reports on neoplastic disease in rabbits has risen considerably. Similar to other animals, neoplastic changes may occur in any organ system, but the rate in which the organ systems are affected differs considerably. In rabbits, tumors have predominantly been found in the urogenital, hemolymphatic, and integumentary systems. This article discusses current insights on the etiopathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of the commonest neoplastic diseases in rabbits and offer guidelines for the correct diagnosis and treatment of the rabbit oncologic patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lymphadenectomy in urologic oncology: pathologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Riley E; Sung, Ming-Tse; Cheng, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Lymphadenectomy (LAD) is an important staging and treatment modality of oncologic surgery. LAD in genitourinary malignancies presents inherent difficulties to the urologist and pathologist because of the differences in anatomic sites and primary histologic type. This review focuses on pathologic evaluation and how communication between urologist and pathologist is necessary to provide optimal care. Recommendations covering general specimen submission and processing are discussed, as well as more specific recommendations concerning the kidney, upper urinary tract, urinary bladder, prostate, testes, and penis. Emerging areas of prognostic significance and the impact that improved molecular techniques are contributing to diagnostic interpretation are highlighted.

  20. Evidence-based paediatric surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Losty, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Surgeons play a pivotal role in the decision-making and multidisciplinary management of childhood solid tumours.(1) Evidence-based medicine-"aims to optimise decision making by emphasising on the use of best evidence from well-designed conducted research." This article offers a brief overview in an effort to demonstrate how a selection of well-conducted, recently published studies can help address some topical and controversial themes in paediatric surgical oncology practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements.

  2. Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Orthopedic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Olga D; Bolia, Ioanna K; Chloros, George D; Goumenos, Stavros D; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Galanis, Evanthia C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-09-01

    Nanomedicine is based on the fact that biological molecules behave similarly to nanomolecules, which have a size of less than 100 nm, and is now affecting most areas of orthopedics. In orthopedic oncology, most of the in vitro and in vivo studies have used osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma cell lineages. In this article, tumor imaging and treatment nanotechnology applications, including nanostructure delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, gene therapy, and the role of nano-selenium-coated implants, are outlined. Finally, the potential role of nanotechnology in addressing the challenges of drug and radiotherapy resistance is discussed. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):280-286.].

  3. [Reconstructive surgery in head and neck oncology: indication and technic].

    PubMed

    Kolb, F; Julieron, M

    2005-02-01

    Oncologic cervicofacial surgery and plastic surgery have had a common evolution over the last 50 years where progress erasing from one was beneficial to the other one. We review here the historical evolution of these specialties and present the state of the art of plastic surgery in the field of cervicofacial oncology.

  4. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  5. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  6. 75 FR 71450 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee....

  7. 77 FR 37911 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. This meeting...

  8. 77 FR 63839 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory... committee have been resolved. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caleb Briggs, Center for Drug Evaluation...

  9. Exercise-Based Oncology Rehabilitation: Leveraging the Cardiac Rehabilitation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Kim L.; Lakoski, Susan G.; Savage, Patrick D.; Kokinda, Nathan; Toth, Michael; Stevens, Diane; Woods, Kimberly; O’Brien, Patricia; Ades, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The value of exercise and rehabilitative interventions for cancer survivors is increasingly clear and oncology rehabilitation programs could provide these important interventions. However, a pathway to create oncology rehabilitation has not been delineated. Community-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs staffed by health care professionals with experience in providing rehabilitation and secondary prevention services to individuals with coronary heart disease are widely available and provide a potential model and location for oncology rehabilitation programs. Our purpose is to outline the rehabilitative needs of cancer survivors and demonstrate how oncology rehabilitation can be created using a cardiac rehabilitation model. METHODS We identify the impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that respond to rehabilitative interventions. Components of the CR model that would benefit cancer survivors are described. An example of an oncology rehabilitation program using a CR model is presented. RESULTS Cancer survivors have impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that improve with rehabilitation. Our experience demonstrates that effective rehabilitation services can be provided utilizing an existing CR infrastructure. Few adjustments to current cardiac rehabilitation models would be needed to provide oncology rehabilitation. Preliminary evidence suggests that cancer survivors participating in an oncology rehabilitation program experience improvements in psychological and physiologic parameters. CONCLUSIONS Utilizing the CR model of rehabilitative services and disease management provides a much needed mechanism to bring oncology rehabilitation to larger numbers of cancer survivors. PMID:25407596

  10. Maintenance of Certification for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Larry E.; Ang, Kian; Erickson, Beth; Harris, Jay; Hoppe, Richard; Leibel, Steve; Davis, Larry; Hattery, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document professional development of American Board of Radiology (ABR) diplomates in the essential elements of quality care in Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. ABR MOC has been developed in accord with guidelines of the American Board of Medical Specialties. All Radiation Oncology certificates issued since 1995 are 10-year, time-limited certificates; diplomates with time-limited certificates who wish to maintain specialty certification must complete specific requirements of the American Board of Radiology MOC program. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate but are strongly encouraged to do so. Maintenance of Certification is based on documentation of participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Through these components, MOC addresses six competencies-medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Details of requirements for components 1, 2, and 3 of MOC are outlined along with aspects of the fourth component currently under development.

  11. [Artificial intelligence applied to radiation oncology].

    PubMed

    Bibault, J-E; Burgun, A; Giraud, P

    2017-05-01

    Performing randomised comparative clinical trials in radiation oncology remains a challenge when new treatment modalities become available. One of the most recent examples is the lack of phase III trials demonstrating the superiority of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in most of its current indications. A new paradigm is developing that consists in the mining of large databases to answer clinical or translational issues. Beyond national databases (such as SEER or NCDB), that often lack the necessary level of details on the population studied or the treatments performed, electronic health records can be used to create detailed phenotypic profiles of any patients. In parallel, the Record-and-Verify Systems used in radiation oncology precisely document the planned and performed treatments. Artificial Intelligence and machine learning algorithms can be used to incrementally analyse these data in order to generate hypothesis to better personalize treatments. This review discusses how these methods have already been used in previous studies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Apps for Radiation Oncology. A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Calero, J J; Oton, L F; Oton, C A

    2017-02-01

    Software applications executed on a smart-phone or mobile device ("Apps") are increasingly used by oncologists in their daily work. A comprehensive critical review was conducted on Apps specifically designed for Radiation Oncology, which aims to provide scientific support for these tools and to guide users in choosing the most suited to their needs. A systematic search was conducted in mobile platforms, iOS and Android, returning 157 Apps. Excluding those whose purpose did not match the scope of the study, 31 Apps were methodically analyzed by the following items: Objective Features, List of Functionalities, Consistency in Outcomes and Usability. Apps are presented in groups of features, as Dose Calculators (7 Apps), Clinical Calculators (4), Tools for Staging (7), Multipurpose (7) and Others (6). Each App is presented with the list of attributes and a brief comment. A short summary is provided at the end of each group. There are numerous Apps with useful tools at the disposal of radiation oncologists. The most advisable Apps do not match the more expensive. Three all-in-one apps seem advisable above all: RadOnc Reference (in English), Easy Oncology (in German) and iOncoR (in Spanish). Others recommendations are suggested for specific tasks: dose calculators, treatment-decision and staging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extremely high-frequency therapy in oncology.

    PubMed

    Teppone, Mikhail; Avakyan, Romen

    2010-11-01

    This article represents a review of the literature, mainly from Russian sources, dealing with the therapeutic application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter band applied to experimental and clinical oncology. At the early stage of these studies, efficacy and safety of millimeter electromagnetic radiation (extremely high frequency [EHF]) was proved for various types of malignant tumors. The majority of the further studies demonstrated the high efficacy and safety of millimeter wave radiation in treating patients suffering from both benign and malignant tumors. Developments led to treatment on skin melanoma, cancer of the ear-nose-throat, bowel and breast cancer, cancer of the uterus, lung, and stomach, solid tumors, as well as lymphoma. The main indications for this therapy are (1) preparation prior to radical treatment; (2) prevention and treatment of side-effects and complications from chemotherapy and radiotherapy; (3) prevention of metastases, relapses, and dissemination of the tumor; (4) treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome; and (5) palliative therapy of incurable patients. In spite of the fact that not all mechanisms underlying effects of EHF therapy are known as yet, this therapeutic modality has been shown to have great potential in clinical oncology from studies performed in Eastern Europe and Russia.

  14. Towards standardized robotic surgery in gastrointestinal oncology.

    PubMed

    Knab, Lawrence M; Zureikat, Amer H; Zeh, Herbert J; Hogg, Melissa E

    2017-09-27

    Minimally invasive techniques have revolutionized the field of surgery over the past several decades. Specifically, robotic surgery is increasingly being used for complex operations, although the appreciable learning curve required to become proficient has deterred many surgeons. We describe how use of a proficiency-based training program can decrease the learning curve and lead to standardized robotic surgery. The steps of a proficiency-based robotic training program are described, including (1) a proficiency-based virtual reality simulation curriculum, (2) an inanimate biotissue curriculum, (3) a video library training, (4) intraoperative evaluation, and (5) skill maintenance with ongoing assessment. The learning curve for robotic gastrointestinal surgery is explored, as well as outcomes compared to laparoscopic and open techniques. The implementation of a proficiency-based robotic training program is feasible. Surgical oncology fellows who participated in the program demonstrated improvement in both the simulation and biotissue curricula. Analyzed as a group, the participants improved in time and errors after the biotissue curriculum. Published outcomes from robotic gastrointestinal surgery have demonstrated safety, feasibility, and preserved oncologic resections. A proficiency-based robotic curriculum is ideal to enable surgeons to achieve mastery in robotic surgery while minimizing the learning curve required.

  15. Technological challenges of theranostics in oncology.

    PubMed

    Warenius, Hilmar M

    2009-07-01

    Although the term theranostics has been coined only fairly recently, attempts to relate the level of biomarkers to therapeutic response in the oncology clinic go back several decades. After a long period in which a limited number of individual theranostic molecular biomarkers gained general clinical acceptance, extremely powerful genomic and proteomic technologies have now emerged. These technologies, reviewed here, promise a potential revolution in our ability to predict therapeutic response in cancer, and by so doing, guide new anticancer drugs more successfully into clinical oncology practice. A full understanding of the detailed molecular nature of clinical cancer is, however, still evolving. The need for appropriate models of the highly complex disease, against which we are attempting to direct effective therapy more accurately, is also addressed. These should include an understanding of genomic and proteomic heterogeneity, genetic instability and systems biology models of cancer that take into account recent demonstrations of the vastly increased mutational state of the average clinical cancer as compared with the normal cell(s) from which it arose. The way forward in theranostics is, arguably, less dependent on further improvements in the already powerful genomic and proteomic technologies themselves than on our improved understanding of how we should apply them to the complex reality of the average clinical cancer.

  16. Computer-assisted surgery in orthopedic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gerbers, Jasper G; Stevens, Martin; Ploegmakers, Joris JW; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Jutte, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — In orthopedic oncology, computer-assisted surgery (CAS) can be considered an alternative to fluoroscopy and direct measurement for orientation, planning, and margin control. However, only small case series reporting specific applications have been published. We therefore describe possible applications of CAS and report preliminary results in 130 procedures. Patients and methods — We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all oncological CAS procedures in a single institution from November 2006 to March 2013. Mean follow-up time was 32 months. We categorized and analyzed 130 procedures for clinical parameters. The categories were image-based intralesional treatment, image-based resection, image-based resection and reconstruction, and imageless resection and reconstruction. Results — Application to intralesional treatment showed 1 inadequate curettage and 1 (other) recurrence in 63 cases. Image-based resections in 42 cases showed 40 R0 margins; 16 in 17 pelvic resections. Image-based reconstruction facilitated graft creation with a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.9 mm in one case. Imageless CAS was helpful in resection planning and length- and joint line reconstruction for tumor prostheses. Interpretation — CAS is a promising new development. Preliminary results show a high number of R0 resections and low short-term recurrence rates for curettage. PMID:25140984

  17. A Study of Layered Learning in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Buie, Larry W.; Lyons, Kayley; Rao, Kamakshi; Pinelli, Nicole R.; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Roth, Mary T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore use of pharmacy learners as a means to expand pharmacy services in a layered learning practice model (LLPM), to examine whether an LLPM environment precludes achievement of knowledge-based learning objectives, and to explore learner perception of the experience. Design. An acute care oncology pharmacy practice experience was redesigned to support the LLPM. Specifically, the redesign focused on micro discussion, standardized feedback (eg, rubrics), and cooperative learning to enhance educational gain through performing clinical activities. Assessment. Posttest scores evaluating knowledge-based learning objectives increased in mean percentage compared to pretest values. Learners viewed the newly designed practice experience positively with respect to perceived knowledge attainment, improved clinical time management skills, contributions to patient care, and development of clinical and self-management skills. A fifth theme among students, comfort with learning, was also noted. Conclusion. Layered learning in an oncology practice experience was well-received by pharmacy learners. Data suggest a practice experience in the LLPM environment does not preclude achieving knowledge-based learning objectives and supports further studies of the LLPM. PMID:27293235

  18. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, and to consider possible solutions to these challenges for the design of future clinical trials. Several themes emerged from the discussions, including the: a) opportunities to learn from null-hypothesis trials through tissue and imaging studies; b) value of pre-clinical data supporting the design of combinatorial therapies; c) significance of validated biomarkers; d) necessity of quality assurance in radiotherapy delivery; e) conduct of sufficiently-powered studies to address the central hypothesis; and f) importance of publishing results of the trials regardless of the outcome. The fact that well-designed hypothesis-driven clinical trials produce null or negative results is expected given the limitations of trial design, and complexities of cancer biology. It is important to understand the reasons underlying such null results however, in order to effectively merge the technological innovations with the rapidly evolving biology for maximal patient benefit, through the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24043463

  19. Social Interaction and Collaboration among Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn; McQuestion, Maurene

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration is a complex process influenced by organizational, professional, interpersonal, and personal factors. Research has demonstrated that collaboration may also be influenced by social factors. Nurses spend much of their time working in collaborative teams, yet little is known about how they socially interact in practice. This qualitative case study explored nurse perceptions of social interaction in relation to collaboration. Data were collected using telephone interviews and documentary reviews from fourteen oncology nurses employed at one cancer center in Canada. Thematic analysis revealed two themes: knowing you is trusting you and formal and informal opportunities. Nurses reported that social interaction meant getting to know someone personally as well as professionally. Social interaction was enacted inside of work during breaks/meals and outside of work at planned events. Social interaction was facilitated by having a long-term current and/or previous professional and personal relationship. The barriers to social interaction included a lack of time to get to know each other, workload issues, and poor interpersonal skills. Findings suggest that social interaction is an important factor in the collaborative relationship among oncology nurses. Nurse leaders need to promote social interaction opportunities and facilitate educational sessions to improve social and interpersonal skills.

  20. Safety and efficacy of biosimilars in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Huub; Smolen, Josef S; Dicato, Mario; Rifkin, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    Biosimilars are considered to be one of the solutions to combat the substantially increasing costs of cancer treatment, and its imminent introduction is expected to expand affordability worldwide. However, biosimilar monoclonal antibodies provide many challenges compared with first-generation biosimilars, growth factors, and hormones, because they have shown only a modest clinical effect, and are often used in combination with other more toxic therapies, making it difficult to design studies that allow appropriate efficacy and safety assessments compared with the original products. The value of comparative clinical trials for showing clinical equivalence of biosimilars that demonstrate a high degree of similarity in physical, chemical, structural, and biological characteristics with the original product is increasingly being questioned, and advances in analytical methods that provide robust non-clinical data might reduce the need for extensive clinical comparisons. In this Series paper, the third of three papers on drug safety in oncology, we review the safety and efficacy of biosimilars in oncology, assessing biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in relation to first-generation biosimilars, the issues surrounding interchangeability and extrapolation of biosimilars to other disease and patient indications, and reassessing the safety approval pathway in light of 10 years worth of biosimilar experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  2. [Introduction of emotional labour into oncology].

    PubMed

    Lazányi, Kornélia; Molnár, Péter; Szluha, Kornélia

    2007-06-03

    Health care professionals do not have emotional labour obligations in their employment contract. However, in everyday work it is often inevitable for them to change their true feelings. This is critically true for professionals treating chronic or cancer patients. The suitable emotional state of the treatment staff does not only influence the practitioner-patient relationship but the process of recovery as well. Depending on the way one might get into the appropriate emotional state, the literature distinguishes between surface, deep and genuine acting. While surface and deep emotional labour has numerous negative psychological consequences genuine acting is usually accompanied by positive side effects. For those working in the field of oncology, emotional labour is a part of the role expectations of the professionals. This is how the appropriate attitude is a fundamental part of the professionals' essence. For the in depth analysis of subjects related to emotional labour, the authors adopted ideas from L. Festinger 's cognitive dissonance theory. The best way to alleviate cognitive dissonance and the negative side effects of emotional labour is to prevent the emergence of them. Oncology professionals should fit their role expectations genuinely, without particular efforts. If this was impossible, or the particular life situations did not allow genuine acting, it is the employer's and the workmates' common duty to help professionals, to ease the load of emotional labour, to diminish the occurring cognitive dissonance with the help of appropriate recompense.

  3. Radiation Oncology Physics and Medical Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Medical physics, an applied field of physics, is the applications of physics in medicine. Medical physicists are essential professionals in contemporary healthcare, contributing primarily to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases through numerous inventions, advances, and improvements in medical imaging and cancer treatment. Clinical service, research, and teaching by medical physicists benefits thousands of patients and other individuals every day. This talk will cover three main topics. First, exciting current research and development areas in the medical physics sub-specialty of radiation oncology physics will be described, including advanced oncology imaging for treatment simulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and biologically-optimized radiation treatment. Challenges in patient safety in high-technology radiation treatments will be briefly reviewed. Second, the educational path to becoming a medical physicist will be reviewed, including undergraduate foundations, graduate training, residency, board certification, and career opportunities. Third, I will introduce the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which is the professional society that represents, advocates, and advances the field of medical physics (www.aapm.org).

  4. Oncology and medical education—past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Oncologists should contribute to the undergraduate curriculum whenever they can, and should teach communication skills, acute oncology, prescribing, and other transferable skills. Newly qualified doctors will care for many patients with cancer in their first years of work, and all doctors need to know when an urgent oncology referral is required and to be aware of the pace of change in oncology. Oncologists should involve their patients in teaching whenever it is appropriate. We should aim to inspire junior doctors to consider a career in oncology. The oncology education community should adopt new teaching methods, for example simulation, mock MDTs and student led clinics. CPD provided by honorable organisations, including online learning, is becoming more important for oncologists to keep up to date. PMID:27350792

  5. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  6. Clinical oncology practice 2015: preparing for the future.

    PubMed

    Kosty, Michael P; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Tetzlaff, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice of oncology has become increasingly complex. An explosion of medical knowledge, increased demands on provider time, and involved patients have changed the way many oncologists practice. What was an acceptable practice model in the past may now be relatively inefficient. This review covers three areas that address these changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) National Oncology Census defines who the U.S. oncology community is, and their perceptions of how practice patterns may be changing. The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-ASCO Teams in Cancer Care Project explores how best to employ team science to improve the efficiency and quality of cancer care in the United States. Finally, how physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) might be best integrated into team-based care in oncology and the barriers to integration are reviewed.

  7. Updates from the 2013 Society for Neuro-Oncology annual and World Federation for Neuro-Oncology quadrennial meeting.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Amidei, Christina

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of a number of key clinical studies in infiltrating gliomas presented at the 2013 Society for Neuro-Oncology and World Federation of Neuro-Oncology joint meeting. This review focuses on efficacy results, including quality of life studies, from larger clinical trials in both high- and low-grade infiltrating gliomas.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Strategic Plan for Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Winkfield, Karen M; Flowers, Christopher R; Patel, Jyoti D; Rodriguez, Gladys; Robinson, Patricia; Agarwal, Amit; Pierce, Lori; Brawley, Otis W; Mitchell, Edith P; Head-Smith, Kimberly T; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel F

    2017-08-01

    In December 2016, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors approved the ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce. Developed through a multistakeholder effort led by the ASCO Health Disparities Committee, the purpose of the plan is to guide the formal efforts of ASCO in this area over the next three years (2017 to 2020). There are three primary goals: (1) to establish a longitudinal pathway for increasing workforce diversity, (2) to enhance ASCO leadership diversity, and (3) to integrate a focus on diversity across ASCO programs and policies. Improving quality cancer care in the United States requires the recruitment of oncology professionals from diverse backgrounds. The ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce is designed to enhance existing programs and create new opportunities that will move us closer to the vision of achieving an oncology workforce that reflects the demographics of the US population it serves.

  9. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-07-28

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  10. Augmented reality in laparoscopic surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Stéphane; Soler, Luc; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2011-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery represents one of the main evolutions of surgical techniques aimed at providing a greater benefit to the patient. However, minimally invasive surgery increases the operative difficulty since the depth perception is usually dramatically reduced, the field of view is limited and the sense of touch is transmitted by an instrument. However, these drawbacks can currently be reduced by computer technology guiding the surgical gesture. Indeed, from a patient's medical image (US, CT or MRI), Augmented Reality (AR) can increase the surgeon's intra-operative vision by providing a virtual transparency of the patient. AR is based on two main processes: the 3D visualization of the anatomical or pathological structures appearing in the medical image, and the registration of this visualization on the real patient. 3D visualization can be performed directly from the medical image without the need for a pre-processing step thanks to volume rendering. But better results are obtained with surface rendering after organ and pathology delineations and 3D modelling. Registration can be performed interactively or automatically. Several interactive systems have been developed and applied to humans, demonstrating the benefit of AR in surgical oncology. It also shows the current limited interactivity due to soft organ movements and interaction between surgeon instruments and organs. If the current automatic AR systems show the feasibility of such system, it is still relying on specific and expensive equipment which is not available in clinical routine. Moreover, they are not robust enough due to the high complexity of developing a real-time registration taking organ deformation and human movement into account. However, the latest results of automatic AR systems are extremely encouraging and show that it will become a standard requirement for future computer-assisted surgical oncology. In this article, we will explain the concept of AR and its principles. Then, we

  11. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  12. Oncology data management in the UK--BODMA's view. British Oncology Data Managers Association.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D.; Ward, L.; Young, T.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the original partnership of clinician and statistician for the running of clinical research projects, especially clinical trials, has come to be supplemented by the data manager and trial coordinator. Increasing numbers of such personnel are now being employed, covering a wide diversity of work areas, including clinical research, medical audit and the cancer registries. The British Oncology Data Managers Association (BODMA) was founded in 1987 and is now in a good position to review the current status of data management in the UK. It is proposed that a national network of data managers and trial coordinators within specialist trials centres, oncology departments and district general hospitals, with a good training programme, plus a recognised career structure, is the way to make the best use of this key resource. BODMA is addressing many of these issues and aims to improve and maintain the quality of data management. PMID:8080719

  13. Attitudes of Chinese Oncology Physicians Toward Death with Dignity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ping; Huang, Bo-Yan; Yi, Ting-Wu; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Zong-Yan; Jiang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Death with dignity (DWD) refers to the refusal of life-prolonging measures for terminally ill patients by "living wills" forms in advance. More and more oncology physicians are receiving DWD requests from advance cancer patients in mainland China. The study objective was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese oncology physicians toward the legalization and implementation of DWD. A questionnaire investigating the understanding and attitudes toward DWD was administered to 257 oncology physicians from 11 hospitals in mainland China. The effective response rate was 86.8% (223/257). The majority of oncology physicians (69.1%) had received DWD requests from patients. Half of the participants (52.5%) thought that the most important reason was the patients' unwillingness to maintain survival through machines. One-third of participants (33.0%) attributed the most important reason to suffering from painful symptoms. Most oncology physicians (78.9%) had knowledge about DWD. A fifth of respondents did not know the difference between DWD and euthanasia, and a few even considered DWD as euthanasia. The majority of oncology physicians supported the legalization (88.3%) and implementation (83.9%) of DWD. Many Chinese oncology physicians have received advanced cancer patients' DWD requests and think that DWD should be legalized and implemented. Chinese health management departments should consider the demands of physicians and patients. It is important to inform physicians about the difference between DWD and euthanasia, as one-fifth of them were confused about it.

