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Sample records for oncology information system

  1. Privacy and Security in an Oncology Information System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce I.; Lenhard, Raymond E.

    1978-01-01

    The growing number of automated medical data bases has focused attention upon the problems associated with privacy and security of patient data. This paper briefly reviews some of the approaches to data base protection and then describes the solution to these problems which have been implemented in the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Clinical Information System.

  2. Implementing a regional oncology information system: approach and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W.K.; Ashbury, F.D.; Hogue, G.L.; Smith, A.; Pun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Paper-based medical record systems are known to have major problems of inaccuracy, incomplete data, poor accessibility, and challenges to patient confidentiality. They are also an inefficient mechanism of record-sharing for interdisciplinary patient assessment and management, and represent a major problem for keeping current and monitoring quality control to facilitate improvement. To address those concerns, national, regional, and local health care authorities have increased the pressure on oncology practices to upgrade from paper-based systems to electronic health records. Objectives Here, we describe and discuss the challenges to implementing a region-wide oncology information system across four independent health care organizations, and we describe the lessons learned from the initial phases that are now being applied in subsequent activities of this complex project. Results The need for change must be shared across centres to increase buy-in, adoption, and implementation. It is essential to establish physician leadership, commitment, and engagement in the process. Work processes had to be revised to optimize use of the new system. Culture change must be included in the change management strategy. Furthermore, training and resource requirements must be thoroughly planned, implemented, monitored, and modified as required for effective adoption of new work processes and technology. Interfaces must be established with multiple existing electronic systems across the region to ensure appropriate patient flow. Periodic assessment of the existing project structure is necessary, and adjustments are often required to ensure that the project meets its objectives. Conclusions The implementation of region-wide oncology information systems across different health practice locations has many challenges. Leadership is essential. A strong, collaborative information-sharing strategy across the region and with the supplier is essential to identify, discuss, and resolve

  3. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  4. [A multidisciplinary mModule for oncological documentation within a hospital information system].

    PubMed

    Kunze, U; Ganslandt, T; Preusser, P; Bürkle, T; Prokosch, H U; Senninger, N; Haier, J

    2004-01-01

    The follow-up documentation of oncological patients in Germany is inadequate in many cases: it is usually limited to a minimal dataset mandated by the epidemiological tumor registers; it is carried out in a paper-based fashion and rarely in a multi-disciplinary context. Parallel documentation efforts can result in redundant or erroneous data and excess work. The introduction of hospital information systems (HIS) allows the implementation of digital oncological documentation systems integrated in surrounding clinical workflows that can provide access to existing data sources as well as data entry and presentation across departmental boundaries. This concept enables the integration of tumor documentation, quality assurance and process optimization within HIS. Feasibility requirements include a high flexibility and adaptability of the underlying HIS to reach a seamless integration of oncological documentation forms within routine clinical workflows. This paper presents the conceptual design and implementation of a modular oncological documentation system at the Muenster University Hospital that is capable of integrating the documentation requirements of multiple departments within the hospital.

  5. Post-upgrade testing on a radiotherapy oncology information system with an embedded record and verify system following the IAEA Human Health Report No. 7 recommendations.

    PubMed

    Nyathi, Thulani; Colyer, Christopher; Bhardwaj, Anup Kumar; Rijken, James; Morton, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Record and verify (R&V) systems have proven that their application in radiotherapy clinics leads to a significant reduction in mis-treatments of patients. The purpose of this technical note is to share our experience of acceptance testing, commissioning and setting up a quality assurance programme for the MOSAIQ® oncology information system and R&V system after upgrading from software version 2.41 to 2.6 in a multi-vendor, multi-site environment. Testing was guided primarily by the IAEA Human Report No. 7 recommendations, but complemented by other departmental workflow specific tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time successful implementation of the IAEA Human Health Report Series No. 7 recommendations have been reported in the literature. PMID:27245299

  6. Health Information Technology in Oncology Practice: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Mea, V Della

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians’ engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds. PMID:25506195

  7. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Children Treated in Children Oncology Clinic with the Aid of Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Özlem; Ayyıldız, Tülay Kuzlu; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research is to examine child cancer cases in Zonguldak/Turkey descriptively in epidemiological aspect with the help of GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 1 and 19 years old who were treated in Children Oncology Clinic with a diagnosis of cancer. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95 % confidence interval and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Variables that were used in the study were assessed, recorded in prepared data collection form and distribution maps were produced. When disease diagnosis of the children participated in the study were evaluated, the most observed three types are ALL with 33.3 % (n = 20), Medullablastoma with 13.3 % (n = 8) and Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma with 11.7 % (n = 7). Kdz. Eregli with 31.7 % (n = 19), Center with 31.7 % (n = 19), and Caycuma with 18.3 % (n = 11) are the first-three counties where the cases were mostly observed. Statistically significant difference was found (p = 0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and distribution maps of the number of cancer cases were produced.

  8. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Children Treated in Children Oncology Clinic with the Aid of Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Özlem; Ayyıldız, Tülay Kuzlu; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research is to examine child cancer cases in Zonguldak/Turkey descriptively in epidemiological aspect with the help of GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 1 and 19 years old who were treated in Children Oncology Clinic with a diagnosis of cancer. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95 % confidence interval and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Variables that were used in the study were assessed, recorded in prepared data collection form and distribution maps were produced. When disease diagnosis of the children participated in the study were evaluated, the most observed three types are ALL with 33.3 % (n = 20), Medullablastoma with 13.3 % (n = 8) and Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma with 11.7 % (n = 7). Kdz. Eregli with 31.7 % (n = 19), Center with 31.7 % (n = 19), and Caycuma with 18.3 % (n = 11) are the first-three counties where the cases were mostly observed. Statistically significant difference was found (p = 0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and distribution maps of the number of cancer cases were produced. PMID:27624492

  9. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation... services. The notice was published in the Federal Register on April 18, 2012 (75 FR 23289). At the request of a company official, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm....

  10. A contemporary case study illustrating the integration of health information technologies into the organisation and clinical practice of radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexis Andrew; Phillips, Aaron K

    2006-01-01

    The development of software in radiation oncology departments has seen the increase in capability from the Record and Verify software focused on patient safety to a fully-fledged Oncology Information System (OIS). This paper reports on the medical aspects of the implementation of a modern Oncology Information System (IMPAC MultiAccess, also known as the Siemens LANTIS) in a New Zealand hospital oncology department. The department was successful in translating paper procedures into electronic procedures, and the report focuses on the changes in approach to organisation and data use that occurred. The difficulties that were faced, which included procedural re-design, management of change, removal of paper, implementation cost, integration with the HIS, quality assurance and datasets, are highlighted along with the local solutions developed to overcome these problems.

  11. Intraoperative imaging and fluorescence image guidance in oncologic surgery using a wearable fluorescence goggle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liu, Yang; Sudlow, Gail P.; Akers, Walter J.; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a wearable, fluorescence goggle based system for intraoperative imaging of tumors and image guidance in oncologic surgery. Our system can detect fluorescence from cancer selective near infra-red (NIR) contrast agent, facilitating intraoperative visualization of surgical margins and tumors otherwise not apparent to the surgeon. The fluorescence information is displayed directly to the head mounted display (HMD) of the surgeon in real time, allowing unhindered surgical procedure under image guidance. This system has the potential of improving surgical outcomes in oncologic surgery and reduce the chances of cancer recurrence.

  12. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  13. Energy therapies in advanced practice oncology: an evidence-informed practice approach.

    PubMed

    Potter, Pamela J

    2013-05-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author's professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  14. A Clinical Information Display System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce J.; Lenhard, Raymond E.; Braine, Hayden; Kammer, Anne

    1977-01-01

    A clinical information display system has been implemented as part of a prototype Oncology Clinical Information System for the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. The information system has been developed to support the management of patient therapy. Capabilities in the prototype include a patient data system, a patient abstract, a tumor registry, an appointment system, a census system, and a clinical information display system. This paper describes the clinical information display component of the prototype. It has the capability of supporting up to 10,000 patient records with online data entry and editing. At the present time, the system is being used only in the Oncology Center. There are plans, however, for trial use by other departments, and the system represents a tool with a potential for more general application.

  15. The modern trends of the evolution laser information technology in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikov, A. A.; Svirin, V. N.

    2008-04-01

    Laser-optical information technologies and devices develop since the 70- years at the end of 20 century and are broadly used for diagnostics and treatment of oncological diseases to date. Although such methods as photodynamic therapy (PDT), laser-induce thermotherapy (LITT), fluorescent diagnostics and spectrophotometry already more than 30 years are used for treatment and diagnostics of oncological diseases, nevertheless, they are enough new methods and, as a rule, are used in large scientific centers and medical institutions. This is bound, first of all, with lack of information on modern method of cancer treatment, the absence of widely available laser procedures and corresponding devices in the polyclinics and even in district hospitals, as well as insufficient understanding of application areas, where laser methods has an advantage by comparison, for instance, with beam or chemotherapy. At present day laser methods are fast upcoming direction of the treatment oncological diseases. This is explained by progress in development essentially laser, particularly diode, improvement electronic and computing components and broad introduction software-algorithmic methods of control the undertaking therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. In article are considered new laser methods of the undertaking diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and is shown that introduction multiwave laser radiation for probe and influences on tissue, the different methods of the determination of the functional state of tissues, realization of the on-line diagnostics when carrying out the therapeutic procedures, automatic control systems of the power laser radiation, which depends on state patient tissue, as well as software-algorithmic methods of management session therapeutic and diagnostic procedures greatly raises efficiency of the treatment oncological diseases. On an example of the multipurpose laser therapeutic devices("MLTA") developed and introduced in clinical practice and multipurpose

  16. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  17. [Novel quality assurance method in oncology: the two-level, multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system].

    PubMed

    Mangel, László; Kövér, Erika; Szilágyi, István; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Bércesi, Eva; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Holcz, Tibor; Karádi, Oszkár; Farkas, Róbert; Csák, Szilvia; Csere, Tibor; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-12-16

    By now therapy decision taken by a multi-disciplinary oncology team in cancer care has become a routine method in worldwide. However, multi-disciplinary oncology team has to face more and more difficulties in keeping abreast with the fast development in oncology science, increasing expectations, and financial considerations. Naturally the not properly controlled decision mechanisms, the permanent lack of time and shortage of professionals are also hindering factors. Perhaps it would be a way out if the staff meetings and discussions of physicians in the oncology departments were transformed and provided with administrative, legal and decision credentials corresponding to those of multi-disciplinary oncology team. The new form of the oncotherapy oncoteam might be able to decide the optimal and particular treatment after previous consultation with the patient. The oncotherapy oncoteam is also suitable to carry out training and tasks of a cancer centre and by diminishing the psychological burden of the doctors it contributes to an improved patient care. This study presents the two-level multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system at the University of Pécs including the detailed analysis of the considerations above.

  18. OncoLink: a multimedia oncology information resource on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Buhle, E L; Goldwein, J W; Benjamin, I

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes OncoLink, the first multimedia World-Wide-Web (WWW) and gopher server focusing on cancer information for both the health care professional and the patient. OncoLink provides an internetworked hypertext and multimedia resource linking people, computers and information together in an easy to use fashion. Our objective in developing OncoLink is to provide comprehensive and timely information about many aspects of oncology for both patients and healthcare providers. Specifically, OncoLink's purposes are: (1) the rapid dissemination of information relevant to treatment of cancer and concomitant problems; (2) education of health care personnel (at all levels) in the field; (3) education of patients and families of patients who have cancer; (4) posting of clinical trials and eligibility criteria; (5) the rapid collection and dissemination of quality, peer-reviewed information pertinent to oncology in general and specific subspecialties; (6) provide a well-organized, frequently updated hypertext system to access other quality cancer information resources on the Internet. OncoLink attempts to provide one-stop shopping for the patient, healthcare provider, researcher or Internet browser searching for cancer-related information. Since its inception on March 7, 1994, OncoLink has averaged more than 36,000 accesses per month from around the world. While also accessible by text-based gopher servers, preliminary observations infer increased use of multimedia and hypertext documents over traditional text-only resources. From the large following of users, it is clear that electronic dissemination of high quality, peer-reviewed cancer information is very popular. We conclude OncoLink is both useful and has wide interest in the international community.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  20. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients.

  1. The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Roche, Véronique P; Palesh, Oxana G; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Spiegel, David; Lévi, Francis A

    2014-06-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving

  2. The ethics of health information technology in oncology: emerging isssues from both local and global perspectives.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Shulman, Lawrence N; Yu, Peter P; Hirsch, Bradford R; Abernethy, Amy P

    2013-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) is ever-increasing in complexity and has incrementally become a fundamental part of our everyday clinical lives. As HIT becomes more complex and commonplace, so do the questions it raises about stewardship and usage of data, along with the ethics of these applications. With the development of rapid-learning systems, such as ASCO's CancerLinQ, careful thought about the ethics and applications of these technologies is necessary. This article uses the principles-based framework of modern bioethics to examine evolving ethical issues that arise in the context of HIT and also discusses HIT's application in reducing cancer care disparities in the developing world. We recognize that this topic is quite broad, so here we provide an overview of the issues, rather than any definitive conclusions about a particular "correct path." Our hope is to stimulate discussion about this important topic, which will increasingly need to be addressed in the oncology community.

  3. A real time Teleconsultation System for Sharing an Oncologic Web-based Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Forti, Stefano; Galvagni, Michele; Galligioni, Enzo; Eccher, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents an innovative real-time Teleconsultation System for synchronized navigation of the pages of a web-based Oncological Electronic Medical Record, designed to provide clinicians a cooperative work tool supporting the oncologic patient management between different hospitals. The system embeds additional tools supporting the discussion: digital whiteboard, chat and a digital audio channel.

  4. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'.

  5. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  6. Informal Financial Assistance for Patients With a Hematological Malignancy: Implications for Oncology Social Work Practice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2015-01-01

    The article presents original research findings on informal financial assistance for hematological patients; that is, the gifts from family, friends, and communities that help patients cope with the financial hardship associated with cancer. The qualitative study involved interviews with 45 hematology patients that were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and then thematically analyzed. The findings examine the differing perspectives that individuals and families bring to the notion of informal financial aid, provide examples of individuals who require and receive informal financial assistance, and conclude with descriptions of those who require informal financial assistance but it is not available. The implications of the findings for oncology social work practice are explored.

  7. Cardio-Oncology: How New Targeted Cancer Therapies and Precision Medicine Can Inform Cardiovascular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Arteaga, Carlos L; Force, Thomas; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Demetri, George D; Druker, Brian J; Moslehi, Javid J

    2015-12-01

    Cardio-oncology (the cardiovascular care of cancer patients) has developed as a new translational and clinical field based on the expanding repertoire of mechanism-based cancer therapies. Although these therapies have changed the natural course of many cancers, several may also lead to cardiovascular complications. Many new anticancer drugs approved over the past decade are "targeted" kinase inhibitors that interfere with intracellular signaling contributing to tumor progression. Unexpected cardiovascular and cardiometabolic effects of patient treatment with these inhibitors have provided unique insights into the role of kinases in human cardiovascular biology. Today, an ever-expanding number of cancer therapies targeting novel kinases and other specific cellular and metabolic pathways are being developed and tested in oncology clinical trials. Some of these drugs may affect the cardiovascular system in detrimental ways and others perhaps in beneficial ways. We propose that the numerous ongoing oncology clinical trials are an opportunity for closer collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists to study the cardiovascular and cardiometabolic changes caused by the modulation of these pathways in patients. In this regard, cardio-oncology represents an opportunity and a novel platform for basic and translational investigation and can serve as a potential avenue for optimization of anticancer therapies and for cardiovascular research and drug discovery.

  8. Improving an electronic system for measuring PROs in routine oncology practice

    PubMed Central

    White, Sharon M.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Snyder, Claire F.

    2016-01-01

    ways to improve a system to incorporate PRO measures into oncology practice. The findings and evaluation methods should be useful to others in efforts to integrate PRO assessments into ambulatory care. Implications for Cancer Survivors Systems to routinely collect patient-reported information can be incorporated into oncology practices and provide useful information that promote patient and clinician partnership to improve the quality of care. PMID:26644190

  9. Information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. Patients' and relatives' experiences and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Grev, Anne; Moen, Mari-Ann; Balteskard, Lise; Holthe, Kari

    2003-05-01

    Cancer patients and relatives worldwide are turning more and more to the internet to obtain health information. The goal of this survey was to clarify their experiences and suggestions on the implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. A total of 127 patients and 60 relatives visiting the outpatient clinic at the Department of Oncology, University of North Norway (UNN), the regional office of the Norwegian Cancer Union (NCU) and the Montebello Centre were included in a questionnaire-based study. Participants were recruited during the period September 2001 to February 2002. There were 92 women and 95 men. We revealed that hospital doctors, followed by nurses and friends, were the most important informants. Two-thirds of patients and relatives had access to the internet, but fewer than one-third had searched the internet for medical information and only one-fifth had discussed information accessed with their doctor. Only one-tenth had visited a hospital website. Internet access was correlated with young age. Almost two-thirds suggested that e-mail and/or WAP (wireless application protocol) communication should be included in hospital-patient communication. Concerning hospital websites, waiting time, treatment offer and addresses were considered the top three topics of interest. In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients and relatives have access to the internet. They recommend ICT employed in patient-hospital communication and suggest waiting time, treatment offers and addresses the three most important topics on hospital websites.

  10. The Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology in Colombia: Correlation with histopathological diagnoses in oncology and non-oncology institutions

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Uribe, Mario Alexander; Sanabria, Álvaro; Romero-Rojas, Alfredo; Pérez, Gabriel; Vargas, Elga Johanna; Abaúnza, María Claudia; Gutiérrez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the correlation between the results of thyroid fine-needle aspirations interpreted using the Bethesda system and final histopathological reports for patients at an oncology hospital (OH) and non-oncology hospitals (NOHs). Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed to compare the cytology and histopathology results for patients with thyroid nodules in three Colombian hospitals. The final correlation of diagnoses between the two methods is reported. In Colombia, the health system provides the existence of general care hospitals and hospitals specializing in care of patients with cancer. Results: A total of 196 reports were reviewed, of which 53% were from OH and 47% were from NOHs. A greater proportion of category V (37.5%) was diagnosed at the OH, whereas NOHs diagnosed a greater proportion of category II (42.3%). The global correlation between diagnoses made using cytology and histopathology was 93.3% for categories V and VI (based on the final malignant diagnosis) and 86.9% for benign category II. Significant differences between institution types were observed when category IV and V and malignant histopathology were compared (56.3% OH vs. 23.5% NOH; P = 0.05 for category IV, 97.4% OH vs. 82.3% NOH; P = 0.03 for category V), while no significant difference between institution types was observed when category II and final benign diagnosis were compared (P = 0.6). Conclusions: The Bethesda system for thyroid cytology correlates adequately with final histopathological diagnosis in Colombia. Significant differences were identified in the diagnostic correlation for malignant lesions between the OH and NOHs in categories IV and V caused by selection bias of the population. PMID:25948937

  11. [Information systems].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Maniega, José Antonio; Trío Maseda, Reyes

    2005-03-01

    The arrival of victims of the terrorist attacks of 11 March at the hospital put the efficiency of its information systems to the test. To be most efficient, these systems should be simple and directed, above all, to the follow-up of victims and to providing the necessary information to patients and families. A specific and easy to use system is advisable. PMID:15771852

  12. Short-term test systems for potential mutagens and carcinogens: V. in vivo tests for chromosomal damage. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Detection of chromosomal damage in mammals; Tests measuring DNA damage and DNA repair in mammals; Dominant-lethal tests in mammals; Tests for effects in mammalian skin and hair; Other tests for mutagenicity in mammals; General reports and evaluations of various mammalian test methods; Mutagenicity testing in non-mammalian systems.

  13. Should oncological cases of upper urinary system be excluded at the beginning of the laparoscopic learning curve?

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Özgür Haki; Ötünçtemur, Alper; Özbek, Emin; Uruç, Fatih; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The place of oncological cases of upper urinary system in the laparoscopic learning curve was investigated. Materials and Methods: A total of 139 patients from two different centers underwent laparoscopic operations and were included in this retrospective study. Results: Mean operative times for oncological, and non-oncological cases were 101.3 (range 60-450), and 102.7 (45-490) minutes respectively. Fourty-two (31.3 %) patients were oncological cases. In 4 oncological cases, the surgeons switched to open surgery because of massive bleeding and six (14.2 %) oncological cases required blood transfusions during peri/postoperative periods. Pulmonary embolism was observed in one oncological case. In one non-oncological case, the surgeon switched to open surgery because of intestinal perforation and 10 (9.7 %) non-oncological cases needed blood transfusions during peri/postoperative periods. In addition, some complications such as intestinal perforation (n=1), mechanical ileus (n=1), and pulmonary embolism (n=1) were observed during postoperative period. Intestinal perforation was repaired using laparoscopic (n=1) method. Mechanical ileus was approached with open surgical technique. Mean hospital stay of the patients in the oncological and non-oncological series were 4.5 (3-23) and 4.5 (3-30) days respectively. Conclusion: We think that renal oncological cases should be included in the spectrum of laparoscopic indications even at the beginning of the learning curve. Certainly, we still share the opinion that cancer cases which require highly challenging surgeries like radical cystectomy, and prostatectomy should be postponed till to gaining of higher level of experience. PMID:26401863

  14. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  15. Standard pediatric oncology data and information technology: necessities for cancer care management.

    PubMed

    Maserat, Elham; Rahimi, Mehrdad Mirza; Maserat, Elnaz; Zali, Mohamad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in children and survivors require life time follow-up. There is a growing recognition of the need to base cancer control policies on accurate, detailed and timely information on cancer management and outcomes. Coordination and central documentation ensure quality of treatment and permit clinical and scientific investigations. The combined data thus obtained create a comprehensive picture of disease, leading to more effective prevention and cure. Medical information can be gathered, processed and analyzed in different ways and the importance of precise language cannot be overestimated. All medical activity arises from the ability to observe and communicate intelligibly and a lack of standardized documentation leads to insufficient integration of clinical work. The Minimal Standard data set is the result of a global effort to establish a common structure and vocabulary for electronic reports. In addition, information technology combines research aspects of decision support and clinical documentation, allowing formal representation of general protocols, calculating of a particular therapy for a patient, data acquisition in the clinics. Our aim in this papers is to stress the need for standard pediatric oncology data and information technology as an approach to cancer care management.

  16. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part I: Health Systems Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Oncology patients with persistent pain treated in outpatient settings and their family caregivers have significant responsibility for managing pain medications. However, little is known about their practical, day-to-day experiences with pain medication management. Objective To describe day-to-day pain medication management from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self© Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management by patients and family caregivers in the context of multiple, complex health systems. Methods We qualitatively analyzed audio-recorded intervention sessions that included extensive dialogue between patients, family caregivers, and nurses about pain medication management during the 10-week intervention. Results The health systems context for pain medication management included multiple complex systems for clinical care, reimbursement, and regulation of analgesic prescriptions. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant to this context were getting prescriptions and obtaining medications. Responsibilities that fell primarily to patients and family caregivers included facilitating communication and coordination among multiple clinicians, overcoming barriers to access, and serving as a final safety checkpoint. Significant effort was required of patients and family caregivers to insure safe and effective pain medication management. Conclusion Health systems issues related to access to needed analgesics, medication safety in outpatient settings, and the effort expended by oncology patients and their family caregivers require more attention in future research and healthcare reform initiatives. PMID:24704800

  17. SU-E-T-524: Web-Based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System (ROIRLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M; Grover, S; Malik, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Describe a Web-based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: The VA National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and near miss data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. Software used for this program is deployed on the VAs intranet as a Website. All data entry forms (adverse event or near miss reports, work product reports) utilize standard causal, RT process step taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM and ASTRO reports on error reporting (AAPM Work Group Report on Prevention of Errors and ASTROs safety is no accident report). All reported incidents are investigated by the radiation oncology domain experts. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The operational workflow is similar to that of the Aviation Safety Reporting System. This system is also synergistic with ROSIS and SAFRON. Results: The ROIRLS facilitates the collection of data that help in tracking adverse events and near misses and develop new interventions to prevent such incidents. The ROIRLS electronic infrastructure is fully integrated with each registered facility profile data thus minimizing key strokes and multiple entries by the event reporters. Conclusions: OIRLS is expected to improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in the VA and fulfills our goal of Effecting Quality While Treating Safely The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations

  18. [Oncological data elements in histopathology].

    PubMed

    Haroske, G; Kramm, T; Mörz, M; Oberholzer, M

    2010-09-01

    In order to cope with increasing demands to supply information to a variety of documentation systems outside pathology, pathologists need to set standards both for the content and the use of the information they generate. Oncological datasets based on a set vocabulary are urgently required for use both in pathology and in further processing. Data elements were defined according to German pathology report guidelines for colorectal cancers in line with ISO 11179 requirements for the relations between data element concepts and value domains, as well as for further formal conditions, which can be exported in XML together with metadata information. Tests on 100 conventionally written diagnoses showed their principal usability and an increasing degree of guideline conformity in diagnoses commensurate with training time. This set of oncological data elements is a valuable checklist tool for pathologists, enabling formatted information export for further use and saving documentation effort. PMID:20544201

  19. Practical Communication Guidance to Improve Phase I Informed Consent Conversations and Decision-Making in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Leek, Angela C.; Drotar, Dennis; Noll, Robert B.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Kodish, Eric D.; Baker, Justin N.

    2015-01-01

    Background It can be difficult to explain pediatric Phase I oncology trials to families of children with refractory cancer. Parents may misunderstand the information presented to them, and physicians may assume that certain topics are covered in the informed consent document and need not be discussed. Communication models can help to ensure effective discussions. Methods Suggestions for improving the informed consent process were first solicited from Phase I study clinicians via questionnaire. Eight parents who had enrolled their child on a Phase I pediatric oncology trial were recruited for an advisory group designed to assess the clinicians’ suggestions and make additional recommendations for improving informed consent for pediatric Phase I trials. Results A Phase I Communication Model was designed to incorporate the suggestions of clinicians and families. It focuses on education of parents/families about Phase I trials at specific time points during a child’s illness, but specifically at the point of relapse. We also present an informative Phase I fact sheet that can be distributed to families. Conclusions Families who will be offered information about a Phase I clinical trial can first receive a standardized fact sheet explaining the general purpose of these early-phase clinical trials. Parental understanding may be further enhanced when oncologists address key themes, beginning at diagnosis and continuing through important decision points during the child’s illness. This model should be prospectively evaluated. PMID:25873253

  20. Society for Neuro-Oncology 2014 annual meeting updates on central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Rimas V.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) took place in November of 2014. The focus of many abstracts, as well as the Education Day, was on recent advances in the study of central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Tumor Biology Key studies evaluating the factors in tumors and their microenvironment associated with the development and growth of brain metastases are reviewed. Prognostication Studies investigating the factors that independently influence survival in participants with brain metastases are presented. Response Assessment The Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology criteria for brain metastases (RANO-BM) and the Neurological Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) criteria, which were both presented, are recapped. Radiotherapy Studies are reviewed evaluating factors that influence survival outcomes in participants with brain metastases who were treated with radiotherapy. Studies investigating the potential risk of radiation necrosis with the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapies are presented. Systemic Therapies Brain metastases-focused subset analyses from the ASCEND-1 trial for ALK-translocated non–small cell lung cancer are presented. Preclinical and clinical work on solid tumor leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is also covered. Sequelae of Central Nervous System Metastases and Their Treatments An overview is provided of treatment- related toxicities as well as important concepts that may influence strategies to protect against these toxicities. Conclusions Key concepts regarding tumor biology, prognostication, response assessment, therapeutic management, and sequelae of treatment for CNS metastases are summarized. Advances in our understanding of the basic and clinical science of CNS metastases have the potential to improve outcomes for patients.

  1. Society for Neuro-Oncology 2014 annual meeting updates on central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Rimas V.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) took place in November of 2014. The focus of many abstracts, as well as the Education Day, was on recent advances in the study of central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Tumor Biology Key studies evaluating the factors in tumors and their microenvironment associated with the development and growth of brain metastases are reviewed. Prognostication Studies investigating the factors that independently influence survival in participants with brain metastases are presented. Response Assessment The Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology criteria for brain metastases (RANO-BM) and the Neurological Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) criteria, which were both presented, are recapped. Radiotherapy Studies are reviewed evaluating factors that influence survival outcomes in participants with brain metastases who were treated with radiotherapy. Studies investigating the potential risk of radiation necrosis with the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapies are presented. Systemic Therapies Brain metastases-focused subset analyses from the ASCEND-1 trial for ALK-translocated non–small cell lung cancer are presented. Preclinical and clinical work on solid tumor leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is also covered. Sequelae of Central Nervous System Metastases and Their Treatments An overview is provided of treatment- related toxicities as well as important concepts that may influence strategies to protect against these toxicities. Conclusions Key concepts regarding tumor biology, prognostication, response assessment, therapeutic management, and sequelae of treatment for CNS metastases are summarized. Advances in our understanding of the basic and clinical science of CNS metastases have the potential to improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27621837

  2. Systems Medicine in Oncology: Signaling Network Modeling and New-Generation Decision-Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Silvio; Riccardi, Giuseppe; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Tortolina, Lorenzo; Maffei, Massimo; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Nencioni, Alessio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Two different perspectives are the main focus of this book chapter: (1) A perspective that looks to the future, with the goal of devising rational associations of targeted inhibitors against distinct altered signaling-network pathways. This goal implies a sufficiently in-depth molecular diagnosis of the personal cancer of a given patient. A sufficiently robust and extended dynamic modeling will suggest rational combinations of the abovementioned oncoprotein inhibitors. The work toward new selective drugs, in the field of medicinal chemistry, is very intensive. Rational associations of selective drug inhibitors will become progressively a more realistic goal within the next 3-5 years. Toward the possibility of an implementation in standard oncologic structures of technologically sufficiently advanced countries, new (legal) rules probably will have to be established through a consensus process, at the level of both diagnostic and therapeutic behaviors.(2) The cancer patient of today is not the patient of 5-10 years from now. How to support the choice of the most convenient (and already clinically allowed) treatment for an individual cancer patient, as of today? We will consider the present level of artificial intelligence (AI) sophistication and the continuous feeding, updating, and integration of cancer-related new data, in AI systems. We will also report briefly about one of the most important projects in this field: IBM Watson US Cancer Centers. Allowing for a temporal shift, in the long term the two perspectives should move in the same direction, with a necessary time lag between them.

