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Sample records for oncology nurse practitioner

  1. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  2. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs.

  3. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  4. Effect of an audit and feedback intervention on hospitalized oncology patients' perception of nurse practitioner care.

    PubMed

    Dulko, Dorothy; Mooney, Kathi

    2010-01-01

    Although patient satisfaction has been used traditionally as a measure of excellence, research has suggested that the perception of being well cared for is likely a more promising indicator of quality than satisfaction alone. Expectations, physical environment, communication, participation and involvement, technical competence, and the influence of healthcare organizations are factors that may impair patients' ability to distinguish nursing care from their overall healthcare experience. This study evaluated the effect of a nurse practitioner audit and feedback intervention on hospitalized patients' perception of care.

  5. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's a Nurse Practitioner? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Nurse Practitioner? ... United States. continue Should My Kids See a Nurse Practitioner? Pediatric NPs can deliver much of the ...

  6. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  7. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  8. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  9. Oncology Nursing and Shared Decision Making for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Mehmeti, Enisa; Spawn, Nadia; McCarter, Sarah P; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Garcia, Ima; Hartle, Lisa; Szubski, Katharine

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the contemporary role of the oncology nurse throughout the entire cancer shared decision-making (SDM) process. Study participants consisted of 30 nurses and nurse practitioners who are actively involved in direct care of patients with cancer in the inpatient or outpatient setting. The major themes that emerged from the content analysis are: oncology nurses have various roles at different time points and settings of cancer SDM processes; patient education, advocacy, and treatment side effects management are among the top nursing roles; oncology nurses value their participation in the cancer SDM process; oncology nurses believe they have a voice, but with various degrees of influence in actual treatment decisions; nurses' level of disease knowledge influences the degree of participation in cancer SDM; and the nursing role during cancer SDM can be complicated and requires flexibility.
.

  10. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  11. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  12. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  13. Creating Quality Online Materials for Specialty Nurse Practitioner Content: Filling a Need for the Graduate Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Klein, Sara Jo; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q

    2016-01-18

    Nurse practitioners are entering specialized areas of practice immediately after graduation from nurse practitioner (NP) education and certification and are finding employment in specialized areas such as oncology. Rapidly achieving a knowledge base in this highly specialized area of medicine coupled with the stress of the new nurse practitioner role can lead to a very difficult orientation and transition period. There are several methods to provide specialized education to NPs during their orientation period. Unfortunately, limitations such as a lack of motivated mentors, limited opportunities to practice the desired skill set or a lack of structure in regards to curriculum quality, and the learning needs of the new nurse hinder the NP's transition to practice. In response to either inadequate or non-standardized orientation to the specialty role of the oncology NP (ONP), a web-enhanced educational tool, funded through the National Cancer Institute, was developed for use in the USA: Oncology Nurse Practitioner Web Education Resource (ONc-PoWER). The development of ONc-PoWER was based upon essential education for NPs new to cancer care, adult learning theory, Bloom's Taxonomy, and foundations of quality online education. The five interactive web-based modules provide specialized education for the nurse practitioner new to oncology along with an on-site mentor to assist the NP in applying the course content to clinical practice.

  14. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  15. Development of a Family Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Januska, Charlotte; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The family nurse practitioner is a generalist who combines the basic skills of the pediatric and medical nurse practitioner with the orientation and approach of the public health nurse. This article outlines the task of preparing the family nurse practitioner. (Author)

  16. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  17. Tobacco control policies of oncology nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Sarna, Linda; Bialous, Stella Aguinaga

    2004-05-01

    Nurses, the largest group of health care professionals, and the policies of nursing organizations, have tremendous potential to promote health and tobacco control. Policies addressing tobacco use have been implemented by a variety of national and international nursing organizations. This article reviews existing tobacco control policies in oncology nursing organizations.

  18. The art of pediatric oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric oncology nursing practice must incorporate both the science and the art of the discipline to foster positive physical and psychosocial treatment outcomes for pediatric oncology patients, especially those outcomes related to their health-related quality of life. In this article, the art of nursing care is described within the context of scientifically based care, and the art of nursing practice is evident in the implementation of the scientific principles and standards for pediatric oncology nursing practice. The author proposes that the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice ought to be evident in care activities that the nurse provides within a therapeutic relationship that is steeped in nursing presence. Although the art of nursing care and the nature of an effective therapeutic relationship is tacit, valued knowledge among pediatric oncology nurses, as well as children and adolescents with cancer and their families, it is difficult to describe and challenging to quantify its effect on patient care outcomes. This article discusses the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice and its influence on treatment outcomes.