  14. [Quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Digue, Laurence; Pedeboscq, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    In medical oncology, how can we be sure that the right drug is being administered to the right patient at the right time? The implementation of quality assurance criteria is important in medical oncology, in order to ensure that the patient receives the best treatment safely. There is very little literature about quality assurance in medical oncology, as opposed to radiotherapy or cancer surgery. Quality assurance must cover the entire patient care process, from the diagnosis, to the therapeutic decision and drug distribution, including its selection, its preparation and its delivery to the patient (administration and dosage), and finally the potential side effects and their management. The dose-intensity respect is crucial, and its reduction can negatively affect overall survival rates, as shown in breast and testis cancers for example. In head and neck medical oncology, it is essential to respect the few well-standardized recommendations and the dose-intensity, in a population with numerous comorbidities. We will first review quality assurance criteria for the general medical oncology organization and then focus on head and neck medical oncology. We will then describe administration specificities of head and neck treatments (chemoradiation, radiation plus cetuximab, postoperative chemoradiation, induction and palliative chemotherapy) as well as their follow-up. Lastly, we will offer some recommendations to improve quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology.

  15. Actionable data analytics in oncology: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Barkley, Ronald; Greenapple, Rhonda; Whang, John

    2014-03-01

    To operate under a new value-based paradigm, oncology providers must develop the capability to aggregate, analyze, measure, and report their value proposition--that is, their outcomes and associated costs. How are oncology providers positioned currently to perform these functions in a manner that is actionable? What is the current state of analytic capabilities in oncology? Are oncology providers prepared? This line of inquiry was the basis for the 2013 Cancer Center Business Summit annual industry research survey. This article reports on the key findings and implications of the 2013 research survey with regard to data analytic capabilities in the oncology sector. The essential finding from the study is that only a small number of oncology providers (7%) currently possess the analytic tools and capabilities necessary to satisfy internal and external demands for aggregating and reporting clinical outcome and economic data. However there is an expectation that a majority of oncology providers (60%) will have developed such capabilities within the next 2 years.

  16. Status of oncologic specialties: global survey of physicians treating cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Takefumi; Mackay, Christine B; Chalise, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    In the United States, medical oncologists play a central role in the management of systemic therapy for cancer patients. Medical oncology as a specialty is not as established in Japan and several other European nations according to recent surveys, and little is known about this specialty in developing nations. We aimed to identify global differences in the roles of physicians treating cancer; specifically, how the management of advanced disease differs among nations. In March 2016, a self-administered internet survey was conducted with degreed physicians who prescribed systemic agents for adult cancer treatment within the past 5 years. Physicians were identified from the American Society of Clinical Oncology active member online directory. Among 3907 members in 55 nations, 376 (9.6%) responded to the survey. The 310 respondents who provided an answer to the recognition of medical oncology were dominated by male MDs that have practiced for more than 5 years at academic centers, and ~60% were medical oncologists. A majority of the respondents in all four regions reported that medical oncology was established in their corresponding nations. However, there are several outlying nations where oncologic specialties play a minimal role in the management of systemic therapy. Despite general recognition of medical oncology, the role is not globally established as the primary point of care for delivery of systemic therapy. Nations lacking this specialty should be assisted by the international community to develop medical oncology.

  17. Advancing performance measurement in oncology: quality oncology practice initiative participation and quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Campion, Francis X; Larson, Leanne R; Kadlubek, Pamela J; Earle, Craig C; Neuss, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    The American health care system, including the cancer care system, is under pressure to improve patient outcomes and lower the cost of care. Government payers have articulated an interest in partnering with the private sector to create learning communities to measure quality and improve the value of health care. In 2006, the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) unveiled the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI), which has become a key component of the measurement system to promote quality cancer care. QOPI is a physician-led, voluntary, practice-based, quality-improvement program, using performance measurement and benchmarking among oncology practices across the United States. Since its inception, ASCO's QOPI has grown steadily to include 973 practices as of November 2010. One key area that QOPI has addressed is end-of-life care. During the most recent data collection cycle in the Fall of 2010, those practices completing multiple data collection cycles had better performance on care of pain compared with sites participating for the first time (62.61% v 46.89%). Similarly, repeat QOPI participants demonstrated meaningfully better performance than their peers in the rate of documenting discussions of hospice and palliative care (62.42% v 54.65%) and higher rates of hospice enrollment. QOPI demonstrates how a strong performance measurement program can lead to improved quality and value of care for patients.

  18. Robotic oncologic complexity score - a new tool for predicting complications in computer-enhanced oncologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sgarbura, Olivia; Tomulescu, Victor; Popescu, Irinel

    2016-06-01

    While there is little doubt that robotic interventions have already opened new horizons in surgery due to its inherent complexity, there is still an unmet need for tools allowing center-to-center performance comparisons. A complexity score could be a valuable instrument for further research. The items of the robotic oncologic complexity score (ROCS) were based on risk factors identified in previous studies. We attempt to build the score and validate it on 400 consecutive cases of robotic oncologic surgery. The primary endpoint is to assess the value of ROCS in predicting major complications. The mean ROCS in the group was 3.3(+/-1.4). Different correlations were calculated: the score and the complications (r=0.38), the major complications (r=0.42), Clavien grade (r=0.5), the operating time (r=0.35), and the length of stay (r=0.47). On the ROC-curve a score >4 has the best specificity and sensibility for predicting major complications (P<0.05). ROCS has potential in predicting complications and hospital length of stay, as well as a role in classifying oncologic robotic surgical interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise in Radiation Oncology Plug and Play-The Future of Radiation Oncology?

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Rengan, Ramesh; Curran, Bruce; Swerdloff, Stuart; Miettinen, Mika; Field, Colin; Ranjitkar, Sunita; Palta, Jatinder; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the processes and benefits of the integrating healthcare enterprises in radiation oncology (IHE-RO). Methods: The IHE-RO process includes five basic steps. The first step is to identify common interoperability issues encountered in radiation treatment planning and the delivery process. IHE-RO committees partner with vendors to develop solutions (integration profiles) to interoperability problems. The broad application of these integration profiles across a variety of vender platforms is tested annually at the Connectathon event. Demonstration of the seamless integration and transfer of patient data to the potential users are then presented by vendors at the public demonstration event. Users can then integrate these profiles into requests for proposals and vendor contracts by institutions. Results: Incorporation of completed integration profiles into requests for proposals can be done when purchasing new equipment. Vendors can publish IHE integration statements to document the integration profiles supported by their products. As a result, users can reference integration profiles in requests for proposals, simplifying the systems acquisition process. These IHE-RO solutions are now available in many of the commercial radiation oncology-related treatment planning, delivery, and information systems. They are also implemented at cancer care sites around the world. Conclusions: IHE-RO serves an important purpose for the radiation oncology community at large.

  20. Targeted mesoporous silica nanocarriers in oncology.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Alejandro; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2016-06-02

    Cancer is one of the major leading causes of death worldwide and its prevalence will be higher in the coming years due to the progressive aging of the population. The development of nanocarriers in oncology has provided a new hope in the fight against this terrible disease. Among the different types of nanoparticles which have been described, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) constitute a very promising material due to their inherent properties as high loading capacity of many different drugs, excellent biocompatibility and easiness functionalization. This review presents the current state of the art related with the development of mesoporous silica nanocarriers for antitumoral therapy paying special attention on targeted MSN able to selectively destroy tumoral cells reducing the side damage in healthy ones, and the basic principles of targeting tumoral tissues and cells.

  1. Music therapy in adult oncology: research issues.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the effects of music and music therapy with adult oncology patients, summarizes major findings, discusses the difficulties inherent in research methodologies, and explores directions for future research. Although there is more qualitative than quantitative research, empiric investigations have found that music techniques are effective in managing pain and other physical symptoms, psychological distress, and mood. Health-related outcomes and quality of life have also been improved. Recommendations for future research include collaborative projects that (1) test established music therapy clinical protocols; (2) control for the presence of a music therapist; (3) identify the characteristics of patients who will potentially benefit most; (4) examine physiologic, psychological, behavioral, neurologic, immunologic, and spiritual outcomes; and (5) detect and control extraneous variability.

  2. Side effects of chemotherapy in musculoskeletal oncology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Romantini, Matteo; Angelini, Andrea; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in medical and orthopedic oncology, radiation therapy and single- or multiple-agent perioperative chemotherapy are currently applied as an essential part of the multidisciplinary treatment to improve disease-free and overall survival of patients with primary and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumors. However, these treatments have led to unwanted complications. A better understanding of the effects of various antineoplastic agents on bone, soft tissue, and organs may provide the basis for the more efficacious use of antiproliferative drugs when fracture healing or allograft incorporation is required. This knowledge may also provide a rationale for concurrent treatment with drugs that protect against or compensate for adverse effects in osseous repair resulting from chemotherapy.

  3. Intervention patterns of pivot nurses in oncology.

    PubMed

    Skrutkowski, Myriam; Saucier, Andréanne; Ritchie, Judith A; Tran, Ngoc; Smith, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Pivot Nurse in Oncology (PNO) is a health care professional dedicated to providing patients with cancer and their families with continuing and consistent supportive care throughout the care trajectory. The purpose of this paper is to describe the variation and frequency of nursing interventions delivered by 12 PNOs at our health centre. An administrative analysis over a three-year period revealed a total of 43,906 interventions that were grouped into 10 categories. This analysis provided a description of the intervention frequency and these interventions were further collapsed into the four role functions of the PNO. Coordination/continuity of care and the assessment of needs and symptoms were identified as the dominant practice domains of the PNO in the professional cancer navigator role.

  4. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  5. [Adaptogens as agents for prophylactic oncology].

    PubMed

    Bocharova, O A

    1999-01-01

    The paper considers whether it is advisable to use the new acting preparations adaptogens, including phytoadaptogens, in oncological care for prevention of cancer. The adaptogens are shown to have a regulating action, to be able to activate the protective properties of the body, to protect it from extreme exposures and to stimulate regenerative processes. The author associates the antitumor effect of adaptogens with the immunomodulating (they can activate macrophages, natural killer cells, antigen-dependent T lymphocytes) and interferonogenic actions and with the their ability to suppress experimental tumor growth, to enhance tissue differentiation, to improve intercellular adhesion, to reduce the likelihood of metastasis spreading. Furthermore, the use of adaptogens, and phytoadaptogens in particular, decreases the toxic effects of chemotherapy and improves drug tolerance.

  6. Preclinical imaging in oncology: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Iommelli, Francesca; DE Rosa, Viviana; Terlizzi, Cristina; Del Vecchio, Silvana

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical imaging with radiolabeled probes became an integral part of the complex translational process that moves a newly developed compound from laboratory to clinical application. Imaging studies in animal tumor models may be undertaken to test a newly synthesized tracer, a newly developed drug or to interrogate, in the living organism, specific molecular and biological processes underlying tumor growth and progression. The aim of the present review is to outline the current knowledge and future perspectives of preclinical imaging in oncology by providing examples from recent literature. Among the biological processes and molecular targets that can be visualized with radiolabeled probes in animal tumor models, we focused on proliferation, expression of targets suitable for therapy, glycolytic phenotype, metastatic dissemination, tumor angiogenesis and survival. The major contribution of preclinical imaging emerging from these studies is the development and validation of imaging biomarkers that can be translated into the clinical context for patient selection and evaluation of tumor response to molecularly targeted agents.

  7. Microfluidics for research and applications in oncology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Jing, Tengyang; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-21

    Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology.

  8. [PET/CT tomography. Usefulness in oncology].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villaseñor, David; Gerson-Cwilich, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    In order to have optimum results in oncological patients, precise evaluation, diagnosis and staging of the patient is necessary. Positron emission tomography (PET) yields a high negative predictive value through exploration of the entire body. It diagnoses the benign or malignant state of a neoplasm that has been detected by other imaging methods and establishes an extensive diagnosis previous to therapeutic treatment of a known cancer. It identifies residual tumor and changes produced after surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy and locates suspicious residual tumor clinically or by elevation of the tumor markers. It allows for a new extension study or re-staging after diagnosis of recurrence and permits early evaluation of response to a therapeutic regime and permits the search for a primary tumor in patients with metastasis of unknown origin. PET leads to a molecular functional imaging of cancer in the entire body.

  9. Improving the outcomes in oncological colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Jeroen LA; Reisinger, Kostan W; Derikx, Joep PM; Boerma, Djamila; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    During the last several decades, colorectal cancer surgery has experienced some major perioperative improvements. Preoperative risk-assessment of nutrition, frailty, and sarcopenia followed by interventions for patient optimization or an adapted surgical strategy, contributed to improved postoperative outcomes. Enhanced recovery programs or fast-track surgery also resulted in reduced length of hospital stay and overall complications without affecting patient safety. After an initially indecisive start due to uncertainty about oncological safety, the most significant improvement in intraoperative care was the introduction of laparoscopy. Laparoscopic surgery for colon and rectal cancer is associated with better short-term outcomes, whereas long-term outcomes regarding survival and recurrence rates are comparable. Nevertheless, long-term results in rectal surgery remain to be seen. Early recognition of anastomotic leakage remains a challenge, though multiple improvements have allowed better management of this complication. PMID:25253944

  10. Advances and trends in dermato-oncology.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Gogas, Helen; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2010-11-01

    The 6th Congress of the European Association of Dermato-Oncology, held in Athens, Greece (16-19 June 2010), focused on the most recent advances in the field of melanoma, epithelial skin cancers and other malignant skin tumors. Under the theme 'transforming care through personalized medicine', the scientific program reviewed and discussed the significant changes that are currently taking place in many aspects of skin cancer care, from risk prediction and prevention to the use of targeted treatments. This article highlights the key messages from selected presentations that feature the remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of skin malignancies and the rapid 'translation' of this knowledge into new effective treatments in clinical practice.

  11. Clinical oncology in Malaysia: 1914 to present

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    A narration of the development of staff, infrastructure and buildings in the various parts of the country is given in this paper. The role of universities and other institutions of learning, public health, palliative care, nuclear medicine and cancer registries is described together with the networking that has been developed between the government, non-governmental organisations and private hospitals. The training of skilled manpower and the commencement of the Master of Clinical Oncology in the University of Malaya is highlighted. Efforts taken to improve the various aspects of cancer control which includes prevention of cancer, early detection, treatment and palliative care are covered. It is vital to ensure that cancer care services must be accessible and affordable throughout the entire health system, from the primary care level up to the centres for tertiary care, throughout the whole country. PMID:21614216

  12. It takes chutzpah: oncology nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Green, E

    1999-01-01

    Chutzpah, according to the Oxford Dictionary of Current English (1996) is a slang term from the Yiddish language which means shameless audacity. Chutzpah has been used to identify people with courage who take on situations that others avoid and somehow achieve the impossible. Tim Porter-O'Grady (1997) recently wrote that management is dead, and has been replaced by process leadership. Health care organizations have made shifts from hierarchical structures to process or program models where people have dual/multiple reporting/communication relationship. In this new orientation, management functions of controlling, directing, organizing and disciplining are replaced by process leadership functions of coordinating, facilitating, linking and sustaining (Porter O'Grady, 1997). Herein lies the challenge for oncology nurse leaders: "what lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us" (Ralph Waldo Emerson). Leadership is not a function of job title. The evidence for this is clear in current practice.... There are no/few positions of nurse leaders. Titles have changed to eliminate the professional discipline, and reflect a non-descript orientation. The new titles are process leaders, program leaders, professional practice leaders. Nurse leaders need new points of reference to take in the challenges of influencing, facilitating and linking. Those points of reference are: principle-centered leadership, integrity and chutzpah. This presentation will focus on examining current thinking, defining key characteristics and attributes, and using scenarios to illustrate the impact of leadership. We, as leaders in oncology nursing, must use chutzpah to make positive change and long-term gains for patient care and the profession of nursing.

  13. Pediatric hematology and oncology in Iran.

    PubMed

    Alebouyeh, Mardawig

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric hematology and oncology (PHO) is a rapidly expandingfield. It has been our goal to meet the needs and increasing demands for comprehensive medical care of children suffering from chronic blood diseases and malignancies. In the past decade we have been able expand and optimize the PHO services throughout Iran, in general and in respect to their prevalence and clinical importance, by trained pediatric hematologist-oncologists, pediatric surgeons and improved para clinical facilities. Major beta-thalassemics receive blood transfusion and chelation therapy according to the current standards mostly at regional blood banks centers. To curb major beta-thalassemia a premarital screening program has been enacted and abortion has been legitimized if major thalassemia is diagnosed by CVS. Hemophiliacs are supervised and treated as indicated by Iranian Hemophilia Comprehensive Care Centers (IHCCC). Screening for transfusion related complications and transmitted viral diseases (HBV, HCV and HIV) in both cohorts are carried out in regular intervals and necessary management will be then carried out as indicated at respective specialized units. Childhood malignancies are treated according to protocols adopted from accredited institutions in the USA and Europe, with almost comparable results. BMT is available for selected patients with beta-thalassemia or malignancies. By going to public we have been able to rise general awareness about chronic blood diseases and childhood malignancies and have initiated establishment of parents groups and formation of NGOs to support these children and their families. Foundation of Iranian Society of Pediatric Hamatology and Oncology (ISPHO) in the year 2000 has been another step forward to consolidate and coordinate the available manpower and facilities. By evaluation of the country's main problems and shortcomings and conduction of collaborative studies and operation planning one will succeed to get the expected feedback and

  14. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  15. Essential Genetic and Genomic Nursing Competencies for the Oncology Nurse

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To review the opportunities and possibilities for advancing oncology nursing competencies in genetic/genomics through the illustration of case scenarios in clinical care. Data Sources Literature; research reports. Conclusions Oncology nurses have the potential to influence whether or not cutting edge research discoveries are utilized at the bedside. Clinical integration of genetic/genomic information has the potential to optimize health outcomes and lengthen patient lives. Implications for Nursing Practice Oncology nurses need to include genetics/genomics in their practice in order to impact quality patient care today and for the future. PMID:21255714

  16. How to Develop a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Park, Jae Yoon; Lerman, Amir; Mulvagh, Sharon; Lin, Grace; Pereira, Naveen; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Villarraga, Hector R; Herrmann, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular demands to the care of cancer patients are common and important given the implications for morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, interactions with cardiovascular disease specialists have intensified to the point of the development of a new discipline termed cardio-oncology. As an additional consequence, so-called cardio-oncology clinics have emerged, in most cases staffed by cardiologists with an interest in the field. This article addresses this gap and summarizes key points in the development of a cardio-oncology clinic.