  3. Design and integration of a graphic interface for an expert system in oncology.

    PubMed

    Marin, R; Taboada, M; Mira, J; Barreiro, A; Otero, R P

    1993-07-01

    We describe a graphic user interface for an expert system in oncology. The main objectives of our work has been to facilitate the adaptation of the system to different clinical environments and potentiate the factors which more directly determine the acceptance of the system by its users. We present the design principles derived from the features of the clinical domain chosen and from the objectives of the system. These principles are reflected on the design of the screen and of the interaction and in the style of integration of the interface with the other components of the system. Underlying the application we describe is a graphic user interface management system which provides facilities for the fast prototyping and integration of interfaces. We describe here those features of this tool which make the practical application of the design principles we consider possible.

  4. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.

  5. Interventional oncology in multidisciplinary cancer treatment in the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Adam, Andreas; Kenny, Lizbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Interventional oncology is an evolving branch of interventional radiology, which relies on rapidly evolving, highly sophisticated treatment tools and precise imaging guidance to target and destroy malignant tumours. The development of this field has important potential benefits for patients and the health-care system, but as a new discipline, interventional oncology has not yet fully established its place in the wider field of oncology; its application does not have a comprehensive evidence base, or a clinical or quality-assurance framework within which to operate. In this regard, radiation oncology, a cornerstone of modern cancer care, has a lot of important information to offer to interventional oncologists. A strong collaboration between radiation oncology and interventional oncology, both of which aim to cure or control tumours or to relieve symptoms with as little collateral damage to normal tissue as possible, will have substantial advantages for both disciplines. A close relationship with radiation oncology will help facilitate the development of a robust quality-assurance framework and accumulation of evidence to support the integration of interventional oncology into multidisciplinary care. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional oncology and radiation oncology fields will have great benefits to practitioners, people affected by cancer, and to the wider field of oncology.

  6. Concise Review: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as New Model Systems in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Laplane, Lucie; Beke, Allan; Vainchenker, William; Solary, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that pluripotent stem cells could be generated by somatic cell reprogramming led to wonder if these so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells would extend our investigation capabilities in the cancer research field. The first iPS cells derived from cancer cells have now revealed the benefits and potential pitfalls of this new model. iPS cells appear to be an innovative approach to decipher the steps of cell transformation as well as to screen the activity and toxicity of anticancer drugs. A better understanding of the impact of reprogramming on cancer cell-specific features as well as improvements in culture conditions to integrate the role of the microenvironment in their behavior may strengthen the epistemic interest of iPS cells as model systems in oncology.

  7. Concise Review: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as New Model Systems in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Laplane, Lucie; Beke, Allan; Vainchenker, William; Solary, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that pluripotent stem cells could be generated by somatic cell reprogramming led to wonder if these so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells would extend our investigation capabilities in the cancer research field. The first iPS cells derived from cancer cells have now revealed the benefits and potential pitfalls of this new model. iPS cells appear to be an innovative approach to decipher the steps of cell transformation as well as to screen the activity and toxicity of anticancer drugs. A better understanding of the impact of reprogramming on cancer cell-specific features as well as improvements in culture conditions to integrate the role of the microenvironment in their behavior may strengthen the epistemic interest of iPS cells as model systems in oncology. PMID:26179060

  8. An Evaluation of Departmental Radiation Oncology Incident Reports: Anticipating a National Reporting System

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Harris, Kendra M.; Ford, Eric; Michalski, Jeff; DeWeese, Theodore; Santanam, Lakshmi; Mutic, Sasa; Gay, Hiram

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Systems to ensure patient safety are of critical importance. The electronic incident reporting systems (IRS) of 2 large academic radiation oncology departments were evaluated for events that may be suitable for submission to a national reporting system (NRS). Methods and Materials: All events recorded in the combined IRS were evaluated from 2007 through 2010. Incidents were graded for potential severity using the validated French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) 5-point scale. These incidents were categorized into 7 groups: (1) human error, (2) software error, (3) hardware error, (4) error in communication between 2 humans, (5) error at the human-software interface, (6) error at the software-hardware interface, and (7) error at the human-hardware interface. Results: Between the 2 systems, 4407 incidents were reported. Of these events, 1507 (34%) were considered to have the potential for clinical consequences. Of these 1507 events, 149 (10%) were rated as having a potential severity of ≥2. Of these 149 events, the committee determined that 79 (53%) of these events would be submittable to a NRS of which the majority was related to human error or to the human-software interface. Conclusions: A significant number of incidents were identified in this analysis. The majority of events in this study were related to human error and to the human-software interface, further supporting the need for a NRS to facilitate field-wide learning and system improvement.

  9. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Subcommittee of the Cancer Prevention Committee (CaPC). The statement was reviewed by both parent committees (ie, the AACR SPGA Committee and the ASCO CaPC) and was approved by the AACR Boards of Directors on August 6, 2014, and the ASCO Executive Committee on September 18, 2014. This policy statement was published jointly by invitation and consent in both Clinical Cancer Research and Journal of Clinical Oncology. Copyright 2015 American Association for Cancer Research and American Society of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or storage in any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. PMID:25572671

  10. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Subcommittee of the Cancer Prevention Committee (CaPC). The statement was reviewed by both parent committees (ie, the AACR SPGA Committee and the ASCO CaPC) and was approved by the AACR Boards of Directors on August 6, 2014, and the ASCO Executive Committee on September 18, 2014. This policy statement was published jointly by invitation and consent in both Clinical Cancer Research and Journal of Clinical Oncology. Copyright 2015 American Association for Cancer Research and American Society of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or storage in any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews.

  12. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Gena; Morimoto, Libby; Mowat, Fionna; O'Malley, Cynthia; Fryzek, Jon; Nordyke, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR) network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry), clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes), and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy) issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.

  13. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Gregory A.; Temin, Sarah; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ellis, Peter M.; Gajra, Ajeet; Rackear, Nancy; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Johnson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Recommendations There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is

  14. Establishing an internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian paediatric oncology network.

    PubMed

    Borgulya, Gábor; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklós

    2004-01-01

    Cancer registration has developed in Europe over the last 50 years, and in the last decade intensive joint activities between the European Cancer Registries, in response to the need of pan-European harmonization of registration practices, have taken place. The Hungarian Paediatric Cancer Registry has been functioning as the database of the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network since 1971, aiming to follow the incidence and the treatment efficacy of malignant diseases. The goals of this globally unique open source information system are the following: 1) to raise the quality of the registration system to the European level by developing an Internet-based registration and communication system, modernizing the database, establishing automatic statistical analyses and adding an Internet website, 2) to support clinical epidemiological studies that we conduct with international collaborators on detailed analyses of the characteristics of patients and their diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, prevention programs, and long-term quality of life and side effects. The benefits of the development of the Internet-based registration and communication system are as follows: a) introduction of an Internet-based case reporting system, b) modernization of the registry database according to international recommendations, c) automatic statistical summaries, encrypted mail systems, document repository, d) application of data security and privacy standards, e) establishment of a website and compilation of educational materials. The overall objective of this scientific project is to contribute towards the improvement of cancer prevention and cancer care for the benefit of the public in general and of cancer patients in particular. PMID:15718593

  15. Geographic Names Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1984-01-01

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is an automated data system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to standardize and disseminate information on geographic names. GNIS provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name. The information in the system can be manipulated to meet varied needs. You can incorporate information from GNIS into your own data base for special applications.

  16. Mission Medical Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  17. Medical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  18. Unintended Consequences of Health Information Technology: Evidence From Veterans Affairs Colorectal Cancer Oncology Watch Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bian, John; Bennett, Charles L.; Fisher, Deborah A.; Ribeiro, Maria; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Oncology Watch intervention, a clinical reminder implemented in Veterans Integrated Service Network 7 (including eight hospitals) to improve CRC screening rates in 2008. Patients and Methods Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data were used to construct four cross-sectional groups of veterans at average risk, age 50 to 64 years; one group was created for each of the following years: 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2010. We applied hospital fixed effects for estimation, using a difference-in-differences model in which the eight hospitals served as the intervention sites, and the other 121 hospitals served as controls, with 2006 to 2007 as the preintervention period and 2009 to 2010 as the postintervention period. Results The sample included 4,352,082 veteran-years in the 4 years. The adherence rates were 37.6%, 31.6%, 34.4%, and 33.2% in the intervention sites in 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2010, respectively, and the corresponding rates in the controls were 31.0%, 30.3%, 32.3%, and 30.9%. Regression analysis showed that among those eligible for screening, the intervention was associated with a 2.2–percentage point decrease in likelihood of adherence (P < .001). Additional analyses showed that the intervention was associated with a 5.6–percentage point decrease in likelihood of screening colonoscopy among the adherent, but with increased total colonoscopies (all indicators) of 3.6 per 100 veterans age 50 to 64 years. Conclusion The intervention had little impact on CRC screening rates for the studied population. This absence of favorable impact may have been caused by an unintentional shift of limited VA colonoscopy capacity from average-risk screening to higher-risk screening and to CRC surveillance, or by physician fatigue resulting from the large number of clinical reminders implemented in the VA. PMID:23045582

  19. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  20. Information extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  1. Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    WxLink is an aviation weather system based on advanced airborne sensors, precise positioning available from the satellite-based Global Positioning System, cockpit graphics and a low-cost datalink. It is a two-way system that uplinks weather information to the aircraft and downlinks automatic pilot reports of weather conditions aloft. Manufactured by ARNAV Systems, Inc., the original technology came from Langley Research Center's cockpit weather information system, CWIN (Cockpit Weather INformation). The system creates radar maps of storms, lightning and reports of surface observations, offering improved safety, better weather monitoring and substantial fuel savings.

  2. Revitalizing executive information systems.

    PubMed

    Crockett, F

    1992-01-01

    As the saying goes, "garbage in, garbage out"--and this is as true for executive information systems as for any other computer system. Crockett presents a methodology he has used with clients to help them develop more useful systems that produce higher quality information. The key is to develop performance measures based on critical success factors and stakeholder expectations and then to link them cross functionally to show how progress is being made on strategic goals. Feedback from the executive information system then informs strategy formulation, business plan development, and operational activities.

  3. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  4. Information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  5. Multicriteria decision analysis in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Adunlin, Georges; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Montero, Alberto J.; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been a growing interest in the development and application of alternative decision-making frameworks within health care, including multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). Even though the literature includes several reviews on MCDA methods, applications of MCDA in oncology are lacking. Aim The aim of this paper is to discuss a rationale for the use of MCDA in oncology. In this context, the following research question emerged: How can MCDA be used to develop a clinical decision support tool in oncology? Methods In this paper, a brief background on decision making is presented, followed by an overview of MCDA methods and process. The paper discusses some applications of MCDA, proposes research opportunities in the context of oncology and presents an illustrative example of how MCDA can be applied to oncology. Findings Decisions in oncology involve trade-offs between possible benefits and harms. MCDA can help analyse trade-off preferences. A wide range of MCDA methods exist. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the appropriate method varies depending on the source and nature of information used to inform decision making. The literature review identified eight studies. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was the most often used method in the identified studies. Conclusion Overall, MCDA appears to be a promising tool that can be used to assist clinical decision making in oncology. Nonetheless, field testing is desirable before MCDA becomes an established decision-making tool in this field. PMID:24635949

  6. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  7. Information System Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, J. H.

    This paper was prepared for distribution to the California Educational Administrators participating in the "Executive Information Systems" Unit of Instruction as part of the instructional program of Operation PEP (Prepare Educational Planners). The purpose of the course was to introduce some basic concepts of information systems technology to…

  8. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  9. Next generation information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Limback, Nathan P; Medina, Melanie A; Silva, Michelle E

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  10. Global Resources Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Star, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Cosentino, M. J.; Mann, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The basic design criteria and operating characteristics of a Global Resources Information System GRIS are defined. Researchers are compiling background material and aiding JPL personnel in this project definition phase of GRIS. A bibliography of past studies and current work on large scale information systems is compiled. The material in this bibliography will be continuously updated throughout the lifetime of this grant. Project management, systems architecture, and user applications are also discussed.

  11. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  12. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients. PMID:20719499

  13. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  14. Earthquake Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    IAEMIS (Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System) is the principal tool of an earthquake preparedness program developed by Martin Marietta and the Mid-America Remote Sensing Center (MARC). It is a two-component set of software, data and procedures to provide information enabling management personnel to make informed decisions in disaster situations. The NASA-developed program ELAS, originally used to analyze Landsat data, provides MARC with a spatially-oriented information management system. Additional MARC projects include land resources management, and development of socioeconomic data.

  15. Telephone counseling in psychosocial oncology: a report from the Cancer Information and Counseling Line.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alfred C; Garrett, Kathleen M; Kulchak-Rahm, Alanna; Barnes, Denise; Dortch, Wendy; Juno, Sara

    2002-04-01

    Providing psychosocial counseling services to cancer patients and their significant others by telephone is emerging as an alternative to traditional (in-person) counseling programs in psychooncology. In this paper, data are reported describing the clients of such a program that has been in continuous operation since 1981: the Cancer Information and Counseling Line (CICL) of the AMC Cancer Research Center. An examination of call record forms completed between 1 June 1998 and 30 May 1999 (N = 1627) revealed that the vast majority of callers were female (77%), non-Hispanic White (77%), with at least some college education (62%). Only 27% were cancer patients/survivors, compared to 43% who were spouses, other relatives and friends of cancer patients/survivors, and 16% who were symptomatic callers. Breast cancer was by far the most frequently mentioned cancer site (30%). Although initial topics of inquiry were dominated by requests for medical information (77%), with only a small percentage of callers initially requesting psychosocial support and counseling (12%), by the time, the call was completed, 67% had received some form of psychosocial support and/or counseling. Recommendations for future research are discussed within the context of this review.

  16. Embedding QR codes in tumor board presentations, enhancing educational content for oncology information management.

    PubMed

    Siderits, Richard; Yates, Stacy; Rodriguez, Arelis; Lee, Tina; Rimmer, Cheryl; Roche, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Quick Response (QR) Codes are standard in supply management and seen with increasing frequency in advertisements. They are now present regularly in healthcare informatics and education. These 2-dimensional square bar codes, originally designed by the Toyota car company, are free of license and have a published international standard. The codes can be generated by free online software and the resulting images incorporated into presentations. The images can be scanned by "smart" phones and tablets using either the iOS or Android platforms, which link the device with the information represented by the QR code (uniform resource locator or URL, online video, text, v-calendar entries, short message service [SMS] and formatted text). Once linked to the device, the information can be viewed at any time after the original presentation, saved in the device or to a Web-based "cloud" repository, printed, or shared with others via email or Bluetooth file transfer. This paper describes how we use QR codes in our tumor board presentations, discusses the benefits, the different QR codes from Web links and how QR codes facilitate the distribution of educational content. PMID:23270096

  17. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  18. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  19. Arkansas Technology Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    The Arkansas Technology Information System (ARTIS) was developed to fill a significant void in existing systems of technical support to Arkansans with disabilities by creating and maintaining a consumer-responsive statewide system of data storage and retrieval regarding assistive technology and services. ARTIS goals also include establishment of a…

  20. HOPE information system review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Kenji; Ono, Shuuji; Fukuda, Kouin

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the review conducted on H-2 Orbiting Plane (HOPE) is presented. A prototype model was constructed by inputting various technical information proposed by related laboratories. Especially operation flow which enables understanding of correlation between various analysis items, judgement criteria, technical data, and interfaces with others was constructed. Technical information data base and retrieval systems were studied. A Macintosh personal computer was selected for information shaping because of its excellent function, performance, operability, and software completeness.

  1. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  2. Establishing Chinese medicine characteristic tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of Chinese medicine oncology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Li, Lei; Liu, Rui; Lin, Hong-sheng

    2012-10-01

    The features and advantages of Chinese medicine (CM) in cancer comprehensive treatment have been in the spotlight of experts both at home and abroad. However, how to evaluate the effect of CM more objectively, scientifically and systematically is still the key problem of clinical trial, and also a limitation to the development and internationalization of CM oncology. The change of tumor response evaluation system in conventional medicine is gradually consistent with the features of CM clinical effect, such as they both focus on a combination of soft endpoints (i.e. quality of life, clinical benefit, etc.) and hard endpoints (i.e. tumor remission rate, time to progress, etc.). Although experts have proposed protocols of CM tumor response evaluation criteria and come to an agreement in general, divergences still exist in the importance, quantification and CM feature of the potential endpoints. Thus, establishing a CM characteristic and wildly accepted tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of CM oncology, and also provides a more convenient and scientific platform for CM international cooperation and communication.

  3. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Kelvin

    An Australian university architect studying management information systems programs at academic institutions in the United States visited 26 universities and colleges and nine educational and professional associations, including extended visits at the University of Wisconsin and the National Center of Higher Education Management Systems. During…

  4. [Biosimilars in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sérgio; Coutinho, Jorge; Damasceno, Margarida; Dinis, José; Forjaz de Lacerda, João; Gervásio, Helena; Leal da Costa, Fernando; Marques Pereira, Ana; Parreira, António; Principe, Fernando; Rodrigues, Helena; Sá, Anabela; Teixeira, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    The development of biotechnology drugs represents one of the great advances in medical therapy and it was observed an exponential growth in its use. The resource to these drugs in Oncology and Hematology is no exception and it soon became an essential element of an integrated and directed therapy strategy. The expiry of the first biotechnology drugs patents has opened the door for the development and marketing of biosimilars, which entry in the Portuguese market was recently approved. This article was built on the analysis of the available state-of-the-art information on biotechnology drugs, biosimilars and current legislation and it expresses the opinion of Oncology and Hematology experts about the substituition of biological drugs by biosimilars in clinical practice.

  5. Network Information System

    1996-05-01

    The Network Information System (NWIS) was initially implemented in May 1996 as a system in which computing devices could be recorded so that unique names could be generated for each device. Since then the system has grown to be an enterprise wide information system which is integrated with other systems to provide the seamless flow of data through the enterprise. The system Iracks data for two main entities: people and computing devices. The following aremore » the type of functions performed by NWIS for these two entities: People Provides source information to the enterprise person data repository for select contractors and visitors Generates and tracks unique usernames and Unix user IDs for every individual granted cyber access Tracks accounts for centrally managed computing resources, and monitors and controls the reauthorization of the accounts in accordance with the DOE mandated interval Computing Devices Generates unique names for all computing devices registered in the system Tracks the following information for each computing device: manufacturer, make, model, Sandia property number, vendor serial number, operating system and operating system version, owner, device location, amount of memory, amount of disk space, and level of support provided for the machine Tracks the hardware address for network cards Tracks the P address registered to computing devices along with the canonical and alias names for each address Updates the Dynamic Domain Name Service (DDNS) for canonical and alias names Creates the configuration files for DHCP to control the DHCP ranges and allow access to only properly registered computers Tracks and monitors classified security plans for stand-alone computers Tracks the configuration requirements used to setup the machine Tracks the roles people have on machines (system administrator, administrative access, user, etc...) Allows systems administrators to track changes made on the machine (both hardware and software) Generates an

  6. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  7. Global Land Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is a World Wide Web-based query tool developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide data and information about the Earth's land surface. Examples of holdings available through the GLIS include cartographic data, topographic data, soils data, aerial photographs, and satellite images from various agencies and cooperators located around the world. Both hard copy and digital data collections are represented in the GLIS, and preview images are available for millions of the products in the system.

  8. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  9. Uptake of a web-based oncology protocol system: how do cancer clinicians use eviQ cancer treatments online?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of computerized systems to support evidence-based practice is commonplace in contemporary medicine. Despite the prolific use of electronic support systems there has been relatively little research on the uptake of web-based systems in the oncology setting. Our objective was to examine the uptake of a web-based oncology protocol system (http://www.eviq.org.au) by Australian cancer clinicians. Methods We used web-logfiles and Google Analytics to examine the characteristics of eviQ registrants from October 2009-December 2011 and patterns of use by cancer clinicians during a typical month. Results As of December 2011, there were 16,037 registrants; 85% of whom were Australian health care professionals. During a typical month 87% of webhits occurred in standard clinical hours (08:00 to 18:00 weekdays). Raw webhits were proportional to the size of clinician groups: nurses (47% of Australian registrants), followed by doctors (20%), and pharmacists (14%). However, pharmacists had up to three times the webhit rate of other clinical groups. Clinicians spent five times longer viewing chemotherapy protocol pages than other content and the protocols viewed reflect the most common cancers: lung, breast and colorectal. Conclusions Our results demonstrate eviQ is used by a range of health professionals involved in cancer treatment at the point-of-care. Continued monitoring of electronic decision support systems is vital to understanding how they are used in clinical practice and their impact on processes of care and patient outcomes. PMID:23497080

  10. A lean case study in an oncological hospital: implementation of a telephone triage system in the emergency service.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, José Crespo; Ramos, Madalena; Paixão, Carina

    2013-01-01

    Lean practices and thinking have increased substantially in the last few years. Applications of lean practices to health care are found worldwide. Despite that, new contributions are required because the application of lean thinking to hospitals has a long way to go. Lean practices and thinking do not include, in the literature or practice programs, any references to triage systems in health care units. The common triage systems require physical presence, but there are alternative methods to avoid the need to move patients: these alternative triage systems, given their characteristics, may be included in the spectrum of lean practices. Currently, patients that are already known to suffer from cancer are encouraged to go to hospital (public or private, with an oncological focus) when facing side effects from chemotherapy or radiation treatments; they are then submitted to a triage system (present themselves to the hospital for examination). The authors of this paper propose the introduction of telephone or email triage for impaired patients as a valid substitute for moving them physically, thereby often avoiding several unnecessary moves. This approach has, in fact, characteristics similar to a lean practice in that it reduces costs and maintains, if done properly, the overall service offered. The proposed 'remote' triage emerged from the results of a large survey sent to patients and also as the outcome of a set of semistructured interviews conducted with hospital nurses. With the results they obtained, the authors felt comfortable proposing this approach both to public and private hospitals, because the study was conducted in the most important, largest, and best-known oncological unit in Spain. As a final result, the health care unit studied is now taking the first steps to implement a remote triage system by telephone, and has begun to reduce the previously necessary movement of impaired patients.

  11. Cardiovascular information systems.

    PubMed

    Marion, Joe

    2012-01-01

    The ARRA/HITECH Act has made electronic medical records a front burner issue, and many believe that EMRs will make departmental systems redundant. Some cardiologists beg to differ, arguing that cardiovascular information systems are deeply clinical and essential to the cardiovascular workflow. Here's a look at the evolution of CVIS, EMR, and their roles as the healthcare landscape is being transformed by meaningful use.

  12. Value: a framework for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A; Steinberg, Michael L

    2014-09-10

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment.

  13. Value: A Framework for Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment. PMID:25113759

  14. Human Resource Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinford, Paul

    1978-01-01

    A computer at Valley View Schools, Illinois, is used to collect, store, maintain, and retrieve information about a school district's human resources. The system was designed to increase the efficiency and thoroughness of personnel and payroll record keeping, and reporting functions. (Author/MLF)

  15. Geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and developmental planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times in the event of a natural disaster, or a GIS might be used to find wetlands that need protection form pollution.

  16. Communication and Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the Microelectronics Education Programme's work in the communication and information systems domain, suggesting that teachers understanding the new technologies and incorporate them into regular classroom instruction. Focuses on computers in the classroom, economy of time, keyboard skills, life skills, and vocational training. (Author/JN)

  17. Studies Probe Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the two recent studies of interest to the library community: (1) an A. D. Little analysis of past and present systems for dissemination of scientific technical information, and (2) Fritz Machlup's economic profile of key disseminators of scholarly, scientific, and intellectual knowledge. (FM)

  18. Energy Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Celia E.

    This paper examines the need for accurate, reliable data on energy, flowing upward to the national government from various energy-intensive information systems. Part I explores the need for a national policy coordinating this flow within both the United States and, for comparative purposes, Great Britain. Part II presents in outline form the…

  19. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    1995-01-01

    When it comes to electronic data processing in healthcare, we offer a guarded, but hopeful, prognosis. To be sure, the age of electronic information processing has hit healthcare. Employers, insurance companies, hospitals, physicians and a host of ancillary service providers are all being ushered into a world of high speed, high tech electronic information. Some are even predicting that the health information business will grow from $20 billion to over $100 billion in a decade. Yet, out industry lags behind other industries in its overall movement to the paperless world. Selecting and installing the most advanced integrated information system isn't a simple task, as we've seen. As in life, compromises can produce less than optimal results. Nevertheless, integrated healthcare systems simply won't achieve their goals without systems designed to support the operation of a continuum of services. That's the reality! It is difficult to read about the wonderful advances in other sectors, while realizing that many trees still fall each year in the name of the health care industry. Yes, there are some outstanding examples of organizations pushing the envelop in a variety of areas. Yet from a very practical standpoint, many (like our physician's office) are still struggling or are on the sidelines wondering what to do. Given the competitive marketplace, organizations without effective systems may not have long to wonder and wait.

  20. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  1. Identification of an N staging system that predicts oncologic outcome in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated which N staging system was the most accurate at predicting survival in pancreatic cancer patients. Lymph node (LN) metastasis is known to be one of the important prognostic factors in resected pancreatic cancer. There are several LN evaluation systems to predict oncologic impact. From January 1992 to December 2014, 77 medical records of patients who underwent radical pancreatectomy for left-sided pancreatic cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Clinicopathologic variables including pN stage, total number of retrieved LNs (N-RLN), lymph node ratio (LNR), and absolute number of LN metastases (N-LNmet) were evaluated. Disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed according to these 4 LN staging systems. In univariate analysis, pN stage (pN0 vs pN1: 17.5 months vs 7.9 months, P = 0.001), LNR (<0.08 vs ≥0.08: 17.5 months vs 4.4 months, P < 0.001), and N-LNmet (#N = 0 vs #N = 1 vs #N≥2: 17.5 months vs 11.0 months vs 6.4 months, P = 0.002) had a significant effect on DFS, whereas the pN stage (pN0 vs pN1: 35.3 months vs 16.7 months, P = 0.001), LNR (<0.08 vs ≥0.08: 37.1 months vs 15.0 months, P < 0.001), and N-LNmet (#N = 0 vs #N = 1 vs #N≥2: 35.3 months vs 18.4 months vs 16.4 months, P = 0.001) had a significant effect on DSS. In multivariate analysis, N-LNmet (#N≥2) was identified as an independent prognostic factor of oncologic outcome (DFS and DSS: Exp (β) = 2.83, P = 0.001, and Exp (β) = 3.17, P = 0.001, respectively). Absolute number of lymph node metastases predicted oncologic outcome in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:27368029

  2. Demystifying radiology information systems.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, R

    2000-01-01

    Selecting the right radiology information system (RIS) can be a difficult and tedious task for radiology managers. Sometimes the information systems department ends up selecting the RIS. As a radiology manager, you can help yourself and your department greatly by becoming more educated concerning the technology and terminology of radiology information systems. You can then participate in one of the most important decisions that will ever be made regarding your department. There is much confusion about the meanings of the terms interfaced and integrated. Two applications are generally considered integrated if they freely access and update each other's databases. Two applications are generally considered interfaced if they pass data to each other but don't directly access nor update the other's databases. Two more terms are centralized and decentralized. Centralized is the concept of "putting all of your eggs in one basket." Decentralization means you spread your resources out. The main difference between centralized and decentralized is that all components of a centralized system share the same fate (good or bad), while decentralized components operate independently and aren't affected directly by failures in another system. Another significant term relevant to RIS systems is HL7, which is a standardized data format that allows one application to pass data to another application in a format that the receiving application understands. RIS vendors generally fall in three categories: single-source vendors, multiproduct vendors and single-product vendors. Single-product vendors include best-of-breed vendors. No one approach is necessarily better than the others; which you choose will depend on your needs. When considering the purchase of an RIS system, there are important questions to ask yourself, the vendor and the vendors' customers as you gather information and prepare to make a decision.