  19. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  20. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  1. The impact of genomics on oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Laura Curr; Linder, Lauri; Wu, Bohua; Eggert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, genetics and genomics information has led to exciting new diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment options in oncology practice. Profiling of cancers offers providers insight into treatment and prognostic factors. Germline testing provides an individual with information for surveillance or therapy that may help them prevent cancer in their lifetime and options for family members as yet untouched by malignancy. This offers a challenge for oncology nurses and other oncology health care providers to become comfortable with incorporating education about genetics/genomics into their clinical practice and patient education.

  2. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.166 Nurse practitioner services. (a) Definition of nurse practitioner services. Nurse practitioner services means services that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 440.166 Section...

  3. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  4. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  5. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  6. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  7. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  8. Promoting visibility for the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, M W

    1988-03-01

    In promoting greater public awareness of nurse practitioners' contributions to health care, two major strategies may be used. Creating broad-based visibility through the use of the basic media and marketing strategies, and utilizing individual client encounters to educate clients about the NP role are both effective. NPs should assume the initiative in seeking out opportunities to create positive images for the nurse practitioner.

  9. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  10. Nurse Practitioner Residency Programs: An Educational Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rys, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is in a state of crisis due to the lack of clinicians and increasing numbers of insured patients. Encouraging more students to go directly through school for their doctor of nursing practice degree and nurse practitioner (NP) certifications is one proposal to alleviate this crisis. However, this approach would deliver graduates with…

  11. Mapping the literature of nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Marie-Lise Antoun

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to identify core journals for the nurse practitioner specialty and to determine the extent of their indexing in bibliographic databases. Methods: As part of a larger project for mapping the literature of nursing, this study followed a common methodology based on citation analysis. Four journals designated by nurse practitioners as sources for their practice information were selected. All cited references were analyzed to determine format types and publication years. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to identify core journals. Nine bibliographic databases were searched to estimate the index coverage of the core titles. Results: The findings indicate that nurse practitioners rely primarily on journals (72.0%) followed by books (20.4%) for their professional knowledge. The majority of the identified core journals belong to non-nursing disciplines. This is reflected in the indexing coverage results: PubMed/MEDLINE more comprehensively indexes the core titles than CINAHL does. Conclusion: Nurse practitioners, as primary care providers, consult medical as well as nursing sources for their information. The implications of the citation analysis findings are significant for collection development librarians and indexing services. PMID:16710457

  12. Oncology Nurse Participation in Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Oncology nurses are playing an important role in the provision of survivorship care. Their involvement includes educating and coordinating multidiscipline teams to initiate and provide care to patients and families. Oncology nurses participate in this evolving model of care in a variety of ways. Using the IOM report recommendations for the provision of quality cancer care nurses provide care based on the specific characteristics of individual health care settings and the populations they serve. Evaluating the settings resources and goals for desired survivorship activities as part of the planning process can be the difference between success and failure. Collaborating with local and national resources for cancer survivors can help expand services for a setting in an efficient and cost effective manner. Models of care vary and resources and communication differs among cancer care settings. Survivorship care differs as a result, across different models. Nurses are key to the dissemination and coordination of survivorship activities and are critical in facilitating communication between health care providers, the patients and caregivers. Nurses have a significant role in the dissemination and coordination of information between the patient and other health care providers. Oncology care does not end when treatment ends. PMID:21112849

  13. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  14. The Oncology Nurse Prescribing: A Catalonian Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ortega, Paz; Cabrera-Jaime, Sandra; Estrada-Masllorens, Joan María

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study identifies the capability, knowledge, and satisfaction of oncology nurses in Spain after approval of the nurse prescribing law in 2006. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 140 nurses in three cancer centers in Catalonia, Spain, by using convenience sampling method. The principal variables of this study were nurse satisfaction, knowledge about what products nurses are allowed to prescribe, the nurses’ perception of their own prescribing ability, and their opinion on education and training needs with regard to the new approved law. The secondary variables included years of professional experience, place of work, and sociodemographic variables. Data were collected during a 3 months period by using a piloted 29-item self-assessment questionnaire. Results: Analyses of univariate and bivariate data showed that 82.2% of the nurses were aware of the approved law, but 94.2% indicated that they lack information about it. The mean satisfaction with the approval of the law was 6.64 ± 1.76 (numerical scale 0-10). In addition, 68.1% and 55.1% of the nurses were prepared to prescribe medical devices and drugs, respectively. To date, 61.1% of the nurses prescribe medical devices and 66% prescribe pharmacological products daily. Conclusions: Nurses expressed general satisfaction with the approval of the Law 29/2006. Nurses currently provide prescriptions, but widespread knowledge of the allowed prescriptions is lacking. PMID:27981146