  17. Exploring Oncology Nurses’ Grief: A Self-study

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Oncology nursing, like many other nursing fields, often provides nurses with the opportunity to get to know their patients and their families well. This familiarity allows oncology nurses to show a level of compassion and empathy that is often helpful to the patient and their family during their struggle with cancer. However, this familiarity can also lead to a profound sense of grief if the patient loses that struggle. This self-study provided me the opportunity to systematically explore my own experience with grief as an oncology nurse, helping me to identify specific stressors and also sources of stress release. PMID:27981166

  18. Requirements for radiation oncology physics in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Oliver, L; Fitchew, R; Drew, J

    2001-03-01

    This Position Paper reviews the role, standards of practice, education, training and staffing requirements for radiation oncology physics. The role and standard of practice for an expert in radiation oncology physics, as defined by the ACPSEM, are consistent with the IAEA recommendations. International standards of safe practice recommend that this physics expert be authorised by a Regulatory Authority (in consultation with the professional organization). In order to accommodate the international and AHTAC recommendations or any requirements that may be set by a Regulatory Authority, the ACPSEM has defined the criteria for a physicist-in-training, a base level physicist, an advanced level physicist and an expert radiation oncology physicist. The ACPSEM shall compile separate registers for these different radiation oncology physicist categories. What constitutes a satisfactory means of establishing the number of physicists and support physics staff that is required in radiation oncology continues to be debated. The new ACPSEM workforce formula (Formula 2000) yields similar numbers to other international professional body recommendations. The ACPSEM recommends that Australian and New Zealand radiation oncology centres should aim to employ 223 and 46 radiation oncology physics staff respectively. At least 75% of this workforce should be physicists (168 in Australia and 35 in New Zealand). An additional 41 registrar physicist positions (34 in Australia and 7 in New Zealand) should be specifically created for training purposes. These registrar positions cater for the present physicist shortfall, the future expansion of radiation oncology and the expected attrition of radiation oncology physicists in the workforce. Registrar physicists shall undertake suitable tertiary education in medical physics with an organised in-house training program. The rapid advances in the theory and methodology of the new technologies for radiation oncology also require a stringent approach

  19. Industry Funding Among Leadership in Medical Oncology and Radiation Oncology in 2015.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Stella K; Ahmed, Awad A; Ileto, Jan; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Deville, Curtiland; Holliday, Emma B; Wilson, Lynn D; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R

    2017-10-01

    To quantify and determine the relationship between oncology departmental/division heads and private industry vis-à-vis potential financial conflict of interests (FCOIs) as publicly reported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments database. We extracted the names of the chairs/chiefs in medical oncology (MO) and chairs of radiation oncology (RO) for 81 different institutions with both RO and MO training programs as reported by the Association of American Medical Colleges. For each leader, the amount of consulting fees and research payments received in 2015 was determined. Logistic modeling was used to assess associations between the 2 endpoints of receiving a consulting fee and receiving a research payment with various institution-specific and practitioner-specific variables included as covariates: specialty, sex, National Cancer Institute designation, PhD status, and geographic region. The majority of leaders in MO were reported to have received consulting fees or research payments (69.5%) compared with a minority of RO chairs (27.2%). Among those receiving payments, the average (range) consulting fee was $13,413 ($200-$70,423) for MO leaders and $6463 ($837-$16,205) for RO chairs; the average research payment for MO leaders receiving payments was $240,446 ($156-$1,234,762) and $295,089 ($160-$1,219,564) for RO chairs. On multivariable regression when the endpoint was receipt of a research payment, those receiving a consulting fee (odds ratio [OR]: 5.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.22-13.65) and MO leaders (OR: 5.54; 95% CI: 2.62-12.18) were more likely to receive research payments. Examination of the receipt of consulting fees as the endpoint showed that those receiving a research payment (OR: 5.41; 95% CI: 2.23-13.99) and MO leaders (OR: 3.06; 95% CI: 1.21-8.13) were more likely to receive a consulting fee. Leaders in academic oncology receive consulting or research payments from industry. Relationships between oncology leaders and

  20. Inconsistent labeling of food effect for oral agents across therapeutic areas: differences between oncology and non-oncology products

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonmo Peter; Ratain, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several recent oral oncology drug labels were labeled to be administered in fasted states despite the fact that food increases their bioavailability. Since this was inconsistent with principles of oral drug delivery, we hypothesized that there were inconsistencies across therapeutic areas. Experimental Design Oral agents approved by US FDA from January 2000 to May 2009 were included in our study. Comparison of the food labeling patterns between oncology and non-oncology drugs was made using Fisher's exact test. Results Of 99 drugs evaluated, 34 showed significant food effects on bioavailability. When food markedly enhanced bioavailability, 8 out of 9 non-oncology drugs were labeled “fed” to take advantage of the food-drug interaction while all oncology drugs (n=3) were labeled to be administered in “fasted” states (Fisher's exact; p= 0.01). Conclusions Drug labeling pattern with respect to food-drug interactions observed with oncology drugs is in contradiction to fundamental pharmacological principles, as exemplified in the labeling of non-oncology drugs. PMID:20736327

  1. Clinical Trials in the Era of Personalized Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Schilsky, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid pace of discoveries in tumor biology, imaging technology, and human genetics hold promise for an era of personalized oncology care. The successful development of a handful of new targeted agents has generated much hope and hype about the delivery of safer and more effective new treatments for cancer. The design and conduct of clinical trials has not yet adjusted to a new era of personalized oncology and so we are more in transition to that era than in it. With the development of treatments for breast cancer as a model, we review the approaches to clinical trials and development of novel therapeutics in the prior era of population oncology, the current transitional era, and the future era of personalized oncology. PMID:22034206

  2. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2014-12-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents-molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs-provide opportunities both to improve health-care access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns.

  3. Compassion Fatigue: Exploring Early-Career Oncology Nurses' Experiences
.

    PubMed

    Finley, Brooke A; Sheppard, Kate G

    2017-06-01

    Oncology nurses have a higher risk and rate of compassion fatigue (CF) compared to professionals in other specialties. CF exhibits tangible negative outcomes, affecting nurses' health and professional practice.
. Early-career oncology nurses' unique CF experiences lack thorough scientific exploration. This secondary analysis seeks to qualitatively augment this paucity and illuminate targeted interventions.
. Open-ended interviews were conducted with five early-career inpatient oncology nurses. Subsequent transcripts were explored for CF themes secondarily using thematic analysis.
. Themes indicate that early-career oncology nurses enjoy connecting with patients and families, but over-relating, long patient stays, and high patient mortality rates trigger CF. Symptoms include internalizing patients' and families' pains and fears, being haunted by specific patient deaths, feeling emotionally depleted, assuming that all patients will die, and experiencing burnout, physical exhaustion, and hypervigilance protecting loved ones.

  4. Targeting communication interventions to decrease oncology family caregiver burden

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Rankin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this paper was to articulate and describe family communication patterns that give shape to four types of family caregivers: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Loner. Data Sources Case studies of oncology family caregivers and hospice patients were selected from data collected as part of a larger, randomized controlled trial aimed at assessing family participation in interdisciplinary team meetings. Conclusion Each caregiver type demonstrates essential communication traits with nurses and team members; an ability to recognize these caregiver types will facilitate targeted interventions to decrease family oncology caregiver burden. Implications for Nursing Practice By becoming familiar with caregiver types, oncology nurses will be better able to address family oncology caregiver burden and the conflicts arising from family communication challenges. With an understanding of family communication patterns and its impact on caregiver burden, nurses can aid patient, family, and team to best optimize all quality of life domains for patient as well as the lead family caregiver. PMID:23107184

  5. Oncology clinical trials nursing: developing competencies for the novice.

    PubMed

    Lubejko, Barbara; Good, Marjorie; Weiss, Patricia; Schmieder, Linda; Leos, David; Daugherty, Penny

    2011-12-01

    Oncology clinical trials are important in the improvement of outcomes for people with or at risk for cancer. Because of the complexity of oncology clinical trials and the needs of patients with cancer, nurses play a crucial and unique role in the trial setting. However, great variability exists in how the role of the nurse on a research team is defined and implemented. An Oncology Nursing Society project team set out to identify the core competencies required of a novice oncology clinical trials nurse (CTN) across diverse settings. This article describes the process used to develop core competencies for the novice CTN, presents the final core competencies, and offers examples of how those competencies might be used in practice.

  6. Ethics in Oncology: An Annotated Bibliography of Important Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Laura L.; Helft, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this annotated bibliography about important articles in the field of ethics and oncology is to provide the practicing hematologist/oncologist with a brief overview of some of the important literature in this crucial area. PMID:23942932

  7. Oncology Nursing and Shared Decision Making for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Mehmeti, Enisa; Spawn, Nadia; McCarter, Sarah P; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Garcia, Ima; Hartle, Lisa; Szubski, Katharine

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the contemporary role of the oncology nurse throughout the entire cancer shared decision-making (SDM) process. Study participants consisted of 30 nurses and nurse practitioners who are actively involved in direct care of patients with cancer in the inpatient or outpatient setting. The major themes that emerged from the content analysis are: oncology nurses have various roles at different time points and settings of cancer SDM processes; patient education, advocacy, and treatment side effects management are among the top nursing roles; oncology nurses value their participation in the cancer SDM process; oncology nurses believe they have a voice, but with various degrees of influence in actual treatment decisions; nurses' level of disease knowledge influences the degree of participation in cancer SDM; and the nursing role during cancer SDM can be complicated and requires flexibility.
.

  8. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents—molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs—provide opportunities both to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns. PMID:25456378

  9. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecologic oncology in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Auranen, Annika; Salvarsdottir, Anna; Høgdall, Claus

    2011-08-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries, we developed an online questionnaire in co-operation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian gynecological centers in charge of surgical treatment of cancer patients. Twenty (91%) centers participated. Four centers reported to be accredited European subspecialty training centers, a further six were interested in being accredited, and 11 centers were accredited by the respective National Board. Fourteen (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecologic oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange of fellows between Nordic countries. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. The white book of radiation oncology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Herruzo, Ismael; Romero, Jesús; Palacios, Amalia; Mañas, Ana; Samper, Pilar; Bayo, Eloísa; Guedea, Ferran

    2011-06-01

    The White Book of Radiation Oncology provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of the speciality of radiation oncology in Spain and is intended to be used as a reference for physicians, health care administrators and hospital managers. The present paper summarises the most relevant aspects of the book's 13 chapters in order to bring the message to a wider audience. Among the topics discussed are the epidemiology of cancer in Spain, the role of the radiation oncologist in cancer care, human and material resource needs, new technologies, training of specialists, clinical and cost management, clinical practice, quality control, radiological protection, ethics, relevant legislation, research & development, the history of radiation oncology in Spain and the origins of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR).

  11. WE-H-BRB-00: Big Data in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Big Data in Radiation Oncology: (1) Overview of the NIH 2015 Big Data Workshop, (2) Where do we stand in the applications of big data in radiation oncology?, and (3) Learning Health Systems for Radiation Oncology: Needs and Challenges for Future Success The overriding goal of this trio panel of presentations is to improve awareness of the wide ranging opportunities for big data impact on patient quality care and enhancing potential for research and collaboration opportunities with NIH and a host of new big data initiatives. This presentation will also summarize the Big Data workshop that was held at the NIH Campus on August 13-14, 2015 and sponsored by AAPM, ASTRO, and NIH. The workshop included discussion of current Big Data cancer registry initiatives, safety and incident reporting systems, and other strategies that will have the greatest impact on radiation oncology research, quality assurance, safety, and outcomes analysis.

  12. NEURO-ONCOLOGIC PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR THE OLDER PERSON

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Willie; Luhmann, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the course of diagnoses, patients with neuro-oncological malignancies present challenges to the physical therapist. At times, the presentation of impairments and disabilities of these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses do not necessarily coincide with the involved area of the brain or spinal cord. It is our intention to provide guidance to the physical therapist who will be working with these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses, in hopes that their encounters will be more productive and meaningful. This article describes a brief overview of common central nervous system malignancies, its medical treatment, as well as possible complications and side effects that would need to be considered in rehabilitating these patients. Special consideration is given to the elderly patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses. Pertinent physical therapy assessments and interventions are discussed. PMID:22049262

  13. International cancer care: what is the role of oncology nursing?

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2010-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care continues to improve in the United States, but many developing countries carry a high cancer burden. With limited resources, nurses in such countries often are unable to improve cancer detection and treatment or relieve patient suffering. The Oncology Nursing Society has developed collaborative relationships with many international organizations to educate nurses around the world. Global partnerships have the potential to improve cancer care internationally and encourage more oncology nurses to use their expertise and become "citizens of the world."

  14. [Medical oncology: is it a new medical speciality in Africa?

    PubMed

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra; Seddik, Youssef; Afqir, Said

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem in Africa. Advances in the treatment of cancers over the last decade are undeniable. Multidisciplinary approach is essential for improved patient's management. Medical oncology is a recently-recognized speciality in Africa Indeed, many African countries do not have doctors or a sufficient number of doctors qualified to practice in this medical specialty. The fight against cancer in Africa involves oncology speciality training and the development of curricula in order to ensure optimum patient management.

  15. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- resident electives | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Resident Electives Select pediatric residents may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The resident is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Residents attend daily in-patient and out-patient rounds, multiple weekly Branch conferences, and are expected to research relevant topics and present a 30-minute talk toward the end of their rotation.

  16. Oncologic Outcomes After Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, J. Scott; Smith, Richard V.; Moore, Eric; Lawson, Georges; Remacle, Marc; Ganly, Ian; Kraus, Dennis H.; Teng, Marita S.; Miles, Brett A.; White, Hilliary; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.; Mehta, Vikas; Kiyosaki, Krista; Damrose, Edward J.; Wang, Steven J.; Kupferman, Michael E.; Koh, Yoon Woo; Genden, Eric M.; Holsinger, F. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Large patient cohorts are necessary to validate the efficacy of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the management of head and neck cancer. OBJECTIVES To review oncologic outcomes of TORS from a large multi-institutional collaboration and to identify predictors of disease recurrence and disease-specific mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective review of records from 410 patients undergoing TORS for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2012, was performed. Pertinent data were obtained from 11 participating medical institutions. INTERVENTIONS Select patients received radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy before or after TORS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Locoregional control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were calculated. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank testing to evaluate individual variable association with these outcomes, followed by multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling to identify independent predictors. RESULTS Of the 410 patients treated with TORS in this study, 364 (88.8%) had oropharyngeal cancer. Of these 364 patients, information about post-operative adjuvant therapy was known about 338: 106 (31.3) received radiation therapy alone, and 72 (21.3%) received radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Neck dissection was performed in 323 patients (78.8%). Mean follow-up time was 20 months. Local, regional, and distant recurrence occurred in 18 (4.4%), 15 (3.7%), and 10 (2.4%) of 410 patients, respectively. Seventeen (4.1%) died of disease, and 13 (3.2%) died of other causes. The 2-year locoregional control rate was 91.8% (95% CI, 87.6%-94.7%), disease-specific survival 94.5% (95% CI, 90.6%-96.8%), and overall survival 91% (95% CI, 86.5%-94.0%). Multivariate analysis identified improved survival among women (P = .05) and for patients with tumors arising in tonsil (P = .01). Smoking was associated with worse overall

  17. Selenium in oncology: from chemistry to clinics.

    PubMed

    Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Muecke, Ralph

    2009-10-12

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with selenium does not

  18. Job satisfaction in an oncology nursing team.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagnára Ribeiro da; Velasque, Luciane de Souza; Tonini, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    to identify the level of attributed, perceived and real job satisfaction of oncology nursing professionals and analyze the relationships between the levels of satisfaction among these workers. a descriptive, quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted using the Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS) to evaluate the nursing team, nurses and technicians/auxiliaries. A total of 348 workers answered the questionnaire, of which 216 were fully completed and considered for the IWS calculation. Autonomy was considered the most important item in attributed satisfaction for the nursing team and nurses. Salary was valorized most by the technicians/auxiliaries. For perceived satisfaction, Professional Status was the most important for all workers. Regarding real satisfaction, Interaction was the most important for the nursing team and technicians/auxiliaries; while the nurses valorized Autonomy. The nurses presented the greatest job satisfaction. a discrepancy was observed in job satisfaction among the oncology nurses, indicating the importance of further quantitative research. identificar o nível de satisfação profissional atribuído, percebido e o real no trabalho de profissionais de enfermagem oncológica e analisar as relações entre os níveis de satisfação desses trabalhadores. estudo quantitativo, descritivo, transversal que utilizou o Índice de Satisfação Profissional (ISP) para avaliar a equipe de enfermagem, enfermeiros e técnicos/auxiliares. Dentre os profissionais, 348 destes responderam o questionário, dos quais 216 foram totalmente preenchidos e considerados para o cálculo do ISP. Autonomia foi mais importante na satisfação atribuída para a equipe de enfermagem e enfermeiros, Remuneração foi mais valorizada pelos técnicos/auxiliares. Para a satisfação percebida, Status profissional foi mais importante para todos os profissionais. Sobre a real satisfação, Interação foi o mais importante para a equipe de enfermagem e técnicos/auxiliares; os

  19. Ethics in oncology: consulting for the investment industry.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Jordan; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Tannock, Ian F

    2007-02-01

    As Ethics Committee Chair, I am pleased to introduce the first in an ongoing series of ethics vignettes. These columns, which are based on true-to-life situations that arise in oncology research and practice, are intended to identify and explore important ethical issues and provide commentary that is specific to oncology. Please look for them periodically in both the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Journal of Oncology Practice. The idea for publishing vignettes evolved through the joint efforts of the Ethics Committee and the Board of Directors. Rather than adopt a single set of ethical principles that applies vaguely to any situation and well to none, the Committee and the Board preferred to tackle ethical dilemmas individually, specifically, and directly. Because the Ethics Committee thought the ethical and legal implications of physician interactions with the investment industry were so important and timely, it chose to address this topic in both a position article, which was previously published in the January 20, 2007, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology (J Clin Oncol 25:338-340, 2007) and in its first vignette column. The Ethics Committee hopes this column will be the first of several that ASCO members will find helpful as they grapple with the many ethical issues that arise in daily practice in the field of oncology. Because these columns are intended to address the concerns of ASCO members, the Committee welcomes suggestions for future topics at vignettes@asco.org. Martin D. Abeloff, MD, Chair, Ethics Committee.

  20. NIH funding in Radiation Oncology – A snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Currently, pay lines for NIH grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like Radiation Oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, this data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH s database because it does not discriminate between Radiology and Radiation Oncology Departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013, we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from Radiation Oncology Departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in Radiation Oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to PIs at the Full Professor level and 122 PIs held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants the research topic fell into the field of Biology, in 13 % into the field of Medical Physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggests that the field of Radiation Oncology is underfunded by the NIH, and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of Radiation Oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force. PMID:23523324

  1. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  2. National Institutes of Health funding in radiation oncology: a snapshot.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Currently, pay lines for National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition, knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like radiation oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, these data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH's database because it does not discriminate between radiology and radiation oncology departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013 we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from radiation oncology departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in radiation oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to principal investigators at the full professor level, and 122 principal investigators held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants, the research topic fell into the field of biology, 13% in the field of medical physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggest that the field of radiation oncology is underfunded by the NIH and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of radiation oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force.

  3. Quantity, Design, and Scope of the Palliative Oncology Literature

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Henrique A.; Damani, Shamsha; Fulton, Stephanie; Liu, Jun; Evans, Avery; De La Cruz, Maxine; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The current state of the palliative oncology literature is unclear. We examined and compared the quantity, research design, and research topics of palliative oncology publications in the first 6 months of 2004 with the first 6 months of 2009. We systematically searched MEDLINE, PsychInfo, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and CINAHL for original studies, review articles, and systematic reviews related to “palliative care” and “cancer” during the first 6 months of 2004 and 2009. Two physicians reviewed the literature independently and coded the study characteristics with high inter-rater reliability. We found a consistent decrease in the proportion of oncology studies related to palliative care between 2004 and 2009, despite an absolute increase in the total number of palliative oncology studies. Combining the two time periods, the most common original study designs were case report/series, cross-sectional studies, and qualitative studies. Randomized controlled trials comprised 6% of all original studies. The most common topics were physical symptoms, health services research, and psychosocial issues. Communication, decision making, spirituality, education, and research methodologies all represented <5% of the literature. Comparing 2004 with 2009, we found an increase in the proportion of original studies among all palliative oncology publications but no significant difference in study design or research topic. We identified significant deficiencies in the quantity, design, and scope of the palliative oncology literature. Further effort and resources are necessary to improve the evidence base for this important field. PMID:21471275

  4. The integration of BRCA testing into oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Percival, Natalie; George, Angela; Gyertson, Jennifer; Hamill, Monica; Fernandes, Andreia; Davies, Emily; Rahman, Nazneen; Banerjee, Susana

    2016-06-23

    The PARP inhibitor, Olaparib, is approved for women with BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Therefore there is an urgent need to test patients and obtain results in time to influence treatment. Models of BRCA testing, such as the mainstreaming oncogenetic pathway, involving oncology health professionals are being used. The authors report on the establishment of the extended role of the clinical nurse specialist in consenting women for BRCA testing in routine gynaecology-oncology clinics using the mainstreaming model. Nurses undertook generic consent training and specific counselling training for BRCA testing in the form of a series of online videos, written materials and checklists before obtaining approval to consent patients for germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Between July 2013 and December 2015, 108 women with ovarian cancer were counselled and consented by nurses in the medical oncology clinics at a single centre (The Royal Marsden, UK). This represented 36% of all ovarian cancer patients offered BRCA testing in the oncology clinics at the centre. Feedback from patients and nurses was encouraging with no significant issues raised in the counselling and consenting process. The mainstreaming model allows for greater access to BRCA testing for ovarian cancer patients, many of whom may benefit from personalised therapy (PARP inhibitors). This is the first report of oncology nurses in the BRCA testing pathway. Specialist oncology nurses trained in BRCA testing have an important role within a multidisciplinary team counselling and consenting patients to undergo BRCA testing.

  5. Creating opportunities to support oncology nursing practice: surviving and thriving.

    PubMed

    Rashleigh, Laura; Cordon, Charissa; Wong, Jiahui

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support that specialization in nursing leads to improved outcomes for patients, including increased QOL, improved symptom management, and fewer hospital admissions. Oncology nurses face several challenges in pursuing specialization, due to individual and system issues such as limited time and resources. To address these challenges, de Souza Institute launched a province-wide study group for nurses in Ontario who planned to write the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Oncology Certification Exam. The study group was led by educators from de Souza and Princess Margaret Hospital and drew expertise from nursing leaders across Ontario who shared the same vision of oncology nursing excellence. The study group was innovative by embracing telemedicine and web-based technology, which enabled flexibility for nurses' work schedules, learning styles, physical location and practice experience. The study group utilized several theoretical perspectives and frameworks to guide the curriculum: Adult Learning Theories, Cooperative Learning, Generational Learning Styles, CANO standards for practice and the CNA exam competencies. This approach enabled 107 oncology nurses across the province in 17 different sites to connect, as a group, study interactively and fully engage in their learning. A detailed evaluation method was utilized to assess baseline knowledge, learning needs, cooperative group process, exam success rates, and document unexpected outcomes. Ninety-four per cent of participants passed the CNA Oncology Exam. Lessons learned and future implications are discussed. The commitment remains to enable thriving through generating new possibilities, building communities of practice, mentoring nurses and fostering excellence in oncology practice.

  6. National Institutes of Health Funding in Radiation Oncology: A Snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Currently, pay lines for National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition, knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like radiation oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, these data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH's database because it does not discriminate between radiology and radiation oncology departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013 we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from radiation oncology departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in radiation oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to principal investigators at the full professor level, and 122 principal investigators held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants, the research topic fell into the field of biology, 13% in the field of medical physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggest that the field of radiation oncology is underfunded by the NIH and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of radiation oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force.

  7. Medical oncology future plan of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology: challenges and future needs of the Spanish oncologists.

    PubMed

    Rivera, F; Andres, R; Felip, E; Garcia-Campelo, R; Lianes, P; Llombart, A; Piera, J M; Puente, J; Rodriguez, C A; Vera, R; Virizuela, J A; Martin, M; Garrido, P

    2017-04-01

    The SEOM Future Plan is aimed at identifying the main challenges, trends and needs of the medical oncology speciality over the next years, including potential oncologist workforce shortages, and proposing recommendations to overcome them. The estimations of the required medical oncologists workforce are based on an updated Medical Oncologist Register in Spain, Medical Oncology Departments activity data, dedication times and projected cancer incidence. Challenges, needs and future recommendations were drawn from an opinion survey and an advisory board. A shortage of 211 FTE medical oncologist specialists has been established. To maintain an optimal ratio of 158 new cases/FTE, medical oncology workforce should reach 1881 FTE by 2035. Main recommendations to face the growing demand and complexity of oncology services include a yearly growth of 2.5% of medical oncologist's workforce until 2035, and development and application of more accurate quality indicators for cancer care and health outcomes measure.