  3. Toward intelligent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Fumio; Hinatsu, Ken'ichi

    This article describes the indexing aid system and project at JICST, API, NLM and BIOSIS. They are dealing with the very broad domain of science, medicine and technological literatures and indexing is done by use of controlled terms, the indexing is routinely performed by highly skilled indexers. Because of the high cost of controlled indexing of bibliographic information they have designed automated indexing system and/or expert-like system to take advantage of many years of experienced indexing using knowledge bases and /on thesauri.

  4. Laboratory Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  5. A clinician's guide to biosimilars in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Linton, Kim M; Cervi, Paul; Rosenberg, Julie A; Jacobs, Ira

    2016-05-01

    Biological agents or "biologics" are widely used in oncology practice for cancer treatment and for the supportive management of treatment-related side effects. Unlike small-molecule generic drugs, exact copies of biologics are impossible to produce because these are large and highly complex molecules produced in living cells. The term "biosimilar" refers to a biological product that is highly similar to a licensed biological product (reference or originator product) with no clinically meaningful differences in terms of safety, purity, or potency. Biosimilars have the potential to provide savings to healthcare systems and to make important biological therapies widely accessible to a global population. As biosimilars for rituximab, trastuzumab, and bevacizumab are expected to reach the market in the near future, clinicians will soon be faced with decisions to consider biosimilars as alternatives to existing reference products. The aim of this article is to inform oncology practitioners about the biosimilar development and evaluation process, and to offer guidance on how to evaluate biosimilar data in order to make informed decisions when integrating these drugs into oncology practice. We will also review several biosimilars that are currently in development for cancer treatment. PMID:27135548

  6. Integrated clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  7. Integrated clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  8. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  9. Nuclear criticality information system

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-11-30

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

  10. Information Systems in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Fedja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Almost the entire human creativity today, from the standpoint of its efficiency and expediency, is conditioned with the existence of information systems. Most information systems are oriented to the management and decision-making, including health information system. System of health and health insurance together form one of the most important segments of society and its functioning as a compact unit. Increasing requirements for reducing health care costs while preserving or improving the quality of services provided represent a difficult task for the health system. Material and methods: Using descriptive metods by retreiiving literature we analyzed the latest solutions in information and telecommunications technology is the basis for building an effective and efficient health system. Computerization does not have the primary objective of saving, but the rationalization of spending in health care. It is estimated that at least 20-30% of money spent in health care can be rationally utilized. Computerization should give the necessary data and indicators for this rationalization. Very important are the goals of this project and the achievement of other uses and benefits, improving overall care for patients and policyholders, increasing the speed and accuracy of diagnosis in determining treatment using electronic diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. Results and discussion: Computerization in dentistry began similarly as in other human activities–recording large amounts of data on digital media, and by replacing manual data processing to machine one. But specifics of the dental profession have led to the specifics of the application of information technology (IT), and continue to require special development of dental oriented and applied IT. Harmonization of dental software with global standards will enable doctors and dentists to with a few mouse clicks via the internet reach the general medical information about their patients from the central

  11. Information sciences experiment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Murray, Nicholas D.; Benz, Harry F.; Bowker, David E.; Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid expansion of remote sensing capability over the last two decades will take another major leap forward with the advent of the Earth Observing System (Eos). An approach is presented that will permit experiments and demonstrations in onboard information extraction. The approach is a non-intrusive, eavesdropping mode in which a small amount of spacecraft real estate is allocated to an onboard computation resource. How such an approach allows the evaluation of advanced technology in the space environment, advanced techniques in information extraction for both Earth science and information science studies, direct to user data products, and real-time response to events, all without affecting other on-board instrumentation is discussed.

  12. Valid informed consent and participative decision-making in children with cancer and their parents: a report of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Spinetta, John J; Masera, Giuseppe; Jankovic, Momcilo; Oppenheim, Daniel; Martins, Antonio Gentil; Ben Arush, Myriam Weyl; van Dongen-Melman, Jeanette; Epelman, Claudia; Medin, Gabriela; Pekkanen, Kirsti; Eden, Tim

    2003-04-01

    This is the tenth official document of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology, instituted in 1991. It is addressed to the pediatric oncology community. Children clearly have a right to participate in medical decisions regarding their own treatment, based on the developmental level of the child. The objective of these guidelines is to encourage physicians to share with the child developmentally relevant medical information specific to that particular child's health status, in the context of the child's own culture, so that he or she can actively participate in the decision-making process regarding his or her own health. These guidelines, geared toward this objective, discuss the child's right to medical information, the parents' legal responsibility for but not exclusive right over the child's health, and ways of encouraging the younger child's active participation in his or her own health care at an age-appropriate level of understanding. For adolescents, there should be a full and legally mandated power to make their own decisions regarding medical treatment.

  13. Clinical Protocol Information System

    PubMed Central

    Wirtschafter, David D.; Gams, Richard; Ferguson, Carol; Blackwell, William; Boackle, Paul

    1980-01-01

    The Clinical Protocol Information System (CPIS) supports the clinical research and patient care objectives of the SouthEastern Cancer Study Group (SEG). The information system goals are to improve the evaluability of clinical trials, decrease the frequency of adverse patient events, implement drug toxicity surveillance, improve the availability of study data and demonstrate the criteria for computer networks that can impact on the general medical care of the community. Nodes in the network consist of Data General MicroNova MP-100 minicomputers that drive the interactive data dialogue and communicate with the network concentrator (another DG MicroNova) in Birmingham. Functions supported include: source data editing, care “advice,” care “audit,” care “explanation,” and treatment note printing. The complete database is updated nightly and resides on UAB's IBM 370/158-AP.

  14. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  15. Engineering Review Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grems, III, Edward G. (Inventor); Henze, James E. (Inventor); Bixby, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Roberts, Mark (Inventor); Mann, Thomas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A disciplinal engineering review computer information system and method by defining a database of disciplinal engineering review process entities for an enterprise engineering program, opening a computer supported engineering item based upon the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, managing a review of the opened engineering item according to the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, and closing the opened engineering item according to the opened engineering item review.

  16. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care.

  17. The information systems heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzhals, P. R.; Bricker, R. W.; Jensen, A. S.; Smith, A. T.

    1981-05-01

    This paper addresses key developments in the evolution of information systems over the past five decades. Major areas covered include the growth of imaging sensors from such pioneering devices as the iconoscope and orthicon which ushered in television, through a wide range of vidicon tubes, to the solid-state arrays which characterize current systems; the phenomenal expansion of electronic communications from telegraph and telephone wires, through the introduction of broadcast and microwave relay services, to the present era of worldwide satellite communications and data networks; and the key role of digital computers from their ancient precursors like the abacus and the mechanical calculating engines, through the appearance of the first large-scale electronic computers and their transistorized successors, to the rapid proliferation of miniaturized processors which impact every aspect of aerospace systems today.

  18. Chemical information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zebora, M.

    1994-12-31

    The growing number of Federal and State regulations today from EPA to OSHA is putting a large burden on organizations to comply with regard to chemicals in the work place. The cornerstone of chemical information is the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). The MSDS has been a requirement for chemical manufacturers for over fifteen years. Manufacturers of hazardous materials must provide MSDSs to purchasers. However, recent additional regulations from OSHA, in particular the Right To Know and the Hazard Communication Standard (Haz-Com) require that employers who use chemicals must be capable of providing an MSDS to every employee that requests one for a material that they work with. Paper filing systems to managing MSDSs are hard to maintain, costly, and inefficient. In multifacility organizations this can result in delays in distributions of those MSDSs to employees. At AT and T Bell Laboratories the Environmental Health and Safety Center has invested over a decade of development work into producing an integrated Chemical Inventory System/MSDS System. That system meets the requirements discussed in this paper and serves six major R and D laboratory facilities in three states. The system resides on a desktop personal computer. Operation of the system relies on teamwork between several diverse organizations which are involved in management of chemical safety at AT and T Bell Laboratories. The departments represented on that team are Industrial Hygiene and Safety, Environmental Management, Facilities Operations, Purchasing, Health Services, Research, and Environmental Data Management Services.

  19. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissebrat, Guillaume; Fleury, Laurence; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Asencio, Nicole; Favot, Florence; Roussot, Odile

    2013-04-01

    The AMMA information system aims at expediting data and scientific results communication inside the AMMA community and beyond. It has already been adopted as the data management system by several projects and is meant to become a reference information system about West Africa area for the whole scientific community. The AMMA database and the associated on line tools have been developed and are managed by two French teams (IPSL Database Centre, Palaiseau and OMP Data Service, Toulouse). The complete system has been fully duplicated and is operated by AGRHYMET Regional Centre in Niamey, Niger. The AMMA database contains a wide variety of datasets: - about 250 local observation datasets, that cover geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health...) They come from either operational networks or scientific experiments, and include historical data in West Africa from 1850; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Database users can access all the data using either the portal http://database.amma-international.org or http://amma.agrhymet.ne/amma-data. Different modules are available. The complete catalogue enables to access metadata (i.e. information about the datasets) that are compliant with the international standards (ISO19115, INSPIRE...). Registration pages enable to read and sign the data and publication policy, and to apply for a user database account. The data access interface enables to easily build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... At present, the AMMA database counts more than 740 registered users and process about 80 data requests every month In order to monitor day-to-day meteorological and environment information over West Africa, some quick look and report display websites have

  20. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Mière, Arnaud; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to boost the data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) quasi real-time display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange collaborative tool. The AMMA information system is enriched by past and ongoing projects (IMPETUS, FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, ACASIS, DACCIWA...) addressing meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, extreme events, health, adaptation of human societies... It is becoming a reference information system on environmental issues in West Africa. (i) The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts about 900 registered users, and 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and

  1. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Roussot, Odile

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to facilitate and speed up data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a multidisciplinary user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) report and chart archives associated with display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange system. The AMMA information system is enriched by several previous (IMPETUS...) and following projects (FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, DACCIWA…) and is becoming a reference information system about West Africa monsoon. (i) The AMMA project includes airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA database user interface enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks from 1850 to present, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) or scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. All the data are documented in compliance with metadata international standards, and delivered into standard formats. The data request user interface takes full advantage of the data and metadata base relational structure and enables users to elaborate easily multicriteria data requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts around 800 registered users and process about 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and ESPRI in France

  2. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  3. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  4. Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models.The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  5. [Assessment of the efficacy of cancer procoagulant (CP) activity evaluation in the oncological diagnosis of the urinary system].

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Darewicz, Barbara; Kudelski, Jacek; Werel, Tadeusz; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Skrzydlewski, Zdzisław; Gabrylewski, Wojciech

    2005-10-01

    Many studies have been carried out to develop unfailing diagnostic methods that could improve cancer detection. There are available cancer markers of relatively low sensitivity and specificity, which makes a reason why they not always let detect neoplasm at their earliest stage. There is a new protease cysteine enzyme named cancer procoagulant (CP) isolated from rabbit V2 Ca neoplasm and characterized by Gordon et al in 1975. Because of its exclusive presentation in the cancer tissues and blood serum of the patients with tumor, this neoplasm-cell-originated protein seems to be a new biochemical cancer disease marker. The elevated activity of CP was found in the cancers of pancreatic, breast, lung, alimentary and urinary system. The blood serum CP activity levels in the patients with renal, bladder, and prostate cancers were determined statistically higher as compared to controls but the difference varied depending on the mentioned organ of the urinary system. The CP highest activity levels was determined in the patients with prostate cancer, lower ones in bladder carcinoma ones and the lowest ones in individuals with renal tumours. That is why it appears to be justifiable to apply the determination of the CP in the oncological diagnosis in the urinary system.

  6. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  7. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A

    2008-07-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe.

  8. Flawless information system implementation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J W

    1993-01-01

    When it was decided to replace the homegrown materiel management information system at Barnes Hospital, a 1,200-bed hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, with a more comprehensive one, the aim was to have a swift, error-free selection, testing and implementation process. It met these goals by dedicating the following resources to the process: 1) a dedicated, full-time user responsible for requirements definition, testing, training and user support, 2) a dedicated IS support team for selection, testing and implementation of the software package, 3) availability of additional personnel in Materiel Management for general assistance, 4) a team approach, both at the project team level, and hospital wide, 5) a total commitment to quality at every phase, 6) a thorough approach to testing, both at the system level, and at the unit, or program level and 7) the vendor commitment of extra time, money and energy to help us make the system work to the best of its ability. PMID:10123862

  9. A CD-ROM database product for oncology.

    PubMed

    Schipma, P B

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a vertically oriented CD-ROM database product in the medical subdiscipline of oncology. Called OncoDisc, the CD-ROM is mastered by ISG. It contains three major information collections: (1) PDQ (a system of a series of files and a set of relationships; the user accesses the data through those relationships); (2) Cancerlit (the research literature that underlies the treatment information contained in PDQ), and (3) full-text articles. SearchLITE, the retrieval system, is written in C language and has been implemented on the the DEC VAX family and the IBM PC/XT and PC/AT. The disc provides a personal library of oncology information for immediate local use by the health professional; it requires no subscription to an online service, no telecommunications, and no online search charges. PMID:10302065

  10. Evaluation and comparison of histopathologic grading systems of epithelial carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Gynecologic Oncology Group studies.

    PubMed

    Stock, R J; Zaino, R; Bundy, B N; Askin, F B; Woodward, J; Fetter, B; Paulson, J A; DiSaia, P J; Stehman, F B

    1994-04-01

    The subjects of this study are 445 patients with advanced cervical cancer treated by standardized radiation therapy. Upon entry into one of two Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) protocols, original pathologic diagnoses and histologic tumor descriptions for each patient were compared with separate evaluations made by a consensus opinion of two GOG pathologists. A review diagnosis using grade, cell type, and the Stendahl scoring system was then made by the first author (R.J.S.) without knowledge of the prior diagnoses. Of the original pathologists' diagnoses, 21% did not include grade or cell type. There was little agreement among the different pathologists as to the use of either specific grade or cell type. Histologic grade, irrespective of the pathologists making the diagnosis, had no correlation to prognosis. The Reagan and Wentz large-cell keratinizing (LCK) cell type, when applied by the author to tumors with any form of squamous keratinization present, identified a group of patients with a poorer prognosis, although not independently of other prognostic factors. The Stendahl scoring system identified a number of patients with both a poorer and better prognosis. This was statistically significant and independent of other risk factors. A major limitation, however, was the number of patients evaluable because of inadequate biopsy material in 23.6% of the study group.

  11. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology.

  12. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  13. Community oncology in an era of payment reform.

    PubMed

    Cox, John V; Ward, Jeffery C; Hornberger, John C; Temel, Jennifer S; McAneny, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Patients and payers (government and private) are frustrated with the fee-for-service system (FFS) of payment for outpatient health services. FFS rewards volume and highly valued services, including expensive diagnostics and therapeutics, over lesser valued cognitive services. Proposed payment schemes would incent collaboration and coordination of care among providers and reward quality. In oncology, new payment schemes must address the high costs of all services, particularly drugs, while preserving the robust distribution of sites of service available to patients in the United States. Information technology and personalized cancer care are changing the practice of oncology. Twenty-first century oncology will require increasing cognitive work and shared decision making, both of which are not well regarded in the FFS model. A high proportion of health care dollars are consumed in the final months of life. Effective delivery of palliative and end-of-life care must be addressed by practice and by new models of payment. Value-based reimbursement schemes will require oncology practices to change how they are structured. Lessons drawn from the principles of primary care's Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) will help oncology practice to prepare for new schemes. PCMH principles place a premium on proactively addressing toxicities of therapies, coordinating care with other providers, and engaging patients in shared decision making, supporting the ideal of value defined in the triple aim-to measurably improve patient experience and quality of care at less cost. Payment reform will be disruptive to all. Oncology must be engaged in policy discussions and guide rational shifts in priorities defined by new payment models.

  14. Toward an integrated knowledge environment to support modern oncology.

    PubMed

    Blake, Patrick M; Decker, David A; Glennon, Timothy M; Liang, Yong Michael; Losko, Sascha; Navin, Nicholas; Suh, K Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Around the world, teams of researchers continue to develop a wide range of systems to capture, store, and analyze data including treatment, patient outcomes, tumor registries, next-generation sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism, copy number, gene expression, drug chemistry, drug safety, and toxicity. Scientists mine, curate, and manually annotate growing mountains of data to produce high-quality databases, while clinical information is aggregated in distant systems. Databases are currently scattered, and relationships between variables coded in disparate datasets are frequently invisible. The challenge is to evolve oncology informatics from a "systems" orientation of standalone platforms and silos into an "integrated knowledge environments" that will connect "knowable" research data with patient clinical information. The aim of this article is to review progress toward an integrated knowledge environment to support modern oncology with a focus on supporting scientific discovery and improving cancer care.

  15. The Phobos information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I. P.; Oberst, J.; Zubarev, A. E.; Nadezhdina, I. E.; Kokhanov, A. A.; Garov, A. S.; Uchaev, D. V.; Uchaev, Dm. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.; Klimkin, N. D.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a Geo-information system (GIS) for Phobos, based on data from the Mars Express and Viking Orbiter missions, which includes orthoimages, global maps, terrain- and gravity field models, all referenced to the Phobos coordinate system. The data are conveniently stored in the ArcGIS software system, which provides an environment for mapping and which allows us to carry out joint data analysis and miscellaneous data cross-comparisons. We have compiled catalogs of Phobos craters using manual and automated techniques, which includes about 5500 and 6400 craters correspondingly. While crater numbers are biased by available image data resolution and illumination, we estimate that our catalog of manually detected craters contains all Phobos craters with diameters D>250 m which is a total of 1072 and catalog of automated detected craters are complete for craters D>400 m (360 craters). Statistical analysis of these large craters reveals a surplus of craters on the anti-Mars hemisphere, whereas differences in crater abundance between leading and trailing hemisphere cannot be confirmed. This in contrast to previous papers, where no such asymmetry was found (Schmedemann et al., 2014). But we cannot rule out remaining biases due to resolution, viewing angles or illumination effects. Using digital terrain model (DTM) derived from photogrammetry image processing we estimate depths of 25 craters larger than 2 km using geometric and dynamic heights (for discussion of Phobos crater morphometry see Kokhanov et al., 2014). We also have compiled catalogs of lineaments, and boulders. In particular, we mapped 546 individual grooves or crater chains, which extend in length from 0.3 km to 16.2 km. We identified and determined the sizes and locations of 1379 boulders near crater Stickney. Cross-comparisons of gravity field models against distribution patterns of grooves and boulders are currently under way and may shed light on their possible origins. Finally, we have developed

  16. Manufacturing information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. K.; Smith, P. R.; Smart, M. J.

    1983-12-01

    The size and cost of manufacturing equipment has made it extremely difficult to perform realistic modeling and simulation of the manufacturing process in university research laboratories. Likewise the size and cost factors, coupled with many uncontrolled variables of the production situation has even made it difficult to perform adequate manufacturing research in the industrial setting. Only the largest companies can afford manufacturing research laboratories; research results are often held proprietary and seldom find their way into the university classroom to aid in education and training of new manufacturing engineers. It is the purpose for this research to continue the development of miniature prototype equipment suitable for use in an integrated CAD/CAM Laboratory. The equipment being developed is capable of actually performing production operations (e.g. drilling, milling, turning, punching, etc.) on metallic and non-metallic workpieces. The integrated CAD/CAM Mini-Lab is integrating high resolution, computer graphics, parametric design, parametric N/C parts programmings, CNC machine control, automated storage and retrieval, with robotics materials handling. The availability of miniature CAD/CAM laboratory equipment will provide the basis for intensive laboratory research on manufacturing information systems.

  17. Implementation of an oncology exercise and wellness rehabilitation program to enhance survivorship: the Beaumont Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Thomas B; Brown, Eric; Kuwajerwala, Nafisa; Stromberg, Jannifer; Gustafson, Gregory; Wood, Ryan; Parzuchowski, Jeanne; Akhtar, Adil

    2014-03-01

    We developed a multidisciplinary approach to oncology rehabilitation by setting up a physical therapy screening program in a dedicated multidisciplinary clinic to improve survivorship care in the community oncology setting. In June 2011, an oncology rehabilitation program was launched as part of the overall survivorship program to provide patients with an introduction to cancer services, consultation with multiple clinicians, education about their diagnoses, and recommendation for rehabilitation services during or after treatment. The consultation was in conjunction with specialists at the multidisciplinary clinics that were already established within the organization. A dedicated and trained oncology physical therapist participated in the comprehensive multidisciplinary discussion. From the beginning of the program in June 2011 until December 2012, 288 patients (231 women and 57 men) entered the oncology exercise and wellness rehabilitation program. The establishment of the program improved the quality of care for cancer patients as demonstrated by the number of patients screened before treatment recommendations. The program also served the need for continued health and wellness for those in survivorship. PMID:24971413

  18. Integrative Physical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Chauviere, Arnaud; Bauer, Amy L.; Leier, André; Lewis, Michael T.; Macklin, Paul; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is arguably the ultimate complex biological system. Solid tumors are micro-structured soft matter that evolves as a consequence of spatio-temporal events at the intracellular (e.g., signaling pathways, macromolecular trafficking), intercellular (e.g., cell-cell adhesion/communication), and tissue (e.g., cell-extracellular matrix interactions, mechanical forces) scales. To gain insight, tumor and developmental biologists have gathered a wealth of molecular, cellular and genetic data, including immunohistochemical measurements of cell type-specific division and death rates, lineage tracing, and gain-of-function/loss-of-function mutational analyses. These data are empirically extrapolated to a diagnosis/prognosis of tissue-scale behavior, e.g., for clinical decision. Integrative Physical Oncology (IPO) is the science that develops physically consistent mathematical approaches to address the significant challenge of bridging the nano (nm)-micro (μm) to macro (mm, cm) scales with respect to tumor development and progression. In the current literature, such approaches are referred to as multiscale modeling. In the present review, we attempt to assess recent modeling approaches on each separate scale and critically evaluate the current “hybrid-multiscale” models used to investigate tumor growth in the context of brain and breast cancers. Finally, we provide our perspective on the further development and the impact of Integrative Physical Oncology. PMID:21853537

  19. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  20. 76 FR 59167 - Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division, Concord, CA; Siemens Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ..., Concord, CA; Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management Including.../Supply Chain Management. These employees provided support for the supply of information technology...,158) and Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management,...

  1. Immune system-tumour efficiency ratio as a new oncological index for radiotherapy treatment optimization.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Rodríguez-Pérez, D; Santos-Miranda, J A; Sotolongo-Costa, O; Antoranz, J C

    2009-12-01

    A dynamical system model for tumour-immune system interaction together with a method to mimic radiation therapy are proposed. A large population of virtual patients is simulated following an ideal radiation treatment. A characteristic parameter, the immune system-tumor efficiency ratio (ISTER) is introduced. ISTER dependence of treatment success and other features are studied. Radiotherapy treatment dose optimization, following ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) criterion, as well as a patient classification are drawn from the statistics results. PMID:19584118

  2. Immune system-tumour efficiency ratio as a new oncological index for radiotherapy treatment optimization.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Rodríguez-Pérez, D; Santos-Miranda, J A; Sotolongo-Costa, O; Antoranz, J C

    2009-12-01

    A dynamical system model for tumour-immune system interaction together with a method to mimic radiation therapy are proposed. A large population of virtual patients is simulated following an ideal radiation treatment. A characteristic parameter, the immune system-tumor efficiency ratio (ISTER) is introduced. ISTER dependence of treatment success and other features are studied. Radiotherapy treatment dose optimization, following ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) criterion, as well as a patient classification are drawn from the statistics results.

  3. Copying and the Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Richard L.

    1975-01-01

    Calls on the users and producers and publishers of scientific information to aid in the design of practical systems for information dissemination that will encompass not only copyright law but also computer file access. (GS)

  4. Cockpit weather information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  5. Career Information Delivery Systems Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gerald T.; Whitman, Patricia D.

    This inventory highlights similarities and differences between 19 computerized career information delivery systems (CIDS) so practitioners may make more informed choices concerning the adoption of such systems, and policymakers may monitor the developing scope of system features and costs. It was developed through a survey of computer products…

  6. Global Land Information System (GLIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is an interactive computer system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for scientists seeking sources of information about the Earth's land surfaces. GLIS contains "metadata," that is, descriptive information about data sets. Through GLIS, scientists can evaluate data sets, determine their availability, and place online requests for products. GLIS is more, however, than a mere list of products. It offers online samples of earth science data that may be ordered through the system.

  7. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T; Phillips, M; Hendrickson, K; Song, W; Kwok, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  8. Performances of the scanning system for the CNAO center of oncological hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanengo, S.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Burini, F.; Cirio, R.; Fabbricatore, P.; Voelker, F.; Garella, M. A.; Incurvati, M.; Monaco, V.; Pardo, J.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.; Taddia, G.; Zampieri, A.

    2010-02-01

    In hadron therapy one of the most advanced methods for beam delivery is the active scanning technique which uses fast scanning magnets to drive a narrow particle beam across the target. The Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) will treat tumours with this technique. The CNAO scanning system includes two identical dipole magnets for horizontal and vertical beam deflection, each one connected to a fast power supply. The dose delivery system exploits a set of monitor chambers to measure the fluence and position of the beam and drives the beam during the treatment by controlling the sequence of currents set by the power supplies. A test of the dynamic performance of the scanning system has been performed using a Hall probe to measure the field inside the magnet and the results are presented in this paper.

  9. Nanomedicine: towards development of patient-friendly drug-delivery systems for oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Ramya; Madanmohan, Shruthilaya; Kesavan, Akila; Baskar, Ganga; Krishnamoorthy, Yoganathan Ramia; Santosham, Roy; Ponraju, D; Rayala, Suresh Kumar; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    The focus on nanotechnology in cancer treatment and diagnosis has intensified due to the serious side effects caused by anticancer agents as a result of their cytotoxic actions on normal cells. This nonspecific action of chemotherapy has awakened a need for formulations capable of definitive targeting with enhanced tumor-killing. Nanooncology, the application of nanobiotechnology to the management of cancer, is currently the most important area of nanomedicine. Currently several nanomaterial-based drug-delivery systems are in vogue and several others are in various stages of development. Tumor-targeted drug-delivery systems are envisioned as magic bullets for cancer therapy and several groups are working globally for development of robust systems. PMID:22403487

  10. OPAL: Toward the Computer-Aided Design of Oncology Advice Systems

    PubMed Central

    Musen, Mark A.; Combs, David M.; Walton, Joan D.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1986-01-01

    Tools that allow physicians to enter knowledge directly into computers will greatly facilitate the creation of medical expert systems. OPAL is the knowledge entry program for ONCOCIN, an expert system that assists in the management of cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials. OPAL uses computer graphics techniques to display knowledge about cancer treatment plans in a manner intuitive to physicians. Knowledge entered graphically into OPAL is automatically converted by the program to the format used internally by ONCOCIN. OPAL thus allows clinical experts with no special training in computer science to create complex medical knowledge bases. Visual representation of knowledge in a manner that is understandable to physicians may greatly expedite the development of certain classes of medical advice systems.

  11. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A generalized interactive information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Friedman, C. A.; Hipkins, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    An interactive information system is described. It is a general purpose, free format system which offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  12. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): An automated hospital information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Simmons, P. B.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    An automated hospital information system that handles all data related to patient-care activities is described. The description is designed to serve as a manual for potential users, nontechnical medical personnel who may use the system. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  13. Condition Assessment Information System

    2002-09-16

    CAIS2000 records, tracks and cost maintenance deficiencies associated with condition assessments of real property assets. Cost information is available for 39,000 items in the currenht RS Means, Facilities Construction Manual. These costs can, in turn, be rolled by by asset to produce the summary condition of an asset or site.

  14. Toward intelligent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Sanzo

    NASA/RECON, the predecessor of DIALOG System, was originally designed as a user friendly system for astronauts, so that they should not miss-operate the machine in spite of tension in the outer space. Since then, DIALOG has endeavoured to develop a series of user friendly systems, such as knowledge index, inbound gateway, as well as Version II. In this so-called end user searching era, DIALOG has released a series of front end systems successively; DIALOG Business Connection, DIALOG Medical Connection and OneSearch in 1986, early and late 1987 respectively. They are all called expert systems. In this paper, the features of each system are described in some detail and the remaining critical issues are also discussed.

  15. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence.

  16. Forest Resource Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrocznyski, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three processing functions aid in utilizing LANDSAT data for forest resource management. Designed to work primarily with digital data obtained from measurements recorded by multispectral remote sensors mounted on aerospace platforms. communication between processing functions, simplicity of control, and commonality of data files in LARSFRIS enhance usefulness of system as tool for research and development of remote sensing systems.

  17. Project Records Information System (PRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.S.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1990-11-01

    The Project Records Information System (PRIS) is an interactive system developed for the Information Services Division (ISD) of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to perform indexing, maintenance, and retrieval of information about Engineering project record documents for which they are responsible. This PRIS User's Manual provides instruction on the use of this system. This manual presents an overview of PRIS, describing the system's purpose; the data that it handles; functions it performs; hardware, software, and access; and help and error functions. This manual describes the interactive menu-driven operation of PRIS. Appendixes A, B, C, and D contain the data dictionary, help screens, report descriptions, and a primary menu structure diagram, respectively.

  18. Physico-technical background of metal vapor laser systems and their application in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armichev, A. V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Kazaryan, Mishik A.