  15. Social Interaction and Collaboration among Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn; McQuestion, Maurene

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration is a complex process influenced by organizational, professional, interpersonal, and personal factors. Research has demonstrated that collaboration may also be influenced by social factors. Nurses spend much of their time working in collaborative teams, yet little is known about how they socially interact in practice. This qualitative case study explored nurse perceptions of social interaction in relation to collaboration. Data were collected using telephone interviews and documentary reviews from fourteen oncology nurses employed at one cancer center in Canada. Thematic analysis revealed two themes: knowing you is trusting you and formal and informal opportunities. Nurses reported that social interaction meant getting to know someone personally as well as professionally. Social interaction was enacted inside of work during breaks/meals and outside of work at planned events. Social interaction was facilitated by having a long-term current and/or previous professional and personal relationship. The barriers to social interaction included a lack of time to get to know each other, workload issues, and poor interpersonal skills. Findings suggest that social interaction is an important factor in the collaborative relationship among oncology nurses. Nurse leaders need to promote social interaction opportunities and facilitate educational sessions to improve social and interpersonal skills.

  16. Puget sound oncology nursing education cooperative.

    PubMed

    Whipple, V T; Hogeland-Drummond, S; Purrier, M; Tofthagen, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Leadership & Professional Development feature is to provide readers with information, ideas, and exemplars of leadership competencies and professional roles in oncology nursing. Manuscripts submitted to the Leadership & Professional Development feature should be prepared according to the Information for Authors published in the Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) but limited to six to eight double-spaced typed pages. Submit two copies of the manuscript using IBM-compatible software along with a computer disk copy, or submit a copy of the manuscript as an e-mail attachment to Joan Such Lockhart, PhD, RN, CORLN, ONF Associate Editor, 1365 Simona Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15201; lockhart /duq.edu (e-mail). Manuscripts should be referenced and include tables, figures, or illustrations as appropriate. Ideas for possible manuscripts are welcome.

  17. Nurse Practitioners: A Decade of Change--Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultz, Harry A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    This is the third report of the findings of the longitudinal studies of nurse practitioners in the United States. It compares the characteristics and motivations of students in nurse practitioner programs in 1973 and 1980. (JOW)

  18. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  19. Exploring boundaries in pediatric oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Hartlage, Heather N

    2012-01-01

    Professional patient boundaries are an issue that is relevant across all realms of nursing practice. By nature, nurses are caring individuals. Therapeutic relationships are integral to the care of patients. When caring for patients on a daily basis for extended periods of time, it can be difficult for nurses to know when their care goes beyond professional boundaries. Providing care to patients in a pediatric oncology situation substantially increases this ethical dilemma. Length of stay, degree of crisis, embedded relationships, and emotional turmoil, along with the nurturing connection between adult and child, are among the reasons that boundaries are often blurred within the context of this sensitive patient population. This article explores the differences between nursing care, boundary crossings, and boundary violations. Strategies to evaluate nursing actions for appropriateness, along with reflection and development of individual boundaries, are offered. The information presented is relevant not only to nursing care of pediatric patients who are facing chronic or life-threatening conditions but also to each nurse-client relationship established in nursing practice.

  20. Nurse Practitioner Research: Some Neglected Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carolyn A.

    1975-01-01

    Two current evaluation projects of the Family Nurse Practitioner Training Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compare the utilization or quality of services provided by graduates practicing in different care settings. Clinical trial studies are essential first steps in assessing an innovation in health care delivery. (EA)

  1. Psychological Characteristics of the Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Martha Sturm

    1975-01-01

    A review of research pertaining to the nurse practitioner reveals most research to be of a descriptive nature. More theoretical research is needed--multi-criteria for measuring success and effectiveness, predictions from different personality and developmental theories, and more complex variables. (Author/EA)

  2. Recommendations for nurse practitioner residency programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine; Wipf, Joyce; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize critical aspects needed in the design and execution of new nurse practitioner (NP) residency programs. Subjects answered a series of questions on formulating residency programs and on key outcomes and cost measures related to their sustainability. These results serve as potential guideposts for future work in NP residency standardization and sustainability development.

  3. [Coordination in oncology, pivot nurses].

    PubMed

    Feld, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The function of the pivot nurse was created when the Cancer Plans were first introduced to improve patient management and has constantly developed since then. It is an essential role for the coordination of care and the different players involved along the patient's care pathway.