  8. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Bernstein, Karen De Amorim; Chetty, Indrin J; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R

    2011-11-15

    In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments’ domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  10. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Ying; De Amorim Bernstein, Karen; Chetty, Indrin J.; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E.; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  11. Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines 2010 for antiemesis in oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hideki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Aiba, Keisuke; Tamura, Kazuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Kenji; Okita, Kenji; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Boku, Narikazu; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Okawa, Yutaka; Onozawa, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hidenori; Shima, Yasuo; Shimoyama, Naohito; Takeda, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to disseminate the standard of antiemetic therapy for Japanese clinical oncologists. On the basis of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument, which reflects evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a working group of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) reviewed clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis and performed a systematic review of evidence-based domestic practice guidelines for antiemetic therapy in Japan. In addition, because health-insurance systems in Japan are different from those in other countries, a consensus was reached regarding standard treatments for chemotherapy that induce nausea and vomiting. Current evidence was collected by use of MEDLINE, from materials from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and from European Society of Medical Oncology/Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines for antiemesis. Initially, 21 clinical questions (CQ) were selected on the basis of CQs from other guidelines. Patients treated with highly emetic agents should receive a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. For patients with moderate emetic risk, 5HT3 receptor antagonists and dexamethasone were recommended, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy with low emetic risk dexamethasone only is recommended. Patients receiving high-emetic-risk radiation therapy should also receive a 5HT3 receptor antagonist. In this paper the 2010 JSCO clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis are presented in English; they reveal high concordance of Japanese medical circumstances with other antiemetic guidelines that are similarly based on evidence.

  12. A technique for marking oncological breast tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaison; Jenkins, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    With new breast conserving oncological surgical techniques, accurate identification of specimen margins is important to allow for the re-excision of margins. The accurate identification of margins is crucial is the success of the patients treatment if further margins are required. NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) guidelines recommend the excised specimen is labelled accurately to correctly identify the margins and allow for X-ray examination. This method has been proven to be cheap, it uses equipment and materials readily available in the operating theatre. Furthermore, if any of the methods fails as there is more than one way to identifying your margins. For example if a clip were to fall off, the type/length of suture and the orientation on the board will still allow you to identify the correct margin. If the sample was to fall off the board, the sutures and clips will still allow the pathologist to orientate the sample. In summary this method is easy to apply, logical and uses equipment readily available within the theatre, i.e. silk sutures, and the needle protection board. It ensures all relevant radiological and surgical criteria are met for enabling orientation of the specimen when removed from the breast tissue. It is an easily taught technique that is easy to remember. A national survey showed a lack and wide variation of specimen orientation protocols. (Volleamere et al., 2013) This technique could be used as the national standard for breast specimen marking and as a national marking system for the NHS.

  13. Supportive care in pediatric oncology: oncologic emergencies and management of fever and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Henry, Meret; Sung, Lillian

    2015-02-01

    Advancements in the care of children with cancer have, in part, been achieved through improvements in supportive care. Situations that require prompt care can occur at the time of presentation as well as during treatment. This article discusses the approach to children with fever and neutropenia, a complication encountered daily by care providers, as well as oncologic emergencies that can be seen at the time of a child's initial diagnosis: hyperleukocytosis, tumor lysis syndrome, superior vena cava syndrome, and spinal cord compression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Compliance with research standards within gynecologic oncology fellowship: A Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship Research Network (GOFRN) study.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Laura J; Michener, Chad M; Levinson, Kimberly; Cobb, Lauren; Tseng, Jill; Jernigan, Amelia

    2017-09-01

    Participation in clinical and basic science research is emphasized in gynecologic oncology training. We sought to identify trends in adherence to expected research practices and reasons for non-adherence among gynecologic oncology fellows. An anonymous 31-question online survey assessing academic behaviors, including IRB compliance, authorship assignment, data sharing, and potential barriers to non-adherence was distributed to all SGO gynecologic oncology fellow members in July 2016. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses were performed. Of 190 members, 35.3% (n=67) responded. 73% (n=49) of respondents reported personal non-compliance and 79.1% (n=53) reported having witnessed others being non-complaint with at least one expected research practice. Areas of compliance failure included changing a research question without appropriate IRB amendment (20%; n=14), conducting research under a nonspecific IRB (13.9%; n=9), and performing research without IRB approval (6.1%; n=4). Longer institutional time for IRB approval was significantly associated with IRB non-adherence (p<0.05). First year fellows were more likely to use a nonspecific IRB (p=0.04) or expand a question without amending the IRB (p=0.04). When asked about storage of protected health information (PHI) for research, 53% reported non-secure storage with 17.1% (n=6) having done so for >1000 patients. Thirty respondents (45.5%) assigned authorship to someone who failed to meet ICMJE criteria and twelve (18.5%) accepted authorship without meeting ICMJE criteria. Most commonly cited reasons for non-adherence were: cumbersome IRB processes (80.3%), pressure from senior authors (78.8%), fear of someone else publishing first, (74.2%) and lack of support navigating appropriate research practices (71.2%). Fellow non-compliance with expected research practices is high, particularly with regards to secure storage of PHI and appropriate authorship assignment. Time-consuming and cumbersome IRB procedures

  15. Inpatient Hematology-Oncology Rotation Is Associated With a Decreased Interest in Pursuing an Oncology Career Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Holland, Jimmie; Holcombe, Randall F

    2015-07-01

    The demand for hematologists and oncologists is not being met. We hypothesized that an inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation would increase residents' interest. Potential reasons mitigating interest were explored and included differences in physician distress, empathy, resilience, and patient death experiences. Agreement with the statement "I am interested in pursuing a career/fellowship in hematology and oncology" was rated by residents before and after a hematology-oncology rotation, with 0 = not true at all, 1 = rarely true, 2 = sometimes true, 3 = often true, and 4 = true nearly all the time. House staff rotating on a hematology-oncology service from November 2013 to October 2014 also received questionnaires before and after their rotations containing the Connors-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, demographic information, and number of dying patients cared for and if a sense of meaning was derived from that experience. Fifty-six residents completed both before- and after-rotation questionnaires (response rate, 58%). The mean interest score was 1.43 initially and decreased to 1.24 after the rotation (P = .301). Female residents' mean score was 1.13 initially and dropped to 0.81 after the rotation (P = .04). Male residents' mean score was 1.71 initially and 1.81 after the rotation (P = .65). Decreased hematology-oncology interest correlated with decreased empathy; male interest decrease correlated with decreased resilience. An inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation does not lead to increased interest and, for some residents, may lead to decreased interest in the field. Encouraging outpatient hematology-oncology rotations and the cultivation of resilience, empathy, and meaning regarding death experiences may increase resident interest. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine research initiatives in the Children's Oncology Group and the role of the pediatric oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Hawks, Ria

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has emerged as a new area of investigation in cancer research and treatment. CAM modalities are widely used, but little is known about their efficacy. The Children's Oncology Group has made a major commitment to CAM research in childhood and adolescent cancer, beginning with studies of CAM in the area of supportive care. Pediatric oncology nurses, as implementing clinicians and collaborating researchers, are critical to the success of these studies.

  17. Web-based Oncology Educational Tool for Medical Trainees on Oncology Rotation-Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Haq, Rashida; Li, Benjamin; Jovicic, Aleksandra; Dastur, Daisy; Trinkaus, Martina; Kong, Amy

    2017-01-03

    Oncology education for post-graduate medical trainees is mostly clinic-based with didactic lectures. However, a 3-4-week rotation lacks full exposure to the vast field of oncology, resulting in an educational gap. We felt there is a need for a standard curriculum to educate trainees on common oncology topics and encourage self-directed learning. This study aims to improve knowledge of oncology in trainees through the use of an oncology educational tool (consisting of a handbook and website) that we developed and evaluated. Fifty-three post-graduate trainees (years 1, 2, and 3) consented to participate at the start of their oncology rotation. In phase I, four participants took part in a usability evaluation of the tool. In phase II, 39 trainees underwent a knowledge assessment with use of the tool. Baseline and post-intervention test results were compared using paired t tests. In the qualitative study (phase III), 10 trainees provided feedback on the updated tool and overall rotation experience. Issues identified from phase I were addressed prior to subsequent phases. Phase II analysis of complete sets of data found the mean post-intervention scores (9.44/10) were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the mean baseline scores (7.47/10). In the qualitative study, feedback strongly supported the integration of the tool for improving knowledge of trainees. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that an oncology educational tool for medical trainees improves oncology knowledge by providing a standard curriculum. Future work involves evaluating this tool to determine if effects are from the education tool or rotation experience.

  18. Human oocyte cryopreservation in infertility and oncology.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Bazzocchi, Antonia; Notarangelo, Leonardo; Paradisi, Roberto; Landolfo, Chiara; Venturoli, Stefano

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the present state of research and clinical application of human oocyte cryopreservation in infertility and oncology. Recent literature documents have an increasing interest in cryopreserving human eggs. A number of studies report on different freezing protocols and various types of clinical application. Increasing attention is paid to vitrification as an alternative to slow cooling for oocyte cryopreservation. Several studies cover the modification of meiotic spindle during cryopreservation in order to assess the less damaging cryopreservation system. The first births with cryopreserved oocytes in cancer patients are reported. Egg freezing may circumvent the ethical and legal concerns regarding embryo cryopreservation, increase assisted reproduction flexibility and be a concrete option to save fertility in women with cancer. Recently, egg survival and pregnancy rates improved, with the birth of more than 500 children. The birth rate per thawed oocyte is around 5-6%. As regards safety, data on birth defects seems to be reassuring so far but must be monitored by an international registry. Comparative studies between slow freezing and vitrification in the same patient population are needed to elucidate pros and cons of each technique.

  19. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  20. Strategic physician communication and oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, T L; Blanchard, C; Ruckdeschel, J C; Coovert, M; Strongbow, R

    1999-10-01

    Clinical trials are the primary means for determining new, effective treatments for cancer patients, yet the number of patients that accrue is relatively limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between physician behavior and patient accrual to a clinical trial by videotaping the interaction. Forty-eight patient-physician interactions involving 12 different oncologists were videotaped in several clinics at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute (Tampa, FL). The purpose of each interaction was to present the possibility of a clinical trial to the patient. A coding system, the Moffitt Accrual Analysis System, was developed by the authors to code behaviors that represented both the legal-informational and social influence models of communication behavior. Thirty-two patients agreed to participate in the clinical trial. Videotaping was found to be a viable, valid, and reliable method for studying the interaction. Physicians who were observed to use both models of influence were found to enroll more patients. Thus, patients were more likely to accrue to the trial when their physician verbally presented items normally included in an informed consent document and when they behaved in a reflective, patient-centered, supportive, and responsive manner. Discussion of benefits, side effects, patient concerns and resources to manage the concerns were all associated with accrual. This research has implications for modifying physician behavior and, thus, increasing the numbers of patients accruing to oncology clinical trials.

  1. Quantitative Information on Oncology Prescription Drug Websites.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Helen W; Aikin, Kathryn J; Squiers, Linda B

    2016-09-02

    Our objective was to determine whether and how quantitative information about drug benefits and risks is presented to consumers and healthcare professionals on cancer-related prescription drug websites. We analyzed the content of 65 active cancer-related prescription drug websites. We assessed the inclusion and presentation of quantitative information for two audiences (consumers and healthcare professionals) and two types of information (drug benefits and risks). Websites were equally likely to present quantitative information for benefits (96.9 %) and risks (95.4 %). However, the amount of the information differed significantly: Both consumer-directed and healthcare-professional-directed webpages were more likely to have quantitative information for every benefit (consumer 38.5 %; healthcare professional 86.1 %) compared with every risk (consumer 3.1 %; healthcare professional 6.2 %). The numeric and graphic presentations also differed by audience and information type. Consumers have access to quantitative information about oncology drugs and, in particular, about the benefits of these drugs. Research has shown that using quantitative information to communicate treatment benefits and risks can increase patients' and physicians' understanding and can aid in treatment decision-making, although some numeric and graphic formats are more useful than others.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gallamini, Andrea; Zwarthoed, Colette; Borra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later. PMID:25268160

  3. Photodynamic therapy: a promising alternative in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.; Filleur, Stephanie

    2004-07-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that is based on the administration of a photosensitizer and the following application of light in a wavelength range matching the absorption spectrum of the photosensitizer. Ideally the photosensitizer retains in the tumor tissue more than in normal tissue and thus allows targeted destruction of cancerous tissue. The use of PDT is slowly being accepted as a standard treatment for certain types of cancer. This includes mainly treatment strategies with only palliative intentions (obstructive esophageal cancer and advanced lung cancer) while for certain malignant conditions new applications exists that are already intended for cure (e.g. early stage of lung cancer). The main advantage of PDT is that the treatment can be repeated multiple times safely without major side effects. PDT can be safely combined with already established treatment options like surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A disadvantage of PDT is the only localized effect of the therapy, which usually cannot significantly alter the outcome of a systemic disease. In this paper we review the history of PDT as well as current clinical applications in oncology and future directions.

  4. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Debenham, Brock; Banerjee, Robyn; Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George; Trotter, Theresa; Yee, Don

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  5. The Oncology Nurse Prescribing: A Catalonian Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ortega, Paz; Cabrera-Jaime, Sandra; Estrada-Masllorens, Joan María

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study identifies the capability, knowledge, and satisfaction of oncology nurses in Spain after approval of the nurse prescribing law in 2006. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 140 nurses in three cancer centers in Catalonia, Spain, by using convenience sampling method. The principal variables of this study were nurse satisfaction, knowledge about what products nurses are allowed to prescribe, the nurses’ perception of their own prescribing ability, and their opinion on education and training needs with regard to the new approved law. The secondary variables included years of professional experience, place of work, and sociodemographic variables. Data were collected during a 3 months period by using a piloted 29-item self-assessment questionnaire. Results: Analyses of univariate and bivariate data showed that 82.2% of the nurses were aware of the approved law, but 94.2% indicated that they lack information about it. The mean satisfaction with the approval of the law was 6.64 ± 1.76 (numerical scale 0-10). In addition, 68.1% and 55.1% of the nurses were prepared to prescribe medical devices and drugs, respectively. To date, 61.1% of the nurses prescribe medical devices and 66% prescribe pharmacological products daily. Conclusions: Nurses expressed general satisfaction with the approval of the Law 29/2006. Nurses currently provide prescriptions, but widespread knowledge of the allowed prescriptions is lacking. PMID:27981146

  6. RTOG Gynecologic Oncology Working Group: Comprehensive Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, David K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Viswanathan, Akila; Schefter, Tracey; Weidhaas, Joanne; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to comprehensively describe the activities of the Gynecologic Oncology Working Group within the RTOG. Clinical trials will be reviewed as well as translational science and ancillary activities. Over the past 40 years, a myriad of clinical trials have been performed within the RTOG with the aim of improving overall survival and decreasing morbidity in women with cervical or endometrial cancer. Major study questions have included hyperbaric oxygen, neutron radiotherapy, altered fractionation, hypoxic cell sensitization, chemosensitization, and volume directed radiotherapy. RTOG 7920 demonstrated improvement in overall survival in patients with stages IB through IIB cervical carcinoma receiving prophylactic paraaortic irradiation compared to pelvic radiation alone. RTOG 9001 demonstrated that cisplatin and 5-FU chemoradiotherapy to the pelvis for advanced cervix cancer markedly improved overall survival compared to extended field radiotherapy alone. More recent trials have employed radioprotectors, molecular targeted therapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy. Ancillary studies have developed CTV atlases for research protocols and routine clinical use. Worldwide practice patterns have been investigated in cervix, endometrial, and vulvar cancer thru the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Translational studies have focused on immunohistochemical markers, changes in gene expression, and miRNA patterns impacting prognosis. The RTOG gynecologic working group has performed clinical trials that have defined the standard of care, improved survival, and added to our understanding of the biology of cervical and endometrial cancers. PMID:24819663

  7. Lean oncology: a new model for oncologists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The history of the term Lean is relatively recent and originates from the Toyota Production System (TPS). The term "Lean" means "thin", which refers to a mental process, operational, productive, no-frills, quick but not hasty, consequential to the previous event. The Lean process flows seamlessly into the result, eliminates unnecessary complications to the effect, prevents unnecessary equipment processes. The idea is to 'do more with less', like using the (few) available resources in the most productive way possible, through the elimination of all types of waste that inevitably accompanies every stage of a production process. Lean management is primarily a management philosophy, a system of values and behaviors that goes beyond the mere application of the instrument and that, once internalized, will form the nucleus of the corporate culture. "Lean Oncology" is a term coined to identify a methodology of care and treatment to cancer patients, consisting on process simplification, streamlining of the organizational and routes of drug treatment, detection and elimination of waste. Its main objective is the centrality of the patient. PMID:22533796

  8. Exploring boundaries in pediatric oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Hartlage, Heather N

    2012-01-01

    Professional patient boundaries are an issue that is relevant across all realms of nursing practice. By nature, nurses are caring individuals. Therapeutic relationships are integral to the care of patients. When caring for patients on a daily basis for extended periods of time, it can be difficult for nurses to know when their care goes beyond professional boundaries. Providing care to patients in a pediatric oncology situation substantially increases this ethical dilemma. Length of stay, degree of crisis, embedded relationships, and emotional turmoil, along with the nurturing connection between adult and child, are among the reasons that boundaries are often blurred within the context of this sensitive patient population. This article explores the differences between nursing care, boundary crossings, and boundary violations. Strategies to evaluate nursing actions for appropriateness, along with reflection and development of individual boundaries, are offered. The information presented is relevant not only to nursing care of pediatric patients who are facing chronic or life-threatening conditions but also to each nurse-client relationship established in nursing practice.

  9. Current oncologic applications of radiofrequency ablation therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Green, Sari; Elliot, Angelina; McGahan, John P; Khatri, Vijay P

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) uses high frequency alternating current to heat a volume of tissue around a needle electrode to induce focal coagulative necrosis with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. RFA can be performed via an open, laparoscopic, or image guided percutaneous approach and be performed under general or local anesthesia. Advances in delivery mechanisms, electrode designs, and higher power generators have increased the maximum volume that can be ablated, while maximizing oncological outcomes. In general, RFA is used to control local tumor growth, prevent recurrence, palliate symptoms, and improve survival in a subset of patients that are not candidates for surgical resection. It’s equivalence to surgical resection has yet to be proven in large randomized control trials. Currently, the use of RFA has been well described as a primary or adjuvant treatment modality of limited but unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastasis, especially colorectal cancer metastases, primary lung tumors, renal cell carcinoma, boney metastasis and osteoid osteomas. The role of RFA in the primary treatment of early stage breast cancer is still evolving. This review will discuss the general features of RFA and outline its role in commonly encountered solid tumors. PMID:23671734

  10. Rationale for Cardio-Oncology Units.

    PubMed

    Nhola, Lara F; Villarraga, Hector R

    2017-07-01

    With the rapidly rising number of patients surviving cancer, often in the setting of new or pre-existing cardiovascular disease and risk factors, a need has arisen for a specialty within the realm of cardiovascular care that can evaluate and manage these patients along with our colleagues in oncology and hematology. By the same token, all health care providers involved in the care of cancer patients with heart disease must be fully aware of the impact of adverse cardiovascular effects on the survival of these patients. Collaboration is required to mitigate the effect of cardiovascular toxicity associated with these necessary life-saving cancer therapies. The cardio-oncologist plays a pivotal role in bridging the 2 specialties, by creating a comprehensive plan to address the comorbidities as well as to provide guidance on the optimal choice of therapy. In this 3-part review, we will outline: a) the significant impact of cancer therapies on the cardiovascular health of patients with cancer and cancer survivors, b) the advantage of a multidisciplinary team in addressing these cardiovascular complications, and c) the delivery of clinical care to patients with cancer and heart disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Palliative care and pediatric surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Inserra, Alessandro; Narciso, Alessandra; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Messina, Raffaella; Crocoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Survival rate for childhood cancer has increased in recent years, reaching as high as 70% in developed countries compared with 54% for all cancers diagnosed in the 1980s. In the remaining 30%, progression or metastatic disease leads to death and in this framework palliative care has an outstanding role though not well settled in all its facets. In this landscape, surgery has a supportive actor role integrated with other welfare aspects from which are not severable. The definition of surgical palliation has moved from the ancient definition of noncurative surgery to a group of practices performed not to cure but to alleviate an organ dysfunction offering the best quality of life possible in all the aspects of life (pain, dysfunctions, caregivers, psychosocial, etc.). To emphasize this aspect a more modern definition has been introduced: palliative therapy in whose context is comprised not only the care assistance but also the plans of care since the onset of illness, teaching the matter to surgeons in training and share paths. Literature is very poor regarding surgical aspects specifically dedicated and all researches (PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane) with various meshing terms result in a more oncologic and psychosocial effort.

  12. Management of neuro-oncologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Jo, J T; Schiff, D

    2017-01-01

    Patients with brain tumors and systemic malignancies are subject to diverse neurologic complications that require urgent evaluation and treatment. These neurologic conditions are commonly due to the tumor's direct effects on the nervous system, such as cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures, spinal cord compression, and leptomeningeal metastases. In addition, neurologic complications can develop as a result of thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, hyperviscosity syndromes, infection, immune-related disorders, and adverse effects of treatment. Patients may present with typical disease syndromes. However, it is not uncommon for patients to have more subtle, nonlocalizing manifestations, such as alteration of mental status, that could be attributed to other systemic, nonneurologic complications. Furthermore, neurologic complications are at times the initial manifestations of an undiagnosed malignancy. Therefore a high index of suspicion is essential for rapid assessment and management. Timely intervention may prolong survival and improve quality of life. In this chapter, we will discuss the common neuro-oncologic emergencies, including epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Bölling, T; Hardes, J; Dirksen, U

    2013-01-01

    The management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology requires careful multidisciplinary planning due to the need for multimodal therapy approaches. The non-specific symptoms often lead to a delayed definitive diagnosis of a bone tumour. Imaging procedures are of major importance for an individualised and optimised treatment planning. They have to be carried out before any surgery, including biopsies. The introduction of multi-agent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival rates in patients suffering from Ewing's sarcomas and osteosarcomas. However, local therapy still remains indispensable in order to achieve long-term survival. For osteosarcoma, surgery remains the only adequate local therapy modality. Radiotherapy may be considered if surgery is not feasible. In these cases, high radiation doses need to be applied. The choice for local therapy modality is not as clear in patients with Ewing's sarcoma. Today, surgery is often preferred if a wide or at least marginal resection can be carried out. Additional radiotherapy is advised in patients with marginal/intralesional resection or poor histological response to induction chemotherapy. Definitive radiotherapy is recommended for inoperable lesions. In the future, new radiotherapy approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton therapy, may yield better results with minor risks of late effects.