    1996-01-01

    Some results of the copper and gold vapor lasers and of helium-cadmium lasers used in medical practice are presented. The most in medical use copper vapor laser is commonly applied for low-intensity laser therapy and endoscopic surgery. A universal capability of dye lasers oscillating in 600 - 670 red region for excitation of the preparates used in photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The copper vapor lasers are shown also to effectively coagulate pre- tumor neoplasms. A new method of laser beams shaping fitted to tumor configuration basing on quantum optical systems including image brightness amplifiers is described. Variability of the irradiating beam contrast is displayed, including the contrast inversion. Possibilities of the copper vapor lasers use for tumors drugless phototherapy and the two-step and two-stage methods of the photodynamic therapy are discussed. Some Russian medical systems based on the copper vapor lasers and dye lasers pumped by them are specified in parameters.

  19. Science information systems: Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Ray J.

    1991-01-01

    Future programs in earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics will involve complex instruments that produce data at unprecedented rates and volumes. Current methods for data display, exploration, and discovery are inadequate. Visualization technology offers a means for the user to comprehend, explore, and examine complex data sets. The goal of this program is to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of scientists in extracting scientific information from large volumes of instrument data.

  20. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  1. Implementing Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Laurie; Porter, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise resource planning system is a complex undertaking. Careful planning, management, communication, and staffing can make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation. (Contains 3 tables.)

  2. Forest resource information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mroczynski, R. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A benchmark classification evaluation framework was implemented. The FRIS preprocessing activities were refined. Potential geo-based referencing systems were identified as components of FRIS.

  3. Information Systems for Federated Biobanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Johann; Dabringer, Claus; Schicho, Michaela; Stark, Konrad

    Biobanks store and manage collections of biological material (tissue, blood, cell cultures, etc.) and manage the medical and biological data associated with this material. Biobanks are invaluable resources for medical research. The diversity, heterogeneity and volatility of the domain make information systems for biobanks a challenging application domain. Information systems for biobanks are foremost integration projects of heterogenous fast evolving sources.

  4. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions.

  5. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:21685582

  6. G-DOC: A Systems Medicine Platform for Personalized Oncology1

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Harris, Michael; Tanenbaum, David M; Gauba, Robinder; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Shinohara, Andrew; Rosso, Kevin; Carabet, Lavinia A; Song, Lei; Riggins, Rebecca B; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Wang, Yue; Byers, Stephen W; Clarke, Robert; Weiner, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, cancer therapy remains limited by a “one-size-fits-all” approach, whereby treatment decisions are based mainly on the clinical stage of disease, yet fail to reference the individual's underlying biology and its role driving malignancy. Identifying better personalized therapies for cancer treatment is hindered by the lack of high-quality “omics” data of sufficient size to produce meaningful results and the ability to integrate biomedical data from disparate technologies. Resolving these issues will help translation of therapies from research to clinic by helping clinicians develop patient-specific treatments based on the unique signatures of patient's tumor. Here we describe the Georgetown Database of Cancer (G-DOC), a Web platform that enables basic and clinical research by integrating patient characteristics and clinical outcome data with a variety of high-throughput research data in a unified environment. While several rich data repositories for high-dimensional research data exist in the public domain, most focus on a single-data type and do not support integration across multiple technologies. Currently, G-DOC contains data from more than 2500 breast cancer patients and 800 gastrointestinal cancer patients, G-DOC includes a broad collection of bioinformatics and systems biology tools for analysis and visualization of four major “omics” types: DNA, mRNA, microRNA, and metabolites. We believe that G-DOC will help facilitate systems medicine by providing identification of trends and patterns in integrated data sets and hence facilitate the use of better targeted therapies for cancer. A set of representative usage scenarios is provided to highlight the technical capabilities of this resource. PMID:21969811

  7. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  8. Developing Information Systems for Competitive Intelligence Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhof, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues connected with developing information systems for competitive intelligence support; defines the elements of an effective competitive information system; and summarizes issues affecting system design and implementation. Highlights include intelligence information; information needs; information sources; decision making; and…

  9. [The second opinion in oncology].

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Luciano; Felicetti, Viviana; Cristina, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The medical second opinion (MSO) means the process through which it is possible to consult any available medical institution or a single physician, to compare, confirm and/or review a first diagnosis and/or a proposed treatment. The MSO is of the utmost importance when patients are suffering serious and disabling diseases or when risking their lives. Oncology is a really complex discipline in which, daily, doctors and patients have to deal with new clinical, managerial and sociological problems. Most patients are now better informed-often having gathered information from the Web, newspapers, magazines.This information is often very mixed and confusing and the number of MSO is increasing.

  10. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  11. Property Information System

    1998-01-28

    Provides cradle to grave tracking of DOE property (capital, accountable, etc.). Major functional areas include Acquisitions, Management, Inventory, Accounting, Agreements, Excessing, Dispositions, and Reporting. The Accounting module is not used at this time and may not be operational. A major enhancement added here at Lockheed Martin Energy Systems is the Web-based portion of the system, which allows custodians of property to record location and custodial changes, and to provide inventory confirmations. PLEASE NOTE: Customer mustmore » contact Ben McMurry, (865) 576-5906, Lockheed Martin Energy Ssytems, for help with installation of package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to the cost of the package from ESTSC. Customer should contact Cheri Cross, (865) 574-6046, for user help.« less

  12. Property Information System

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Ben

    1998-01-28

    Provides cradle to grave tracking of DOE property (capital, accountable, etc.). Major functional areas include Acquisitions, Management, Inventory, Accounting, Agreements, Excessing, Dispositions, and Reporting. The Accounting module is not used at this time and may not be operational. A major enhancement added here at Lockheed Martin Energy Systems is the Web-based portion of the system, which allows custodians of property to record location and custodial changes, and to provide inventory confirmations. PLEASE NOTE: Customer must contact Ben McMurry, (865) 576-5906, Lockheed Martin Energy Ssytems, for help with installation of package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to the cost of the package from ESTSC. Customer should contact Cheri Cross, (865) 574-6046, for user help.

  13. Multipurpose interactive NASA information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. M.; Keefer, R. L.; Sanders, D. R.; Seitz, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information System (MINIS) is data management system capable of retrieving descriptive data from LANDSAT photos. General enough to be used with other user-defined data bases, interactive data management and information retrieval system was especially developed for small and medium-sized computers. It uses free-form data base that allows one to create entirely new and different data bases and to control format of output products.

  14. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  15. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  16. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring. PMID:27249776

  17. System for Information Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Vern; Nakamura, Grant; Younkin, Chance

    1998-09-25

    SID characterizes natural language based documents so that they may be related and retrieved based on content similarity. This technology processes textual documents, autonoumsly identifies the major topics of the document set, and constructs an interpretable, high dimensional representation of each document. SID also provides the ability to interactively reweight representations based on user need, so users may analyze the dataset from multiple points of view. The particular advantages SID offers are speed, data compression, flexibility in representation, and incremental processing. SPIRE consists of software for visual analysis of text-based information sources. This technology enables users to make discoveries about the content of very large sets of textual documents without requiring the user to read or presort the documents. It employs algorithms for text and word proximity analysis to identify the key themes within the documents. The results of this analysis are projected onto a visual spatial proximity display (Galaxies or Themescape) where document proximity represents the degree of relatedness of theme.

  18. System for Information Discovery

    1998-09-25

    SID characterizes natural language based documents so that they may be related and retrieved based on content similarity. This technology processes textual documents, autonoumsly identifies the major topics of the document set, and constructs an interpretable, high dimensional representation of each document. SID also provides the ability to interactively reweight representations based on user need, so users may analyze the dataset from multiple points of view. The particular advantages SID offers are speed, data compression,more » flexibility in representation, and incremental processing. SPIRE consists of software for visual analysis of text-based information sources. This technology enables users to make discoveries about the content of very large sets of textual documents without requiring the user to read or presort the documents. It employs algorithms for text and word proximity analysis to identify the key themes within the documents. The results of this analysis are projected onto a visual spatial proximity display (Galaxies or Themescape) where document proximity represents the degree of relatedness of theme.« less

  19. Earth Science Information System (ESIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1982-01-01

    The Earth Science Information System (ESIS) was developed in 1981 by the U.S. Geological Survey's Office of the Data Administrator. ESIS serves as a comprehensive data management facility designed to support the coordination, integration, and standardization of scientific, technical, and bibliographic data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). ESIS provides, through an online interactive computer system, referral to information about USGS data bases, data elements which are fields in the records of data bases, and systems. The data bases contain information about many subjects from several scientific disciplines such as: geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, cartography, oceanography, geography, minerals exploration and conservation, and satellite data sensing.

  20. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  1. Maryland Automated Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer based system designed for storing geographic data in a consistent and coordinated manner is described. The data are stored, retrieved, and analyzed using a 400 km sq/acre cell. Stored information can be displayed on computer maps in a manner similar to standard map graphics. The data bank contains various information for performing land use analysis in a variety of areas.

  2. Identifying oncological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kumar, Nilay; Segon, Ankur; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    Prompt identification and treatment of life-threatening oncological conditions is of utmost importance and should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Oncological emergencies can have a myriad of presentations ranging from mechanical obstruction due to tumor growth to metabolic conditions due to abnormal secretions from the tumor. Notably, hematologic and infectious conditions may complicate the presentation of oncological emergencies. Advanced testing and imaging is generally required to recognize these serious presentations of common malignancies. Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions can significantly affect the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:23873016

  3. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  4. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A Generalized Interactive Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterescu,Sidney; And Others

    This report describes an interactive information system. It is a general purpose, free format system which can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. The report is designed to serve as a manual for potential users--nontechnical personnel who will use the…

  5. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  6. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  7. Geographic Information System Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Chad; Casad, Christopher; Floriano, Luis G.; Hill, Tracie; Johnson, Rashida K.; Locklear, J. Mark; Penn, Stephen; Rhoulac, Tori; Shay, Adam H.; Taylor, Antone; Thorpe, Karina

    1995-01-01

    Data was collected in order to further NASA Langley Research Center's Geographic Information System(GIS). Information on LaRC's communication, electrical, and facility configurations was collected. Existing data was corrected through verification, resulting in more accurate databases. In addition, Global Positioning System(GPS) points were used in order to accurately impose buildings on digitized images. Overall, this project will help the Imaging and CADD Technology Team (ICTT) prove GIS to be a valuable resource for LaRC.

  8. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  9. A Model for Rural Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Laurence J.; Christensen, Scott D.; deVere-White, Ralph W.; Meyers, Fredrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Small rural hospitals in the United States have had challenging issues developing sustainable oncology programs. This is a report on the development of a successful rural oncology program. In 2006, the Tahoe Forest Health System in Truckee, CA, a remote mountain resort town, started a cancer program that was focused on addressing patient and family fears that are common to all cancer patients but more frightening in the rural setting. Four years later, it is a thriving program with significant community support, a creative academic affiliation, and a central focus of the future of the hospital. The Tahoe Forest Cancer Center developed a sustainable model for high quality cancer care that overcomes geographic, cultural and financial barriers. This structure may serve as a model for national rural health care. PMID:21886498

  10. Information Processing in Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2016-03-01

    Life depends as much on the flow of information as on the flow of energy. Here we review the many efforts to make this intuition precise. Starting with the building blocks of information theory, we explore examples where it has been possible to measure, directly, the flow of information in biological networks, or more generally where information-theoretic ideas have been used to guide the analysis of experiments. Systems of interest range from single molecules (the sequence diversity in families of proteins) to groups of organisms (the distribution of velocities in flocks of birds), and all scales in between. Many of these analyses are motivated by the idea that biological systems may have evolved to optimize the gathering and representation of information, and we review the experimental evidence for this optimization, again across a wide range of scales.

  11. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  12. Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B.; Brown, J.B.; Horton, R.D.; Strittmatter, R.; Manatt, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

  13. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  14. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  15. Simulating The SSF Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Govind K.; Kleine, Henry; Younger, Joseph C.; Sanders, Felicia A.; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Aster, Robert W.; Olivieri, Jerry M.; Paul, Lori L.

    1993-01-01

    Freedom Operations Simulation Test (FROST) computer program simulates operation of SSF information system, tracking every packet of data from generation to destination, for both uplinks and downlinks. Collects various statistics concerning operation of system and provides reports of statistics at intervals specified by user. FROST also incorporates graphical-display capability to enhance interpretation of these statistics. Written in SIMSCRIPT 11.5.

  16. Forest Resource Information System (FRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technological and economical feasibility of using multispectral digital image data as acquired from the LANDSAT satellites in an ongoing operational forest information system was evaluated. Computer compatible multispectral scanner data secured from the LANDSAT satellites were demonstrated to be a significant contributor to ongoing information systems by providing the added dimensions of synoptic and repeat coverage of the Earth's surface. Major forest cover types of conifer, deciduous, mixed conifer-deciduous and non-forest, were classified well within the bounds of the statistical accuracy of the ground sample. Further, when overlayed with existing maps, the acreage of cover type retains a high level of positional integrity. Maps were digitized by a graphics design system, overlayed and registered onto LANDSAT imagery such that the map data with associated attributes were displayed on the image. Once classified, the analysis results were converted back to map form as a cover type of information. Existing tabular information as represented by inventory is registered geographically to the map base through a vendor provided data management system. The notion of a geographical reference base (map) providing the framework to which imagery and tabular data bases are registered and where each of the three functions of imagery, maps and inventory can be accessed singly or in combination is the very essence of the forest resource information system design.

  17. Integrated multimedia timeline of medical images and data for thoracic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Aberle, D R; Dionisio, J D; McNitt-Gray, M F; Taira, R K; Cárdenas, A F; Goldin, J G; Brown, K; Figlin, R A; Chu, W W

    1996-05-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database has been developed to provide image and textual data for thoracic oncology patients undergoing treatment of advanced malignancies. The database integrates image data from the hospital picture archiving and communication system with textual reports from the radiology information system, alphanumeric data contained in the hospital information system, and other electronic medical data. The database presents information in a timeline format and also contains visualization programs that permit the user to view and annotate radiographic measurements in tabular or graphic form. The database provides an efficient and intuitive display of the changing status of oncology patients. The ability to integrate, manage, and access relevant multimedia information may substantially enhance communication among distributed multidisciplinary health care providers and may ensure greater consistency and completeness of patient-related data.

  18. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y.

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Using Innovative Information Systems Techniques To Teach Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimi, Carl J.; Gordon, Gene M.

    This paper discusses a number of innovative techniques that were used to teach courses in Information Systems to undergraduate and graduate students. While none of these techniques is individually innovative, the combination of techniques provides a true "hands-on" environment for students; because of the way that the components of the courses are…

  20. NICA project management information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashashin, M. V.; Kekelidze, D. V.; Kostromin, S. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Morozov, V. V.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The science projects growth, changing of the efficiency criteria during the project implementation require not only increasing of the management specialization level but also pose the problem of selecting the effective planning methods, monitoring of deadlines and interaction of participants involved in research projects. This paper is devoted to choosing the project management information system for the new heavy-ion collider NICA (Nuclotron based Ion Collider fAcility). We formulate the requirements for the project management information system with taking into account the specifics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna, Russia) as an international intergovernmental research organization, which is developed on the basis of a flexible and effective information system for the NICA project management.

  1. Total centralisation and optimisation of an oncology management suite via Citrix®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, C.; Frantzis, J.; Ripps, L.; Fenton, P.

    2014-03-01

    The management of patient information and treatment planning is traditionally an intra-departmental requirement of a radiation oncology service. Epworth Radiation Oncology systems must support the transient nature of Visiting Medical Officers (VMOs). This unique work practice created challenges when implementing the vision of a completely paperless solution that allows for a responsive and efficient service delivery. ARIA® and EclipseTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) have been deployed across four dedicated Citrix® (Citrix Systems, Santa Clara, CA, USA) servers allowing VMOs to access these applications remotely. A range of paperless solutions were developed within ARIA® to facilitate clinical and organisational management whilst optimising efficient work practices. The IT infrastructure and paperless workflow has enabled VMOs to securely access the VarianTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) oncology software and experience full functionality from any location on multiple devices. This has enhanced access to patient information and improved the responsiveness of the service. Epworth HealthCare has developed a unique solution to enable remote access to a centralised oncology management suite, while maintaining a secure and paperless working environment.

  2. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Felix L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a computer systems philosophy, a set of validated hardware building blocks, and a set of validated services as embodied in system software. The goal of AIPS is to provide the knowledgebase which will allow achievement of validated fault-tolerant distributed computer system architectures, suitable for a broad range of applications, having failure probability requirements of 10E-9 at 10 hours. A background and description is given followed by program accomplishments, the current focus, applications, technology transfer, FY92 accomplishments, and funding.

  3. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  4. Using the hypertext software to develop computer-assisted instruction in oncology for medical students.

    PubMed

    Markou, S A; Koukouras, D; Pimenidis, T; Androulakis, J

    1995-01-01

    A new development in computer-assisted medical education has been the introduction of hypertext authoring systems. Authoring systems are computer programs that can allow an instructor to prepare computer-based medical educational materials without the need to know programming languages. Hypertext is a database management system that lets the user connect screens of information using associative links. The authors developed a hypertext authoring system for teaching their medical students the domain of oncology. The features of the system are hierarchical structure, index browsing, and nonsequential browsing. Moreover, the student may become a writer of a hyperdocument by typing a few script commands. In this way the hierarchical structure of a document meets the needs of the reader. Although hypertext brings with it a few difficulties for the student, the authors expect that the system will become a popular mean for organizing textual information for retrieval and browsing in oncology.

  5. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. [Electronic poison information management system].

    PubMed

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier. PMID:24466697

  7. [Electronic poison information management system].

    PubMed

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  8. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  9. Effect of an Electronic Health Record on the Culture of an Outpatient Medical Oncology Practice in a Four-Hospital Integrated Health Care System: 5-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brockstein, Bruce; Hensing, Thomas; Carro, George W.; Obel, Jennifer; Khandekar, Janardan; Kaminer, Lynne; Van De Wege, Christine; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) was adopted into the NorthShore University HealthSystem, a four-hospital integrated health system located in suburban Chicago, in 2003. By 2005, all chemotherapy and medicine order entry was conducted through the EHR, completing the incorporation of a fully paperless EHR in our hospital-based oncology practice in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The use of the EHR has dramatically changed our practice environment by improving efficiency, patient safety, research productivity, and operations, while allowing evaluation of adherence to established quality measures and incorporation of new quality improvement initiatives. The reach of the EHR has been substantial and has influenced every aspect of care at our institution over the short period since its implementation. In this article, we describe subjective and objective measures, outcomes, and achievements of our 5-year EHR experience. PMID:22043197

  10. Music Information Services System (MISS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Paladugu V.

    Music Information Services System (MISS) was developed at the Eastern Illinois University Library to manage the sound recording collection. Operating in a batch mode, MISS keeps track of the inventory of sound recordings, generates necessary catalogs to facilitate the use of the sound recordings, and provides specialized bibliographies of sound…

  11. Information Systems, Security, and Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Willis H.

    1984-01-01

    Computer security and computer privacy issues are discussed. Among the areas addressed are technical and human security threats, security and privacy issues for information in electronic mail systems, the need for a national commission to examine these issues, and security/privacy issues relevant to colleges and universities. (JN)

  12. Policy Information System Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Roger E.; And Others

    The concepts and methodologies outlined in "A Policy Information System for Vocational Education" are presented in a simple computer format in this booklet. It also contains a sample output representing 5-year projections of various planning needs for vocational education. Computerized figures in the eight areas corresponding to those in the…

  13. Learning Information Systems: Theoretical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Terrance D.

    This paper uses the conceptual framework of cybernetics to understand why learning information systems such as the "Accelerated Reader" work so successfully, and to examine how this simple yet incisive concept can be used to accelerate learning at every level and in all disciplines. The first section, "Basic Concepts," discusses the cybernetic…

  14. Information Systems: Fact or Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearley, William

    Rising costs of programming and program maintenance have caused discussion concerning the need for generalized information systems. These would provide data base functions plus complete report writing and file maintenance capabilities. All administrative applications, including online registration, student records, and financial applications are…

  15. Database Systems. Course Three. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the third of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with database management concepts and standard database management software. Databases and their roles, advantages, and limitations are explained. An overview of the course sets forth the condition and performance standard…

  16. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  17. PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

  18. Fisher Information in Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. Roy; Gatenby, Robert A.

    Fisher information is being increasingly used as a tool of research into ecological systems. For example the information was shown in Chapter 7 to provide a useful diagnostic of the health of an ecology. In other applications to ecology, extreme physical information (EPI) has been used to derive the population-rate (or Lotka-Volterra) equations of ecological systems, both directly [1] and indirectly (Chapter 5) via the quantum Schrodinger wave equation (SWE). We next build on these results, to derive (i) an uncertainty principle (8.3) of biology, (ii) a simple decision rule (8.18) for predicting whether a given ecology is susceptible to a sudden drop in population (Section 8.1), (iii) the probability law (8.57) or (8.59) on the worldwide occurrence of the masses of living creatures from mice to elephants and beyond (Section 8.2), and (iv) the famous quarter-power laws for the attributes of biological and other systems. The latter approach uses EPI to derive the simultaneous quarter-power behavior of all attributes obeyed by the law, such as metabolism rate, brain size, grazing range, etc. (Section 8.3). This maximal breadth of scope is allowed by its basis in information, which of course applies to all types of quantitative data (Section 1.4.3, Chapter 1).

  19. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  20. Information systems vulnerability: A systems analysis perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Daniel, S.L.; Schriner, H.K.; Gaylor, T.R.

    1996-07-01

    Vulnerability analyses for information systems are complicated because the systems are often geographically distributed. Sandia National Laboratories has assembled an interdisciplinary team to explore the applicability of probabilistic logic modeling (PLM) techniques (including vulnerability and vital area analysis) to examine the risks associated with networked information systems. The authors have found that the reliability and failure modes of many network technologies can be effectively assessed using fault trees and other PLM methods. The results of these models are compatible with an expanded set of vital area analysis techniques that can model both physical locations and virtual (logical) locations to identify both categories of vital areas simultaneously. These results can also be used with optimization techniques to direct the analyst toward the most cost-effective security solution.

  1. Automated Information System (AIS) Alarm System

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.

    1997-05-01

    The Automated Information Alarm System is a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory to demonstrate and implement, on a small-to-medium sized local area network, an automated system that detects and automatically responds to attacks that use readily available tools and methodologies. The Alarm System will sense or detect, assess, and respond to suspicious activities that may be detrimental to information on the network or to continued operation of the network. The responses will allow stopping, isolating, or ejecting the suspicious activities. The number of sensors, the sensitivity of the sensors, the assessment criteria, and the desired responses may be set by the using organization to meet their local security policies.

  2. Engineering Design Information System (EDIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.S.; Short, R.D.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1990-11-01

    This manual is a guide to the use of the Engineering Design Information System (EDIS) Phase I. The system runs on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., IBM 3081 unclassified computer. This is the first phase in the implementation of EDIS, which is an index, storage, and retrieval system for engineering documents produced at various plants and laboratories operated by Energy Systems for the Department of Energy. This manual presents on overview of EDIS, describing the system's purpose; the functions it performs; hardware, software, and security requirements; and help and error functions. This manual describes how to access EDIS and how to operate system functions using Database 2 (DB2), Time Sharing Option (TSO), Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF), and Soft Master viewing features employed by this system. Appendix A contains a description of the Soft Master viewing capabilities provided through the EDIS View function. Appendix B provides examples of the system error screens and help screens for valid codes used for screen entry. Appendix C contains a dictionary of data elements and descriptions.

  3. The risk assessment information system

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.B.; Bonczek, R.R.; McGinn, C.W.; Land, M.L.; Bloom, L.D.; Sample, B.E.; Dolislager, F.G.

    1998-06-01

    In an effort to provide service-oriented environmental risk assessment expertise, the Department of Energy (DOE) Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) and DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) are sponsoring Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a web-based system for disseminating risk tools and information to its users. This system, the Risk Assessment Information System (RAIS), was initially developed to support the site-specific needs of the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program. With support from the CRE, the system is currently being expanded to benefit all DOE risk information users and can be tailored to meet site-specific needs. Taking advantage of searchable and executable databases, menu-driven queries, and data downloads, using the latest World Wide Web technologies, the RAIS offers essential tools that are used in the risk assessment process or anywhere from project scoping to implementation. The RAIS tools can be located directly at http://risk.lsd.ornl.gov/homepage/rap{_}tool.htm or through the CRE`s homepage at http://www.doe.gov/riskcenter/home.html.

  4. Nanophotonics for integrated information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Tetz, Kevin; Rokitski, Rostislav; Kim, Hyu-Chang; Tsai, Chia-Ho; Abashin, Maxim; Pang, Lin; Zezhad, Maziar; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2006-02-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous information system applications, including optical communications, storage, signal processing, biology, medicine, and sensing. As optical technology develops, there is a growing need to develop scalable and reliable photonic integration technologies. These include the development of passive and active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, electrically or optically controlled switching fabrics, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic information systems. Our approach includes design, modeling and simulations of selected components and devices, their nanofabrication, followed by validation via characterization and testing of the fabricated devices. The latter exploits our recently constructed near field complex amplitude imaging tool. The understanding of near field interactions in nanophotonic devices and systems is a crucial step as these interactions provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Furthermore, near-field optical devices facilitate miniaturization, and simultaneously enhance multifunctionality, greatly increasing the functional complexity per unit volume of the photonic system. Since the optical properties of near-field materials are controlled by the geometry, there is flexibility in the choice of constituent materials, facilitating the implementation of a wide range of devices using compatible materials for ease of fabrication and integration.

  5. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places hot spots, or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  6. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places ''hot spots'', or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  7. Computerized prescriber order entry in the outpatient oncology setting: from evidence to meaningful use

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, V.; Cosby, R.; Cheung, A.; Lankshear, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy is an effective treatment in the fight against many cancers. Medication errors in oncology can be particularly serious given the narrow therapeutic window of antineoplastic drugs and their high toxicities. Computerized prescriber order entry (cpoe) has consistently been shown to reduce medication errors and adverse drug events in various settings, but its use in the oncology setting has not been well established. To gain a better understanding of the meaningful use of cpoe systems in the outpatient chemotherapy setting, we undertook a systematic review of systemic therapy cpoe. Methods A province-wide expert panel consisting of clinical experts, health information professionals, and specialists in human factors design provided guidance in the development of the research questions, search terms, databases, and inclusion criteria. The systematic review was undertaken by a core team consisting of a medical oncologist, nurse, pharmacist, and methodologist. The medline, embase, cinahl, and compendex databases were searched for relevant evidence. Results The database searches resulted in 5642 hits, of which 9 met the inclusion criteria and were retained. In the oncology setting, cpoe systems generally reduce chemotherapy medication errors; however, specific types of errors increase with the use of cpoe. These systems affect practice both positively and negatively with respect to time, workload, and productivity. Conclusions Despite the paucity of oncology-specific research, cpoe should be used in outpatient chemotherapy delivery to reduce chemotherapy-related medication errors. Adoption by clinicians will be enhanced by cpoe processes that complement current practice and workflow processes. PMID:25089110

  8. Applied Information Systems Research Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredekamp, Joe

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Applied Information Systems Research Program Workshop are presented. Topics covered include: the Earth Observing System Data and Information System; the planetary data system; Astrophysics Data System project review; OAET Computer Science and Data Systems Programs; the Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences; and CASIS background.

  9. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  10. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  11. Oncological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, Sir Michael; Highnam, Ralph; Irving, Benjamin; Schnabel, Julia A

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is one of the world's major healthcare challenges and, as such, an important application of medical image analysis. After a brief introduction to cancer, we summarise some of the major developments in oncological image analysis over the past 20 years, but concentrating those in the authors' laboratories, and then outline opportunities and challenges for the next decade.

  12. Quality Assessment in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-07-01

    The movement to improve healthcare quality has led to a need for carefully designed quality indicators that accurately reflect the quality of care. Many different measures have been proposed and continue to be developed by governmental agencies and accrediting bodies. However, given the inherent differences in the delivery of care among medical specialties, the same indicators will not be valid across all of them. Specifically, oncology is a field in which it can be difficult to develop quality indicators, because the effectiveness of an oncologic intervention is often not immediately apparent, and the multidisciplinary nature of the field necessarily involves many different specialties. Existing and emerging comparative effectiveness data are helping to guide evidence-based practice, and the increasing availability of these data provides the opportunity to identify key structure and process measures that predict for quality outcomes. The increasing emphasis on quality and efficiency will continue to compel the medical profession to identify appropriate quality measures to facilitate quality improvement efforts and to guide accreditation, credentialing, and reimbursement. Given the wide-reaching implications of quality metrics, it is essential that they be developed and implemented with scientific rigor. The aims of the present report were to review the current state of quality assessment in oncology, identify existing indicators with the best evidence to support their implementation, and propose a framework for identifying and refining measures most indicative of true quality in oncologic care.

  13. Oncology legislative update.

    PubMed

    Holmes, H

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews current legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the oncology community. Topics include patient protection, Medicare support of clinical trials, research data protection, the Medical Innovation Tax Credit, National Cancer Institute appropriations, and medical record privacy issues. Other topics discussed included funding for stem-cell research, genetic therapy oversight, and coverage for uninsured patients.