  4. Family nurse practitioners: "value add" in outpatient chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Lynn

    2012-12-01

    Nurse practitioners are capable leaders in primary care design as practices nationwide move to consider and adopt the patient-centered medical home. The chronic care model provides a structure to enhance the care of chronic illness. Nurse practitioners are instrumental in many areas of this model as both leaders and caregivers. Safety and quality are basic medical home goals; nurse practitioners enhance both. The addition of a nurse practitioner to a practice is an effective "value add" in every way.

  5. A nurse practitioner's experience in a post-graduate nurse practitioner urology fellowship.

    PubMed

    Comola, Gilbert M

    2014-01-01

    In 2012 the Division of Urologic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine developed and piloted a 12-month post-graduate nurse practitioner fellowship. The author completed this fellowship. This is a report on the experiences.

  6. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  7. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  8. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  9. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  10. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  11. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept.

  12. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  13. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  14. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  15. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  16. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  17. International cancer care: what is the role of oncology nursing?

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2010-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care continues to improve in the United States, but many developing countries carry a high cancer burden. With limited resources, nurses in such countries often are unable to improve cancer detection and treatment or relieve patient suffering. The Oncology Nursing Society has developed collaborative relationships with many international organizations to educate nurses around the world. Global partnerships have the potential to improve cancer care internationally and encourage more oncology nurses to use their expertise and become "citizens of the world."

  18. Academics and practitioners: nurses as intellectuals.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Colin A

    2002-06-01

    Academics and practitioners: nurses as intellectuals In the author's experience, nurse educators working in universities generally accept that they are 'academics', but dismiss suggestions that they are 'intellectuals' because they see it as a pretentious description referring to a small number of academics and aesthetes who inhabit a conceptual world beyond the imaginative capacity of most other people. This paper suggests that the concept of the 'intellectual', if not the word itself, be admitted into nursing discourse through the adoption of a non-élitist Gramscian understanding, similar to the more recently formulated conception of the reflective practitioner. According to the Italian Marxist scholar Antonio Gramsci, intellectuals are those people who develop ways in which to construct the conditions of their own existence, a possibility he believed was open to all. It is suggested that, from a Gramscian perspective, all nurses are intellectuals to varying degrees, and nurse educators should not only be nurturing their own intellectualism but also the potential for intellectualism as it exists within each individual. The ways in which this project are related to Habermasian critical theory are also briefly outlined.

  19. Transitioning from physician to nurse practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Monica; Olenick, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Foreign-educated physicians (FEPs), also known as “international medical graduates”, represent a rich source of potential primary-care providers. Despite their high level of medical knowledge and skills as well as ethnic and cultural diversity suited to meet the demands of patients, FEPs face many barriers in their attempt to continue to practice medicine in the USA. The program of study at Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences provides FEPs the opportunity to have an impact on health care and continue to practice medicine in the USA by becoming nurse practitioners. PMID:24489472

  20. Intervention patterns of pivot nurses in oncology.

    PubMed

    Skrutkowski, Myriam; Saucier, Andréanne; Ritchie, Judith A; Tran, Ngoc; Smith, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Pivot Nurse in Oncology (PNO) is a health care professional dedicated to providing patients with cancer and their families with continuing and consistent supportive care throughout the care trajectory. The purpose of this paper is to describe the variation and frequency of nursing interventions delivered by 12 PNOs at our health centre. An administrative analysis over a three-year period revealed a total of 43,906 interventions that were grouped into 10 categories. This analysis provided a description of the intervention frequency and these interventions were further collapsed into the four role functions of the PNO. Coordination/continuity of care and the assessment of needs and symptoms were identified as the dominant practice domains of the PNO in the professional cancer navigator role.

  1. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  2. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January 1, 1992...

  3. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  4. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  5. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January 1, 1992...

  6. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  7. [Development trends and future challenges in community nurse practitioner].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Min

    2012-04-01

    Community health nursing is an innovative aspect of healthcare that has grown in response to changing environmental and social structure changes into a worldwide movement. Taiwan's fast growing elderly population, improving health technologies and rising healthcare costs impact significantly upon the development and definition of the scope of practice for community health nurse nurses. This paper explores the innovative community care model development experiences of several countries and reviews the scope of practice of community health nurse practitioners in each. We further explore the current situation of nurse practitioners in Taiwan and suggest a future path for Taiwan community health nurse practitioners development and policymaking.

  8. The attitudes of GPs towards the nurse-practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Carr, J; Bethea, J; Hancock, B

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, nursing and health-care policy have promoted the advanced role of the nurse -- that of nurse practitioner. But such a role has not been integrated widely into the primary health-care team. This study investigates the knowledge and attitudes of GPs who do not employ nurse practitioners to find out what prevents them doing so. Ten GPs who did not already employ a nurse practitioner took part in semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that GPs, although confused about the role, were generally supportive of advanced nursing practice. Skills identified with the role were prescribing, disease diagnosis and minor-illness management. GPs thought that protocols and guidelines should govern practice, which differs fundamentally from the Royal College of Nursing definition. None of the GPs had encountered the role in primary care, and the lack of professional regulation and role definition for practice nurses and nurse practitioners who work in primary care may have affected GPs' perceptions.