  14. Dendritic cell therapy for oncology roundtable conference

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-3 September 2010, Brussels, Belgium The Dendritic Cell Therapy for Oncology Roundtable Conference was organized by Reliable Cancer Therapies and moderated by Prof. Dr. Steven De Vleeschouwer. The organizer, Reliable Cancer Therapies, is a Swiss non-profit organization that provides information on evidence-based cancer treatments and funding for the development of a selection of promising cancer therapies. In order to be able to give valuable information about dendritic cell (DC) therapy to patients and physicians, the organizing committee felt it necessary to organize this conference to get an up-to-date status of the academic DC therapy field, collect ideas to guide patients towards clinical trials and to induce cross-fertilization for protocol optimization. In total, 31 experts participated to an in-depth discussion about the status and the future development path for dendritic cell vaccines. The conference started with general presentations about cancer immunotherapy, followed by comprehensive overview presentations about the progress in DC vaccine development achieved by each speaker. At the end of the meeting, a thorough general discussion focused on key questions about what is needed to improve DC vaccines. This report does not cover all presentations, but aims to highlight selected points of interest, particularly relating to possible limitations and potential approaches to improvement of DC therapies specifically, and also immunotherapeutic interventions in general terms. PMID:21226916

  15. Vaccination strategies for neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Sampson, John H; Mitchell, Duane A

    2015-11-01

    Vaccination against cancer-associated antigens has long held the promise of inducting potent antitumor immunity, targeted cytotoxicity while sparing normal tissues, and long-lasting immunologic memory that can provide surveillance against tumor recurrence. Evaluation of vaccination strategies in preclinical brain tumor models has borne out the capacity for the immune system to effectively and safely eradicate established tumors within the central nervous system. Early phase clinical trials have established the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of several vaccine platforms, predominantly in patients with glioblastoma. Definitive demonstration of clinical benefit awaits further study, but initial results have been encouraging. With increased understanding of the stimulatory and regulatory pathways that govern immunologic responses and the enhanced capacity to identify novel antigenic targets using genomic interrogation of tumor cells, vaccination platforms for patients with malignant brain tumors are advancing with increasing personalized complexity and integration into combinatorial treatment paradigms. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  17. Lean oncology: a new model for oncologists.

    PubMed

    Montesarchio, Vincenzo; Grimaldi, Antonio Maria; Fox, Bernard A; Rea, Antonio; Marincola, Francesco M; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2012-04-25

    The history of the term Lean is relatively recent and originates from the Toyota Production System (TPS). The term "Lean" means "thin", which refers to a mental process, operational, productive, no-frills, quick but not hasty, consequential to the previous event. The Lean process flows seamlessly into the result, eliminates unnecessary complications to the effect, prevents unnecessary equipment processes. The idea is to 'do more with less', like using the (few) available resources in the most productive way possible, through the elimination of all types of waste that inevitably accompanies every stage of a production process. Lean management is primarily a management philosophy, a system of values and behaviors that goes beyond the mere application of the instrument and that, once internalized, will form the nucleus of the corporate culture. "Lean Oncology" is a term coined to identify a methodology of care and treatment to cancer patients, consisting on process simplification, streamlining of the organizational and routes of drug treatment, detection and elimination of waste. Its main objective is the centrality of the patient.

  18. Breaking Bad News in Oncology: A Metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Orri, Massimiliano; Winterman, Sabine; Brugière, Charlotte; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The delivery of bad news by oncologists to their patients is a key moment in the physician-patient relationship. We performed a systematic review of qualitative studies (a metasynthesis) that focused on the experiences and points of view of oncologists about breaking bad news to patients. We searched international publications to identify relevant qualitative research exploring oncologists' perspectives about this topic. Thematic analysis, which compensates for the potential lack of generalizability of the primary studies by their conjoint interpretation, was used to identify key themes and synthesize them. NVivo qualitative analysis software was used. We identified 40 articles (> 600 oncologists) from 12 countries and assessed their quality as good according to the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP). Two main themes emerged: the patient-oncologist encounter during the breaking of bad news, comprising essential aspects of the communication, including the process of dealing with emotions; and external factors shaping the patient-oncologist encounter, composed of factors that influence the announcement beyond the physician-patient relationship: the family, systemic and institutional factors, and cultural factors. Breaking bad news is a balancing act that requires oncologists to adapt continually to different factors: their individual relationships with the patient, the patient's family, the institutional and systemic environment, and the cultural milieu. Extending the development of the ability to personalize and adapt therapeutic treatment to this realm of communications would be a major step forward from the stereotyped way that oncologists are currently trained in communication skills. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Metrics of hope: disciplining affect in oncology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nik

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the emergence of a 'regime of hope' in the context of oncology care, practice and research. More specifically, my focus is the emergence, since the 1970s or so, of hope scales and indexes used to metricise the emotional states of cancer patients. These usually take the form of psychometric tests designed and deployed in order to subject affective life to calculative and rational scrutiny. This article locates this within the tensions of a 'turn' towards the emotions in critical social science literature. Scholarship has, for instance, been anxious not to deny the embodied reality of affectivity and the emotions. But it has been equally important to recognise the extent to which emotions are discursively ordered and structured as objects and effects of power. This article charts the emergence of hope scales historically alongside wider historical forces in the metrification of life and health and more specifically the emotions. It locates hope scales in a post-war climate of individual resilience and perseverant enterprise and the significance of hope as a naturalised vitalistic attribute of biopolitical life.

  20. [Novel quality assurance method in oncology: the two-level, multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system].

    PubMed

    Mangel, László; Kövér, Erika; Szilágyi, István; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Bércesi, Eva; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Holcz, Tibor; Karádi, Oszkár; Farkas, Róbert; Csák, Szilvia; Csere, Tibor; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-12-16

    By now therapy decision taken by a multi-disciplinary oncology team in cancer care has become a routine method in worldwide. However, multi-disciplinary oncology team has to face more and more difficulties in keeping abreast with the fast development in oncology science, increasing expectations, and financial considerations. Naturally the not properly controlled decision mechanisms, the permanent lack of time and shortage of professionals are also hindering factors. Perhaps it would be a way out if the staff meetings and discussions of physicians in the oncology departments were transformed and provided with administrative, legal and decision credentials corresponding to those of multi-disciplinary oncology team. The new form of the oncotherapy oncoteam might be able to decide the optimal and particular treatment after previous consultation with the patient. The oncotherapy oncoteam is also suitable to carry out training and tasks of a cancer centre and by diminishing the psychological burden of the doctors it contributes to an improved patient care. This study presents the two-level multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system at the University of Pécs including the detailed analysis of the considerations above.

  1. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  2. Oncology Education in Medical Schools: Towards an Approach that Reflects Australia's Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    McRae, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Cancer has recently overtaken heart disease to become the number 1 cause of mortality both globally and in Australia. As such, adequate oncology education must be an integral component of medical school if students are to achieve learning outcomes that meet the needs of the population. The aim of this review is to evaluate the current state of undergraduate oncology education and identify how Australian medical schools can improve oncology learning outcomes for students and, by derivative, improve healthcare outcomes for Australians with cancer. The review shows that oncology is generally not well represented in medical school curricula, that few medical schools offer mandatory oncology or palliative care rotations, and that junior doctors are exhibiting declining oncology knowledge and skills. To address these issues, Australian medical schools should implement the Oncology Education Committee's Ideal Oncology Curriculum, enact mandatory oncology and palliative care clinical rotations for students, and in doing so, appreciate the importance of students' differing approaches to learning.

  3. AllergoOncology - the impact of allergy in oncology: EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Bax, H J; Bianchini, R; Capron, M; Corrigan, C; Castells, M; Dombrowicz, D; Daniels-Wells, T R; Fazekas, J; Fiebiger, E; Gatault, S; Gould, H J; Janda, J; Josephs, D H; Karagiannis, P; Levi-Schaffer, F; Meshcheryakova, A; Mechtcheriakova, D; Mekori, Y; Mungenast, F; Nigro, E A; Penichet, M L; Redegeld, F; Saul, L; Singer, J; Spicer, J F; Siccardi, A G; Spillner, E; Turner, M C; Untersmayr, E; Vangelista, L; Karagiannis, S N

    2016-12-29

    Th2 immunity and allergic immune surveillance play critical roles in host responses to pathogens, parasites and allergens. Numerous studies have reported significant links between Th2 responses and cancer, including insights into the functions of IgE antibodies and associated effector cells in both antitumour immune surveillance and therapy. The interdisciplinary field of AllergoOncology was given Task Force status by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2014. Affiliated expert groups focus on the interface between allergic responses and cancer, applied to immune surveillance, immunomodulation and the functions of IgE-mediated immune responses against cancer, to derive novel insights into more effective treatments. Coincident with rapid expansion in clinical application of cancer immunotherapies, here we review the current state-of-the-art and future translational opportunities, as well as challenges in this relatively new field. Recent developments include improved understanding of Th2 antibodies, intratumoral innate allergy effector cells and mediators, IgE-mediated tumour antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells, as well as immunotherapeutic strategies such as vaccines and recombinant antibodies, and finally, the management of allergy in daily clinical oncology. Shedding light on the crosstalk between allergic response and cancer is paving the way for new avenues of treatment.

  4. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists.

  5. Attitudes of Chinese Oncology Physicians Toward Death with Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-ping; Huang, Bo-yan; Yi, Ting-wu; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yu-qing; Zhang, Zong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Death with dignity (DWD) refers to the refusal of life-prolonging measures for terminally ill patients by “living wills” forms in advance. More and more oncology physicians are receiving DWD requests from advance cancer patients in mainland China. Objective: The study objective was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese oncology physicians toward the legalization and implementation of DWD. Methods: A questionnaire investigating the understanding and attitudes toward DWD was administered to 257 oncology physicians from 11 hospitals in mainland China. Results: The effective response rate was 86.8% (223/257). The majority of oncology physicians (69.1%) had received DWD requests from patients. Half of the participants (52.5%) thought that the most important reason was the patients' unwillingness to maintain survival through machines. One-third of participants (33.0%) attributed the most important reason to suffering from painful symptoms. Most oncology physicians (78.9%) had knowledge about DWD. A fifth of respondents did not know the difference between DWD and euthanasia, and a few even considered DWD as euthanasia. The majority of oncology physicians supported the legalization (88.3%) and implementation (83.9%) of DWD. Conclusions: Many Chinese oncology physicians have received advanced cancer patients' DWD requests and think that DWD should be legalized and implemented. Chinese health management departments should consider the demands of physicians and patients. It is important to inform physicians about the difference between DWD and euthanasia, as one-fifth of them were confused about it. PMID:27022774

  6. A Nationwide Medical Student Assessment of Oncology Education.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Patel, Krishnan R; Burt, Lindsay M; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA, but there is minimal data on how oncology is taught to medical students. The purpose of this study is to characterize oncology education at US medical schools. An electronic survey was sent between December 2014 and February 2015 to a convenience sample of medical students who either attended the American Society for Radiation Oncology annual meeting or serve as delegates to the American Association of Medical Colleges. Information on various aspects of oncology instruction at participants' medical schools was collected. Seventy-six responses from students in 28 states were received. Among the six most common causes of death in the USA, cancer reportedly received the fourth most curricular time. During the first, second, and third years of medical school, participants most commonly reported 6-10, 16-20, and 6-10 h of oncology teaching, respectively. Participants were less confident in their understanding of cancer treatment than workup/diagnosis or basic science/natural history of cancer (p < 0.01). During the preclinical years, pathologists, scientists/Ph.D.'s, and medical oncologists reportedly performed the majority of teaching, whereas during the clinical clerkships, medical and surgical oncologists reportedly performed the majority of teaching. Radiation oncologists were significantly less involved during both periods (p < 0.01). Most schools did not require any oncology-oriented clerkship. During each mandatory rotation, <20 % of patients had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Oncology education is often underemphasized and fragmented with wide variability in content and structure between medical schools, suggesting a need for reform.

  7. Stress Levels of Nurses in Oncology Outpatient Units.

    PubMed

    Ko, Woonhwa; Kiser-Larson, Norma

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nursing is often a source of substantial stress for nurses. Many nurses, particularly novice nurses, have inadequate preparation to care for patients at the end of life and their families. Unless nurses prevent or manage work-related stress by using effective coping strategies, oncology nursing staff will continue to suffer from burnout and compassion fatigue. The purpose of this article is to identify stress levels and stressful factors of nurses working in oncology outpatient units and to explore coping behaviors for work-related stress of oncology staff nurses in outpatient units. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to identify stress levels and stressful factors for outpatient oncology nurses, investigate differences in stress levels among nurses' demographic characteristics, and explore coping behaviors of the nurses. Study participants (N = 40) included RNs and licensed practical nurses who completed the Nursing Stress Scale, three open-ended questions, and a demographic questionnaire. The highest sources of stress were workload and patient death and dying. Demographic variables of age and work experience in nursing showed a significant positive relationship to work-related stress scores. The three most frequently used coping behaviors were verbalizing, exercising or relaxing, and taking time for self. Continuing education programs on stress management are highly recommended. Outpatient oncology nurses should be nurtured and supported through tailored interventions at multiple levels to help them find effective coping strategies and develop self-care competencies. Although younger and less experienced nurses had lower mean stress scores than older and more experienced nurses, the continuing education programs and tailored interventions would be helpful for all oncology nursing staff.

  8. Specialty Payment Model Opportunities and Assessment: Oncology Simulation Report.

    PubMed

    White, Chapin; Chan, Chris; Huckfeldt, Peter J; Kofner, Aaron; Mulcahy, Andrew W; Pollak, Julia; Popescu, Ioana; Timbie, Justin W; Hussey, Peter S

    2015-07-15

    This article describes the results of a simulation analysis of a payment model for specialty oncology services that is being developed for possible testing by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). CMS asked MITRE and RAND to conduct simulation analyses to preview some of the possible impacts of the payment model and to inform design decisions related to the model. The simulation analysis used an episode-level dataset based on Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims for historical oncology episodes provided to Medicare FFS beneficiaries in 2010. Under the proposed model, participating practices would continue to receive FFS payments, would also receive per-beneficiary per-month care management payments for episodes lasting up to six months, and would be eligible for performance-based payments based on per-episode spending for attributed episodes relative to a per-episode spending target. The simulation offers several insights into the proposed payment model for oncology: (1) The care management payments used in the simulation analysis-$960 total per six-month episode-represent only 4 percent of projected average total spending per episode (around $27,000 in 2016), but they are large relative to the FFS revenues of participating oncology practices, which are projected to be around $2,000 per oncology episode. By themselves, the care management payments would increase physician practices' Medicare revenues by roughly 50 percent on average. This represents a substantial new outlay for the Medicare program and a substantial new source of revenues for oncology practices. (2) For the Medicare program to break even, participating oncology practices would have to reduce utilization and intensity by roughly 4 percent. (3) The break-even point can be reduced if the care management payments are reduced or if the performance-based payments are reduced.

  9. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Philip L.; James, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This paper reports the key findings of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census and compares the results with earlier surveys. Methods The census was conducted in mid‐2014 with distribution to all radiation oncologists, educational affiliates and trainees listed on the college database. There were six email reminders and responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 76.1%. Results The age range of fellows was 32–96 (mean = 49 years, median = 47 years). The majority of the radiation oncologists were male (n = 263, 63%). The minority of radiation oncologists were of Asian descent (n = 43, 13.4%). Radiation oncologists graduated from medical school on average 23 years ago (median = 22 years). A minority of fellows (n = 66, 20%) held another postgraduate qualification. Most radiation oncologists worked, on average, at two practices (median = 2, range 1–7). Practising radiation oncologists worked predominantly in the public sector (n = 131, 49%), but many worked in both the public and private sectors (n = 94, 37%), and a minority worked in the private sector only (n = 38, 14%). The largest proportion of the workforce was from New South Wales accounting for 29% of radiation oncologists. Radiation oncologists worked an average of 43 h/week (median = 43 h, range 6–80). Radiation oncologists who worked in the private sector worked less hours than their public sector or public/private sector colleagues. (38.3 vs. 42.9 vs. 44.3 h, P = 0.042). Victorians worked the fewest average hours per week at 38 h and West Australians the most at 46 h/week. Radiation oncologists averaged 48 min for each new case, 17 min per follow up and 11 min for a treatment review. Radiation oncologists averaged 246 new patients per year (median = 250, range = 20–600) with men (average = 268), Western Australians (average = 354) and those in private practice seeing

  10. Postdural puncture headache in paediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Burt, N; Dorman, B H; Reeves, S T; Rust, P F; Pinosky, M L; Abboud, M R; Barredo, J C; Laver, J H

    1998-08-01

    Previous studies have not determined the correlation between dural puncture and postural headache in paediatric patients. Furthermore, no studies have evaluated the correlation between atypical headache and dural puncture in the paediatric population. Therefore, we prospectively analyzed the incidence of typical postdural puncture headache (PDPHA) and atypical headache in paediatric oncology patients following dural puncture. The study population consisted of 66 paediatric patients undergoing 128 consecutive procedures, including 99 lumbar punctures and 29 bone marrow aspirations without concomitant lumbar puncture. Patients were prospectively randomized into four groups: Group I, preteens (< 13 yr) undergoing lumbar puncture, Group II, adolescents (13-21 yr) undergoing lumbar puncture, Group III, preteens undergoing bone marrow aspiration, and Group IV, adolescents undergoing bone marrow aspiration. The presence and description of headache was documented immediately after dural puncture or bone marrow aspiration, and on post-procedure days # 1, 3 and 5 by personnel blinded to the type of procedure. There was an increase in the incidence of headache (9.1%) after lumbar puncture in patients < 21 yr relative to patients undergoing bone marrow aspiration (P < 0.05). No difference was found between the incidence of typical PDPHA after dural puncture in preteens and adolescents. There was also no difference in the incidence of atypical headache after dural puncture or after bone marrow aspiration among preteens and adolescents. Paediatric patients experience an increased incidence of typical postdural puncture headache after dural puncture compared with age-matched patients undergoing bone marrow aspiration only. Atypical headache is relatively common in the paediatric population after dural puncture or bone marrow aspiration.

  11. Implementation of nanoparticles in therapeutic radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Erik; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2017-05-01

    Development and progress of cancer is a very complex disease process to comprehend because of the multiple changes in cellular physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology resulting from the numerous genetic changes from which cancer originates. As a result, most common treatments are not directed at the molecular level but rather at the tissue level. While personalized care is becoming an increasingly aim, the most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, each of which has a high likelihood of resulting in rather severe adverse side effects. For example, currently used radiation therapy does not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and greatly relies on the external targeting of the radiation beams to specific cells and organs. Because of this, there is an immediate need for the development of new and innovative technologies that help to differentiate tumor cells and micrometastases from normal cells and facilitate the complete destruction of those cells. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have paved a way for the development of nanoparticles (NPs) as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery, and improve the therapeutic index of radiation and tumor response to the treatment. The application of NPs in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing therapeutic effect in tumors and reducing toxicity on normal tissues. Because NPs possess unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and minimal uptake in normal tissues, it makes them ideal for the delivery of radiotherapy. This review provides an overview of the recent development of NPs for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment for a variety of cancers in radiation oncology.

  12. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Interpreting the economic literature in oncology.

    PubMed

    Grusenmeyer, Patrick A; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2007-01-10

    New treatment options provide hope for patients with localized and advanced cancer. However, these advances are associated with cost, both in terms of treatment-related expenditures and effects on quality of life. It is important that patients, physicians, insurers, and policymakers understand the relationship between costs and outcomes of new cancer treatments. Various methods of cost analysis can provide a structured manner to assess cost. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) compares the cost of the intervention with the effect, resulting in a cost per effect (eg, cost per year of life gained) that can be compared across interventions. In this article, we review three recent CEAs in the oncology literature, including chemoprevention in breast cancer, adjuvant endocrine therapy in early-stage breast cancer, and salvage chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer. The important elements of CEA, including the recommendations of the US Public Health Service Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine as they relate to cancer treatments, are discussed. Many well-done CEAs in cancer treatment have been performed during the last decade. As with clinical trials, the rigor and methods of the analysis are critical to the reliability of the results. Therapies with high cost and small incremental improvement in survival and/or quality of life may find it difficult to meet the societal thresholds for what is considered cost effective. CEA is a method to assess the cost and effect of cancer treatments, providing important insights into the best use (ie, obtaining the most value for) of health care expenditures. As the literature indicates, one must be cognizant of the fact that there can be extraordinary costs associated with some newer cancer therapies that provide small incremental clinical benefit. Better understanding of the cancer economic literature can help lead to an informed dialogue on the health policy implications of resource allocation in cancer care.