  14. The Co-Creation of Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomillion, David

    2013-01-01

    In information systems development, end-users have shifted in their role: from consumers of information to informants for requirements to developers of systems. This shift in the role of users has also changed how information systems are developed. Instead of systems developers creating specifications for software or end-users creating small…

  15. Information Security and Integrity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs from the Information Security and Integrity Systems seminar held at the University of Houston-Clear Lake on May 15-16, 1990 are presented. A tutorial on computer security is presented. The goals of this tutorial are the following: to review security requirements imposed by government and by common sense; to examine risk analysis methods to help keep sight of forest while in trees; to discuss the current hot topic of viruses (which will stay hot); to examine network security, now and in the next year to 30 years; to give a brief overview of encryption; to review protection methods in operating systems; to review database security problems; to review the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (Orange Book); to comment on formal verification methods; to consider new approaches (like intrusion detection and biometrics); to review the old, low tech, and still good solutions; and to give pointers to the literature and to where to get help. Other topics covered include security in software applications and development; risk management; trust: formal methods and associated techniques; secure distributed operating system and verification; trusted Ada; a conceptual model for supporting a B3+ dynamic multilevel security and integrity in the Ada runtime environment; and information intelligence sciences.

  16. Centralized versus Decentralized Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugoson, Mats-Åke

    This paper brings into question whether information systems should be centralized or decentralized in order to provide greater support for different business processes. During the last century companies and organizations have used different approaches for centralization and decentralization; a simple answer to the question does not exist. This paper provides a survey of the evolution of centralized and decentralized approaches, mainly in a Nordic perspective. Based on critical reflections on the situation in the end of the century we can discuss what we can learn from history to achieve alignment between centralized and decentralized systems and the business structure. The conclusion is that theories, management and practice for decisions on centralization or decentralization of information systems must be improved. A conscious management and control of centralization /decentralization of IT support is a vital question in the company or the organization, and this is not a task that can be handled only by IT-specialists. There is a need for business oriented IT management of centralization/decentralization.

  17. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  18. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  19. Does Cancer Literature Reflect Multidisciplinary Practice? A Systematic Review of Oncology Studies in the Medical Literature Over a 20-Year Period

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Ahmed, Awad A.; Yoo, Stella K.; Jagsi, Reshma; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Quality cancer care is best delivered through a multidisciplinary approach requiring awareness of current evidence for all oncologic specialties. The highest impact journals often disseminate such information, so the distribution and characteristics of oncology studies by primary intervention (local therapies, systemic therapies, and targeted agents) were evaluated in 10 high-impact journals over a 20-year period. Methods and Materials: Articles published in 1994, 2004, and 2014 in New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Oncology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and European Journal of Surgical Oncology were identified. Included studies were prospectively conducted and evaluated a therapeutic intervention. Results: A total of 960 studies were included: 240 (25%) investigated local therapies, 551 (57.4%) investigated systemic therapies, and 169 (17.6%) investigated targeted therapies. More local therapy trials (n=185 [77.1%]) evaluated definitive, primary treatment than systemic (n=178 [32.3%]) or targeted therapy trials (n=38 [22.5%]; P<.001). Local therapy trials (n=16 [6.7%]) also had significantly lower rates of industry funding than systemic (n=207 [37.6%]) and targeted therapy trials (n=129 [76.3%]; P<.001). Targeted therapy trials represented 5 (2%), 38 (10.2%), and 126 (38%) of those published in 1994, 2004, and 2014, respectively (P<.001), and industry-funded 48 (18.9%), 122 (32.6%), and 182 (54.8%) trials, respectively (P<.001). Compared to publication of systemic therapy trial articles, articles investigating local therapy (odds ratio: 0.025 [95% confidence interval: 0.012-0.048]; P<.001) were less likely to be found in high-impact general medical journals. Conclusions: Fewer studies evaluating local therapies, such as surgery and radiation, are published in

  20. CAIS. Condition Assessment Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Oak, J.C.

    1996-09-30

    CAIS is used by Architects and Engineers to gather facility condition assessment data. This data consist of architectural, civil, structural, electrical, and mechanical systems and components that are a part of the inspected facility. Data is collected using a hand-held, pen-based computer system which is preprogrammed for detailed inventories of individual components. The program is deficiency based for collecting data for repair and replacement observations. Observations are recorded on checklists preformatted to individual site needs, allowing for comments on unusual conditions to be documented on site. Data is transferred to a central database, where it can be reviewed, costed, and reported on using different scenarios. Information can be transferred to the DOE operations offices as well as to the DOE FIMS database for each site.

  1. Computers in Radiation Oncology: The Third Decade

    PubMed Central

    Sternick, Edward S.

    1978-01-01

    Computers have been used for the past 25 years in radiation oncology for such diverse activities as treatment planning, treatment machine verification, image processing, and tumor registry analysis. This paper reviews each of these areas, with examples of working systems, and outlines a computer hardware configuration most suitable for their implementation. ImagesFig. 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

  2. RBIS - An Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, F.; Kralisch, S.

    2012-04-01

    The River Basin Information System (RBIS) developed at the Department of Geoinformatics at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena provides a modular structured and web-based platform for environmental data management and data sharing (http://www.rbis.uni-jena.de). The system is used in several multidisciplinary research projects and provides user-friendly functions for the management, analysis, visualization and presentation of different types of data. These types of data include time series data (e.g. hydrological, climatologically …), geodata, documents and more domain specific modules for example related to soil, vegetation, scenarios, simulation models or indicators. One main focus lies on the maintenance on meta-data to make sure information about data provenance and responsible parties are preserved. Furthermore the fine grained user and permission management of RBIS take care about the access and manipulation rights of all stored data. For an easy data exchange of time series data and other data types RBIS provides several interfaces. One example is a prototypical implementation using OGC standards (Sensor Observation Service (SOS) and WaterML2.0). Since RBIS is used for data in research regions located in different countries (e.g. Brazil, Vietnam, Angola, Chile, Germany) a Multilanguage support was added to address not only research project partners but also local stakeholder and public. We will present the structure, modules, main functions, permission management and interfaces for data exchange of RBIS together with selected examples of RBIS instances.

  3. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  4. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  5. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  6. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  7. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  8. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  9. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  10. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  11. Concept of JINR Corporate Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filozova, I. A.; Bashashin, M. V.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Musulmanbekov, G.; Semenov, R. N.; Shestakova, G. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Ustenko, P. V.; Zaikina, T. N.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the concept of JINR Corporate Information System (JINR CIS). Special attention is given to the information support of scientific researches - Current Research Information System as a part of the corporate information system. The objectives of such a system are focused on ensuring an effective implementation and research by using the modern information technology, computer technology and automation, creation, development and integration of digital resources on a common conceptual framework. The project assumes continuous system development, introduction the new information technologies to ensure the technological system relevance.

  12. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  13. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  14. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable. PMID:1727112

  15. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable.

  16. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested. PMID:26597474

  17. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    -changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

  18. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  19. Colorado Career Information System. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Colorado Career Information Center.

    Covering the period from October 1, 1975, to September 30, 1976, this annual report contains information on the Colorado Career Information System's (COCIS) administration and organization, information development, delivery vehicle, and marketing and field services. (COCIS is an on-line computerized career information system that has been…

  20. Dosimetric Verification of the System of Planning Brainscan for Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Oncology Department of the General Hospital of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez R, J. T.; Salinas, B.; Tovar M, V. M.; Villasenor O, L. F.; Molero M, A. C.

    2006-09-08

    The verification consists on the planning and administration of stereotactic treatments by means of conformed static beams, several polyethylene capsules with powder TLD 100 (type IAEA) located inside the head of a phantom Alderson-Rando. Because the planning system corrects for no-homogeneity in the density from the tomographic information, it is assumed that the absorbed dose in the tumor volume (capsule) corresponds to the dose absorbed to LiF: DLiF. Applying different cavity theories, the percent deviations to the nominal dose are: -1.81%{<=}{delta}%{<=}0.71%, which are consistent with the order of the U%'s. The values of DW are calculated from two calibration curve: TL Response (nC) vs DW for the energy of the 60Co corrected for energy dependence to the accelerator photon beam quality D20/D10=0.57. Once curve for 0.5 to 5 Gy and other for 5 to 35 Gy. The traceability for the Dwater is obtained by means of a secondary standard ionization chamber Farmer PTW 30013 calibrated at the NRC.

  1. Portable, parallel 9-wavelength near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system for efficient characterization of breast cancer within the clinical oncology infusion suite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Pogue, Brian W.; Haider, Steffen J.; Gui, Jiang; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Jiang, Shudong

    2016-01-01

    A portable near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system was developed with simultaneous frequency domain (FD) and continuous-wave (CW) optical measurements for efficient characterization of breast cancer in a clinical oncology setting. Simultaneous FD and CW recordings were implemented to speed up acquisition to 3 minutes for all 9 wavelengths, spanning a range from 661nm to 1064nm. An adjustable interface was designed to fit various breast sizes and shapes. Spatial images of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid, and scattering components were reconstructed using a 2D FEM approach. The system was tested on a group of 10 normal subjects, who were examined bilaterally and the recovered optical images were compared to radiographic breast density. Significantly higher total hemoglobin and water were estimated in the high density relative to low density groups. One patient with invasive ductal carcinoma was also examined and the cancer region was characterized as having a contrast ratio of 1.4 in total hemoglobin and 1.2 in water. PMID:27375937

  2. Surgical education and training program development for gynecologic oncology: American perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Bodurka, Diane C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about gynecologic oncology fellowship training and guidance in program development. The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialty, strong interpersonal skills, the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  3. Expert Systems and Intelligent Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores what an intelligent information retrieval system involves and why expert system techniques might interest system designers. Expert systems research is reviewed with emphasis on components, architecture, and computer interaction, and it is concluded that information retrieval is not an ideal problem domain for expert system application at…

  4. Management Information Systems for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Roger G.

    A management information system (MIS) is embedded in the management and operating system of the organization. An MIS exists to provide information for management and operating purposes. The MIS must meet the information needs of management and operating users. The MIS consists of two components--a processor and a data base. Packaged systems have…

  5. An Expertise Based Energy Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, S.

    This paper describes an intelligent decision support system for information on petroleum resources and use currently being designed by the Information Methodology Research Project as the first step in the development of a comprehensive intelligent information system for dealing with energy resources in the United States. The system draws on…

  6. The Information Support System: Management Information for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Nancy A.

    The Information Support System (ISS) is a management information system developed for the National Drug Education Program (NDEP). The major components of the ISS are: (1) the Project Growth Record which provides a tool for project self-evaluation and for communication between NDEP project officers and project directors; (2) the Quarterly Project…

  7. Puget sound oncology nursing education cooperative.

    PubMed

    Whipple, V T; Hogeland-Drummond, S; Purrier, M; Tofthagen, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Leadership & Professional Development feature is to provide readers with information, ideas, and exemplars of leadership competencies and professional roles in oncology nursing. Manuscripts submitted to the Leadership & Professional Development feature should be prepared according to the Information for Authors published in the Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) but limited to six to eight double-spaced typed pages. Submit two copies of the manuscript using IBM-compatible software along with a computer disk copy, or submit a copy of the manuscript as an e-mail attachment to Joan Such Lockhart, PhD, RN, CORLN, ONF Associate Editor, 1365 Simona Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15201; lockhart /duq.edu (e-mail). Manuscripts should be referenced and include tables, figures, or illustrations as appropriate. Ideas for possible manuscripts are welcome.

  8. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic. PMID:26460989

  9. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic.

  10. The Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) Project

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Vikas, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) Project seeks to repurpose well-known and well-characterised non-cancer drugs for new uses in oncology. The rationale for this project is presented, examining current issues in oncological drug development, challenges for health systems, and existing and future patient needs. In addition to discussing the advantages of repurposing, the paper also outlines some of the characteristics used in the selection of drug candidates by this project. Challenges in moving candidate drugs into clinical trial and subsequent practice are also discussed. PMID:25075216

  11. [Photodynamic therapy: non-oncologic indications].

    PubMed

    Karrer, S; Szeimies, R-M

    2007-07-01

    While efficacy of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of superficial non-melanoma skin cancer is already well-proven by several controlled clinical trials, there are only a few controlled studies showing efficacy of PDT for non-oncologic skin disorders. This report provides information on the use of PDT for inflammatory skin disorders, disorders of the pilosebaceous unit, infections of the skin, sclerotic skin diseases and cosmetic indications. PMID:17546432

  12. An environmental and energy information system.

    PubMed

    Ulrikson, G U; Caton, G M; Guthrie, M P; McDuffie, H F

    1975-01-01

    The Environmental Information System Office (EISO) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides information support for researchers and administrators involved with energy and environmental policy and progress. Multiple EISO activities for various governmental agencies have resulted in establishment of compatible data bases concerned with energy environmental information, methods for effectively developing these, development and computer display of numerical daya summaries, and reports evaluating published information. Direction is provided by continuing dialogue between users and information system staff. PMID:1193029

  13. Science Information Systems Newsletter, issue 28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Information Systems Newsletter is to inform the space science and applications research community about information systems development and to promote coordination and collaboration by providing a forum for communication. This quarterly publication focuses on programs sponsored by the Information Systems Branch in support of NASA's Office of Space Science. Articles of interest for other programs and agencies are presented as well. The April 1993 issue is presented.

  14. Conceptual Model of Multidimensional Marketing Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriksciuniene, Dalia; Urbanskiene, Ruta

    This article is aimed to analyse, why the information systems at the enterprise not always satisfy the expectations of marketing management specialists. The computerized systems more and more successfully serve information needs of those areas of enterprise management, where they can create the information equivalent of real management processes. Yet their inability to effectively fulfill marketing needs indicate the gaps not only in ability to structure marketing processes, but in the conceptual development of marketing information systems (MkIS) as well.

  15. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Bosch, Walter R; Curran, Walter J; Followill, David S; Galvin, James M; Hanusik, Richard; King, Steven R; Knopp, Michael V; Laurie, Fran; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Michalski, Jeff M; Saltz, Joel H; Schnall, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Lawrence; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; Urie, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy, and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real-time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial. PMID:23508883

  16. TWRS information locator database system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, B.J.

    1996-09-13

    This document gives an overview and description of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Locator Database (ILD)system design. The TWRS ILD system is an inventory of information used in the TWRS Systems Engineering process to represent the TWRS Technical Baseline. The inventory is maintained in the form of a relational database developed in Paradox 4.5.

  17. Information for Successful Interaction with Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Johnson, Kathy A.

    2003-01-01

    Interaction in heterogeneous mission operations teams is not well matched to classical models of coordination with autonomous systems. We describe methods of loose coordination and information management in mission operations. We describe an information agent and information management tool suite for managing information from many sources, including autonomous agents. We present an integrated model of levels of complexity of agent and human behavior, which shows types of information processing and points of potential error in agent activities. We discuss the types of information needed for diagnosing problems and planning interactions with an autonomous system. We discuss types of coordination for which designs are needed for autonomous system functions.

  18. A survey of chemical information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Shaikh, Aneesa Bashir

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the features, functions, and characteristics of a fairly wide variety of chemical information storage and retrieval systems currently in operation is given. The types of systems (together with an identification of the specific systems) addressed within this survey are as follows: patents and bibliographies (Derwent's Patent System; IFI Comprehensive Database; PULSAR); pharmacology and toxicology (Chemfile; PAGODE; CBF; HEEDA; NAPRALERT; MAACS); the chemical information system (CAS Chemical Registry System; SANSS; MSSS; CSEARCH; GINA; NMRLIT; CRYST; XTAL; PDSM; CAISF; RTECS Search System; AQUATOX; WDROP; OHMTADS; MLAB; Chemlab); spectra (OCETH; ASTM); crystals (CRYSRC); and physical properties (DETHERM). Summary characteristics and current trends in chemical information systems development are also examined.

  19. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  20. Educational Management Information Systems: Progress and Prospectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John A.

    An educational management information system is a network of communication channels, information sources, computer storage and retrieval devices, and processing routines that provide data to educational managers at different levels, places, and times to facilitate decisionmaking. Management information systems should be differentiated from…

  1. An Information System in the Private Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Arlene R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The article describes how the New York Association for the Blind (The Lighthouse) studied its information needs and further systematized information collection, retrieval, and use for internal case management and external information exchange with human service agencies by means of a computerized client information system. (Author)

  2. Image Information Mining System Evaluation Using Information-Theoretic Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschiel, Herbert; Datcu, Mihai

    2005-12-01

    During the last decade, the exponential increase of multimedia and remote sensing image archives, the fast expansion of the world wide web, and the high diversity of users have yielded concepts and systems for successful content-based image retrieval and image information mining. Image data information systems require both database and visual capabilities, but there is a gap between these systems. Database systems usually do not deal with multidimensional pictorial structures and vision systems do not provide database query functions. In terms of these points, the evaluation of content-based image retrieval systems became a focus of research interest. One can find several system evaluation approaches in literature, however, only few of them go beyond precision-recall graphs and do not allow a detailed evaluation of an interactive image retrieval system. Apart from the existing evaluation methodologies, we aim at the overall validation of our knowledge-driven content-based image information mining system. In this paper, an evaluation approach is demonstrated that is based on information-theoretic quantities to determine the information flow between system levels of different semantic abstraction and to analyze human-computer interactions.

  3. Developing a Management Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael

    This paper is based on the assumption that in shaping academic strategies for long-range planning purposes, educational institutions must be able to gather adequate information on which to base administrative decisions. Information on how the institution has operated in the past as well as how it is currently operating are critical items for valid…

  4. Environmental information system for visualizing environmental impact assessment information.

    PubMed

    Cserny, Angelika; Kovács, Zsófia; Domokos, Endre; Rédey, Akos

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Engineering at the University of Pannonia has undertaken the challenge to develop an online environmental information system. This system is able to receive and process the collected environmental data via Internet. The authors have attached importance to the presentation of the data and have included other comprehensible information for laymen as well in order to work out visualisation techniques that are expressive and attract attention for environmental questions through the developed information system. The ways of visualizing physical and chemical parameters of surface water and the effects of motorway construction were examined.

  5. Information technology security system engineering methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology is described for system engineering security into large information technology systems under development. The methodology is an integration of a risk management process and a generic system development life cycle process. The methodology is to be used by Security System Engineers to effectively engineer and integrate information technology security into a target system as it progresses through the development life cycle. The methodology can also be used to re-engineer security into a legacy system.

  6. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it. PMID:27093325

  7. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it.

  8. Oncology in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  9. Environmental remediation and waste management information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

  10. Information management challenges of the EOS Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kenneth R.; Blake, Deborah J.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the current information management concepts that are embodied in the plans for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is presented, and some of the technology development and application areas that are envisioned to be particularly challenging are introduced. The Information Management System (IMS) is the EOSDIS element that provides the primary interface between the science users and the data products and services of EOSDIS. The goals of IMS are to define a clear and complete set of functional requirements and to apply innovative methods and technologies to satisfy them. The information management functions are described in detail, and some applicable technolgies are discussed. Some of the general issues affecting the successful development and operation of the information management element are addressed.

  11. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  12. Design information for solar-heating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report contains preliminary design information for two solar-heating and hot water systems presently under development. Information includes quality control data, special tooling specifications, hazard analysis, and preliminary training program for installation contractors.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... the UAB-SCIMS More The UAB-SCIMS Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a resource to promote knowledge in the ...

  14. Information Systems; Modern Health Care and Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandejs, J. F., And Others

    1975-01-01

    To effectively handle changes in health policy and health information, new designs and applications of automation are explored. Increased use of computer-based information systems in health care could serve as a means of control over the costs of developing more comprehensive health service, with applications increasing not only the automation of…

  15. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals.

  16. Designing control system information models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panin, K. I.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    Problems encountered in modeling information models are discussed, Data cover condition, functioning of the object of control, and the environment involved in the control. Other parameters needed for the model include: (1) information for forming an image of the real situation, (2) data for analyzing and evaluating an evolving situation, (3) planning actions, and (4) data for observing and evaluating the results of model realization.

  17. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  18. Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST) are presented. The goal is to perform technology evaluation and prototyping of information systems to support SFOC and JPL flight projects in order to reduce risk in the development of operational data systems for such projects.

  19. Top Four Trends in Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The modern student information systems (SIS) is a powerful administrative tool with robust functionality. As such, it is essential that school and district administrators consider the top trends in modern student information systems before going forward with system upgrades or new purchases. These trends, described herein, are: (1) Support for…

  20. A Bibliographic Handbook: Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joplin, Alan L., Comp.

    Over 400 publications related to all aspects of the Management Information Systems concept are listed in this bibliography. The materials deal not only with the Management Information Systems concept specifically, but with the organizational and theoretical context in which the systems approach to management operates. In other words, the topics…

  1. [The Brazilian Drug Information System--SISMED].

    PubMed

    Vidotti, C C; Hoefler, R; Silva, E V; Bergsten-Mendes, G

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the professional profile of pharmacists as specialists in drug information. Drug Information (DI) and Drug Information Centers (DIC) are defined. The fundamental activity of a DIC should be that of providing passive information or answering questions. The advantage of a DIC network is discussed, and strategies to implement the Brazilian Drug Information System (SISMED) are presented: investment in professional specialization and regular meetings of DIC coordinators to exchange experiences. The different DICs work within a cooperative protocol. Four training courses have been held, resulting in the rapid development of Brazil's national DIC network. Two national meetings of DIC professionals have helped strengthen the Brazilian Drug Information System. PMID:11175535

  2. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology. PMID:26644543

  3. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Trip Information Log Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Jeffrey F.

    1992-06-23

    The system is focused on the Employee Business Travel Event. The system must be able to CRUD (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete) instances of the Travel Event as well as the ability to CRUD frequent flyer milage associated with airline travel. Additionally the system must provide for a compliance reporting system to monitor reductions in travel costs and lost opportunity costs (i.e., not taking advantage of business class or 7 day advance tickets).

  5. Systems Suitable for Information Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, John C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Describes computer operating systems applicable to microcomputers, noting hardware components, advantages and disadvantages of each system, local area networks, distributed processing, and a fully configured system. Lists of hardware components (disk drives, solid state disk emulators, input/output and memory components, and processors) and…

  6. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically Driven Electronic Medical Record for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Light, Kim L.; Walker, Robyn M.; Georgas, Debra L.; Antoine, Phillip A.; Clough, Robert W.; Cozart, Heidi B.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR) eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality, or productivity. Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT) specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes. Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes, and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records, and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system, which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage “Radiation Oncology” data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems.) The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS) was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality, or confidentiality. However

  7. Analysis of information systems for hydropower operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. L.; Becker, L.; Estes, J.; Simonett, D.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The operations of hydropower systems were analyzed with emphasis on water resource management, to determine how aerospace derived information system technologies can increase energy output. Better utilization of water resources was sought through improved reservoir inflow forecasting based on use of hydrometeorologic information systems with new or improved sensors, satellite data relay systems, and use of advanced scheduling techniques for water release. Specific mechanisms for increased energy output were determined, principally the use of more timely and accurate short term (0-7 days) inflow information to reduce spillage caused by unanticipated dynamic high inflow events. The hydrometeorologic models used in predicting inflows were examined to determine the sensitivity of inflow prediction accuracy to the many variables employed in the models, and the results used to establish information system requirements. Sensor and data handling system capabilities were reviewed and compared to the requirements, and an improved information system concept outlined.

  8. NEURO-ONCOLOGIC PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR THE OLDER PERSON.

    PubMed

    Ching, Willie; Luhmann, Melissa

    2011-07-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the course of diagnoses, patients with neuro-oncological malignancies present challenges to the physical therapist. At times, the presentation of impairments and disabilities of these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses do not necessarily coincide with the involved area of the brain or spinal cord. It is our intention to provide guidance to the physical therapist who will be working with these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses, in hopes that their encounters will be more productive and meaningful. This article describes a brief overview of common central nervous system malignancies, its medical treatment, as well as possible complications and side effects that would need to be considered in rehabilitating these patients. Special consideration is given to the elderly patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses. Pertinent physical therapy assessments and interventions are discussed.

  9. Radiation oncology (Vol. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Radiation Oncology series features update reports on the current status of primary therapy for lung cancer and the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hepatomas. Other articles describe the use of stereotaxic interstitial implantation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and discuss the indications for and results of radiation as the primary or adjuvant treatment of large bowel cancer. Reports on new technological developments examine the biological basis and clinical potential of local-regional hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy. Included are reviews of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of cancer and of three-dimensional treatment planning for high energy external beam radiotherapy.

  10. [Genomics medicine and oncology].

    PubMed

    Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2014-05-01

    Progress in genomics with, in particular, high throughput next generation sequencing is revolutionizing oncology. The impact of these techniques is seen on the one hand the identification of germline mutations that predispose to a given type of cancer, allowing for a personalized care of patients or healthy carriers and, on the other hand, the characterization of all acquired somatic mutation of the tumor cell, opening the door to personalized treatment targeting the driver oncogenes. In both cases, next generation sequencing techniques allow a global approach whereby the integrality of the genome mutations is analyzed and correlated with the clinical data. The benefits on the quality of care delivered to our patients are extremely impressive. PMID:24800772

  11. Dialectical Learning in Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The classical dialectical (study partner) learning method of Greek and Hellenistic antiquity remains the traditional learning method of Jewish religious and cultural studies, and enjoys widespread informal use by students in some American universities. The cognitive advantages of dialectical study have led to its adoption as a powerful, general…

  12. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  13. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  14. Participatory design with children in the development of a support system for patient-centered care in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Ruland, Cornelia M; Starren, Justin; Vatne, Torun M

    2008-08-01

    Developing software for children with severe illness poses a number of design challenges. In this paper we describe participatory design methods used in the development of SISOM, a support system for children with cancer age 7-12 to help children elicit and report their symptoms/problems in a child-friendly, age-adjusted manner, and to assist clinicians at the point of care in addressing and integrating children's reported symptoms and problems in patient care. The particular design challenges in the development of a clinical support tool for seriously ill children are described, followed by the participatory design techniques we used to meet these challenges. Healthy children and children with cancer participated actively in different stages of the design process. We describe how children contributed to the graphical design of the system's interface; selection of understandable, child-friendly terms used in the system; iconic and graphical representations; and its usability. The methods applied helped us to significantly improve and adapt SISOM to children's cognitive and emotional developmental stage. Working with children as partners in the design also provided important insights into the role children can play in participatory design that may be helpful for other system developers who wish to design support applications for ill children. Children had very creative design ideas that considerably improved the software. However, system development for seriously ill children also requires psychological and pedagogical insights and design and usability expertise. This limits the role children can play as full design partners.

  15. Library Information-Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    System works with Library of Congress MARC II format. System composed of subsystems that provide wide range of library informationprocessing capabilities. Format is American National Standards Institute (ANSI) format for machine-readable bibliographic data. Adaptable to any medium-to-large library.

  16. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  17. Oncology Nurse Participation in Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Oncology nurses are playing an important role in the provision of survivorship care. Their involvement includes educating and coordinating multidiscipline teams to initiate and provide care to patients and families. Oncology nurses participate in this evolving model of care in a variety of ways. Using the IOM report recommendations for the provision of quality cancer care nurses provide care based on the specific characteristics of individual health care settings and the populations they serve. Evaluating the settings resources and goals for desired survivorship activities as part of the planning process can be the difference between success and failure. Collaborating with local and national resources for cancer survivors can help expand services for a setting in an efficient and cost effective manner. Models of care vary and resources and communication differs among cancer care settings. Survivorship care differs as a result, across different models. Nurses are key to the dissemination and coordination of survivorship activities and are critical in facilitating communication between health care providers, the patients and caregivers. Nurses have a significant role in the dissemination and coordination of information between the patient and other health care providers. Oncology care does not end when treatment ends. PMID:21112849

  18. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATION FOR A NATIONAL CHEMICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Management, Inc., Burlington, MA.

    THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS A SET OF STATEMENTS ABOUT INFORMATION NEEDS, SYSTEM GOALS, SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS, AND SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CHEMICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM. IN ITS PRESENT FORM, THE DOCUMENT CONSTITUTES A BASIS FOR FUTURE PLANNING. AS POLICY DECISIONS ARE MADE, TECHNICAL PROBLEMS SOLVED AND PLANS ARE ALTERED, THE…

  19. Informational analysis involving application of complex information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupak, Clébia; Vanti, Adolfo Alberto; Balloni, Antonio José; Espin, Rafael

    The aim of the present research is performing an informal analysis for internal audit involving the application of complex information system based on fuzzy logic. The same has been applied in internal audit involving the integration of the accounting field into the information systems field. The technological advancements can provide improvements to the work performed by the internal audit. Thus we aim to find, in the complex information systems, priorities for the work of internal audit of a high importance Private Institution of Higher Education. The applied method is quali-quantitative, as from the definition of strategic linguistic variables it was possible to transform them into quantitative with the matrix intersection. By means of a case study, where data were collected via interview with the Administrative Pro-Rector, who takes part at the elaboration of the strategic planning of the institution, it was possible to infer analysis concerning points which must be prioritized at the internal audit work. We emphasize that the priorities were identified when processed in a system (of academic use). From the study we can conclude that, starting from these information systems, audit can identify priorities on its work program. Along with plans and strategic objectives of the enterprise, the internal auditor can define operational procedures to work in favor of the attainment of the objectives of the organization.