  9. Anabolic steroids: implications for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D J; Shaw, E B

    1985-12-01

    Anabolic steroids are being used by athletes in a wide variety of sports in efforts to enhance their athletic performances. Steroid abuse is complex to evaluate due to the highly emotional subject matter and the limitations in researching anabolic steroids. This article has been written to heighten the practitioner's awareness of the problem of "sports doping" with anabolic steroids. It will provide practical information on possible consequences of steroid use and outline essential information to obtain through the history, physical exam and laboratory studies. Intervention strategies based on the three levels of prevention are described. With awareness of the problem of sports doping and knowledge of how to deal with it in primary care, the nurse practitioner can enhance the health care provided to aspiring athletes, athletes and retired athletes.

  10. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  11. Mary Grant Seacole: the first nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Messmer, P R; Parchment, Y

    1998-01-01

    Mary Grant Seacole was born in 1805, in Kingston, Jamaica, to a Jamaican doctress (medicine woman) and a Scottish naval officer. Later Seacole became a doctress, nursing British soldiers during epidemics of cholera, dysentery, and yellow fever in Jamaica, Cuba, and Panama. After refusals by both the British government and Florence Nightingale to be allowed to practice in Scutari, she financed her own way to the scene of the Crimean War and then established the British Hotel to serve both the comfort and medical needs of the wounded soldiers. At night, Seacole worked side by side with Nightingale at Scutari as a volunteer nurse. Seacole's fame grew proportionately after she was seen helping wounded soldiers on the battlefields even while the battles were still raging. Seacole died on May 14, 1881, in London. One hundred years later, many members of the London black community, a few members of the Nurses Association of Jamaica and the Friends of Mary Seacole marched to her grave, honoring her as one of the greatest women of all times. Mary Grant Seacole rose above the barriers of racial prejudice and demonstrated the determinism, compassion, and caring that have became the hallmark of nurse practitioners.

  12. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS)

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kazuko

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN), the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed. PMID:27981075

  13. Team Development Curriculum. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A curriculum consisting of four modules is presented to help nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians develop team practices and improve and increase the utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in primary care settings. The curriculum was prepared in 1981-1982 by the California Area Health Education Center…

  14. A Cooperative Education Program for Nurse Practitioners/Physician's Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowkes, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Traditionally, nurse practitioners and physician's assistants have been trained separately. In l977, the Family Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of California, Davis, and the Primary Care Associate Program at Stanford University merged clinical curricula. The cooperative program is described and its first year evaluated. (Author/JMD)

  15. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation.

  16. Occupational health nurse practitioners' roles in workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Donna

    2008-05-01

    The occupational health nurse practitioner is an integral part of coordinating care for the injured or ill worker. Decisions regarding whether an injury or illness is related to work are based on the practitioner's diagnosis and reports of the worker's progress. Understanding workers' compensation laws will enable the practitioner to provide efficient care for the worker.

  17. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or...

  18. Role of advanced paediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Egerton

    2012-07-01

    Children's attendance at emergency departments (EDs) is increasing every year, yet many children present with minor, self-limiting illnesses that could be managed at home. In light of Williams et al (2009) suggestion that healthcare professionals should improve the care available to patients at point of contact rather than try to change their health-seeking behaviours, this article describes how Tameside and Glossop Primary Care Trust has developed an advanced paediatric nurse practitioner (APNP) service in the ED to improve the care of children, and to reduce the number of admissions. The APNPs treat children in the ED then divert them to more appropriate services where support is given to the families to care for their children at home. The role contributes to meeting ED clinical quality indicators, frees up medical staff to deal with more seriously ill patients, and makes financial savings for the trust.