  14. Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Aneja, Sanjay; Smith, Benjamin D.; Gross, Cary P.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Roberts, Kenneth; Yu, James B.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p < 0.001), lower unemployment rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

  15. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  16. Anti-mutagenicity Effects of Vitamin E on Oncology and Non-oncology Hospital Nurses by Ames Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Basiri, Majid; Rezazadeh, Hassan; Aswadi-Kermani, Iraj; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmud

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to determine the anti-mutagenic effects of Vitamin E among nurses of oncology and non-oncology hospitals exposed to chemotherapy drugs. Several studies have demonstrated that nurses occupationally exposes to cytostatic drugs. Material and Methods: A total of 138 female nurses from oncology and non-oncology hospitals participated in the study. All urine samples of nurses before and after Vitamin E consumption (200 mg/day) were evaluated by Ames Salmonella typhimorium mutagenicity test using histidine negative of tester strain TA100 with and without S-9mix. In all steps the collected urine samples extracts were prepared using amberlit XAD-2 resins and examined for mutagenicity activity. The data of Ames assay were analyzed with Anova one way and t-test statistical. Results: In the present study 25% of oncology nursing staff excrete carcinogenic compounds in their urine and oral consumption of Vitamin E for two weeks showed significant anti-mutagenic effects. Discussion: It was appeared that the urinary mutagenic activity will decrease by receiving Vitamin E. However, after Vitamin E consumption there was significantly depletion of urinary mutagenic activity in urine extracts among the exposed nursing personnel. Conclusion: We conclude that mild effects of Vitamin E against poor safety and significant adverse events among nurses handling cytotoxic drugs. There is, therefore, a need to improve the safety of the work environment, make available protective equipment, develop standard practice guidelines for oncology nurses and higher therapeutic doses of Vitamin E may be a promising compound for reducing mutagenic effects of anti-neoplastic drugs among oncology hospital nurses. PMID:24551674

  17. Nutrition in oncology: the case of micronutrients (review).

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Zänker, Kurt; Hahn, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    In the course of cancer disease, many oncological patients develop tumor-associated malnutrition characterized by an insufficient supply of macro- and micronutrients. The inadequate nutritional status and the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome related to it are clinically relevant, as the response to antineoplastic measures, such as radiation and chemotherapy, is diminished, their side effects aggravated and the patient's quality of life and prognosis negatively affected. Therefore, the supportive nutrition care of oncological patients is of central importance. In this context, vitamins, minerals and long-chain omega -3 fatty acids are becoming more and more relevant in oncology although the benefit of such supplements is discussed controversially. Starting from a description of the etiopathogenesis and the pathophysiological consequences of cancer-associated malnutrition, the present study provides an overview of the importance of micronutrients for oncological patients. In the case of reduced food intake and/or inappropriate food choice the use of a multi-vitamin-multimineral supplement administered in physiological doses, i.e. nutrient quantities approximately corresponding to the recommended daily allowances, can be generally recommended. However, to enhance postoperative wound healing, it seems that cancer patients require higher amounts of micronutrients than healthy individuals. Because vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in oncological patients, improvement of vitamin D status is of special interest.

  18. [WINHO quality indicators for outpatient oncology care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hermes-Moll, Kerstin; Klein, Gudrun; Buschmann-Maiworm, Regina E; Baumann, Walter; Otremba, Burkhard; Lebahn, Herbert; Steinmetz, H Tilmann; Geraedts, Max; Kleeberg, Ulrich R; Schmitz, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the WINHO indicators project is to describe and enhance the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany with indicators. This paper deals with the development of a set of evidence- and consensus-based meaningful indicators to assess the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany. These indicators are intended to be applied in assessments of quality of patient care in oncology practices, in quality reports and in peer-to-peer benchmarking. A set of 272 already existing indicators was identified through internet and literature searches. After redundancy reduction and addition of newly developed indicators for areas of ambulatory oncology care that were not yet covered, a preliminary set of 67 indicators was established. The further development of the indicator set was based on a modified version of the two-step RAND/UCLA expert evaluation method, which has been internationally established for developing quality indicator sets. The indicators were modified after the first round of ratings. After completing and assessing the second round of ratings, a set of 46 homogeneously positively rated quality indicators is now available for outpatient oncology care in Germany. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  20. Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael B; Thode, Richard J

    2010-04-01

    The major impediment to the expansion of oncology services is a shortage of personnel. To develop a distance learning course for radiation oncology trainees. Under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Regional Cooperative Agreement administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a CD ROM-based Applied Sciences of Oncology (ASOC) distance learning course of 71 modules was created. The course covers communications, critical appraisal, functional anatomy, molecular biology, pathology. The materials include interactive text and illustrations that require students to answer questions before they can progress. The course aims to supplement existing oncology curricula and does not provide a qualification. It aims to assist students in acquiring their own profession's qualification. The course was piloted in seven countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America during 2004. After feedback from the pilot course, a further nine modules were added to cover imaging physics (three modules), informed consent, burnout and coping with death and dying, Economic analysis and cancer care, Nutrition, cachexia and fatigue, radiation-induced second cancers and mathematical tools and background for radiation oncology. The course was widely distributed and can be downloaded from http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Training/Aso/register.html. ASOC has been downloaded over 1100 times in the first year after it was posted. There is a huge demand for educational materials but the interactive approach is labour-intensive and expensive to compile. The course must be maintained to remain relevant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The potential role of quorum-sensing peptides in oncology.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, E; Pauwels, E; Van de Wiele, C; Burvenich, C; De Spiegeleer, B

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a limited cure rate and late diagnosis for certain types of cancer (e.g. pancreatic cancer). As this disease presents an enormous challenge for scientists, new paradigms in oncology are needed to defeat this serious disease. Currently, several peptide drugs are investigated for their preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic properties in oncology, with already 15 peptide drugs marketed for cancer therapy. However, we suggest that quorum-sensing peptide agonists and antagonists can be used in oncology as well, resulting in a larger potential peptide space. This hypothesis is based on (1) the recent evidence of prokaryote-eukaryote signalling by the use of quorum-sensing signalling molecules, (2) the apoptotic phenomenon seen in bacteria, (3) the clear similarities between the bacterial quorum-sensing mechanisms and the metastatic process tumor cells initiate, (4) the multiple receptor targeting and (5) the possibility of pharmacologic manipulation of peptides, resulting in increased receptor targeting. Up till now, however, the use of quorum-sensing signalling peptides in oncology has not yet been investigated, despite the urgent need for new insights in oncology and the promising perspectives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 2016 AAHA Oncology Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Biller, Barb; Berg, John; Garrett, Laura; Ruslander, David; Wearing, Richard; Abbott, Bonnie; Patel, Mithun; Smith, Diana; Bryan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    All companion animal practices will be presented with oncology cases on a regular basis, making diagnosis and treatment of cancer an essential part of comprehensive primary care. Because each oncology case is medically unique, these guidelines recommend a patient-specific approach consisting of the following components: diagnosis, staging, therapeutic intervention, provisions for patient and personnel safety in handling chemotherapy agents, referral to an oncology specialty practice when appropriate, and a strong emphasis on client support. Determination of tumor type by histologic examination of a biopsy sample should be the basis for all subsequent steps in oncology case management. Diagnostic staging determines the extent of local disease and presence or absence of regional or distant metastasis. The choice of therapeutic modalities is based on tumor type, histologic grade, and stage, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and adjunctive therapies, such as nutritional support and pain management. These guidelines discuss the strict safety precautions that should be observed in handling chemotherapy agents, which are now commonly used in veterinary oncology. Because cancer is often a disease of older pets, the time of life when the pet-owner relationship is usually strongest, a satisfying outcome for all parties involved is highly dependent on good communication between the entire healthcare team and the client, particularly when death or euthanasia of the patient is being considered. These guidelines include comprehensive tables of common canine and feline cancers as a resource for case management and a sample case history.

  3. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    PubMed

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  4. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS)

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kazuko

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN), the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed. PMID:27981075

  5. The Impact of a Radiation Oncologist led Oncology Curriculum on Medical Student Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ankit; Shah, Aishwarya; Shah, Bhartesh; Koottappillil, Brian; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2017-05-09

    Medical students at our institution all take a pre-clinical oncology course as well as a clinical radiation oncology didactic session during their clinical curriculum. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate the impact of the radiation oncology didactic on medical student knowledge of core oncology concepts. All students received a standardized didactic lecture introducing students to core concepts of general oncology and radiation. We administered an 18-question pretest and a posttest examining student knowledge between 2012 and 2015. Changes in student responses between pre-test and post-tests were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the didactic session. Over the course of three years, 319 (64.4%) of 495 students who completed the Radiology block completed both the pre-test and post-test. The average student test grade improved from 62.0% on the pretest to 69.6% on the posttest (p < 0.001). By category, students increased their score from 81.4% to 89.8% (p < 0.001) in general oncology, from 59.9% to 69.9% (p < 0.001) in breast oncology, from 43.0% to 51.0% (p < 0.001) in prostate oncology, and from 71.3% to 75.7% (p = 0.003) in radiation oncology. Students showed increases in knowledge across general oncology, prostate oncology, breast oncology, and radiation oncology.

  6. Oncology nurses' attitudes toward prognosis-related communication: a pilot mailed survey of oncology nursing society members.

    PubMed

    Helft, Paul R; Chamness, Amy; Terry, Colin; Uhrich, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    To assess oncology nurses' attitudes toward prognosis-related communication and experiences of the quality of such communication among physicians. Cross-sectional study. Nationwide survey in the United States. 394 Oncology Nursing Society members who completed surveys. Pilot mailed survey. Demographic variables, measures of attitudes toward and experiences of prognosis-related communication. Nurses had mixed views of prognosis-related communication and identified common barriers to their own more effective participation in prognosis-related communication. Nurses with more experience and those who worked in inpatient settings were more likely to be present for physicians' prognosis-related communication with patients. Respondents identified uncertainties regarding the scope of oncology nurses' role in prognosis-related communication. Respondents also identified opportunities for improved interdisciplinary communication, most importantly the inclusion of oncology nurses in prognosis-related communication. Opportunities for oncology nurses to bridge some gaps in prognosis-related communication likely exist, although barriers surrounding nurses' role, education, and communication within the context of the larger healthcare team need to be clarified if potential solutions are to be developed.

  7. Moral distress in nurses in oncology and haematology units.

    PubMed

    Lazzarin, Michela; Biondi, Andrea; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2012-03-01

    One of the difficulties nurses experience in clinical practice in relation to ethical issues in connection with young oncology patients is moral distress. In this descriptive correlational study, the Moral Distress Scale-Paediatric Version (MDS-PV) was translated from the original language and tested on a conventional sample of nurses working in paediatric oncology and haematology wards, in six north paediatric hospitals of Italy. 13.7% of the total respondents claimed that they had changed unit or hospital due to moral distress. The items with the highest mean intensity in the sample were almost all connected with medical and nursing competence and have considerably higher values than frequency. The instrument was found to be reliable. The results confirmed the validity of the MDS-PV (Cronbach's alpha = 0.959). This study represents the first small-scale attempt to validate MDS-PV for use in paediatric oncology-haematology nurses in Italy.

  8. Designing a mixed methods study in pediatric oncology nursing research.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Krista; Woodgate, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Despite the appeal of discovering the different strengths of various research methods, mixed methods research remains elusive in pediatric oncology nursing research. If pediatric oncology nurses are to succeed in mixing quantitative and qualitative methods, they need practical guidelines for managing the complex data and analyses of mixed methods research. This article discusses mixed methods terminology, designs, and key design features. Specific areas addressed include the myths about mixed methods research, types of mixed method research designs, steps involved in developing a mixed method research study, and the benefits and challenges of using mixed methods designs in pediatric oncology research. Examples of recent research studies that have combined quantitative and qualitative research methods are provided. The term mixed methods research is used throughout this article to reflect the use of both quantitative and qualitative methods within one study rather than the use of these methods in separate studies concerning the same research problem.

  9. Current and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mia A.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical imaging plays an essential role in cancer care and research for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response assessment. Major advances have been made over the last several decades in imaging informatics to support medical imaging. More recent informatics advances focus on the special needs of oncologic imaging, yet gaps still remain. We review the current state, limitations, and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology care including clinical and clinical research systems. We review information systems to support cancer clinical workflows including oncologist ordering of radiology studies, radiologist review and reporting of image findings, and oncologist review and integration of imaging information for clinical decision making. We discuss informatics approaches to oncologic imaging including but not limited to controlled terminologies, image annotation, and image processing algorithms. With the ongoing development of novel imaging modalities and imaging biomarkers, we expect these systems will continue to evolve and mature. PMID:21799326

  10. Current and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology.

    PubMed

    Levy, Mia A; Rubin, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    Clinical imaging plays an essential role in cancer care and research for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response assessment. Major advances in imaging informatics to support medical imaging have been made during the last several decades. More recent informatics advances focus on the special needs of oncologic imaging, yet gaps still remain. We review the current state, limitations, and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology care including clinical and clinical research systems. We review information systems to support cancer clinical workflows including oncologist ordering of radiology studies, radiologist review and reporting of image findings, and oncologist review and integration of imaging information for clinical decision making. We discuss informatics approaches to oncologic imaging including, but not limited to, controlled terminologies, image annotation, and image-processing algorithms. With the ongoing development of novel imaging modalities and imaging biomarkers, we expect these systems will continue to evolve and mature.

  11. Variability of physics education in radiation oncology medical residency programs.

    PubMed

    Das, Indra J; Moskvin, Vadim

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of medical physics education for radiation oncology medical residents. An independent survey regarding physics education was carried out using e-mail. The survey contained 12 questions addressing the duration, length, and quality of education. Responses were tabulated and compared with the recommended educational scheme. Nearly 56% of institutions participated in this survey. Educational patterns were found to be significantly variable among institutions. Some have minimum physics education (10 lectures), and some have 90 lectures per year. In general, two-thirds of the institutions require residents to attend classes up to the third year. Significant variability of physics education for radiation oncology medical residents was observed, contrary to the national recommendations. With advanced treatment techniques, physics education should be given more importance, and the number of lectures should be increased to accommodate every aspect of radiation oncology practice. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stressing factors and coping strategies used by oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Andrea Bezerra; Chaves, Eliane Corrêa

    2008-01-01

    In the oncology specialty, many factors can result in occupational stress in nursing professionals. As an attempt to controlling this situation, individuals may use coping strategies. Coping is a cognitive and behavioral effort one uses to face a stressful situation. The aims of this study were to identify the stressful factors regarding oncology nurses, and to verify what coping strategies they use. Two questionnaires were used: a demographic data inventory, designed by the researcher, and the Folkman and Lazarus coping strategies inventory. The results showed that the main stressful factors for oncology nurses are patient death (28.6%), emergency situations (16.9%), relationship issues with the nursing team (15.5%), and work-process situations (15.5%). In the studied population, the main coping strategy used was positive reappraisal.

  13. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services.

  14. Restricted mouth opening and trismus in oral oncology.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, P S; Mohan, Minu P; Jacob, Jayan

    2014-06-01

    Restricted mouth opening (RMO) and trismus are terms commonly used in oral oncology in instances where there is difficulty in mouth opening. The term trismus in oral oncology is mainly used to indicate the radiation-induced fibrosis of the muscles of mastication. The treatment given for RMO as reported in the literature is given for muscular dysfunction trismus, whereas RMO in oral oncology can occur owing to various reasons other than muscular dysfunction. RMO occurs in various conditions of the oral cavity; in posterior pharyngeal infection, where it is termed reflectory trismus; in oral submucous fibrosis; in oral mucosal disorders; in the use of certain drugs; and in minor dental procedures of the posterior oral cavity. The usage of the term trismus in all RMO cases would complicate the treatment; thus, the word should not be used in all RMO cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Women in oncology: progress, challenges, and keys to success.

    PubMed

    Reeder-Hayes, Katherine; Felip, Enriqueta; Patt, Debra; Jaffee, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Women have an increasingly significant presence in the oncology physician workforce but remain underrepresented in leadership positions and at the senior levels of academic medicine. Initiatives to close these gaps are underway both in the United States and Europe. However, many areas for improvement remain on an organizational level and in the trenches of career development and mentorship for individual female oncologists in both community and academic settings. Solutions to advance women in the oncology workforce will involve policy initiatives by professional and funding organizations, individual initiatives by universities and practices to recognize and develop female leaders, an increased focus on teamwork and novel practice arrangements, and high-quality mentorship of young women entering the oncology field.

  16. Metals as radio-enhancers in oncology: The industry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Pottier, Agnés Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2015-12-18

    Radio-enhancers, metal-based nanosized agents, could play a key role in oncology. They may unlock the potential of radiotherapy by enhancing the radiation dose deposit within tumors when the ionizing radiation source is ‘on’, while exhibiting chemically inert behavior in cellular and subcellular systems when the radiation beam is ‘off’. Important decision points support the development of these new type of therapeutic agents originated from nanotechnology. Here, we discuss from an industry perspective, the interest of developing radio-enhancer agents to improve tumor control, the relevance of nanotechnology to achieve adequate therapeutic attributes, and present some considerations for their development in oncology. - Highlights: • Oncology is a field of high unmet medical need. • Despites of its widespread usage, radiation therapy presents a narrow therapeutic window. • High density material at the nanoscale may enhance radiation dose deposit from cancer cells. • Metal-based nanosized radio-enhancers could unlock the potential of radiotherapy.

  17. Using big data for quality assessment in oncology.

    PubMed

    Broughman, James R; Chen, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing attention in the US healthcare system on the delivery of high-quality care, an issue central to oncology. In the report 'Crossing the Quality Chasm', the Institute of Medicine identified six aims for improving healthcare quality: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient and equitable. This article describes how current big data resources can be used to assess these six dimensions, and provides examples of published studies in oncology. Strengths and limitations of current big data resources for the evaluation of quality of care are also discussed. Finally, this article outlines a vision where big data can be used not only to retrospectively assess the quality of oncologic care, but help physicians deliver high-quality care in real time.

  18. Adverse reactions to oncologic drugs: spontaneous reporting and signal detection.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Montagnani, Sabrina; Capogrosso-Sansone, Alice; Mantarro, Stefania; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Oncology is one of the areas of medicine with the most active research being conducted on new drugs. New pharmacological entities frequently enter the clinical arena, and therefore, the safety profile of anticancer products deserves continuous monitoring. However, only very severe and (unusual) suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are usually reported, since cancer patients develop ADRs very frequently and some practical selectivity must be used. Notably, a recent study was able to identify 76 serious ADRs reported in updated drug labels of oncologic drugs and 50% of them (n = 38) were potentially fatal. Of these, 49 and 58%, respectively, were not described in initial drug labels. The aims of this article are to provide an overview about spontaneous reporting of ADRs of oncologic drugs and to discuss the available methods to analyze the safety of anticancer drugs using databases of spontaneous ADR reporting.

  19. Overview of Accountable Care Organizations for Oncology Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish J.; Macklis, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are poised to become major components of health care delivery in the United States. The practice of oncology, often laden with high charges, is likely to undergo major shifts as ACOs become widespread. In this article, we review the economic factors leading to the growth of ACOs and discuss some elements of the current ACO model proposed in the Affordable Care Act. Oncology specialists—in medicine, surgery, and radiation oncology—will have important roles in determining the place of specialty care in an ACO framework and will have to take the lead in educating patients, primary care physicians, and administrators on the value propositions related to their activities. We also describe how oncology specialists may participate in the model to ensure success for physicians and patients. PMID:23942925

  20. Translational value of mouse models in oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Gould, Stephen E; Junttila, Melissa R; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2015-05-01

    Much has been written about the advantages and disadvantages of various oncology model systems, with the overall finding that these models lack the predictive power required to translate preclinical efficacy into clinical activity. Despite assertions that some preclinical model systems are superior to others, no single model can suffice to inform preclinical target validation and molecule selection. This perspective provides a balanced albeit critical view of these claims of superiority and outlines a framework for the proper use of existing preclinical models for drug testing and discovery. We also highlight gaps in oncology mouse models and discuss general and pervasive model-independent shortcomings in preclinical oncology work, and we propose ways to address these issues.

  1. International collaboration for pediatric oncology nursing leadership: Nicaragua and Canada.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A; Marin, V; Reyes, S; Challinor, J; Carpio, B

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, with financial support from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario, a pilot nursing leadership project linked pediatric oncology nurses from Canada with nurses at the La Mascota Hospital in Managua, Nicaragua. Following consultation with the pediatric oncology team in Nicaragua, a program was developed to strengthen clinical nursing leadership in a clinical setting through continuing education. The nurses believed that care of the patient and family improved due to the increased leadership skills of nurses in the unit and as the profile and credibility of nurses as peers in the health care team became evident. Providing nurses with the autonomy and financing for a project related directly to nursing care represented an important development for leadership in the profession.

  2. Population-based advanced practice nursing: where does oncology fit in?

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Jennie Greco

    2013-12-01

    A national work group met in 2004 to discuss the future of advanced practice nursing. The representatives were nursing education, certification, accreditation, and regulation experts, and the goal was to develop a consensus model for advanced practice nursing regulation (Nevidjon et al., 2010). As a result, a set of recommendations was published in an article that defined a new consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation (APRN Consensus Workgroup, 2008; Goudreau, 2009). The new model included six population-based focuses of practice (i.e., family and individual across the lifespan, adult and gerontology, neonatal, pediatrics, women's health- and gender-related, and psychiatric and mental health) (Johnson, Dawson, & Brassard, 2010). A goal of the new model was to standardize the licensure, certification, and regulation of nurse practitioners into specific focuses. State boards were facing an increasing number of requests to recognize nurse practitioner specialties (e.g., organ specific, body systems, diseases) (Johnson et al., 2010). The new model helped standardize education programs, which may help certifying agencies set up curriculum review processes to ensure appropriate credentials for APRNs (Johnson et al., 2010). It also supported the mission of nursing to meet future healthcare needs of the public and to protect the public (Johnson et al., 2010). Some advantages exist to delineating into population-based focuses, but the new model leaves out many specialties (e.g., oncology) that encompass the whole person as well as concentrate on certain diseases.

  3. Applications for oncologic drugs: a descriptive analysis of the oncologic drugs advisory committee reviews.

    PubMed

    Chan, John K; Kiet, Tuyen K; Monk, Bradley J; Young-Lin, Nichole; Blansit, Kevin; Kapp, Daniel S; Amanam, Idoroenyi

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in cancer research, the majority of drug applications submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are not approved. It is important to identify the concerns of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee (ODAC) from rejected applications. All applications referred to the ODAC from 2001 to 2012 were reviewed. Of 46 applications, 31 (67%) were for full and 15 (33%) were for supplemental approval, 34 (74%) were for solid and 12 (26%) were for hematologic tumors. In all, 22 (48%) were not approved. ODAC comments addressed missing or inadequate data (65%), excessive toxicity (55%), inappropriate study endpoints (45%), poor study design (40%), and insufficient sample size (30%). To define efficacy, 19 applications used response rates (RR) (median = 38%), and 19 applications used hazard ratios (HR) (median = 0.67). For all organ systems combined, the median cumulative grade 3 or 4 toxicity was 64%. Drugs with higher RR, lower HR, and lower toxicity were more likely to be approved versus other drugs (89% vs. 45%; p = .02). Over time (2001-2004, 2005-2008, 2009-2012), there was an increase in the following: number of applications submitted for review (from 11 to 12 to 23, respectively), number of approvals (from 6 to 6 to 12, respectively), and proportion of trials using progression-free survival as a primary endpoint (from 0% to 50% to 70%, respectively; p = .01). Of all applications, common ODAC concerns included inadequate data, excessive toxicity, and inappropriate study endpoints. Over time, there was an approximate doubling of FDA application submissions and approved oncology drugs.