  20. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  1. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  2. Innovations in an Accounting Information Systems Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaoul, Jean

    A new approach to teaching an introductory accounting information systems course is outlined and the potential of this approach for integrating computers into the accounting curriculum at Manchester University (England) is demonstrated. Specifically, the use of a small inventory recording system and database in an accounting information course is…

  3. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides…

  4. Successful Introduction of Student Information Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, N. J.

    Proceeding from the premise that effective educational management requires effective information management, this paper identifies requirements to consider in designing student information systems, and describes how the Toronto Public Schools' system meets these requirements. In addition to examining the common characteristics of information…

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS) FACT SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the fact sheet is to provide information about the US EPA Office of Research and Developments Environmental Information Management System. The fact sheet indicates the type of records that are in EIMS, systems that are integrated with EIMS as well as some highligh...

  6. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes two systems--Wide Area Information Servers (WAIS) and Rosebud--that provide protocol-based mechanisms for accessing remote full-text information servers. Design constraints, human interface design, and implementation are examined for five interfaces to these systems developed to run on the Macintosh or Unix terminals. Sample screen…

  7. Information Systems: Current Developments and Future Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    On May 20, 1970, a one-day seminar was held for Congressional members and staff. The papers given at this seminar and included in the proceedings are: (1) "Understanding Information Systems" by J. D. Aron, (2) "Computer Applications in Political Science" by Kenneth Janda, (3) "Who's the Master of Your Information System?" by Marvin Kornbluh, (4)…

  8. Developing WWW Information Systems on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianqun; Reid, Edna O. F.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses basic concepts and technologies related to World Wide Web information system development. Describes the design and implementation of Virtual Travel Mart, a Web-based end- user oriented information system. Emphasizes design considerations, which focus on user needs; creativity; integration of in-house databases on the Internet; currency;…

  9. Compatibility Issues Affecting Information Systems and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. Wilfrid; Smith, Linda C.

    This UNISIST publication discusses issues related to the compatibility and standardization of bibliograpic records, index languages, software, hardware, and other information systems and services. Following an executive summary, definitions of terms, and other introductory material, existing information systems with common standards are briefly…

  10. Changes in Information Systems in Czech Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavik, Milan

    2004-01-01

    A study carried out in 1998 (reported in the Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 2003) of the information systems used by farmers in the Czech Republic to access information and advice was repeated in 2003. The research aim was to assess whether, and how, the systems had changed during these five years. The perceived importance of 10…

  11. Modelling Information System Dynamics: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswitch, Pauline

    1983-01-01

    Describes British Library's work on Systems Dynamics, a set of techniques for building simulation models based on analysis of information feedback loops. Highlights include macro-simulation modelling activities of social science disciplines, systems analyses and models of information retrieval processes and library services, policy models, and…

  12. Display system for imaging scientific telemetric information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabiyakin, G. I.; Rykovanov, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A system for imaging scientific telemetric information, based on the M-6000 minicomputer and the SIGD graphic display, is described. Two dimensional graphic display of telemetric information and interaction with the computer, in analysis and processing of telemetric parameters displayed on the screen is provided. The running parameter information output method is presented. User capabilities in the analysis and processing of telemetric information imaged on the display screen and the user language are discussed and illustrated.

  13. Policy enabled information sharing system

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Craig R.; Nelson, Brian D.; Ratheal, Steve W.

    2014-09-02

    A technique for dynamically sharing information includes executing a sharing policy indicating when to share a data object responsive to the occurrence of an event. The data object is created by formatting a data file to be shared with a receiving entity. The data object includes a file data portion and a sharing metadata portion. The data object is encrypted and then automatically transmitted to the receiving entity upon occurrence of the event. The sharing metadata portion includes metadata characterizing the data file and referenced in connection with the sharing policy to determine when to automatically transmit the data object to the receiving entity.

  14. In-vehicle information system functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tufano, D.R.; Spelt, P.F.; Knee, H.E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the functional requirement for an In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS), which will manage and display all driving-related information from many sources. There are numerous information systems currently being fielded or developed (e.g., routing and navigation, collision avoidance). However, without a logical integration of all of the possible on-board information, there is a potential for overwhelming the driver. The system described in this paper will filter and prioritize information across all sources, and present it to the driver in a timely manner, within a unified interface. To do this, IVIS will perform three general functions: (1) interact with other, on-board information subsystems and the vehicle; (2) manage the information by filtering, prioritizing, and integrating it; and (3) interact with the driver, both in terms of displaying information to the driver and allowing the driver to input requests, goals and preferences. The functional requirements described in this paper have either been derived from these three high-level functions or are directly mandated by the overriding requirements for modularity and flexibility. IVIS will have to be able to accommodate different types of information subsystems, of varying level of sophistication. The system will also have to meet the diverse needs of different types of drivers (private, commercial, transit), who may have very different levels of expertise in using information systems.

  15. Review and assessment of information kiosk systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E.

    1997-03-01

    This report reviews the current state-of-the-art and assesses the progress that is being made in kiosk information systems. This information will be used in developing a kiosk system for the Metro Dade Transit (MDTA), which has recently been awarded a Federal Transit Administration (FTA) operational test grant to develop an informational kiosk prototype at major rail and bus transfer points. A literature review of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) American National Clearinghouse and FTA`s Advanced Public Transportation Systems project summaries revealed kiosk projects at several transit agencies. These transit agencies were surveyed to gather information about kiosk technology. This survey provided the information about kiosk systems deployed or tested at transit agencies.

  16. Conceptual Design of a Regional Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Regional Council of Governments, CO.

    This report describes the conceptual design of a regional information system, developed in support of the Denver Regional Council of Government's established comprehensive planning work program. It includes a discussion of system objectives, available data sources, recommended system content, software and system maintenance requirements,…

  17. MiSIS: Michigan Student Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Higher Education Management Services.

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component, of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. It was developed by the Michigan community college system as a systematic and valid method of collecting…

  18. Strategies for Building Distributed Information Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Ian A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of the need for distributed information retrieval systems focuses on a model system, Fulcrum FUL/Text. Differences from distributed database management systems are described; system design is discussed; implementation requirements are explained including remote operation calls (ROC's); and a prototype simulation model based on FUL/Text…

  19. Increasing Minority Enrollment Onto Clinical Trials: Practical Strategies and Challenges Emerge From the NRG Oncology Accrual Workshop.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Sandra E; Muller, Carolyn Y; Robinson, William; Walker, Eleanor M; Yeager, Kate; Cook, Elise D; Friedman, Sue; Somkin, Carol P; Brown, Carol Leslie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-11-01

    Racial and ethnic diversity has historically been difficult to achieve in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, even while as many as 80% of those trials have faced difficulty in meeting overall recruitment targets. In an attempt to address these issues, NRG Oncology recently convened a comprehensive workshop titled "Clinical Trials Enrollment: Challenges and Opportunities." Discussants at the workshop included representatives of the three legacy groups of the NRG (ie, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Program, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group), a minority-based community clinical oncology program, a large integrated health care system, the leadership of the National Cancer Institute, and a large patient advocacy group. This article summarizes the concepts discussed at the workshop, which included: needs assessments, infrastructural support, training of investigators and research staff, specific clinical trial recruitment strategies (both system and community based), and development and mentoring of young investigators. Many new, more specific tactics, including use of diverse cancer care settings, direct-to-consumer communication, and the need for centralized information technology such as the use of software to match trials to special populations, are presented. It was concluded that new, innovative trial designs and the realities of limited funding would require the adoption of effective and efficient recruiting strategies, specialized training, and stakeholder engagement. US clinical research programs must generate and embrace new ideas and pilot test novel recruitment strategies if they are to maintain their historic role as world leaders in cancer care innovation and delivery. PMID:26464496

  20. Information Systems for Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Casagrande, John T.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a massive growth in data for cancer research, with high-throughput technologies joining clinical trials as major drivers of informatics needs. These data provide opportunities for developing new cancer treatments but also major challenges for informatics, and we summarize the systems needed and potential issues arising in addressing these challenges. Integrating these data into the research enterprise will require investments in 1) data capture and management, 2) data analysis, 3) data integration standards, 4) visualization tools, and 5) methods for integration with other enterprise systems. PMID:19093263

  1. Sensorpedia: Information Sharing Across Autonomous Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Bryan L; Resseguie, David R; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher H

    2009-01-01

    The concept of adapting social media technologies is introduced as a means of achieving information sharing across autonomous sensor systems. Historical examples of interoperability as an underlying principle in loosely-coupled systems is compared and contrasted with corresponding tightly-coupled, integrated systems. Examples of ad hoc information sharing solutions based on Web 2.0 social networks, mashups, blogs, wikis, and data tags are presented and discussed. The underlying technologies of these solutions are isolated and defined, and Sensorpedia is presented as a formalized application for implementing sensor information sharing across large-scale enterprises with incompatible autonomous sensor systems.

  2. The Oklahoma Geographic Information Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geographic Information Retrieval System (OGIRS) is a highly interactive data entry, storage, manipulation, and display software system for use with geographically referenced data. Although originally developed for a project concerned with coal strip mine reclamation, OGIRS is capable of handling any geographically referenced data for a variety of natural resource management applications. A special effort has been made to integrate remotely sensed data into the information system. The timeliness and synoptic coverage of satellite data are particularly useful attributes for inclusion into the geographic information system.

  3. Information retrieval and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groover, J. L.; King, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Versatile command-driven data management system offers users, through simplified command language, a means of storing and searching data files, sorting data files into specified orders, performing simple or complex computations, effecting file updates, and printing or displaying output data. Commands are simple to use and flexible enough to meet most data management requirements.

  4. BIO-Plex Information System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Boulanger, Richard; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a suggested design for an integrated information system for the proposed BIO-Plex (Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex) at Johnson Space Center (JSC), including distributed control systems, central control, networks, database servers, personal computers and workstations, applications software, and external communications. The system will have an open commercial computing and networking, architecture. The network will provide automatic real-time transfer of information to database server computers which perform data collection and validation. This information system will support integrated, data sharing applications for everything, from system alarms to management summaries. Most existing complex process control systems have information gaps between the different real time subsystems, between these subsystems and central controller, between the central controller and system level planning and analysis application software, and between the system level applications and management overview reporting. An integrated information system is vitally necessary as the basis for the integration of planning, scheduling, modeling, monitoring, and control, which will allow improved monitoring and control based on timely, accurate and complete data. Data describing the system configuration and the real time processes can be collected, checked and reconciled, analyzed and stored in database servers that can be accessed by all applications. The required technology is available. The only opportunity to design a distributed, nonredundant, integrated system is before it is built. Retrofit is extremely difficult and costly.

  5. Interactive information retrieval systems with minimalist representation

    SciTech Connect

    Domeshek, E.; Kedar, S.; Gordon, A.

    1996-12-31

    Almost any information you might want is becoming available on-line. The problem is how to find what you need. One strategy to improve access to existing information sources, is intelligent information agents - an approach based on extensive representation and inference. Another alternative is to simply concentrate on better information organization and indexing. Our systems use a form of conceptual indexing sensitive to users` task-specific information needs. We aim for minimalist representation, coding only select aspects of stored items. Rather than supporting reliable automated inference, the primary purpose of our representations is to provide sufficient discrimination and guidance to a user for a given domain and task. This paper argues, using case studies, that minimal representations can make strong contributions to the usefulness and usability of interactive information systems, while minimizing knowledge engineering effort. We demonstrate this approach in several broad spectrum applications including video retrieval and advisory systems.

  6. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  7. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  8. Biomass energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on biomass energy systems are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. This report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. Results from 12 biomass groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: Federally Funded Researchers (2 groups), Nonfederally Funded Researchers (2 groups), Representatives of Manufacturers (2 groups), Representatives of State Forestry Offices, Private Foresters, Forest Products Engineers, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, and System Managers. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  9. Personal medical information system using laser card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong H.; Kim, Keun Ho; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Park, Hyun Wook

    1996-04-01

    The well-known hospital information system (HIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) are typical applications of multimedia to medical area. This paper proposes a personal medical information save-and-carry system using a laser card. This laser card is very useful, especially in emergency situations, because the medical information in the laser card can be read at anytime and anywhere if there exists a laser card reader/writer. The contents of the laser card include the clinical histories of a patient such as clinical chart, exam result, diagnostic reports, images, and so on. The purpose of this system is not a primary diagnosis, but emergency reference of clinical history of the patient. This personal medical information system consists of a personal computer integrated with laser card reader/writer, color frame grabber, color CCD camera and a high resolution image scanner optionally. Window-based graphical user interface was designed for easy use. The laser card has relatively sufficient capacity to store the personal medical information, and has fast access speed to restore and load the data with a portable size as compact as a credit card. Database items of laser card provide the doctors with medical data such as laser card information, patient information, clinical information, and diagnostic result information.

  10. Ontology-driven health information systems architectures.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd; Oemig, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Following an architecture vision such as the Generic Component Model (GCM) architecture framework, health information systems for supporting personalized care have to be based on a component-oriented architecture. Representing concepts and their interrelations, the GCM perspectives system architecture, domains, and development process can be described by the domains' ontologies. The paper introduces ontology principles, ontology references to the GCM as well as some practical aspects of ontology-driven approaches to semantically interoperable and sustainable health information systems.

  11. Decentralized Multisensory Information Integration in Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-hao; Chen, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    How multiple sensory cues are integrated in neural circuitry remains a challenge. The common hypothesis is that information integration might be accomplished in a dedicated multisensory integration area receiving feedforward inputs from the modalities. However, recent experimental evidence suggests that it is not a single multisensory brain area, but rather many multisensory brain areas that are simultaneously involved in the integration of information. Why many mutually connected areas should be needed for information integration is puzzling. Here, we investigated theoretically how information integration could be achieved in a distributed fashion within a network of interconnected multisensory areas. Using biologically realistic neural network models, we developed a decentralized information integration system that comprises multiple interconnected integration areas. Studying an example of combining visual and vestibular cues to infer heading direction, we show that such a decentralized system is in good agreement with anatomical evidence and experimental observations. In particular, we show that this decentralized system can integrate information optimally. The decentralized system predicts that optimally integrated information should emerge locally from the dynamics of the communication between brain areas and sheds new light on the interpretation of the connectivity between multisensory brain areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To extract information reliably from ambiguous environments, the brain integrates multiple sensory cues, which provide different aspects of information about the same entity of interest. Here, we propose a decentralized architecture for multisensory integration. In such a system, no processor is in the center of the network topology and information integration is achieved in a distributed manner through reciprocally connected local processors. Through studying the inference of heading direction with visual and vestibular cues, we show that

  12. River Protection Project information systems assessment

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.L.

    1999-07-28

    The Information Systems Assessment Report documents the results from assessing the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Hanford Data Integrator 2000 (HANDI 2000) system, Business Management System (BMS) and Work Management System phases (WMS), with respect to the System Engineering Capability Assessment Model (CAM). The assessment was performed in accordance with the expectations stated in the fiscal year (FY) 1999 Performance Agreement 7.1.1, item (2) which reads, ''Provide an assessment report on the selected Integrated Information System by July 31, 1999.'' This report assesses the BMS and WMS as implemented and planned for the River Protection Project (RPP). The systems implementation is being performed under the PHMC HANDI 2000 information system project. The project began in FY 1998 with the BMS, proceeded in FY 1999 with the Master Equipment List portion of the WMS, and will continue the WMS implementation as funding provides. This report constitutes an interim quality assessment providing information necessary for planning RPP's information systems activities. To avoid confusion, HANDI 2000 will be used when referring to the entire system, encompassing both the BMS and WMS. A graphical depiction of the system is shown in Figure 2-1 of this report.

  13. Activity Theory in Information Systems Research and Practice: Theoretical Underpinnings for an Information Systems Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursu, Anja; Luukkonen, Irmeli; Toivanen, Marika; Korpela, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of information systems is to facilitate work activities: here we consider how Activity Theory can be applied in information systems development. Method. The requirements for an analytical model for emancipatory, work-oriented information systems research and practice are specified. Previous research work in Activity…

  14. Information systems - Issues in global habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. D.; Brass, J. A.; Jones, H.; Morse, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with fundamental issues, related to information considerations, which arise in an interdisciplinary approach to questions of global habitability. Information system problems and issues are illustrated with the aid of an example involving biochemical cycling and biochemical productivity. The estimation of net primary production (NPP) as an important consideration in the overall global habitability issue is discussed. The NPP model requires three types of data, related to meteorological information, a land surface inventory, and the vegetation structure. Approaches for obtaining and processing these data are discussed. Attention is given to user requirements, information system requirements, workstations, network communications, hardware/software access, and data management.

  15. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data.

  16. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  17. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  18. Uptake Carriers and Oncology Drug Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) family of transporters are responsible for the cellular influx of a broad range of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics in multiple tissues. Many of these transporters are highly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and kidney and are considered to be of particular importance in governing drug absorption, elimination, and cellular sensitivity of specific organs to a wide variety of oncology drugs. Although the majority of studies on the interaction of oncology drugs with SLC have been restricted to the use of exploratory in vitro model systems, emerging evidence suggests that several SLCs, including OCT2 and OATP1B1, contribute to clinically important phenotypes associated with those agents. Recent literature has indicated that modulation of SLC activity may result in drug-drug interactions, and genetic polymorphisms in SLC genes have been described that can affect the handling of substrates. Alteration of SLC function by either of these mechanisms has been demonstrated to contribute to interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics and toxicity associated with several oncology drugs. In this report, we provide an update on this rapidly emerging field. PMID:24378324

  19. Image storage in radiation oncology: What did we learn from diagnostic radiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Kurt; Luick, Marc; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier; Karlovits, Stephen; Werts, E. Day

    2009-02-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard was developed by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) for medical image archiving and retrieval. An extension to this implemented a standard named DICOM-RT for use in Radiation Oncology. There are currently seven radiotherapy-specific DICOM objects which include: RT Structure Set, RT Plan, RT Dose, RT Image, RT Beams Treatment Record, RT Brachy Treatment Record, and RT Treatment Summary Record. The type of data associated with DICOM-RT includes (1) Radiation treatment planning datasets (CT, MRI, PET) with radiation treatment plans showing beam arrangements, isodose distributions, and dose volume histograms of targets/normal tissues and (2) Image-guided radiation modalities such as Siemens MVision mega-voltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT). With the advent of such advancing technologies, there has been an exponential increase in image data collected for each patient, and the need for reliable and accessible image storage has become critical. A potential solution is a Radiation Oncology specific picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) that would allow data storage from multiple vendor devices and support the storage and retrieval needs not only of a single site but of a large, multi-facility network of radiation oncology clinics. This PACS system must be reliable, expandable, and cost-effective to operate while protecting sensitive patient image information in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant environment. This paper emphasizes the expanding DICOM-RT storage requirements across our network of 8 radiation oncology clinics and the initiatives we undertook to address the increased volume of data by using the ImageGrid (CANDELiS Inc, Irvine CA) server and the IGViewer license (CANDELiS Inc, Irvine CA) to create a DICOM-RT compatible PACS system.

  20. LAS: a software platform to support oncological data management.

    PubMed

    Baralis, Elena; Bertotti, Andrea; Fiori, Alessandro; Grand, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    The rapid technological evolution in the biomedical and molecular oncology fields is providing research laboratories with huge amounts of complex and heterogeneous data. Automated systems are needed to manage and analyze this knowledge, allowing the discovery of new information related to tumors and the improvement of medical treatments. This paper presents the Laboratory Assistant Suite (LAS), a software platform with a modular architecture designed to assist researchers throughout diverse laboratory activities. The LAS supports the management and the integration of heterogeneous biomedical data, and provides graphical tools to build complex analyses on integrated data. Furthermore, the LAS interfaces are designed to ease data collection and management even in hostile environments (e.g., in sterile conditions), so as to improve data quality.

  1. 1986 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey.

    PubMed

    Meredith, R F; Eisert, D R

    1987-12-01

    Two simultaneous surveys were conducted by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). A survey of all residents in Radiation Oncology was conducted to obtain information on trends in residency training. A simultaneous survey of Chief Residents was obtained to determine more specific information on current training programs. Over one-half of residents responded. Eighty-eight percent of respondents were graduates of a North American medical school. Most did at least an internship prior to entering Radiation Oncology and 3/4 of those who did not do a separate internship rotated through other areas at a later time to broaden their knowledge. One-half are Board certified or Board eligible in another specialty or hold a Masters or Ph.D. degree. Three-quarters of all residents had authorship of at least one paper during training and one-half were primary authors. Eighty percent felt adequately prepared for practice after residency. One-half plan at least an initial post-residency affiliation with an academic center. Many were concerned that Radiation Oncologists are not afforded respect equivalent to that of other specialties. Ninety-eight percent favored departmental status for Radiation Oncology. Resident recommendations for improving the image of Radiation Oncology are presented.

  2. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  3. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F.; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  4. Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Cao, Luyin; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2002-07-01

    In this work we develop a method for assessing the information density and efficiency of hyperspectral imaging systems that have spectral bands of nonuniform width. Imaging system designs with spectral bands of nonuniform width can efficiently gather information about a scene by allocating bandwidth among the bands according to their information content. The information efficiency is the ratio of information density to data density and is a function of the scene's spectral radiance, hyperspectral system design, and signal-to-noise ratio. The assessment can be used to produce an efficient system design. For example, one approach to determining the number and width of the spectral bands for an information-efficient design is to begin with a design that has a single band and then to iteratively divide a band into two bands until no further division improves the system's efficiency. Two experiments illustrate this approach, one using a simple mathematical model for the scene spectral-radiance autocorrelation function and the other using the deterministic spectral-radiance autocorrelation function of a hyperspectral image from NASA's Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer. The approach could be used either to determine a fixed system design or to dynamically control a system with variable-width spectral bands (e.g., using on-board processing in a satellite system).

  5. Corporate information systems in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nature of corporate information systems and their applications in health organisations. It emphasises the importance of financial and human resource information in the creation of a corporate data model. The paper summarises the main features of finance and human resource systems as they are used in health organisations. It looks at a series of case studies carried out in health organisations, which were selected on the basis of their representation of different aspects of service delivery. It also discusses the theoretical and practical perspectives of the systems themselves, their roles in information management, executive and decision support, and in planning and forecasting. PMID:10173702

  6. Clinical information systems for integrated healthcare networks.

    PubMed Central

    Teich, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    In the 1990's, a large number of hospitals and medical practices have merged to form integrated healthcare networks (IHN's). The nature of an IHN creates new demands for information management, and also imposes new constraints on information systems for the network. Important tradeoffs must be made between homogeneity and flexibility, central and distributed governance, and access and confidentiality. This paper describes key components of clinical information systems for IHN's, and examines important design decisions that affect the value of such systems. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929178

  7. Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information Systems (MINIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information System was developed to provide remote, interactive information retrieval capability for various types of data bases to be processed on different types of small and medium size computers. Use of the system for three different data bases is decribed: (1) LANDSAT photo look-up, (2) land use, and (3) census/socioeconomic. Each of the data base elements is shown together with other detailed information that a user would require to contact the system remotely, to transmit inquiries on commands, and to receive the results of the queries or commands.

  8. Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    This final rule replaces the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule with the Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule. The rule also makes conforming amendments in rules in related requirements. This rule will assist title IV-E agencies in developing information management systems that leverage new innovations and technology in order to better serve children and families. More specifically, this final rule supports the use of cost-effective, innovative technologies to automate the collection of high-quality case management data and to promote its analysis, distribution, and use by workers, supervisors, administrators, researchers, and policy makers.

  9. Information System for Educational Policy and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, J. C., Jr.

    Educational Information System (EIS) is a proposed computer-based data processing system to help schools solve current educational problems more efficiently. The system would allow for more effective administrative operations in student scheduling, financial accounting, and long range planning. It would also assist school trustees and others in…

  10. Plans for a National Physics Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Franz L.; Herschman, Arthur

    Against a background of widespread interest in national information systems, the American Institute of Physics is developing such a system for physics. This program pivots on the design of a new classification system for physics which is to be used, in conjunction with free-language index terms, for the intellectual organization of the physics…

  11. Information Processing Capacity of Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, both natural and artificial, are stimulated by time dependent external signals, somehow processing the information contained therein. We demonstrate how to quantify the different modes in which information can be processed by such systems and combine them to define the computational capacity of a dynamical system. This is bounded by the number of linearly independent state variables of the dynamical system, equaling it if the system obeys the fading memory condition. It can be interpreted as the total number of linearly independent functions of its stimuli the system can compute. Our theory combines concepts from machine learning (reservoir computing), system modeling, stochastic processes, and functional analysis. We illustrate our theory by numerical simulations for the logistic map, a recurrent neural network, and a two-dimensional reaction diffusion system, uncovering universal trade-offs between the non-linearity of the computation and the system's short-term memory. PMID:22816038

  12. Geographical information system for flight safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Homma, Kohzo; Gomi, Hiromi; Kitagata, Satoru; Kumasaka, Kazuhiro; Oikawa, Tetsuya

    2003-03-01

    This paper proposes a geographical information system for terrain and obstacle awareness and alerting that extracts information from high-resolution satellite images. On-board terrain elevation databases are being increasingly used in aircraft terrain awareness and warning systems (TAWS), offering a step change in capability from the radar altimeter-based ground proximity warning system. However, to enhance the safety of flight of small aircraft and helicopters, in addition to pure topographic information a TAWS database should also contain significant man-made obstacles that present a collision hazard, such tall buildings and chimneys, communications masts and electrical power transmission lines. Another issue is keeping the terrain and obstacle database current, reflecting changes to features over time. High-resolution stereoscopic images remotely sensed from Earth orbit have great potential for addressing these issues. In this paper, some critical items are discussed and effective information processing schemes for extracting information relevant to flight safety from satellite images are proposed.

  13. MISS: A Metamodel of Information System Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arni-Bloch, Nicolas; Ralyté, Jolita

    Integration of different components that compose enterprise information systems (IS) represents a big challenge in the IS development. However, this integration is indispensable in order to avoid IS fragmentation and redundancy between different IS applications. In this work we apply service-oriented development principles to information systems. We define the concept of information system service (ISS) and propose a metamodel of ISS (MISS). We claim that it is not sufficient to consider an ISS as a black box and it is essential to include in the ISS specification the information about service structure, processes and rules shared with other services and thus to make the service transparent. Therefore we define the MISS using three informational spaces (static, dynamic and rule).

  14. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  15. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  16. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  17. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: a practical and technical review and guide.

    PubMed

    Korreman, Stine; Rasch, Coen; McNair, Helen; Verellen, Dirk; Oelfke, Uwe; Maingon, Philippe; Mijnheer, Ben; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT.

  18. Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglanski, M.; Messios, N.; de Donder, E.; Gamby, E.; Calders, S.; Hetey, L.; Evans, H.

    2009-04-01

    SPENVIS is an ESA operational software developed and maintained at BIRA-IASB since 1996. It provides standardized access to most of the recent models of the hazardous space environment, through a user-friendly Web interface (http://www.spenvis.oma.be/). The system allows spacecraft engineers to perform a rapid analysis of environmental problems related to natural radiation belts, solar energetic particles, cosmic rays, plasmas, gases, magnetic fields and micro-particles. Various reporting and graphical utilities and extensive help facilities are included to allow engineers with relatively little familiarity to produce reliable results. SPENVIS also contains an active, integrated version of the ECSS Space Environment Standard and access to in-flight data on the space environment. Although SPENVIS in the first place is designed to help spacecraft engineers, it is also used by technical universities in their educational programs. At present more than 4000 users are registered. With SPENVIS, one can generate a spacecraft trajectory or a coordinate grid and then calculate: geomagnetic coordinates; trapped proton and electron fluxes; solar proton fluences; cosmic ray fluxes; radiation doses (ionising and non-ionising) for simple geometries; a sectoring analysis for dose calculations in more complex geometries; damage equivalent fluences for Si, GaAs and multi-junction solar cells; Geant4 Monte Carlo analysis for doses and pulse height rates in planar and spherical shields; ion LET and flux spectra and single event upset rates; trapped proton flux anisotropy; atmospheric and ionospheric densities and temperatures; atomic oxygen erosion depths; surface and internal charging characteristics; solar array current collections and power losses; wall damage. The new version of SPENVIS (to be released in January 2009) also allows mission analysis for Mars and Jupiter.

  19. Data vs. information: A system paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    The data system designer requires data parameters, and is dependent on the user to convert information needs to these data parameters. This conversion will be done with more or less accuracy, beginning a chain of inaccuracies which propagate through the system, and which, in the end, may prevent the user from converting the data received into the information required. The concept to be pursued is that errors occur in various parts of the system, and, having occurred, propagate to the end. Modeling of the system may allow an estimation of the effects at any point and the final accumulated effect, and may prove a method of allocating an error budget among the system components. The selection of the various technical parameters which a data system must meet must be done in relation to the ability of the user to turn the cold, impersonal data into a live, personal decision or piece of information.

  20. Development of living body information monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Ohbuchi, Yoshifumi; Torigoe, Ippei; Miyagawa, Hidekazu; Murayama, Nobuki; Hayashida, Yuki; Igasaki, Tomohiko

    2009-12-01

    The easy monitoring systems of contact and non-contact living body information for preventing the the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) were proposed as an alternative monitoring system of the infant's vital information. As for the contact monitoring system, respiration sensor, ECG electrodes, thermistor and IC signal processor were integrated into babies' nappy holder. This contact-monitoring unit has RF transmission function and the obtained data are analyzed in real time by PC. In non-contact mortaring system, the infrared thermo camera was used. The surrounding of the infant's mouth and nose is monitored and the respiration rate is obtained by thermal image processing of its temperature change image of expired air. This proposed system of in-sleep infant's vital information monitoring system and unit are very effective as not only infant's condition monitoring but also nursing person's one.