  19. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  20. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  3. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  4. Cooperative m-learning with nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Krauskopf, Patricia B; Gaylord, Nan M; Ward, Andrew; Huffstutler-Hawkins, Shelley; Goodwin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    New technologies give nurse academicians the opportunity to incorporate innovative teaching-learning strategies into the nursing curricula. Mobile technology for learning, or m-learning, has considerable potential for the nursing classroom but lacks sufficient empirical evidence to support its use. Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, the effect of using cooperative and interactive m-learning techniques in enhancing classroom and clinical learning was explored. The relationship between m-learning and students' learning styles was determined through a multimethod educational research study involving nurse practitioner students at two mid-Atlantic universities. During the 16-month period, nurse practitioner students and their faculty used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to participate in various m-learning activities. Findings from focus group and survey responses concluded that PDAs, specifically the Pocket PC, are useful reference tools in the clinical setting and that all students, regardless of learning style, benefited from using PDAs. It was also demonstrated that connecting students with classmates and other nurse practitioner students at distant universities created a cooperative learning community providing additional support and knowledge acquisition. The authors concluded that in order to successfully prepare nurse practitioner graduates with the skills necessary to function in the present and future health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must be creative and innovative, incorporating various revolutionary technologies into their nurse practitioner curricula.

  5. Continuing Education Needs of the Office Oncology Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Miriam P.

    1999-01-01

    A study determined the learning needs of office oncology nurses (n=290)as a critical first step in planning education programs. Participants ranked cancer-care topics similarly, regardless of age, background, or experience. The highest-ranked needs were clustered in the areas of cancer nursing practice, major cancers, and cancer treatment.…

  6. Interventions to manage compassion fatigue in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Nancy; Boyle, Deborah

    2009-04-01

    Work-related stress emanating from close interpersonal contact with patients with cancer and their families may result in physical, emotional, social, and spiritual adversity for oncology nurses. The negative result of this cumulative distress has historically been referred to as burnout. However, this dated term does not truly depict the result of the longitudinal workplace ramifications of sadness and despair on nursing staff. This article proposes that the phrase compassion fatigue replace the outdated notion of burnout in describing this phenomenon. Although not clearly and uniformly described in the literature, this occurrence is seen regularly in clinical practice and is conceptually known by nurses. Limited information is available about interventions to manage compassion fatigue; therefore, a national survey was conducted to identify resources available to oncology nurses to counter this phenomenon. Participants provided information about the availability of interventions in three major categories: on-site professional resources, educational programs, and specialized retreats. The availability of resources ranged from 0%-60%. Survey findings, along with narrative comments by respondents, provide relevant information for oncology nurses and their employers. By recognizing the perils of inattention to this frequent nursing phenomenon and the scope of existing workplace options that may augment nurse coping, oncology nurses' recognition and management of this entity may be enhanced. Organizations also may be encouraged to periodically inventory their support and lobby for workplace interventions to manage this critical work-related issue.

  7. Moral distress in nurses in oncology and haematology units.

    PubMed

    Lazzarin, Michela; Biondi, Andrea; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2012-03-01

    One of the difficulties nurses experience in clinical practice in relation to ethical issues in connection with young oncology patients is moral distress. In this descriptive correlational study, the Moral Distress Scale-Paediatric Version (MDS-PV) was translated from the original language and tested on a conventional sample of nurses working in paediatric oncology and haematology wards, in six north paediatric hospitals of Italy. 13.7% of the total respondents claimed that they had changed unit or hospital due to moral distress. The items with the highest mean intensity in the sample were almost all connected with medical and nursing competence and have considerably higher values than frequency. The instrument was found to be reliable. The results confirmed the validity of the MDS-PV (Cronbach's alpha = 0.959). This study represents the first small-scale attempt to validate MDS-PV for use in paediatric oncology-haematology nurses in Italy.

  8. Comparison of the work of a nurse practitioner with that of a general practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Christopher J.; Tettersell, Monica J.

    1988-01-01

    The work of a nurse practitioner was compared with that of a general practitioner. Both were equally available to the same patient population over the same period. The nurse practitioner saw a similar age and sex distribution of patients to the doctor but saw different types of problems. More of the patients she saw were for followup of chronic diseases, health advice and screening measures while fewer were acutely ill. The doctor dealt with four times as many patients. The nurse practitioner managed 78% of her consultations without referral to a doctor, and 89% without resorting to prescribed drugs. There was a high level of patient satisfaction with her work and 97% of the patients who saw the nurse would choose to consult her again. The role of the nurse practitioner in our practice has developed differently from a similar post in another setting, thus emphasizing the need for flexibility when defining the role. Nurse practitioners are a valuable extra resource for the development of new areas of care, rather than a cheaper substitute for a general practitioner. PMID:3255828

  9. Oncology nurses and indoor tanning: stylish or risky behavior?

    PubMed

    Leong, Christina Marie; Palos, Guadalupe R

    2014-06-01

    Being tan has become a social norm, and some nurses engage in that widely accepted lifestyle. Mounting evidence of the increased risk to melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers associated with indoor tanning supports the need for nurses to integrate skin cancer education, counseling, and referrals into routine practice. The current article presents an overview of the risks associated with indoor tanning, discusses its acceptance as a social norm, and offers strategies to support oncology nurses in changing the widespread trend.