  4. Toward a consensus on radiobiology teaching to radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Dynlacht, Joseph R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hall, Eric J; Rosenstein, Barry S; Zeman, Elaine M

    2002-05-01

    There are approximately 82 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States, which provide training opportunities for about 400 residents. All accredited radiation oncology residency programs must have at least one basic scientist on the faculty, and it is these individuals who often assume, wholly or in part, the responsibility of teaching radiation and cancer biology to radiation oncology residents in preparation for the American College of Radiology (ACR) In-Training Examination in Radiation Oncology and the American Board of Radiology (ABR) written examinations. In response to a perceived lack of uniformity in radiation and cancer biology curricula currently being taught to residents and a perceived lack of guidance for instructors in formulating course content for this population, a special session was presented at the Forty-eighth Annual Radiation Research Society meeting on April 23, 2001. The session, entitled "Toward a Consensus on Radiobiology Teaching to Radiation Oncology Residents", was focused on issues related to teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents and targeted for individuals who actively teach radiation and cancer biology as well as coordinators of residency training programs. The speakers addressed current challenges and future problems facing instructors and programs. Among these were lack of feedback on resident performance on ABR and ACR written examinations and on course content, uncertainty about what topics residents must know to pass the ABR examination, and, in the near future, a reduction (due to retirement) of instructors qualified to teach radiobiology. This article provides a synopsis of the information that was presented during that session, offers a glimpse into how the ABR and ACR examinations are prepared and details of the content of past and future examinations, and summarizes the activities of the Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching which was formed to educate instructors, to establish a

  5. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M; Bondurant, Patricia G; Cohn, Susan L; Dobrozsi, Sarah K; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children's Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology.

  6. Community oncology in an era of payment reform.

    PubMed

    Cox, John V; Ward, Jeffery C; Hornberger, John C; Temel, Jennifer S; McAneny, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Patients and payers (government and private) are frustrated with the fee-for-service system (FFS) of payment for outpatient health services. FFS rewards volume and highly valued services, including expensive diagnostics and therapeutics, over lesser valued cognitive services. Proposed payment schemes would incent collaboration and coordination of care among providers and reward quality. In oncology, new payment schemes must address the high costs of all services, particularly drugs, while preserving the robust distribution of sites of service available to patients in the United States. Information technology and personalized cancer care are changing the practice of oncology. Twenty-first century oncology will require increasing cognitive work and shared decision making, both of which are not well regarded in the FFS model. A high proportion of health care dollars are consumed in the final months of life. Effective delivery of palliative and end-of-life care must be addressed by practice and by new models of payment. Value-based reimbursement schemes will require oncology practices to change how they are structured. Lessons drawn from the principles of primary care's Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) will help oncology practice to prepare for new schemes. PCMH principles place a premium on proactively addressing toxicities of therapies, coordinating care with other providers, and engaging patients in shared decision making, supporting the ideal of value defined in the triple aim-to measurably improve patient experience and quality of care at less cost. Payment reform will be disruptive to all. Oncology must be engaged in policy discussions and guide rational shifts in priorities defined by new payment models.

  7. Imaging in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Alberico, Ronald A; Husain, Syed Hamed S; Sirotkin, Igor

    2004-01-01

    pacemakers and certain other implanted metallic devices, and artifacts related to multiple causes, not the least of which is motion. CT is fast, well tolerated, and readily available but has lower contrast resolution and requires iodinated contrast and ionizing radiation. The current authors' practice is heavily centered on CT for initial evaluation, preoperative planning, biopsy targeting, and postoperative follow-up. They reserve MRI for tumors that are suspicious for perineural,cartilaginous, or bony invasion on CT, or for tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma that are highly likely to spread by way of these routes. For patients who have head and neck cancer, a radiologist who is educated in the treatment options, patterns of tumor growth, and important surgical landmarks, and who has a well-established pattern of communication with the head and neck clinical services, including surgery, radiation oncology,and pathology, is key in providing accurate and useful image interpretation.

  8. Practical perspectives of personalized healthcare in oncology.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Darren R; Wellings, Robert; Harbron, Christopher

    2012-09-15

    There is an increasing prevalence of drug-diagnostic combinations in oncology. This has placed diagnostic stakeholders directly into the complex benefit-risk, cost, value and uncertainty-driven development paradigm traditionally the preserve of the drug development community. In this review we focus on the delivery of the clinical data required to advance such drug-diagnostic combination development programmes and ultimately satisfy regulators and payors of the value of contemporaneous changes in diagnostic and treatment practice. Ideally all stakeholders would like to initially estimate, and ultimately specify, the comparative benefit-risk for a new treatment option with and without changing diagnostic practice. Hence, in an ideal world clinical trial design is focused on acquiring biomarker treatment interaction data. In this review we describe the key scientific and feasibility inputs required to design and deliver such trials and the drivers, advantages and disadvantages associated with departing from this model. We do not discuss the discovery of new biomarkers nor the analytical validation and marketing of diagnostic products. Following on from trial design we describe how subsequent success then depends upon the concepts that guide trial design being driven into the complex world of large, multinational clinical trial delivery. For every aspect of a traditional clinical drug trial such as supply, recruitment and adherence, there is a corresponding concept for the diagnostic element. In practice, this means that each patient's contribution to the decision making data-set is subject to double jeopardy (attrition on clinical outcome and biomarker status). Historically, this has led to significantly reduced power for detecting biomarker-treatment interactions, reduced decision making confidence and a waste of valuable human and financial resources. We describe recent practice changes and experience that have led to the successful delivery of such trials focusing

  9. Advances in radioguided surgery in oncology.

    PubMed

    Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Manca, Gianpiero; Mariani, Giuliano; León-Ramírez, Luisa F; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is probably the most well-known radioguided technique in surgical oncology. Today SLN biopsy reduces the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy and increases the identification rate of occult lymphatic metastases by offering the pathologist the lymph nodes with the highest probability of containing metastatic cells. These advantages may result in a change in clinical management both in melanoma and breast cancer patients. The SLN evaluation by pathology currently implies tumor burden stratification for further prognostic information. The concept of SLN biopsy includes pre-surgical lymphoscintigraphy as a "roadmap" to guide the surgeon toward the SLNs and to localize unpredictable lymphatic drainage patterns. In addition to planar images, SPECT/CT improves SLN detection, especially in sites closer to the injection site, providing anatomic landmarks which are helpful in localizing SLNs in difficult to interpret studies. The use of intraoperative imaging devices allows a better surgical approach and SLN localization. Several studies report the value of such devices for excision of additional sentinel nodes and for monitoring the whole procedure. The combination of preoperative imaging and radioguided localization constitutes the basis for a whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures, which recently have been encompassed under the term "guided intraoperative scintigraphic tumor targeting" (GOSTT). Excepting SLN biopsy, GOSTT includes procedures based on the detection of target lesions with visible uptake of tumor-seeking radiotracers on SPECT/CT or PET/CT enabling their subsequent radioguided excisional biopsy for diagnostic of therapeutic purposes. The incorporation of new PET-tracers into nuclear medicine has reinforced this field delineating new strategies for radioguided excision. In cases with insufficient lesion uptake after systemic radiotracer administration, intralesional injection of a tracer

  10. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology.

  11. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  12. Periodontium destruction associated with oncology therapy. Five case reports

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radiation treatment to the head and neck and cytotoxic chemotherapy can produce deleterious side effects to the periodontium that are generally transient in nature, reversible, and do not result in permanently visible defects. However, combinations of the malignant disease itself, the direct and indirect effects of medical therapy and associated oral infections, along with local trauma can lead to periodontal tissue destruction with resulting permanent architectural defects. Five case reports illustrate destructive alterations of the periodontium that were associated with oncology therapy. Proposed guidelines for periodontal treatment of compromised individuals undergoing oncology therapies are suggested.

  13. Communication Skills Training in Pediatric Oncology: Moving Beyond Role Modeling.

    PubMed

    Feraco, Angela M; Brand, Sarah R; Mack, Jennifer W; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Block, Susan D; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Communication is central to pediatric oncology care. Pediatric oncologists disclose life-threatening diagnoses, explain complicated treatment options, and endeavor to give honest prognoses, to maintain hope, to describe treatment complications, and to support families in difficult circumstances ranging from loss of function and fertility to treatment-related or disease-related death. However, parents, patients, and providers report substantial communication deficits. Poor communication outcomes may stem, in part, from insufficient communication skills training, overreliance on role modeling, and failure to utilize best practices. This review summarizes evidence for existing methods to enhance communication skills and calls for revitalizing communication skills training within pediatric oncology.

  14. Appropriateness criteria of FDG PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    18Fluorine-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established functional imaging method widely used in oncology. In this article, we have incorporated the various indications for 18FDG PET/CT in oncology based on available evidence and current guidelines. Growing body of evidence for use of 18FDG PET/CT in select tumors is also discussed. This article attempts to give the reader an overview of the appropriateness of using 18F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies. PMID:25969632

  15. Genomic Oncology Education: An Urgent Need, A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Richard L.; Saffitz, Jeffrey E.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic testing has entered oncology practice. With reduced cost and faster turn-around-times, clinical applications for next-generation sequencing-based assays will only continue to increase. As such, there is an urgent need for health professional education to allow implementation of these new diagnostic tools. However, current medical school, residency and fellowship training has had limited success in educating physicians in the fundamentals of single gene testing let alone genomic methods. In this review, we describe the novel approach the pathology community has taken in genomic education and the potential for application to oncology trainees. PMID:24445771

  16. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  17. Searching for wisdom in oncology care: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Garcia, Carla; Bauman, Glenn

    2017-06-01

    The concept of "wisdom" is beginning to emerge in the oncology literature, raising questions concerning: (1) how the concept of wisdom is used in oncology literature; (2) the ways in which wisdom has been a focus of inquiry within oncology care; and (3) how wisdom is characterized when the term is used. A scoping review, using Arksey and O'Malley's five-step framework, was undertaken to address these questions. In consultation with oncology reference librarians, "wisdom"- and "oncology"-related search terms were identified, and four electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, SocINDEX, PubMed, and PsychINFO. After removal of duplicates and application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 58 records were identified and included for analysis. The concept of wisdom was employed with a breadth of meanings, and 58 records were schematized into 7 genres, including: (1) empirical research with wisdom foregrounded as a study focus (n = 2); (2) empirical research articles where "wisdom" appears in the findings (n = 16); (3) a quality-improvement project where wisdom is an embedded concept (n = 1); (4) essays where wisdom is an aspect of the discussion (n = 5); (5) commentary/opinion pieces where wisdom is an aspect of its focus (n = 6); (6) personal stories describing wisdom as something gleaned from lived experience with cancer (n = 2); and (7) everyday/taken-for-granted uses of wisdom (n = 26). The notion of wisdom has a taken-for-granted presence in the published oncology literature and holds promise for future research into patient and clinician wisdom in oncology care. Nonetheless, the terminology is varied and unclear. A scholarly focus on wisdom has not been brought to bear in cancer care to the degree it has in other fields, and research is in the early stages. Various characterizations of wisdom are present. If such a resource as "wisdom" exists, dwelling in human experiences and practices, there may be benefit in recognizing wisdom as informing the epistemologies

  18. Perspectives on making big data analytics work for oncology.

    PubMed

    El Naqa, Issam

    2016-12-01

    Oncology, with its unique combination of clinical, physical, technological, and biological data provides an ideal case study for applying big data analytics to improve cancer treatment safety and outcomes. An oncology treatment course such as chemoradiotherapy can generate a large pool of information carrying the 5Vs hallmarks of big data. This data is comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of patient demographics, radiation/chemo dosimetry, multimodality imaging features, and biological markers generated over a treatment period that can span few days to several weeks. Efforts using commercial and in-house tools are underway to facilitate data aggregation, ontology creation, sharing, visualization and varying analytics in a secure environment. However, open questions related to proper data structure representation and effective analytics tools to support oncology decision-making need to be addressed. It is recognized that oncology data constitutes a mix of structured (tabulated) and unstructured (electronic documents) that need to be processed to facilitate searching and subsequent knowledge discovery from relational or NoSQL databases. In this context, methods based on advanced analytics and image feature extraction for oncology applications will be discussed. On the other hand, the classical p (variables)≫n (samples) inference problem of statistical learning is challenged in the Big data realm and this is particularly true for oncology applications where p-omics is witnessing exponential growth while the number of cancer incidences has generally plateaued over the past 5-years leading to a quasi-linear growth in samples per patient. Within the Big data paradigm, this kind of phenomenon may yield undesirable effects such as echo chamber anomalies, Yule-Simpson reversal paradox, or misleading ghost analytics. In this work, we will present these effects as they pertain to oncology and engage small thinking methodologies to counter these effects ranging from

  19. Communication, Documentation, and Training Standards in Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology.

    PubMed

    Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Pelletier, Wendy; Bingen, Kristin

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger effort to create standards for psychosocial care of children with cancer, we document consensus and evidence-based data on interprofessional communication, documentation, and training for professionals providing psycho-oncology services. Six databases were searched. Sixty-five articles and six guidelines and consensus-based documents were identified; 35 met inclusion criteria. Data support strong recommendations for standards of care in communication/collaboration, documentation of patient information, and training in pediatric psycho-oncology. These are areas where extensive research is unlikely to be conducted; however, professional expectations and qualifications may be further clarified and strengthened with time. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ESTRO 2012 strategy meeting: vision for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Bourhis, Jean; Hollywood, Donal

    2012-04-01

    Access to modern radiation oncology treatment programmes is now recognised as an essential component of high-quality cancer treatment and central to optimal patient care. Looking to the future, ESTRO strongly believes that further development of the discipline will be critically important to the future strategic development of multidisciplinary cancer care. On behalf of the Board and membership of ESTRO, this document outlines the Society's Vision for the development of the discipline of Radiation and Clinical Oncology together with the associated priority action areas that will collectively and strategically direct the Society's activities in the forthcoming years.

  1. Cardio-oncology: The Role of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Mandawat, Anant; Williams, Andrew E; Francis, Sanjeev A

    2017-04-01

    Despite its challenges, a "big data" approach offers a unique opportunity within the field of cardio-oncology. A pharmacovigilant approach using large data sets can help characterize cardiovascular toxicities of the rapidly expanding armamentarium of targeted therapies. Creating a broad coalition of data sharing can provide insights into the incidence of cardiotoxicity and stimulate research into the underlying mechanisms. Population health necessitates the use of big data and can help inform public health interventions to prevent both cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a relatively new discipline, cardio-oncology is poised to take advantage of big data.

  2. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  3. Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

  4. Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

  5. Clinical oncology and palliative medicine as a combined specialty--a unique model in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Rebecca; Wong, Kam-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Keung; Wong, Ka-Yan; Yau, Yvonne; Lo, Sing-Hung; Liu, Rico

    2015-07-01

    The importance of early integration of palliative care (PC) into oncology treatment is increasingly being recognized. However, there is no consensus on what is the optimal way of integration. This article describes a unique model in Hong Kong where clinical oncology and palliative medicine (PM) is integrated through the development of PM as a subspecialty under clinical oncology.

  6. About the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group supports clinical oncology trials in cancer prevention and control in community settings. The group also supports investigator-initiated research projects in supportive, palliative and end-of-life care, and coordinates clinical oncology research projects with other NCI programs to be done in the community setting. |

  7. Palliative Care Education in Gynecologic Oncology: a Survey of Gynecologic Oncologists and Gynecologic Oncology Fellows in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ratanakaaew, A; Khemapech, N; Laurujisawat, P

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to survey the education and training of certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in Thailand. A secondary objective was to study the problems in fellowship training regarding palliative care for gynecologic cancer patients. A descriptive study was conducted by sending a questionnaire regarding palliative care education to all certified gynecologic oncologists and gynecologic oncology fellows in Thailand. The contents of the survey included fellowship training experience, caring for the dying, patient preparation, attitudes and respondent characteristics. Statistics were analyzed by percentage, mean and standard deviation and chi-square. One hundred seventy completed questionnaires were returned; the response rate was 66%. Most certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in gynecologic oncology have a positive attitude towards palliative care education, and agree that "psychological distress can result in severe physical suffering". It was found that the curriculum of gynecologic oncology fellowship training equally emphasizes three aspects, namely managing post-operative complications, managing a patient at the end of life and managing a patient with gynecologic oncology. As for experiential training during the fellowship of gynecologic oncology, education regarding breaking bad news, discussion about goals of care and procedures for symptoms control were mostly on-the-job training without explicit teaching. In addition, only 42.9% of respondents were explicitly taught the coping skill for managing their own stress when caring for palliative patients during fellowship training. Most of respondents rated their clinical competency for palliative care in the "moderately well prepared" level, and the lowest score of the competency was the issue of spiritual care. Almost all certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in gynecologic oncology have a positive attitude towards learning and teaching in palliative care. In this

  8. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  9. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    2016-12-20

    Purpose A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. Recommendations The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

  10. Technology evaluation: SAGE, Genzyme molecular oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J

    2001-02-01

    Genzyme Molecular Oncology (GMO) is using its SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) combinatorial chemistry technology to screen compound libraries. SAGE is a high-throughput, high-efficiency method to simultaneously detect and measure the expression levels of genes expressed in a cell at a given time, including rare genes. SAGE can be used in a wide variety of applications to identify disease-related genes, to analyze the effect of drugs on tissues and to provide insights into disease pathways. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the expressed genes that are present in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. The sequence data are then analyzed to identify each gene expressed in the cell and the levels at which each gene is expressed. This information forms a library that can be used to analyze the differences in gene expression between cells [293437]. By December 1999, GMO had identified a set of 40 genes from 3.5 million transcripts that were expressed at elevated levels in all cancer tissue but not seen in normal tissue. The company hope these may provide diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. The studies also provided data furthering the understanding of the way cells use their genome [349968]. GMO has signed a collaborative agreement with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to search for new drug candidates in the field of cancer chemotherapy. The collaboration combines GMO's SAGE technology with the NCI's extensive array of 60 cell-based cancer screens. Under the agreement, the NCI will evaluate Genzyme's library consisting of one million compounds against selected cancer screens to identify compounds with anticancer properties [255082]. Xenometrix granted a license agreement for gene expression profiling to GMO in February 1999, giving company access to claims covered in issued US and European patents. The license is non-exclusive and covers the

  11. Multicenter Analysis of Long-Term Oncologic Impact of Anastomotic Leakage After Laparoscopic Total Mesorectal Excision

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeonghyun; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Nam Kyu; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Kang Young; Baik, Seung Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to validate the oncologic outcomes of anastomotic leakage (AL) after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) in a large multicenter cohort. The impact of AL after laparoscopic TME for rectal cancer surgery has not yet been clearly described. This was a multicenter retrospective study of 1083 patients who underwent laparoscopic TME for nonmetastatic rectal cancer (stage 0–III). AL was defined as an anastomotic complication within 30 days of surgery irrespective of requiring a reoperation or interventional radiology. Estimated local recurrence (LR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the leakage group and the no leakage group using the log-rank method. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis was used to adjust confounding for survival. The incidence of AL was 6.4%. Mortality within 30 days of surgery occurred in 1 patient (1.4%) in the leakage group and 2 patients (0.2%) in the no leakage group. The leakage group showed a higher LR rate (6.4% vs 1.8%, P = 0.011). Five-year DFS and OS were significantly lower in the leakage group than the no leakage group (DFS 71.7% vs 82.1%, P = 0.016, OS 81.8% vs 93.5%, P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that AL was an independent poor prognostic factor for DFS and OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.0–2.6; P = 0.042, HR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0–4.2; P = 0.028, respectively). AL after laparoscopic TME was significantly associated with an increased rate of LR, systemic recurrence and poor OS. PMID:26200636

  12. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  13. Triaging referrals as part of hematology/oncology fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Kyei, Mark; Lavelle, Ellen; Kyasa, Jameel; Safar, Mazin; Makhoul, Issam; Mehta, Paulette

    2010-09-01

    We developed an integrative component of the consult rotation for fellows training in hematology/oncology. This component consisted of triaging all consults to the hematology/oncology service of the CAVHS during a 1-year period of time. The goals of the rotation were to improve timeliness of response to consultation requests, to gain experience in differential diagnosis of patients with potential hematologic/oncologic disorders through of such patients, review of decisions with attending physicians, and communication of such with the referring physician. The major benefits were that fellows integrated didactic learning into real-life clinical cases, selected patients for their continuity clinic to assure sufficient variety and complexity of cases, honed their communication skills, learned about referring and attending physicians' styles, and gained practice in clinical vignettes representative of cases they would be expected to see in clinical practice. Disadvantages were time involvement (approximately 2 h/day) and risks of over- or under-referrals. Administratively, there was a significant decline in the wait time for patients to be seen in the hematology/oncology service. In all, this elective is a valuable integrative experience of senior fellows, but may have less value for first year fellows.

  14. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  15. Oncology Social Workers' Attitudes toward Hospice Care and Referral Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Janet E.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the Association of Oncology Social Workers completed a survey, which included the Hospice Philosophy Scale (HPS) assessing the likelihood of the worker referring a terminally ill patient to hospice, background and experience, and demographics. The respondents held overwhelmingly favorable attitudes toward hospice philosophy and care,…

  16. Antidrug Antibody Formation in Oncology: Clinical Relevance and Challenges.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, Emilie M J; Ros, Willeke; Wolbink, Gertjan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-10-01

    : In oncology, an increasing number of targeted anticancer agents and immunotherapies are of biological origin. These biological drugs may trigger immune responses that lead to the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). ADAs are directed against immunogenic parts of the drug and may affect efficacy and safety. In other medical fields, such as rheumatology and hematology, the relevance of ADA formation is well established. However, the relevance of ADAs in oncology is just starting to be recognized, and literature on this topic is scarce. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, we provide an up-to-date status of ADA formation in oncology. In this focused review, data on ADAs was extracted from 81 clinical trials with biological anticancer agents. We found that most biological anticancer drugs in these trials are immunogenic and induce ADAs (63%). However, it is difficult to establish the clinical relevance of these ADAs. In order to determine this relevance, the possible effects of ADAs on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety parameters need to be investigated. Our data show that this was done in fewer than 50% of the trials. In addition, we describe the incidence and consequences of ADAs for registered agents. We highlight the challenges in ADA detection and argue for the importance of validating, standardizing, and describing well the used assays. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies such as immunosuppression and regimen adaptations. We encourage the launch of clinical trials that explore these strategies in oncology.