  1. Development of living body information monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Ohbuchi, Yoshifumi; Torigoe, Ippei; Miyagawa, Hidekazu; Murayama, Nobuki; Hayashida, Yuki; Igasaki, Tomohiko

    2010-03-01

    The easy monitoring systems of contact and non-contact living body information for preventing the the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) were proposed as an alternative monitoring system of the infant's vital information. As for the contact monitoring system, respiration sensor, ECG electrodes, thermistor and IC signal processor were integrated into babies' nappy holder. This contact-monitoring unit has RF transmission function and the obtained data are analyzed in real time by PC. In non-contact mortaring system, the infrared thermo camera was used. The surrounding of the infant's mouth and nose is monitored and the respiration rate is obtained by thermal image processing of its temperature change image of expired air. This proposed system of in-sleep infant's vital information monitoring system and unit are very effective as not only infant's condition monitoring but also nursing person's one.

  2. Attitudes of Chinese Oncology Physicians Toward Death with Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-ping; Huang, Bo-yan; Yi, Ting-wu; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yu-qing; Zhang, Zong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Death with dignity (DWD) refers to the refusal of life-prolonging measures for terminally ill patients by “living wills” forms in advance. More and more oncology physicians are receiving DWD requests from advance cancer patients in mainland China. Objective: The study objective was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese oncology physicians toward the legalization and implementation of DWD. Methods: A questionnaire investigating the understanding and attitudes toward DWD was administered to 257 oncology physicians from 11 hospitals in mainland China. Results: The effective response rate was 86.8% (223/257). The majority of oncology physicians (69.1%) had received DWD requests from patients. Half of the participants (52.5%) thought that the most important reason was the patients' unwillingness to maintain survival through machines. One-third of participants (33.0%) attributed the most important reason to suffering from painful symptoms. Most oncology physicians (78.9%) had knowledge about DWD. A fifth of respondents did not know the difference between DWD and euthanasia, and a few even considered DWD as euthanasia. The majority of oncology physicians supported the legalization (88.3%) and implementation (83.9%) of DWD. Conclusions: Many Chinese oncology physicians have received advanced cancer patients' DWD requests and think that DWD should be legalized and implemented. Chinese health management departments should consider the demands of physicians and patients. It is important to inform physicians about the difference between DWD and euthanasia, as one-fifth of them were confused about it. PMID:27022774

  3. Information Systems Enrollments: Challenges and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Mary J.; Dick, Geoffrey; Jacobson, Carolyn McKinnell; Van Slyke, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, enrollments in Information Technology and Information Systems-related academic programs have declined sharply. This paper addresses possible causes of the enrollment decline, and some of the "myths" regarding careers in IT/IS are dispelled. A number of efforts underway at various universities and professional organizations in…

  4. Selection and Implementation of New Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Keith J; Rao, Luigi K F

    2015-06-01

    The single most important element to consider when evaluating clinical information systems for a practice is workflow. Workflow can be broadly defined as an orchestrated and repeatable pattern of business activity enabled by the systematic organization of resources into processes that transform materials, provide services, or process information. PMID:26065798

  5. A HyperCard Map Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Chi-King

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development of a HyperCard system at the University of Hong Kong that enables users to retrieve information about maps, aerial photos, or satellite images in a particular area of interest. User needs are discussed, and cartobibliographic information contained in the HyperCard stacks is described. (six references) (LRW)

  6. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1983-07-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information.

  7. Occupational Information System (OIS) Handbook Training Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (DOL/ETA), Washington, DC.

    This training package, consisting of information concerning the content, use, and applications of the Occupational Information System (OIS), is designed for use in a training presentation conducted for administrators, trainers, counselors, job placement specialists, and economic development staff who will be working with the OIS. Included in the…

  8. A Hypermedia Information System for Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell, Karin M.

    The Hypermedia Information System (HIS) is being developed under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine's (AAM) Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance (HFAM) research program. The goal of the hypermedia project is to create new tools and methods for aviation-related information storage and retrieval.…

  9. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  10. Cosmos: An Information Retrieval System that Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Katherine; Grossman, Alvin

    1980-01-01

    Briefly described is the County of San Mateo Online System (COSMOS) which was developed and is used by the San Mateo Educational Resources Center (SMERC) to access the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Fugitive Information Data Organizer (FIDO) databases as well as the curriculum guides housed at SMERC. (TG)

  11. AEROMETRIC INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (AIRS) - GRAPHICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) is a computer-based repository of information about airborne pollution in the United States and various World Health Organization (WHO) member countries. AIRS is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and runs on t...

  12. Distributing Executive Information Systems through Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, James I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Many colleges and universities will soon adopt distributed systems for executive information and decision support. Distribution of shared information through computer networks will improve decision-making processes dramatically on campuses. Critical success factors include administrative support, favorable organizational climate, ease of use,…

  13. Inside EUREKA. The California Career Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaghan, Bill; And Others

    A computerized career information system named EUREKA has been developed for California. It originated in 1975-76 under the direction of the Bay Area Computer Educators and since that time has received state and VEA funding. It consists of two major components, Quest and information files. Quest asks users twenty-one questions in order to…

  14. Understanding and implementing hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    One of a hospital's greatest resources is its information. The hospital's information system, whether computerized or manual, is the means by which data is collected, integrated, and retrieved. However, because optimal patient treatment, financial management, and hospital operation require that decisions be based on current, accurate, complete, and well-organized data, a computerized hospital information system (HIS), when correctly implemented, can be the most effective means of disseminating valuable information to decision makers. Although the systems currently in place in most hospitals are used primarily to manage finances, an integrated HIS is much more than a financial system; it can, in fact, coordinate all of a hospital's information needs. An integrated HIS develops over time, typically several years. Merely automating existing procedures may not provide many of the potential benefits of a new system and may even carry forward most of the drawbacks of the old system. Determining how information is currently processed in the hospital and putting together an effective team to carry out acquisition and implementation of an HIS must precede the purchase of computers, networks, and software applications. In Part 1 of this article, we describe hospitals' general information needs and provide an overview of the current state of HISs and what hospitals can expect to gain from implementing a new system; in Part 2, we describe the steps hospitals can take when putting the system in place. We caution readers that, although we will be discussing many benefits of successful HISs, little documented or quantified evidence exists to show that these benefits are being realized; most evidence is subjective and qualitative, and claims are not thoroughly substantiated. Few, if any, hospitals have achieved the completely integrated system model--or even come close. Nevertheless, this article provides the groundwork for hospitals to make a thoughtful beginning. In upcoming

  15. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements.

  16. The Future of Precision Medicine in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Millner, Lori M; Strotman, Lindsay N

    2016-09-01

    Precision medicine in oncology focuses on identifying which therapies are most effective for each patient based on genetic characterization of the cancer. Traditional chemotherapy is cytotoxic and destroys all cells that are rapidly dividing. The foundation of precision medicine is targeted therapies and selecting patients who will benefit most from these therapies. One of the newest aspects of precision medicine is liquid biopsy. A liquid biopsy includes analysis of circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acid, or exosomes obtained from a peripheral blood draw. These can be studied individually or in combination and collected serially, providing real-time information as a patient's cancer changes. PMID:27514468

  17. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements. PMID:27424424

  18. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  19. A System for Information Documentation and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Dennis M.; Taggart, William M. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Southeast Regional Data Center (SERDAC) has an operational Information Documentation and Control System that provides the documentation and control necessary for SERDAC to implement an organizational data base to support its many applications. (Author)

  20. IDEAL: A methology for developing information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Ken H.; Bachert, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of improved capabilities obtained through current computer technologies, application programs and expert systems, Enterprises are being designed or upgraded to be highly integrated and automated information systems. To design or modify Enterprises, it is necessary to first define what functions are to be performed within the Enterprise, identify which functions are potential candidates for automation, and what automated or expert systems are available, or must be developed, to accomplish the selected function. Second, it is necessary to define and analyze the informational requirements for each function along with the informational relationships among the functions so that a database structure can be established to support the Enterprise. To perform this type of system design, an integrated set of analysis tools is required to support the information analysis process. The IDEAL (Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Languages) methodology provides this integrated set of tools and is discussed.

  1. Ariel: an information system for AIDS research.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M M; Li, P

    1993-07-01

    An information system has been established at the National Institute for Biological Standards & Control for the exchange of knowledge in AIDS research, particularly in relation to vaccine design. This system, the AIDS information exchange link (Ariel), is designed to act as a central store of relevant information for scientists in the UK and abroad and was set up under the auspices of the Medical Research Council. It holds information on research materials (reagents), on genetic sequences and on projects. Several computers and database systems are involved. Access is obtained through Janet, the UK academic network, or PSS, the British Telecom public network. Both these networks are linked to international network systems, e.g. Internet, Earn, IPSS. Ariel has been in operation for 18 months and is accessed internationally.

  2. Survivable Authentication for Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bicakci, Kemal; Baykal, Nazife

    2003-01-01

    Possible solutions to establish a survivable authentication framework in a health information system including the one based on one-time passwords (OTPs) are discussed. A new convenient method to generate OTPs is proposed. PMID:14728296

  3. Project Records Information System (PRIS) user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.S.; Nations, J.A.; Short, R.D.

    1991-08-01

    The Projects Record Information System (PRIS) is an interactive system developed for the Information Services Division (ISD) of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to perform indexing, maintenance, and retrieval of information about Engineering project record documents for which they are responsible. This PRIS User's Manual provides instruction on the use of this system. Section 2.0 of this manual presents an overview of PRIS, describing the system's purpose; the data that it handles, functions it performs; hardware, software, and access; and help and error functions. Section 3.0 describes the interactive menu-driven operation of PRIS. Appendixes A, B,C, and D contain the data dictionary, help screens, report descriptions, and a primary menu structure diagram, respectively.

  4. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described.

  5. Early-EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, George H.; Hunolt, Gregory W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), an integral part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, will provide simultaneous observations from a suite of instruments in low-earth orbit. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) will handle the data from those instruments, as well as provide access to observations and related information from other earth science missions. The Early-EOSDIS Program will provide initial improved support for global change research by building upon present capabilities and data, and will establish a working prototype EOSDIS for selected archiving, distribution, and information management functions by mid-1994.

  6. Hypertext and hypermedia systems in information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, K. M.; Kuhn, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper opens with a brief history of hypertext and hypermedia in the context of information management during the 'information age.' Relevant terms are defined and the approach of the paper is explained. Linear and hypermedia information access methods are contrasted. A discussion of hyperprogramming in the handling of complex scientific and technical information follows. A selection of innovative hypermedia systems is discussed. An analysis of the Clinical Practice Library of Medicine NASA STI Program hypermedia application is presented. The paper concludes with a discussion of the NASA STI Program's future hypermedia project plans.

  7. The challenge to reduce breast cancer mortality in Okinawa: consensus of the first Okinawa breast oncology meeting.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Kentaro; Tamaki, Nobumitsu; Kamada, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Kano; Zaha, Hisamitsu; Onomura, Mai; Gushimiyagi, Masanori; Kurashita, Kaname; Miyazato, Keiko; Tengan, Hiromu; Miyara, Kyuichiro; Ishida, Takanori

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer mortality is gradually increasing in Okinawa. The 1st Okinawa Breast Oncology Meeting was held on 6 July 2012 and discussions on how to curb the rising trend were focused on breast cancer screening, adjuvant treatment, socioeconomic and geographic issues, and the problem of complementary and alternative medicine. The consensus of the 1st Okinawa Breast Oncology Meeting was that ultrasonography screening is an acceptable screening system for Okinawan women because of the geographic disadvantage of having many small islands and rural areas. Educational and economic support is needed for women in rural areas to get correct information, for access to urban areas and to be treated by evidence-based optimal therapy for breast cancer. In addition, new approaches are needed for Okinawan people to successfully educate patients to correctly interpret evidence-based information.

  8. Information survey for microcomputer systems integration

    SciTech Connect

    Hake, K.A.

    1991-12-01

    One goal of the PM-AIM is to provide US Army Project Managers (PMs) and Project Executive Officers (PEOs) with a fundamental microcomputing resource to help perform acquisition information management and its concomitant reporting requirements. Providing key application software represents one means of accomplishing this goal. This workstation would furnish a broad range of capabilities needed in the PM and PEO office settings as well as software tools for specific project management and acquisition information. Although still in the conceptual phase, the practical result of this exercise in systems integration will likely be a system called the Project Manager's Information System (PMIS) or the AIM workstation. It would include such software as, Project Manager's System Software (PMSS), Defense Acquisition Executive Summary (DAES), and Consolidated Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) and would conform to open systems architecture as accepted by the Department of Defense. ORNL has assisted PM-AIM in the development of technology ideas for the PMIS workstation concept. This paper represents the compilation of information gained during this process. This information is presented as a body of knowledge (or knowledge domain) defining the complex technology of microcomputing. The concept of systems integration or tying together all hardware and software components reflects the nature of PM-AIM's task in attempting to field a PMIS or AIM workstation.

  9. Information survey for microcomputer systems integration

    SciTech Connect

    Hake, K.A.

    1991-12-01

    One goal of the PM-AIM is to provide US Army Project Managers (PMs) and Project Executive Officers (PEOs) with a fundamental microcomputing resource to help perform acquisition information management and its concomitant reporting requirements. Providing key application software represents one means of accomplishing this goal. This workstation would furnish a broad range of capabilities needed in the PM and PEO office settings as well as software tools for specific project management and acquisition information. Although still in the conceptual phase, the practical result of this exercise in systems integration will likely be a system called the Project Manager`s Information System (PMIS) or the AIM workstation. It would include such software as, Project Manager`s System Software (PMSS), Defense Acquisition Executive Summary (DAES), and Consolidated Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) and would conform to open systems architecture as accepted by the Department of Defense. ORNL has assisted PM-AIM in the development of technology ideas for the PMIS workstation concept. This paper represents the compilation of information gained during this process. This information is presented as a body of knowledge (or knowledge domain) defining the complex technology of microcomputing. The concept of systems integration or tying together all hardware and software components reflects the nature of PM-AIM`s task in attempting to field a PMIS or AIM workstation.

  10. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  11. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity. PMID:16486093

  12. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  13. MINIS: Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information Systems (MINIS) was developed in response to the need for a data management system capable of operation on several different minicomputer systems. The desired system had to be capable of performing the functions of a LANDSAT photo descriptive data retrieval system while remaining general in terms of other acceptable user definable data bases. The system also had to be capable of performing data base updates and providing user-formatted output reports. The resultant MINI System provides all of these capabilities and several other features to complement the data management system. The MINI System is currently implemented on two minicomputer systems and is in the process of being installed on another minicomputer system. The MINIS is operational on four different data bases.

  14. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research. The Earth Science Data Systems provide end-to-end capabilities to deliver data and information products to users in support of understanding the Earth system. The presentation contains photographs from space of recent events, (i.e., the effects of the tsunami in Japan, and the wildfires in Australia.) It also includes details of the Data Centers that provide the data to EOSDIS and Science Investigator-led Processing Systems. Information about the Land, Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and some of the uses that the system has made possible are reviewed. Also included is information about how to access the data, and evolutionary plans for the future of the system.

  15. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.

    PubMed

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  16. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.

    PubMed

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described.

  17. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system

    PubMed Central

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S.; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein–protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  18. Integrated telemedicine applications and services for oncological positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kontaxakis, George; Visvikis, Dimitris; Ohl, Roland; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Suarez, Juan Pablo; Selby, Peter; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Santos, Andres; Ortega, Fernando; Diaz, Javier; Pan, Leyun; Strauss, Ludwig; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Sakas, Georgios; Pozo, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    TENPET (Trans European Network for Positron Emission Tomography) aims to evaluate the provision of integrated teleconsultation and intelligent computer supported cooperative work services for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) in Europe at its current stage, as it is a multi-centre project financially supported by the European Commission (Information Society, eTEN Program). It addresses technological challenges by linking PET centres and developing supporting services that permit remote consultation between professionals in the field. The technological platform (CE-marked) runs on Win2000/NT/XP systems and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion, as well as for interactive communication and message handling for off-line communications. Four PET Centres from Spain, France and Germany participate to the pilot system trials. The performance evaluation of the system is carried out via log files and user-filled questionnaires on the frequency of the teleconsultations, their duration and efficacy, quality of the images received, user satisfaction, as well as on privacy, ethical and security issues. TENPET promotes the co-operation and improved communication between PET practitioners that are miles away from their peers or on mobile units, offering options for second opinion and training and permitting physicians to remotely consult patient data if they are away from their centre. It is expected that TENPET will have a significant impact in the development of new skills by PET professionals and will support the establishment of peripheral PET units. To our knowledge, TENPET is the first telemedicine service specifically designed for oncological PET. This report presents the technical innovations incorporated in the TENPET platform and the initial pilot studies at real and diverse clinical environments in the field of oncology.

  19. On Roles of Models in Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sølvberg, Arne

    The increasing penetration of computers into all aspects of human activity makes it desirable that the interplay among software, data and the domains where computers are applied is made more transparent. An approach to this end is to explicitly relate the modeling concepts of the domains, e.g., natural science, technology and business, to the modeling concepts of software and data. This may make it simpler to build comprehensible integrated models of the interactions between computers and non-computers, e.g., interaction among computers, people, physical processes, biological processes, and administrative processes. This chapter contains an analysis of various facets of the modeling environment for information systems engineering. The lack of satisfactory conceptual modeling tools seems to be central to the unsatisfactory state-of-the-art in establishing information systems. The chapter contains a proposal for defining a concept of information that is relevant to information systems engineering.

  20. The Nuclear Criticality Information System: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) has served the criticality community for the past ten years with publications and with an online information system. NCIS provides a mean for widely distributed nuclear criticality specialists to communicate and work together instantly. Users of the system may receive assistance from all members of the NCIS community, which provides a much broader base of support than is available at any single site. When unified by NCIS, these diverse specialists provide a resource that has proven to be very useful in the safe handling of fissile material. NCIS also is a source of current nuclear criticality safety information; the rapid access of such up-to-date information on the handling of fissile materials outside of nuclear reactors is international in scope, extending beyond political and geographical boundaries.

  1. The Nuclear Criticality Information System: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) has served the criticality community for the past ten years with publications and with an online information system. NCIS provides a mean for widely distributed nuclear criticality specialists to communicate and work together instantly. Users of the system may receive assistance from all members of the NCIS community, which provides a much broader base of support than is available at any single site. When unified by NCIS, these diverse specialists provide a resource that has proven to be very useful in the safe handling of fissile material. NCIS also is a source of current nuclear criticality safety information; the rapid access of such up-to-date information on the handling of fissile materials outside of nuclear reactors is international in scope, extending beyond political and geographical boundaries.

  2. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  3. Legal Medicine Information System using CDISC ODM.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tamaki, Keiji; Nagai, Hisashi; Harada, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Hirono

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a new database system for forensic autopsies, called the Legal Medicine Information System, using the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM). This system comprises two subsystems, namely the Institutional Database System (IDS) located in each institute and containing personal information, and the Central Anonymous Database System (CADS) located in the University Hospital Medical Information Network Center containing only anonymous information. CDISC ODM is used as the data transfer protocol between the two subsystems. Using the IDS, forensic pathologists and other staff can register and search for institutional autopsy information, print death certificates, and extract data for statistical analysis. They can also submit anonymous autopsy information to the CADS semi-automatically. This reduces the burden of double data entry, the time-lag of central data collection, and anxiety regarding legal and ethical issues. Using the CADS, various studies on the causes of death can be conducted quickly and easily, and the results can be used to prevent similar accidents, diseases, and abuse.

  4. Legal Medicine Information System using CDISC ODM.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tamaki, Keiji; Nagai, Hisashi; Harada, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Hirono

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a new database system for forensic autopsies, called the Legal Medicine Information System, using the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM). This system comprises two subsystems, namely the Institutional Database System (IDS) located in each institute and containing personal information, and the Central Anonymous Database System (CADS) located in the University Hospital Medical Information Network Center containing only anonymous information. CDISC ODM is used as the data transfer protocol between the two subsystems. Using the IDS, forensic pathologists and other staff can register and search for institutional autopsy information, print death certificates, and extract data for statistical analysis. They can also submit anonymous autopsy information to the CADS semi-automatically. This reduces the burden of double data entry, the time-lag of central data collection, and anxiety regarding legal and ethical issues. Using the CADS, various studies on the causes of death can be conducted quickly and easily, and the results can be used to prevent similar accidents, diseases, and abuse. PMID:24060460

  5. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Cancer.gov

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  6. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology...

  7. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... relevance and potential use of such measures in the pediatric development plans of oncology products....

  8. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee...

  9. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development...

  10. 78 FR 63224 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... late stage development for various adult oncology indications. The subcommittee will consider...

  11. Communication, Documentation, and Training Standards in Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology.

    PubMed

    Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Pelletier, Wendy; Bingen, Kristin

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger effort to create standards for psychosocial care of children with cancer, we document consensus and evidence-based data on interprofessional communication, documentation, and training for professionals providing psycho-oncology services. Six databases were searched. Sixty-five articles and six guidelines and consensus-based documents were identified; 35 met inclusion criteria. Data support strong recommendations for standards of care in communication/collaboration, documentation of patient information, and training in pediatric psycho-oncology. These are areas where extensive research is unlikely to be conducted; however, professional expectations and qualifications may be further clarified and strengthened with time.

  12. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  13. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  14. Bibliographic Information Retrieval Systems: Increasing Cognitive Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the impact of research in artificial intelligence and human computer interaction on the design of bibliographic information retrieval systems, and presents design principles of a prototype system that uses semantically based searches and a knowledge base consisting of conceptual frames. (10 references) (CLB)

  15. Divulging Personal Information within Learning Analytics Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifenthaler, Dirk; Schumacher, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if students are prepared to release any personal data in order to inform learning analytics systems. Besides the well-documented benefits of learning analytics, serious concerns and challenges are associated with the application of these data driven systems. Most notably, empirical evidence regarding…

  16. Natural Resource Information System. Remote Sensing Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachtenauer, J.; And Others

    A major design objective of the Natural Resource Information System entailed the use of remote sensing data as an input to the system. Potential applications of remote sensing data were therefore reviewed and available imagery interpreted to provide input to a demonstration data base. A literature review was conducted to determine the types and…

  17. Virtualization Technologies in Information Systems Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Information systems educators must balance the need to protect the stability, availability, and security of computer laboratories with the learning objectives of various courses. In advanced courses where students need to install, configure, and otherwise manipulate application and operating system settings, this is especially problematic as these…

  18. Delivering Training for Highly Demanding Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Andrew Lawrence; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette May; Coulson-Thomas, Colin Joseph; Ashurst, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of research covering the training requirements of organisations implementing highly demanding information systems (HDISs). The aim of this paper is to help in the understanding of appropriate training requirements for such systems. Design/methodology/approach: This research investigates the training delivery within a…

  19. Object-Oriented Systems for Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcoate, Judith

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of object technology for the development of information management systems. Notes the benefits of modelling complex real-world systems and the increases in productivity leading to flexible, reusable, and maintainable software. Discusses problems, support for multimedia data types, and storage capabilities. (AEF)

  20. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  1. Promoting Geographic Information System Usage across Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Shaun; Kinikin, Janae

    2004-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss how they implemented and promoted Geographic Information System (GIS) applications at Weber State University (WSU), a four-year public institution with two campuses. GIS is a type of computer system made of hardware, software, and data that allows the mapping of spatially related layers that have a common…

  2. Organization of Communication in Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datsenko, V. P.; Zaytsev, N. G.

    Organization of communication between the center of an automated system of information exchange and the subscribers to the system is described. The three requirements are: (1) those technical communication means must be chosen which will provide effective and convenient avenues for calls from the subscribers to the center, (2) the required…

  3. An Information System for an Educational Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, S. G.

    The Management Systems Series consists of documents of interest to persons concerned with the management of public resources. Operation PEP (Prepare Educational Planners), which called for a three-day session of instruction on Executive (Management Information Systems) was documented in detail as part of this series. This portion attempts to…

  4. A Low Cost Course Information Syndication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, A. O.; Olajubu, E. A.; Bello, S. A.; Soriyan, H. A.; Obamuyide, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a cost effective, reliable, and convenient mobile web-based system to facilitate the dissemination of course information to students, to support interaction that goes beyond the classroom. The system employed the Really Simple Syndication (RSS) technology and was developed using Rapid Application Development (RAD) methodology.…

  5. Maintenance Information and Data Acquisition System (MIDAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Stansberry, C.T.; Odom, S.M.; Martin, C.D. )

    1989-09-01

    The Maintenance Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) is an innovative program to combine new and existing programs into one unique system that allows quick response to a wide range of management information programs, leading to more effective administration of the Maintenance Management Department of the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of this system is to provide rapid access to broad areas of management programs as easily as possible. Doing so with the touch of a single computer key thus lives up to the Midas legend, the Golden Touch.''

  6. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  7. Geographical information systems and tropical medicine

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, O. A.; DAVENHALL, W.; ALI, M.; CASTILLO-SALGADO, C.; VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, G.; KITRON, U.; SOARES MAGALHÃES, R. J.; CLEMENTS, A. C. A.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of their applicability to the field of tropical medicine, geographical information systems (GIS) have developed enormously in the last two decades. This article reviews some of the pertinent and representative applications of GIS, including the use of such systems and remote sensing for the mapping of Chagas disease and human helminthiases, the use of GIS in vaccine trials, and the global applications of GIS for health-information management, disease epidemiology, and pandemic planning. The future use of GIS as a decision-making tool and some barriers to the widespread implementation of such systems in developing settings are also discussed. PMID:20659391

  8. Space Station Information System integrated communications concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, J.; Bigham, J.; Whitelaw, V.; Marker, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a model for integrated communications within the Space Station Information System (SSIS). The SSIS is generally defined as the integrated set of space and ground information systems and networks which will provide required data services to the Space Station flight crew, ground operations personnel, and customer communities. This model is based on the International Standards Organization (ISO) layered model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). The requirements used to develop the model are presented, and the various elements of the model described.

  9. Paper-Based Survivorship Care Plans May be Less Helpful for Cancer Patients Who Search for Disease-Related Information on the Internet: Results of the Registrationsystem Oncological Gynecology (ROGY) Care Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ezendam, Nicole PM; Pijnenborg, Johanna MA; Boll, Dorry; Vos, Maria Caroline; Kruitwagen, Roy FPM; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine recommends Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) for all cancer survivors. However, it is unclear whether certain patient groups may or may not benefit from SCPs. Objective The aim was to assess whether the effects of an automatically generated paper SCP on patients’ satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, and health care utilization were moderated by disease-related Internet use. Methods Twelve hospitals were randomized to either SCP care or usual care in the pragmatic cluster randomized Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) Care trial. Newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients completed questionnaires after diagnosis (N=221; response: 74.7%, 221/296), 6 months (n=158), and 12 months (n=147), including patients’ satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, health care utilization (how many times patients visited a medical specialist or primary care physician about their cancer in the past 6 months), and disease-related Internet use (whether patients used the Internet to look for information about cancer). Results In total, 80 of 221 (36.2%) patients used the Internet to obtain disease-related information. Disease-related Internet use moderated the SCP care effect on the amount of information received about the disease (P=.03) and medical tests (P=.01), helpfulness of the information (P=.01), and how well patients understood their illness (P=.04). All stratified analyses were not statistically significant. However, it appeared that patients who did not seek disease-related information on the Internet in the SCP care arm reported receiving more information about their disease (mean 63.9, SD 20.1 vs mean 58.3, SD 23.7) and medical tests (mean 70.6, SD 23.5 vs mean 64.7, SD 24.9), finding the information more helpful (76.7, SD 22.9 vs mean 67.8, SD 27.2; scale 0-100), and understanding their illness better (mean 6.6, SD 3.0 vs mean 6.1, SD 3.2; scale 1-10) than

  10. Palliative medicine and medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, M; Amadori, D

    2001-04-01

    Traditionally, medical oncology and palliative care have been considered two distinct and separate disciplines, both as regards treatment objectives and delivery times. Palliative care in terminal stages, aimed exclusively at evaluating and improving quality of life, followed antitumor therapies, which concentrated solely on quantitative results (cure, prolongation of life, tumoral mass shrinkage). Over the years, more modern concepts have developed on the subject. Medical oncology, dealing with the skills and strategic co-ordination of oncologic interventions from primary prevention to terminal phases, should also include assessment and treatment of patients' subjective needs. Anticancer therapies should be evaluated in terms of both the quantitative and qualititative impact on patients' lives. Hence, the traditional view of palliative care has to be modified: it constitutes a philosophical and methodological approach to be adopted from the early phases of illness. It is not the evident cultural necessity of integrating medical oncology with palliative medicine that may be a matter of argument, but rather the organizational models needed to put this combined care into practice: should continuous care be guaranteed by a single figure, the medical oncologist, or rather by an interdisciplinary providers' team, including full-time doctors well-equipped for palliative care? In this paper the needs of cancer patients and the part that a complete oncologist should play to deal with such difficult and far-reaching problems are firstly described. Then, as mild provocation, data and critical considerations on the ever increasing needs of palliative care, the present shortcomings in quality of life and pain assessment and management by medical oncologists, and the uncertain efficacy of interventional programmes to change clinical practice are described. Finally, a model of therapeutic continuity is presented. which in our view is realistic and feasible: an Oncologic

  11. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  12. Response to "The Evidence Behind Integrating Palliative Care Into Oncology Practice"
.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    I am writing in response to "The Evidence Behind Integrating Palliative Care Into Oncology Practice" (Dailey, 2016). I have 16 years of oncology experience and work at the University Health Systems in San Antonio, Texas. Our facility's palliative care program holds the Advanced Certification awarded by the Joint Commission, and we have dedicated inpatient beds for palliative care patients. PMID:27668363

  13. Information Service System For Small Forestowners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaochen; Li, Yun

    Individual owned forests have boomed in the last decade in China. Hundreds of millions of private forest owners have emerged since years of afforestation practice and collective forest ownership reform. Most of those private forest owners are former peasants living in afforestation areas. They thirst for forestry information, such as technique knowledge, forestry policies, finance, marketing, etc. Unfortunately the ways they could get certain information are very limit. Before internet time, Local governments are the main channel they search helps for useful information and technique supports. State and local governments have paid much attention to provide necessary forestry technique supports to those small forest owners and provided varies training projects, issued official forestry information through their websites. While, as state government expands household contract system in the management of collective forestry land, the number of individual forest owners is bumping up in future 5 years. There is still a gap between supplying ability and requirement of forestry information. To construct an effective forestry information service system in next 3-5 year can bridge the gap. This paper discusses the framework of such an information service system.