  10. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  11. Improving oncology nurses' communication skills for difficult conversations.

    PubMed

    Baer, Linda; Weinstein, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    When oncology nurses have strong communication skills, they play a pivotal role in influencing patient satisfaction, adherence to plans of care, and overall clinical outcomes. However, research studies indicate that nurses tend to keep communication with patients and families at a superficial, nontherapeutic level. Processes for teaching goals-of-care communication skills and for implementing skills into clinical practice are not clearly defined. Nurses at a large comprehensive cancer center recognized the need for help with this skill set and sought out communication experts to assist in providing the needed education. An educational project was developed to improve therapeutic communication skills in oncology nurses during goals-of-care discussions and giving bad news. The program was tailored to nurses and social workers providing care to patients in a busy, urban, academic, outpatient oncology setting. Program topics included exploring the patient's world, eliciting hopes and concerns, and dealing with conflict about goals. Sharing and discussing specific difficult questions and scenarios were encouraged throughout the program. The program was well attended and well received by oncology nurses and social workers. Participants expressed interest in the continuation of communication programs to further enhance skills.

  12. The Business Management Preceptorship within the Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Donna Marie

    1998-01-01

    A nurse practitioner business preceptorship provides students with knowledge of basic business, accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and reimbursement. A lack of qualified faculty can be offset with adjunct business faculty. Selection of placement sites should provide challenging management experiences. (SK)

  13. A New Teacher in Medical Education: The Family Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Len Hughes; And Others

    1977-01-01

    At the University of California, Davis, family nurse practitioners who are faculty members in the Department of Family Practice have proven to be effective teachers of medical students and family practice residents. (Author/LBH)

  14. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  15. The role of resilience and mindful leadership in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Rishel, Cindy J

    2015-03-01

    When oncology nurses think of the word resilient, they often describe the term in the context of the patients and families they care for each day. When patients face a diagnosis of cancer, their lives have suddenly been altered in a frightening manner. Everything changes, and they must find a way to navigate the troubled waters ahead. 
.

  16. The role of the nurse practitioner in psychiatric/mental health nursing: exploring consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wortans, J; Happell, B; Johnstone, H

    2006-02-01

    There is a substantial body of literature pertaining to the role of the nurse practitioner. Research directed towards consumer satisfaction suggests that the care provided by nurse practitioners is perceived as at least equal to that provided by a medical practitioner. However, there is a paucity of literature examining the nurse practitioner role in the psychiatric/mental health field. An evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner demonstration model has recently been undertaken in the Crisis, Assessment and Treatment Team in Victoria, Australia. This article presents the findings of a qualitative, exploratory study. Individual interviews were conducted with consumers (n = 7) who had received care and treatment provided by the nurse practitioner candidate. Data analysis revealed two main themes: the quality of the service provided, and the unique role of the nurse. The findings supported the available literature in articulating the specific aspects of the nurse practitioner role that are favourably perceived by consumers of services. This study contributes to the limited body of knowledge in the psychiatric/mental health nursing field and specifically emphasizes the importance of the relationship between nurse practitioner and consumer in facilitating the provision of effective care and treatment.

  17. Empathy, Burnout, Demographic Variables and their Relationships in Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Taleghani, Fariba; Ashouri, Elaheh; Saburi, Morteza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Development of nurse–patient empathic communication in the oncology ward is of great importance for the patients to relieve their psychological stress, however, nursing care of cancer patients is accompanied with high stress and burnout. The present study aimed to define the level of empathy and its association with burnout and some demographic characteristics of oncology nurses. Materials and Methods: This descriptive/correlation study was conducted in a professional cancer treatment center in Isfahan. Through census sampling, 67 oncology nurses were selected. The data collection tools were Jefferson Scale of Nursing Empathy, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and demographic characteristics questionnaire. Results: Mean nurses’ empathy and overall burnout scores were 62.28 out of 100 and 38.8 out of 100, respectively. Score of empathy showed an inverse correlation with overall burnout score (r = −0.189, P = 0.04), depersonalization (r = −0.218, P = 0.02), and personal accomplishment (r = −0.265, P = 0.01). Multiple regression test was used to detect which dimension of burnout was a better predictor for the reduction of empathy score. Results showed that the best predictors were lack of personal accomplishment (P = 0.02), depersonalization (P = 0.04), and emotional exhaustion (P = 0.14), respectively. The most influential demographic factor on empathy was work experience (r = 0.304, P = 0.004). One-way analysis of variance showed that official staff had a higher empathy score (f = 2.39, P = 0.045) and their burnout was lower (f = 2.56, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Results showed a negative relationship between empathy and burnout in oncology nurses. Therefore, nursing support from managers to reduce burnout increases empathic behavior of nurses. PMID:28382057