  17. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  18. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  19. Oncology Social Workers' Attitudes toward Hospice Care and Referral Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Janet E.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the Association of Oncology Social Workers completed a survey, which included the Hospice Philosophy Scale (HPS) assessing the likelihood of the worker referring a terminally ill patient to hospice, background and experience, and demographics. The respondents held overwhelmingly favorable attitudes toward hospice philosophy and care,…

  20. Dynamic optical projection of acquired luminescence for aiding oncologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Gullicksrud, Kyle; Mondal, Suman; Sudlow, Gail P.; Achilefu, Samuel; Akers, Walter J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical imaging enables real-time visualization of intrinsic and exogenous contrast within biological tissues. Applications in human medicine have demonstrated the power of fluorescence imaging to enhance visualization in dermatology, endoscopic procedures, and open surgery. Although few optical contrast agents are available for human medicine at this time, fluorescence imaging is proving to be a powerful tool in guiding medical procedures. Recently, intraoperative detection of fluorescent molecular probes that target cell-surface receptors has been reported for improvement in oncologic surgery in humans. We have developed a novel system, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL), to further enhance real-time guidance of open oncologic surgery. In this method, collected fluorescence intensity maps are projected onto the imaged surface rather than via wall-mounted display monitor. To demonstrate proof-of-principle for OPAL applications in oncologic surgery, lymphatic transport of indocyanine green was visualized in live mice for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes. Subsequently, peritoneal tumors in a murine model of breast cancer metastasis were identified using OPAL after systemic administration of a tumor-selective fluorescent molecular probe. These initial results clearly show that OPAL can enhance adoption and ease-of-use of fluorescence imaging in oncologic procedures relative to existing state-of-the-art intraoperative imaging systems.

  1. Improving oncology nurses' communication skills for difficult conversations.

    PubMed

    Baer, Linda; Weinstein, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    When oncology nurses have strong communication skills, they play a pivotal role in influencing patient satisfaction, adherence to plans of care, and overall clinical outcomes. However, research studies indicate that nurses tend to keep communication with patients and families at a superficial, nontherapeutic level. Processes for teaching goals-of-care communication skills and for implementing skills into clinical practice are not clearly defined. Nurses at a large comprehensive cancer center recognized the need for help with this skill set and sought out communication experts to assist in providing the needed education. An educational project was developed to improve therapeutic communication skills in oncology nurses during goals-of-care discussions and giving bad news. The program was tailored to nurses and social workers providing care to patients in a busy, urban, academic, outpatient oncology setting. Program topics included exploring the patient's world, eliciting hopes and concerns, and dealing with conflict about goals. Sharing and discussing specific difficult questions and scenarios were encouraged throughout the program. The program was well attended and well received by oncology nurses and social workers. Participants expressed interest in the continuation of communication programs to further enhance skills.

  2. [Factors limiting and favoring communication and information in oncology].

    PubMed

    Razavi, D; Delvaux, N

    1989-12-01

    The authors discuss actual concepts about the transmission of information to the patient and his family in oncology. After the discussion of problems related to the emission and reception of information, they introduce the useful strategies designed in order to achieve an optimal transmission of information, and to improve doctor-patient communication.

  3. Possibly Impossible Patients: Management of Difficult Behavior in Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.; Meyer, Fremonta L.; Miovic, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Angry, threatening, or otherwise disruptive behavior by patients can interfere with necessary oncologic treatment, sometimes to the point of rendering continued care impossible. We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology setting. We review the existing literature on dealing with difficult patients and present clinical experience at a comprehensive cancer center where a formalized, institutional process for responding to disruptive outpatients has been developed. A structured, multidisciplinary approach to deal with difficult behavior in oncology outpatients can improve care and staff morale. Staff using this approach can identify causes of treatment-disrupting behavior, develop and implement appropriate behavior plans, facilitate communication, address mental health issues, and ensure that decisions to terminate a relationship with a patient are ethical, clinically justified, and supported by due process. In the future, clinical recommendations and institutional guidelines for dealing with difficult patients should be evaluated with more structured, quantitative research. PMID:22043189

  4. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Chevalier, Pat; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Barksey, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a major health issue that affects a significant proportion of the population. Advancements in oncology treatment have reduced mortality, creating an ever-greater need for psychosocial oncology. Patients with cancer at Grand River Regional Cancer Centre (GRRCC) have access to some psychosocial intervention (e.g., wellness workshops, social work intervention); however, the extent to which these efforts meet patients' current needs is not known. The purpose of the exploratory survey was to assess patients' psychosocial needs and psychosocial oncology service needs. Patients receiving treatment for cancer at GRRCC were asked to participate in the anonymous survey. Two research assistants from the University of Guelph obtained informed consent, then with assistance from volunteers from the GRRCC, collected all data. The two screening tools, and standardized, self-report measures of depression and social support (Perceived Social Support Scale) were administered. Patients rated the psychosocial oncology services as very helpful, though 100% indicated the presence of distress. The main source of distress concerned not knowing what their personal outcomes will be. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  5. 76 FR 65736 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  6. 77 FR 31025 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-12588] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of...

  7. 76 FR 11489 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  8. 77 FR 25184 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  9. 76 FR 82309 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  10. 78 FR 13348 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  11. 77 FR 58399 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  12. 77 FR 5813 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  13. 75 FR 9419 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  14. 75 FR 75680 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  15. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  16. 76 FR 82310 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the...

  17. Interventions to manage compassion fatigue in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Nancy; Boyle, Deborah

    2009-04-01

    Work-related stress emanating from close interpersonal contact with patients with cancer and their families may result in physical, emotional, social, and spiritual adversity for oncology nurses. The negative result of this cumulative distress has historically been referred to as burnout. However, this dated term does not truly depict the result of the longitudinal workplace ramifications of sadness and despair on nursing staff. This article proposes that the phrase compassion fatigue replace the outdated notion of burnout in describing this phenomenon. Although not clearly and uniformly described in the literature, this occurrence is seen regularly in clinical practice and is conceptually known by nurses. Limited information is available about interventions to manage compassion fatigue; therefore, a national survey was conducted to identify resources available to oncology nurses to counter this phenomenon. Participants provided information about the availability of interventions in three major categories: on-site professional resources, educational programs, and specialized retreats. The availability of resources ranged from 0%-60%. Survey findings, along with narrative comments by respondents, provide relevant information for oncology nurses and their employers. By recognizing the perils of inattention to this frequent nursing phenomenon and the scope of existing workplace options that may augment nurse coping, oncology nurses' recognition and management of this entity may be enhanced. Organizations also may be encouraged to periodically inventory their support and lobby for workplace interventions to manage this critical work-related issue.

  18. Continuing Education Needs of the Office Oncology Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Miriam P.

    1999-01-01

    A study determined the learning needs of office oncology nurses (n=290)as a critical first step in planning education programs. Participants ranked cancer-care topics similarly, regardless of age, background, or experience. The highest-ranked needs were clustered in the areas of cancer nursing practice, major cancers, and cancer treatment.…

  19. [Artificial neural networks for decision making in urologic oncology].

    PubMed

    Remzi, M; Djavan, B

    2007-06-01

    This chapter presents a detailed introduction regarding Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and their contribution to modern Urologic Oncology. It includes a description of ANNs methodology and points out the differences between Artifical Intelligence and traditional statistic models in terms of usefulness for patients and clinicians, and its advantages over current statistical analysis.

  20. Fibre-optic intubation in oncological head and neck emergencies.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Bipin Thomas; Balakrishnan, Mallika; Kuriakose, Renju

    2005-08-01

    Although fibre-optic bronchoscopic intubation is well recognized as the most valuable adjunct for elective management of the difficult airway its precise role in oncological head and neck emergencies has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of fibre-optic intubation in such emergencies. This was a consecutive case series study by a single surgeon (the otolaryngologist) and anaesthetist team, taking place in a regional tertiary-referral head and neck surgical oncology centre. A series of 17 consecutive oncological head and neck emergency patients underwent fibre-optic intubation with a Portex endotracheal tube of inner diameter > or =7 mm, with the aid of a 6-mm (EB-1830T2) Pentax fibre-optic video bronchoscope. The study assessed occurrence of: avoidance of tracheostomy in bleeding emergencies; a well placed, uncomplicated tracheostomy in airway obstruction; and successful intubation. Two cases were decannulated completely. All cases were successfully intubated and a tracheostomy was avoided in all cases in which emergency intubation was required and the patient was bleeding. We conclude that fibre-optic bronchoscopic intubation is a viable option in head and neck oncological emergencies due to upper airway obstruction and tumour bleeding. Clinical and endoscopic judgement and operator experience are the key factors determining success.

  1. Privacy and Security in an Oncology Information System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce I.; Lenhard, Raymond E.

    1978-01-01

    The growing number of automated medical data bases has focused attention upon the problems associated with privacy and security of patient data. This paper briefly reviews some of the approaches to data base protection and then describes the solution to these problems which have been implemented in the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Clinical Information System.

  2. Vitamin-B12 deficiency following therapy in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, L.C.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Vitamin-B12 deficiency results from inadequate absorption of the vitamin by the distal ileum and depletion of available stores. Both radiotherapy and intestinal resection can contribute to development of this condition. The significance of this problem in gynecologic oncology is discussed and two patients are described.

  3. Experiences of pediatric oncology nurses: the first year of hire.

    PubMed

    Linder, Lauri

    2009-01-01

    As the number of specialty pediatric oncology units increases, many units are hiring increasing numbers of newly graduated registered nurses. Intense specialty training and an emotionally demanding work environment place new nurses at risk for job frustration and early job resignation. The purpose of this study is to investigate experiences of pediatric oncology nurses during their first year of hire using a phenomenological approach. Participants were 6 nurses employed on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit in a tertiary care center located in the Intermountain West. A purposive sampling approach was used. Data were collected via semistructured interviews, which were analyzed for specific statements and themes providing description and meaning to nurses' experiences. Eleven themes in the categories of professional role development, a unique practice, and personal reflection were identified. Practice implications include supporting new nurses beyond the acquisition of skills and knowledge and including opportunities for personal reflection as part of the orientation experience. Successful role development is essential to ensure the retention of new pediatric oncology nurses as well as their future achievements within the subspecialty.

  4. Continuing Education Needs of the Office Oncology Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Miriam P.

    1999-01-01

    A study determined the learning needs of office oncology nurses (n=290)as a critical first step in planning education programs. Participants ranked cancer-care topics similarly, regardless of age, background, or experience. The highest-ranked needs were clustered in the areas of cancer nursing practice, major cancers, and cancer treatment.…

  5. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  6. The role of resilience and mindful leadership in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Rishel, Cindy J

    2015-03-01

    When oncology nurses think of the word resilient, they often describe the term in the context of the patients and families they care for each day. When patients face a diagnosis of cancer, their lives have suddenly been altered in a frightening manner. Everything changes, and they must find a way to navigate the troubled waters ahead. 
.

  7. Increasing diversity in pediatric hematology/oncology.

    PubMed

    Frugé, Ernest; Lakoski, Joan M; Luban, Naomi; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Poplack, David G; Hagey, Anne; Felgenhauer, Judy; Hilden, Joanne; Margolin, Judith; Vaiselbuh, Sarah R; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2011-07-15

    Diversity is necessary for the survival and success of both biological and social systems including societies. There is a lack of diversity, particularly the proportion of women and minorities in leadership positions, within medicine [Leadley. AAMC 2009. Steinecke and Terrell. Acad Med 2010;85:236-245]. In 2009 a group of ASPHO members recognized the need to support the career advancement of women and minority members. This article reports the results of a survey designed to characterize the comparative career pathway experience of women and minority ASPHO members. A group of ASPHO members modified a published Faculty Worklife survey [Pribbenow et al. High Educ Policy 2010;23:17-38] for use by Pediatric Hematologist-Oncologists (PHOs). A link to an online version of the survey was sent to all ASPHO members. Of 1,228 ASPHO members polled, 213 responded (17%). Women and minority PHOs reported less satisfaction than their counterparts on 70 of the 90 issues addressed in the survey including the hiring process, access to resources as well as integration and satisfaction with their organizations. Women also expressed greater dissatisfaction with issues of work-life balance, support for family obligations and personal health. The current literature suggests that there are significant disparities in career opportunities, compensation and satisfaction for women compared to men and minority compared to majority faculty in academic medicine [Nivet. J Vasc Surg 2010;51:53S-58S; Peterson et al. J Gen Intern Med 2004;19:259-265; DesRoches et al. Acad Med 2010;85:631-639; Castillo-Page. AAMC 2008]. Our data, derived from a survey of ASPHO members, suggests that this holds true for PHOs as well.

  8. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  9. Considerations for Observational Research using Large Datasets in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C.; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D.; Yu, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based datasets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the Red Journal assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytic challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold substantial promise for advancing our understanding of

  10. The IR Evolution in Oncology: Tools, Treatments, and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    de Baere, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Early focus of interventional oncologists was developing tools and imaging guidance, performing "procedures" acting as a skillful technician without knowledge of clinical patient outcomes, beyond post-treatment image findings. Interventional oncologists must deliver "treatments" and not "procedures", and focus on clinically relevant outcomes, provide clinical continuity of care, which means stand at multidisciplinary tumor boards, see patients in consultation before treatment and for follow-up. Interventional oncologists have fought for the same "market" with surgery in a head to head, bloody competition called red ocean strategy in marketing terms, resulting in many aborted trials. Wide adoption of interventional oncology is facing the challenge to build evidence with overall survival as endpoint in randomized trials while the benefits of a treatment on overall survival are diluted by the effects of possible/inevitable subsequent therapies. Because interventional oncology is a disruptive force in medicine achieving same results as others (surgery) using different, less invasive approaches, patients where surgery is irrelevant can be target with a blue ocean strategy (to propose treatment where there is no competition). Recently interventional oncology has been included in the ESMO guidelines for colorectal cancer with oligometastatic disease with both surgical resection, and thermal ablation classified in the same category called "local ablative treatments". Interventional oncologists have to shape the future by publications in oncologic journal, by being active members of oncology scientific societies, and use modern public megaphone (blog, video sharing, …) to disseminate information and let society know that interventional is not a me-too product but a disruptive treatment.

  11. Oncology nurses' experience of collaboration: A case study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the health system have created new models of healthcare delivery such as nurse-led teams. This has resulted in the increased opportunity for enhanced collaboration among nurses. Oncology nurses have a long history of working together, yet little is known about their perceptions about collaboration in the practice setting. This paper aimed to explore and describe the experiences of collaboration among oncology nurses, and to understand the factors that influenced collaboration. Qualitative, case study design was used to study fourteen oncology nurses from one cancer center in Canada. Participants were registered nurses or nurse practitioners, employed full-time or permanent part-time in an oncology nurse role, and working on an in-patient or out-patient unit. Data were collected in 2013 using individual telephone interviews and document reviews. Thematic analysis revealed two themes: Art of dancing together, and the stumbling point. The first theme related to the facilitators of collaboration including having: regular face-to-face interaction, an existing and/or previous relationship, oncology nursing experience, and good interpersonal skills. The second theme related to the barriers to collaboration such as: role ambiguity, organizational leadership, and multi-generational differences. Collaboration is a complex process that does not occur spontaneously. To improve collaboration nursing leadership needs to support and promote opportunities for nurses to build the relationships required to effectively collaborate. It is equally important that individual nurses be willing to collaborate and possess the interpersonal skills required to build and maintain the collaborative relationship despite differences in age, generation, and clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses' participation in hospital decision making.

  13. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  14. What is integrative oncology and can it help my patients?

    PubMed

    Pineda, Mario Javier; Singh, Diljeet K

    2012-06-01

    Integrative oncology lends itself to the comprehensive practice of gynecologic oncology with multiple tools and interventions that can impact on QoL and survival. However, there remains a paucity of well-designed, well-powered randomized control trials on various CAM modalities for gynecologic cancer patients. The reasons for the lack of level 1 evidence include the nascent state of integrative medicine as a science, the limitations on CAM funding, the relative lack of integration of CAM practitioners into the oncology community, and absence of strict regulation of herbs and supplements by the US FDA. The use of CAM as adjunctive therapies will likely continue given the patient-driven trends to date, and given the evidence for at least safety and potentially efficacy, our patients deserve our willingness to use all possible approaches to improving their outcomes. Continued evolution of our ability to specifically measure and describe QoL will further our ability to hone in on domains most important to patients and their survival and allow practitioners to make patient-specific recommendations. Multimodal programs that include physical activity, stress management, and diet have the potential to address demonstrated deficits in PWB and FWB in ovarian cancer patients which suggests a model of collaborative gynecologic oncology care). Integrative oncology represents a holistic approach to patient care whose goal is maximization of patient quantity and quality of life. Patients can achieve this optimal outcome through the synergy of conventional care, integrative modalities, lifestyle modifications, and supportive care. Refer to Table 4 for a listing of integrated medicine Internet resources.

  15. QL-10NEURO-ONCOLOGY TELEMEDICINE FOLLOW-UP VISITS

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard; Woyshner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    We report our 18 month experience with the use of a videoconferencing system to perform neuro-oncology follow-up visits. The Neuro-oncology Program at the Kaiser Permanente-Los Angeles Medical center serves the majority of Kaiser HMO patients in the Southern California region. We installed a videoconferencing system (Cisco TelePresence EX90, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA) in our office in Los Angeles and in a medical office building in Anaheim, CA at a distance of 35 miles. Established neuro-oncology patients from Orange County chose between in-person and remote visits. Patients were seated in an examination room and the neuro-oncology provider alerted by text page. A focused history and physical examination was performed, followed by desktop sharing of clinical and laboratory data using an electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, WI) and of neuroimages (Phillips iSite PACS, Andover, MA). Patients were asked, but not required, to complete an anonymous online 16 question satisfaction survey after each visit. Visits were performed by either a neuro-oncologist (179) or a Physician's Assistant (12). Of the 191 visits, 174 included evaluation of neuroimaging and 77 included evaluation of response to ongoing chemotherapy. During 12 visits chemotherapy was initiated, and during 15 visits the chemotherapy regimen was changed based on imaging findings. One-hundred and eleven surveys (58% of visits) were completed. Patients reported a high level of satisfaction with the visits (average 9.6, on a 1-10 scale). The average estimated travel time saved was 118 minutes per visit. Four surveys reported technical problems and 1 indicated a preference for an in-person visit. No adverse events could be attributed to use of the telemedicine system. These data suggest that neuro-oncology follow-up visits can be practiced safely and effectively using a telemedicine system, with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  16. Publication status of contemporary oncology randomised controlled trials worldwide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Liu, Xu; Lv, Jia-Wei; Li, Wen-Fei; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the extent of selective publication in contemporary oncology randomised controlled trials (RCTs) worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the rates of publication and timely publication (within 24 months) for contemporary oncology RCTs from all over the world. We also investigated the trial characteristics associated with publication and timely publication. We identified all phase III oncology RCTs registered on ClinicalTrials.gov with a primary completion date between January 2008 and December 2012. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify publications. The final search date was 31 December 2015. Our primary outcome measure was the time to publication from the primary completion date to the date of primary publication in a peer-reviewed journal. We identified 598 completed oncology RCTs; overall, 398 (66.6%) had been published. For published trials, the median time to publication was 25 months (interquartile range, 16-37 months). Only 192 trials (32.1%) were published within 24 months. Timely publication was independently associated with trials completed late in 2012. Trials conducted in Asia and other regions were less likely to have timely publication, but trials conducted in different locations were all equally likely to be published. Industry- and NIH-funded trials were equally likely to be published timely or at any time after trial completion. Among 391 published trials with clear primary outcomes, there was a trend for timely publication of positive trials compared with negative trials. Despite the ethical obligations and societal expectations of disclosing findings promptly, oncology RCTs performed poorly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The optimal organization of gynecologic oncology services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M.; Kennedy, E.B.; Biagi, J.; Colgan, T.; D’Souza, D.; Elit, L.M.; Hunter, A.; Irish, J.; McLeod, R.; Rosen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background A system-level organizational guideline for gynecologic oncology was identified by a provincial cancer agency as a key priority based on input from stakeholders, data showing more limited availability of multidisciplinary or specialist care in lower-volume than in higher-volume hospitals in the relevant jurisdiction, and variable rates of staging for ovarian and endometrial cancer patients. Methods A systematic review assessed the relationship of the organization of gynecologic oncology services with patient survival and surgical outcomes. The electronic databases medline and embase (ovid: 1996 through 9 January 2015) were searched using terms related to gynecologic malignancies combined with organization of services, patterns of care, and various facility and physician characteristics. Outcomes of interest included overall or disease-specific survival, short-term survival, adequate staging, and degree of cytoreduction or optimal cytoreduction (or both) for ovarian cancer patients by hospital or physician type, and rate of discrepancy in initial diagnoses and intraoperative consultation between non-specialist pathologists and gyne-oncology–specialist pathologists. Results One systematic review and sixteen additional primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base as a whole was judged to be of lower quality; however, a trend toward improved outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology was found, particularly with respect to the gynecologic oncology care of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Conclusions Improvements in outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology services can be attributed to a number of factors, including access to specialist care and multidisciplinary team management. Findings of this systematic review should be used with caution because of the limitations of the evidence base; however, an expert consensus process made it possible to create recommendations for implementation. PMID:26300679

  18. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Patrick Y; Chang, Susan M; Van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Macdonald, David R; Lee, Eudocia Q

    2017-07-20

    Development of novel therapies for CNS tumors requires reliable assessment of response and progression. This requirement has been particularly challenging in neuro-oncology for which contrast enhancement serves as an imperfect surrogate for tumor volume and is influenced by agents that affect vascular permeability, such as antiangiogenic therapies. In addition, most tumors have a nonenhancing component that can be difficult to accurately quantify. To improve the response assessment in neuro-oncology and to standardize the criteria that are used for different CNS tumors, the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group was established. This multidisciplinary international working group consists of neuro-oncologists, medical oncologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neuropsychologists, and experts in clinical outcomes assessments, working in collaboration with government and industry to enhance the interpretation of clinical trials. The RANO working group was originally created to update response criteria for high- and low-grade gliomas and to address such issues as pseudoresponse and nonenhancing tumor progression from antiangiogenic therapies, and pseudoprogression from radiochemotherapy. RANO has expanded to include working groups that are focused on other tumors, including brain metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, spine tumors, pediatric brain tumors, and meningiomas, as well as other clinical trial end points, such as clinical outcomes assessments, seizures, corticosteroid use, and positron emission tomography imaging. In an effort to standardize the measurement of neurologic function for clinical assessment, the Neurologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology scale was drafted. Born out of a workshop conducted by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and the US Food and Drug Administration, a standardized brain tumor imaging protocol now exists to reduce variability and improve reliability. Efforts by RANO

  19. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  20. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…