  14. NASA metrology information system: A NEMS subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, E. S., Jr.; Kern, F. A.; Yow, R. P.; Peterson, E.

    1984-01-01

    the NASA Metrology Information Systems (NMIS) is being developed as a standardized tool in managing the NASA field Center's instrument calibration programs. This system, as defined by the NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop, will function as a subsystem of the newly developed NASA Equipment Management System (NEMS). The Metrology Information System is designed to utilize and update applicable NEMS data fields for controlled property and to function as a stand alone system for noncontrolled property. The NMIS provides automatic instrument calibration recall control, instrument historical performance data storage and analysis, calibration and repair labor and parts cost data, and instrument user and location data. Nineteen standardized reports were developed to analyze calibration system operations.

  15. Information Management System for Site Remediation Efforts.

    PubMed

    Laha; Mukherjee; Nebhrajani

    2000-05-01

    / Environmental regulatory agencies are responsible for protecting human health and the environment in their constituencies. Their responsibilities include the identification, evaluation, and cleanup of contaminated sites. Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) constitute a major source of subsurface and groundwater contamination. A significant portion of a regulatory body's efforts may be directed toward the management of UST-contaminated sites. In order to manage remedial sites effectively, vast quantities of information must be maintained, including analytical dataon chemical contaminants, remedial design features, and performance details. Currently, most regulatory agencies maintain such information manually. This makes it difficult to manage the data effectively. Some agencies have introduced automated record-keeping systems. However, the ad hoc approach in these endeavors makes it difficult to efficiently analyze, disseminate, and utilize the data. This paper identifies the information requirements for UST-contaminated site management at the Waste Cleanup Section of the Department of Environmental Resources Management in Dade County, Florida. It presents a viable design for an information management system to meet these requirements. The proposed solution is based on a back-end relational database management system with relevant tools for sophisticated data analysis and data mining. The database is designed with all tables in the third normal form to ensure data integrity, flexible access, and efficient query processing. In addition to all standard reports required by the agency, the system provides answers to ad hoc queries that are typically difficult to answer under the existing system. The database also serves as a repository of information for a decision support system to aid engineering design and risk analysis. The system may be integrated with a geographic information system for effective presentation and dissemination of spatial data.

  16. Why All the Fuss about Information Systems? or Information Systems as Golden Anchors in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorr, William; Hossler, Don

    2006-01-01

    The importance and attention given to information systems are relatively new phenomena in the history of higher education. This chapter documents the ascendancy of information systems in the scheme of institutional priorities and considers the strengths and weaknesses associated with vended and homegrown systems.

  17. The Arbo‑zoonet Information System.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Alessio; Di Sabatino, Daria; Blanda, Valeria; Cioci, Daniela; Conte, Annamaria; Bruno, Rossana; Sauro, Francesca; Calistri, Paolo; Savini, Lara

    2016-06-30

    The Arbo‑zoonet Information System has been developed as part of the 'International Network for Capacity Building for the Control of Emerging Viral Vector Borne Zoonotic Diseases (Arbo‑zoonet)' project. The project aims to create common knowledge, sharing data, expertise, experiences, and scientific information on West Nile Disease (WND), Crimean‑Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF), and Rift Valley fever (RVF). These arthropod‑borne diseases of domestic and wild animals can affect humans, posing great threat to public health. Since November 2011, when the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) has been discovered for the first time in Northern Europe, the Arbo‑zoonet Information System has been used in order to collect information on newly discovered disease and to manage the epidemic emergency. The system monitors the geographical distribution and epidemiological evolution of CCHF, RVF, and WND since 1946. More recently, it has also been deployed to monitor the SBV data. The Arbo‑zoonet Information System includes a web application for the management of the database in which data are stored and a WebGIS application to explore spatial disease distributions, facilitating the epidemiological analysis. The WebGIS application is an effective tool to show and share the information and to facilitate the exchange and dissemination of relevant data among project's participants.

  18. [Information system in the cardio polyclinic].

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, Marina; Zivković, Marija

    2014-03-01

    The cardiologic polyclinic information system ensures effective management of business processes in the polyclinic. Medical nurse provides health care to a patient with the support of the information system, which enables recording the patient's identity, admission, participation fee charges, billing for the services provided, patients' orders for noninvasive diagnostic methods, and implementation of diagnostic methods. The nurse enters patient's personal information at every work station, updates the existing records, and has an opportunity to add notes and insights to the results of patient's diagnostic tests and doctors' opinions for patients in the polyclinic. Additionally, the nurse records the services and supplies provided, and these entries are used for billing and service charges. This information is accessible at every work station to authorized persons exclusively. The implementation of the information system enables medical nurses working at the reception desk and in nurses' consulting room to record administrative data and data related to diagnostic analysis at the moment and at the place they happen. A personal password is required to access these data. In this way, the patient admission recording is facilitated, and in case the patient needs to be contacted, communication with him/her is improved, and finally, writing reports and data analysis are simplified. Apart from the advantages, there also are problems such as inadequate staff education and insufficient reliability of the information infrastructure, which if overloaded, can slow down the system, and this is time consuming for both health workers and patients.

  19. EOSDIS Science Data Information and Analysis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Ullman, R.; Pfister, R.

    2002-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Information Systems (ESDIS) Project is committed to operating and maintaining a quality Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) which enables research by Earth scientists and fosters data accessibility and application by the broader user community. With the recent launch of Aqua, a few hundred new datasets will be added to the current 1560 datasets available through EOSDIS. One of the core functions at ESDIS is to enable the processing of all science data collected from the various EOS missions including Terra and Aqua, upcoming ICESat and Aura and other missions. There are many EOS Science data producers, data users, planners and managers of available data systems and tools for managing EOS data. There are also many services available through EOSDIS including those that will help scientists process, archive and access data and information for research, applications, planning and management. This paper will describe system services, functionality, access requirements and procedures and the intended user community that work principally with EOSDIS data. It will address analysis tools, data population tools, specific EOSDIS data sets and metadata types, tools for metadata creation and management, tools for distribution, EOSDIS data formats and distribution techniques. New techniques are critical to the success of EOS data manipulation including data mining, intelligent data archiving, data fusion, agent technologies, visualization, and other advanced information system concepts. Data management is key to EOSDIS and our strategic focus areas look to EOSDIS evolution, external integration, data system development and relationship building with our user community.

  20. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  1. Embedded ubiquitous services on hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Takatoshi; Masuda, Yasushi; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Hori, Kenta; Ohboshi, Naoki; Takemura, Tadamasa; Chihara, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    A Hospital Information Systems (HIS) have turned a hospital into a gigantic computer with huge computational power, huge storage and wired/wireless local area network. On the other hand, a modern medical device, such as echograph, is a computer system with several functional units connected by an internal network named a bus. Therefore, we can embed such a medical device into the HIS by simply replacing the bus with the local area network. This paper designed and developed two embedded systems, a ubiquitous echograph system and a networked digital camera. Evaluations of the developed systems clearly show that the proposed approach, embedding existing clinical systems into HIS, drastically changes productivity in the clinical field. Once a clinical system becomes a pluggable unit for a gigantic computer system, HIS, the combination of multiple embedded systems with application software designed under deep consideration about clinical processes may lead to the emergence of disruptive innovation in the clinical field. PMID:22855229

  2. Complementarity of Historic Building Information Modelling and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Macher, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the potential of integrating both semantically rich models from Building Information Modelling (BIM) and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to build the detailed 3D historic model. BIM contributes to the creation of a digital representation having all physical and functional building characteristics in several dimensions, as e.g. XYZ (3D), time and non-architectural information that are necessary for construction and management of buildings. GIS has potential in handling and managing spatial data especially exploring spatial relationships and is widely used in urban modelling. However, when considering heritage modelling, the specificity of irregular historical components makes it problematic to create the enriched model according to its complex architectural elements obtained from point clouds. Therefore, some open issues limiting the historic building 3D modelling will be discussed in this paper: how to deal with the complex elements composing historic buildings in BIM and GIS environment, how to build the enriched historic model, and why to construct different levels of details? By solving these problems, conceptualization, documentation and analysis of enriched Historic Building Information Modelling are developed and compared to traditional 3D models aimed primarily for visualization.

  3. Adaptable Information Models in the Global Change Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, B.; Buddenberg, A.; Aulenbach, S.; Wolfe, R.; Goldstein, J.

    2014-12-01

    The US Global Change Research Program has sponsored the creation of the Global Change Information System () to provide a web based source of accessible, usable, and timely information about climate and global change for use by scientists, decision makers, and the public. The GCIS played multiple roles during the assembly and release of the Third National Climate Assessment. It provided human and programmable interfaces, relational and semantic representations of information, and discrete identifiers for various types of resources, which could then be manipulated by a distributed team with a wide range of specialties. The GCIS also served as a scalable backend for the web based version of the report. In this talk, we discuss the infrastructure decisions made during the design and deployment of the GCIS, as well as ongoing work to adapt to new types of information. Both a constrained relational database and an open ended triple store are used to ensure data integrity while maintaining fluidity. Using natural primary keys allows identifiers to propagate through both models. Changing identifiers are accomodated through fine grained auditing and explicit mappings to external lexicons. A practical RESTful API is used whose endpoints are also URIs in an ontology. Both the relational schema and the ontology are maleable, and stability is ensured through test driven development and continuous integration testing using modern open source techniques. Content is also validated through continuous testing techniques. A high degres of scalability is achieved through caching.

  4. Mental health surveillance and information systems.

    PubMed

    Gater, R; Chisholm, D; Dowrick, C

    2015-07-01

    Routine information systems for mental health in many Eastern Mediterranean Region countries are rudimentary or absent, making it difficult to understand the needs of local populations and to plan accordingly. Key components for mental health surveillance and information systems are: national commitment and leadership to ensure that relevant high quality information is collected and reported; a minimum data set of key mental health indicators; intersectoral collaboration with appropriate data sharing; routine data collection supplemented with periodic surveys; quality control and confidentiality; and technology and skills to support data collection, sharing and dissemination. Priority strategic interventions include: (1) periodically assessing and reporting the mental health resources and capacities available using standardized methodologies; (2) routine collection of information and reporting on service availability, coverage and continuity, for priority mental disorders disaggregated by age, sex and diagnosis; and (3) mandatory recording and reporting of suicides at the national level (using relevant ICD codes). PMID:26442892

  5. Central American information system for energy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, M.G.; Lyon, P.C.; Heskett, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    SICAPE (Sistema de Information Centroamericano para Planificacion Energetica) is an expandable information system designed for energy planning. Its objective is to satisfy ongoing information requirements by means of a menu driver operational environment. SICAPE is as easily used by the novice computer user as those with more experience. Moreover, the system is capable of evolving concurrently with future requirements of the individual country. The expansion is accomplished by menu restructuring as data and user requirements change. The new menu configurations require no programming effort. The use and modification of SICAPE are separate menu-driven processes that allow for rapid data query, minimal training, and effortless continued growth. SICAPE's data is organized by country or region. Information is available in the following areas: energy balance, macro economics, electricity generation capacity, and electricity and petroleum product pricing. (JF)

  6. Hazardous materials information hotline using System 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, J.E.; Fuchel, K.

    1984-04-30

    The Center for Assessment of Chemical and Physical Hazards (CACPH) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a computer hotline service for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. This service provides access to health and safety information for over 800 chemicals and hazardous materials. The data base uses System 2000 on a CDC 6600 and provides information on the chemical name and its synonyms, 17 categories of health and safety information, composition of chemical mixtures, categories of chemicals, use and hazards, and physical, chemical and toxicity attributes. In order to make this information available to people unfamiliar with System 2000, a user-friendly interface was developed using a Fortran PLEX Program. 1 reference, 1 figure.

  7. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2015-06-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations.

  8. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2015-06-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26065790

  9. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2016-03-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26851664

  10. Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

  11. Semantic visualization of oncology knowledge sources.

    PubMed

    Cole, W G; Sherertz, D D; Tuttle, M S; Hsu, G T; Fagan, L M; Carlson, R W

    1995-01-01

    Visualization of knowledge sources can have a substantial impact on the use of such sources at the point of care. This is because barriers to use at the point of care include hours required to master the electronic interfaces to those sources, and minutes required to master the electronic interfaces to those sources, and minutes required to accomplish any one retrieval. For a system to be used regularly at the point of care, therefore, it must be intuitive and fast. This paper presents a three dimensional interface to oncology knowledge sources that aims to meet this challenge.

  12. Information capacity of electronic vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubkin, Igor I.; Trishenkov, Mikhail A.

    1996-10-01

    The comparison of various electronic-optical vision systems has been conducted based on the criterion ultimate information capacity, C, limited by fluctuations of the flux of quanta. The information capacity of daylight, night, and thermal vision systems is determined first of all by the number of picture elements, M, in the optical system. Each element, under a sufficient level of irradiation, can transfer about one byte of information for the standard frame time and so C ≈ M bytes per frame. The value of the proportionality factor, one byte per picture element, is referred to systems of daylight and thermal vision, in which a photocharge in a unit cell of the imager is limited by storage capacity, and in general it varies within a small interval of 0.5 byte per frame for night vision systems to 2 bytes per frame for ideal thermal imagers. The ultimate specific information capacity, C ∗, of electronic vision systems under low irradiation levels rises with increasing density of optical channels until the number of the irradiance gradations that can be distinguished becomes less than two in each channel. In this case, the maximum value of C ∗ turns out to be proportional to the flux of quanta coming from an object under observation. Under a high level of irradiation, C ∗ is limited by difraction effects and amounts oto 1/ λ2 bytes/cm 2 frame.

  13. Air Force geographic information and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Henney, D.A.; Jansing, D.S.; Durfee, R.C.; Margle, S.M.; Till, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputer-based geographic information and analysis system (GIAS) was developed to assist Air Force planners with environmental analysis, natural resources management, and facility and land-use planning. The system processes raster image data, topological data structures, and geometric or vector data similar to that produced by computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) systems, integrating the data where appropriate. Data types included Landsat imagery, scanned images of base maps, digitized point and chain features, topographic elevation data, USGS stream course data, highway networks, railroad networks, and land use/land cover information from USGS interpreted aerial photography. The system is also being developed to provide an integrated display and analysis capability with base maps and facility data bases prepared on CADD systems. 3 refs.

  14. Security of information in IT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliczynska, Malgorzata

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to increase human awareness of the dangers connected with social engineering methods of obtaining information. The article demonstrates psychological and sociological methods of influencing people used in the attacks on IT systems. Little known techniques are presented about one of the greater threats that is electromagnetic emission or corona effect. Moreover, the work shows methods of protecting against this type of dangers. Also, in the paper one can find information on devices made according to the TEMPEST technology. The article not only discusses the methods of gathering information, but also instructs how to protect against its out-of-control loss.

  15. Pilot Performance With Predictive System Status Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    1997-01-01

    Research has shown a strong pilot preference for predictive information of aircraft system status in the flight deck. However, the benefits of predictive information have not been quantitatively demonstrated. The study described here attempted to identify and quantify these benefits if they existed. In this simulator experiment, three types of predictive information (none, whether a parameter was changing abnormally, and the time for a parameter to reach an alert range) and four initial times to an alert (1 minute, 5 minutes, 15 minutes, and ETA+ 45 minutes) were found to affect when subjects accomplished certain actions, such as accessing pertinent checklists, declaring emergencies, diverting, and calling the flight attendant and dispatch.

  16. Storage and distribution system for multimedia information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tokumichi

    1994-06-01

    Recent advances in technologies such as digital signal processing, LSI devices and storage media have led to an explosive growth in multimedia environment. Multimedia information services are expected to provide an information-oriented infrastructure which will integrate visual communication, broadcasting and computer services. International standardizations in video/audio coding accelerate permeation of these services into society. In this paper, from trends of R & D and international standardization in video coding techniques, an outline is given of a storage and distribution system for multimedia information, and a summary of the requirements of digital storage media.

  17. Online information retrieval systems and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Lialiou, Pascalina; Mantas, John

    2014-01-01

    The following paper presents a scientific contribution that explores the clinicians' use of online information retrieval systems for their clinical decision making. Particularly, the research focuses on the ability of doctors and nurses in seeking information through MEDLINE and ScienceDirect. The research process took place by an electronic form consisted of five clinical scenarios and an evaluation sheet. The results testify that only a small percent of clinicians use the recommended electronic bibliographic databasesand take the right clinical decision to the scenarios. Health professionals have to be educated in information searching and take advantage from the provided literature taking more useful and reliable answers on their clinical questions.

  18. Applied Information Systems Research Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The first Applied Information Systems Research Program (AISRP) Workshop provided the impetus for several groups involved in information systems to review current activities. The objectives of the workshop included: (1) to provide an open forum for interaction and discussion of information systems; (2) to promote understanding by initiating a dialogue with the intended benefactors of the program, the scientific user community, and discuss options for improving their support; (3) create an advocacy in having science users and investigators of the program meet together and establish the basis for direction and growth; and (4) support the future of the program by building collaborations and interaction to encourage an investigator working group approach for conducting the program.

  19. Critical issues in NASA information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has developed a globally-distributed complex of earth resources data bases since LANDSAT 1 was launched in 1972. NASA envisages considerable growth in the number, extent, and complexity of such data bases, due to the improvements expected in its remote sensing data rates, and the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of its scientific investigations. Work already has begun on information systems to support multidisciplinary research activities based on data acquired by the space station complex and other space-based and terrestrial sources. In response to a request from NASA's former Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications, the National Research Council convened a committee in June 1985 to identify the critical issues involving information systems support to space science and applications. The committee has suggested that OSSA address four major information systems issues; centralization of management functions, interoperability of user involvement in the planning and implementation of its programs, and technology.

  20. Collective systems:physical and information exergies.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D. III; Wilson, David Gerald

    2007-04-01

    Collective systems are typically defined as a group of agents (physical and/or cyber) that work together to produce a collective behavior with a value greater than the sum of the individual parts. This amplification or synergy can be harnessed by solving an inverse problem via an information-flow/communications grid: given a desired macroscopic/collective behavior find the required microscopic/individual behavior of each agent and the required communications grid. The goal of this report is to describe the fundamental nature of the Hamiltonian function in the design of collective systems (solve the inverse problem) and the connections between and values of physical and information exergies intrinsic to collective systems. In particular, physical and information exergies are shown to be equivalent based on thermodynamics and Hamiltonian mechanics.

  1. Information Processing in Decision-Making Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Matthijs; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Redish, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Decisions result from an interaction between multiple functional systems acting in parallel to process information in very different ways, each with strengths and weaknesses. In this review, the authors address three action-selection components of decision-making: The Pavlovian system releases an action from a limited repertoire of potential actions, such as approaching learned stimuli. Like the Pavlovian system, the habit system is computationally fast but, unlike the Pavlovian system permits arbitrary stimulus-action pairings. These associations are a “forward” mechanism; when a situation is recognized, the action is released. In contrast, the deliberative system is flexible but takes time to process. The deliberative system uses knowledge of the causal structure of the world to search into the future, planning actions to maximize expected rewards. Deliberation depends on the ability to imagine future possibilities, including novel situations, and it allows decisions to be taken without having previously experienced the options. Various anatomical structures have been identified that carry out the information processing of each of these systems: hippocampus constitutes a map of the world that can be used for searching/imagining the future; dorsal striatal neurons represent situation-action associations; and ventral striatum maintains value representations for all three systems. Each system presents vulnerabilities to pathologies that can manifest as psychiatric disorders. Understanding these systems and their relation to neuroanatomy opens up a deeper way to treat the structural problems underlying various disorders. PMID:22492194

  2. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    SciTech Connect

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer.

  3. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  4. Integration of health care information systems.

    PubMed

    Cuddeback, J K

    1993-03-01

    Information is at the core of an effective response to virtually all of the new demands that health care institutions will face in the 1990s. New information that is differently organized, more timely, and more conveniently available will facilitate new interactions within the institution. The consistent theme of the new systems requirements introduced by CQI is tighter connection to the processes of patient care and integration of systems and data as those processes cross traditional organizational boundaries. Even the billing requirements are pushing in the same direction. Ironically, the dinosaurs descended from billing systems do not even perform very well as billing systems today, because payers want more clinical detail, in addition to information at very specific points during the patient-care process. This new management model changes our view of our systems. Instead of systems designed to create an after-the-fact record of patient care, we need to think in terms of systems that are part of the patient-care process. This is essential for the continuous monitoring and--when the process gets out of control--rapid intervention that are an intrinsic part of the process in the CQI model. Of course, these systems also produce a complete record as a by-product, but that is not their primary objective. These demands will test the capacities of many of our existing systems and will require the replacement of others. Like all complex processes, however, systems development is performed one step at a time. Each step is taken within the context of an overall goal but also presents an opportunity for learning. CQI is a new management model, and the system requirements are far from clear. Hence, we are likely to need a little continuous improvement in the systems, too.

  5. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia. PMID:27296401

  6. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia.

  7. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented. PMID:12722411

  8. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7. PMID:9848400

  9. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7.

  10. Information storage capacity of discrete spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Beni

    2013-11-15

    Understanding the limits imposed on information storage capacity of physical systems is a problem of fundamental and practical importance which bridges physics and information science. There is a well-known upper bound on the amount of information that can be stored reliably in a given volume of discrete spin systems which are supported by gapped local Hamiltonians. However, all the previously known systems were far below this theoretical bound, and it remained open whether there exists a gapped spin system that saturates this bound. Here, we present a construction of spin systems which saturate this theoretical limit asymptotically by borrowing an idea from fractal properties arising in the Sierpinski triangle. Our construction provides not only the best classical error-correcting code which is physically realizable as the energy ground space of gapped frustration-free Hamiltonians, but also a new research avenue for correlated spin phases with fractal spin configurations. -- Highlights: •We propose a spin model with fractal ground states and study its coding properties. •We show that the model asymptotically saturates a theoretical limit on information storage capacity. •We discuss its relations to various theoretical physics problems.

  11. An Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxhold, William E.

    1991-03-01

    A nuts-and-bolts introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), this book outlines the basic concepts and diverse uses of this technology in a local government environment. Emphasizing the value of integrating data from various sources, the book provides a set of tools for improving the way public services are delivered, resources are managed, and policy decisions are made. Rather than stressing the computer technology that is so rapidly changing in the GIS industry, this book concentrates on the concepts upon which this technology is based: information systems design, computer-aided mapping, topological data structures, geographic base files, and land records systems. It also provides the latest information on the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER files and the Global Positioning Satellite System established by the U.S. Department of Defense. Special features include fourteen case studies, a chapter describing the enormous effort required to set up and manage a typical GIS project, and an appendix on who is using GIS technology and how it is being used. Whether they run the GIS or help run the government, readers of An Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems will learn efficient and effective methods for improving the impact that local government has on its citizens.

  12. Geographic Information Systems and Web Page Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The Facilities Engineering and Architectural Branch is responsible for the design and maintenance of buildings, laboratories, and civil structures. In order to improve efficiency and quality, the FEAB has dedicated itself to establishing a data infrastructure based on Geographic Information Systems, GIS. The value of GIS was explained in an article dating back to 1980 entitled "Need for a Multipurpose Cadastre" which stated, "There is a critical need for a better land-information system in the United States to improve land-conveyance procedures, furnish a basis for equitable taxation, and provide much-needed information for resource management and environmental planning." Scientists and engineers both point to GIS as the solution. What is GIS? According to most text books, Geographic Information Systems is a class of software that stores, manages, and analyzes mapable features on, above, or below the surface of the earth. GIS software is basically database management software to the management of spatial data and information. Simply put, Geographic Information Systems manage, analyze, chart, graph, and map spatial information. GIS can be broken down into two main categories, urban GIS and natural resource GIS. Further still, natural resource GIS can be broken down into six sub-categories, agriculture, forestry, wildlife, catchment management, archaeology, and geology/mining. Agriculture GIS has several applications, such as agricultural capability analysis, land conservation, market analysis, or whole farming planning. Forestry GIs can be used for timber assessment and management, harvest scheduling and planning, environmental impact assessment, and pest management. GIS when used in wildlife applications enables the user to assess and manage habitats, identify and track endangered and rare species, and monitor impact assessment.

  13. Analysis of methods. [information systems evolution environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J. (Editor); Ackley, Keith A.; Wells, M. Sue; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Decker, Louis P.; Toland, Joel A.; Crump, J. Wesley; Menzel, Christopher P.; Bodenmiller, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    Information is one of an organization's most important assets. For this reason the development and maintenance of an integrated information system environment is one of the most important functions within a large organization. The Integrated Information Systems Evolution Environment (IISEE) project has as one of its primary goals a computerized solution to the difficulties involved in the development of integrated information systems. To develop such an environment a thorough understanding of the enterprise's information needs and requirements is of paramount importance. This document is the current release of the research performed by the Integrated Development Support Environment (IDSE) Research Team in support of the IISEE project. Research indicates that an integral part of any information system environment would be multiple modeling methods to support the management of the organization's information. Automated tool support for these methods is necessary to facilitate their use in an integrated environment. An integrated environment makes it necessary to maintain an integrated database which contains the different kinds of models developed under the various methodologies. In addition, to speed the process of development of models, a procedure or technique is needed to allow automatic translation from one methodology's representation to another while maintaining the integrity of both. The purpose for the analysis of the modeling methods included in this document is to examine these methods with the goal being to include them in an integrated development support environment. To accomplish this and to develop a method for allowing intra-methodology and inter-methodology model element reuse, a thorough understanding of multiple modeling methodologies is necessary. Currently the IDSE Research Team is investigating the family of Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) DEFinition (IDEF) languages IDEF(0), IDEF(1), and IDEF(1x), as well as ENALIM, Entity

  14. 77 FR 18791 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NIST Associates Information System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NIST Associates Information System AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). ACTION: Notice... Associates Information System (NAIS) information collection instrument(s) are completed by incoming NAs....

  15. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  16. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  17. System Description and Status Report: California Education Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    The California Education Information System (CEIS) consists of two subsystems of computer programs designed to process business and pupil data for local school districts. Creating and maintaining records concerning the students in the schools, the pupil subsystem provides for a central repository of school district identification information and a…

  18. GROUNDWATER INFORMATION TRACKING SYSTEM/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Groundwater Information Tracking System with STATistical analysis capability (GRITS/STAT) is a tool designed to facilitate the storage, analysis, and reporting of data collected through groundwater monitoring programs at RCRA, CERCLA, and other regulated facilities an...

  19. An integrated hospital information system in Geneva.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, J R; Baud, R H; Hochstrasser, D; Ratib, O

    1990-01-01

    Since the initial design phase from 1971 to 1973, the DIOGENE hospital information system at the University Hospital of Geneva has been treated as a whole and has retained its architectural unity, despite the need for modification and extension over the years. In addition to having a centralized patient database with the mechanisms for data protection and recovery of a transaction-oriented system, the DIOGENE system has a centralized pool of operators who provide support and training to the users; a separate network of remote printers that provides a telex service between the hospital buildings, offices, medical departments, and wards; and a three-component structure that avoids barriers between administrative and medical applications. In 1973, after a 2-year design period, the project was approved and funded. The DIOGENE system has led to more efficient sharing of costly resources, more rapid performance of administrative tasks, and more comprehensive collection of information about the institution and its patients.

  20. Understanding and surviving the transition to value-based oncology.

    PubMed

    Cox, John V; Sprandio, John D; Barkley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This paper and the three presentations it supports are drawn from the theme of the 2012 Cancer Center Business Summit (CCBS): "Transitioning to Value-Based Oncology: Strategies to Survive and Thrive." The CCBS is a forum on oncology business innovation, and the principal question the organizers address each year is "What are the creative, innovative, and best business models and practices that are being conceived or piloted today that may provide a responsible and sustainable platform for the delivery of cancer care tomorrow?" At this moment in health care-when so much is in flux and new business models and solutions abound-the oncology sector has a solemn responsibility: to forge the business models and relationships that will help to define a new cancer care value proposition and a sustainable health care system of tomorrow for the benefit of the patients it serves to get it "right."