  18. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug pain interventions in practice.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Bumpus, Molly; Wanta, Britt; Serlin, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Cancer pain management guidelines recommend nondrug interventions as adjuvants to analgesic medications. Although physicians typically are responsible for pharmacologic pain treatments, oncology staff nurses, who spend considerable time with patients, are largely responsible for identifying and implementing nondrug pain treatments. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug interventions, however, has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to describe oncology nurses' use of four nondrug interventions (music, guided imagery, relaxation, distraction) and to identify factors that influence their use in practice. A national sample of 724 oncology staff nurses completed a mailed survey regarding use of the nondrug interventions in practice, beliefs about the interventions, and demographic characteristics. The percentages of nurses who reported administering the strategies in practice at least sometimes were 54% for music, 40% for guided imagery, 82% for relaxation, and 80% for distraction. Use of each nondrug intervention was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about effectiveness of the intervention (e.g., perceived benefit; P<0.025) and a composite score on beliefs about support for carrying out the intervention (e.g., time; P<0.025). In addition, use of guided imagery was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about characteristics of patients who may benefit from the intervention (e.g., cognitive ability; P<0.05). Some nurse demographic, professional preparation, and practice environment characteristics also predicted use of individual nondrug interventions. Efforts to improve application of nondrug interventions should focus on innovative educational strategies, problem solving to secure support, and development and testing of new delivery methods that require less time from busy staff nurses.

  19. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  20. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  1. Non-nurse college graduates: a new resource for future nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Smith, P L; Shoffner, D H

    1991-01-01

    Non-nurse college graduates are admitted to the master's of science in nursing (MSN) degree program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK). Over the years, a majority of these non-traditional students have chosen the family nurse practitioner clinical concentration. The purpose of this study was to compare non-traditional and traditional family nurse practitioner (FNP) graduates in terms of academic and career-development characteristics. The study population consisted of all 91 (48 non-traditional and 43 traditional) UTK FNP graduates from 1981 to 1986. Little difference was found between the two groups' academic success in the program, self-perceptions of clinical preparedness for practice, current participation in the workforce, and self-perceptions of acceptance from administrators, other nurses and physicians in current work settings. Several notable differences between the two groups were found. The non-traditional FNP graduates had higher Graduate Record Examination (GRE) mean scores. More non-traditional than traditional FNP graduates were employed initially as nurse practitioners. Similarly, more non-traditional FNP graduates were currently employed as nurse practitioners in primary health care settings. Fewer non-traditional FNP graduates expressed satisfaction with their initial or current nursing positions. In regard to career goals, however, more of the non-traditional FNP graduates stated their intent was to be functioning as nurse practitioners in the future. Non-nurse college graduates with an interest in health care are a rich resource from which to recruit practicing nurse practitioners for the future.

  2. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  3. Occupational stress in oncology nurse caregiving: caring for ourselves.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Deborah A

    2015-10-01

    The emotional work of oncology nurses is complex. Inherent in our job is the requirement to be exquisitely empathic. We must look after, respond to, and support numerous patients and their families. Fully present, we repeatedly listen to stories of sadness and despair. Intermittently, we must either display or suppress our emotions. All of this takes place in an occupational environment where support for the nurses' emotional well-being is nonexistent. Lacking are opportunities to vent emotions, sufficient time to grieve patients' deaths, and resources to help nurses cope with work-related stress.

  4. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  5. Nurse practitioners: reevaluation of the need for and willingness to hire by nurse administrators, nurse practitioners, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Sabo, C E; Louis, M

    1996-08-01

    A survey of all nurse administrators and advanced practice nurses and a simple random sample survey of licensed physicians in Nevada were completed to reevaluate the perceived need for and willingness to hire nurse practitioners (NPs). The reevaluation was deemed necessary based on a similar survey that was completed by these authors in 1990. At that time significant questions were raised concerning the lack of understanding of the role of NPs in and their contribution to the health care team. The results of the study clearly indicate that the unique contributions of the NP to the health care team should be further publicized and clarified. In addition, for some physicians, a significant disparity continues to exist between the optimal, collaborative role and the more readily accepted dependent role of the NP. The family NP (FNP) continues to be the most desired specialty for those who hire NPs.

  6. Toward a narrative-centered curriculum for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Swenson, M M; Sims, S L

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses various alternative and nontraditional teaching strategies currently used in nurse practitioner curricula. These instructional strategies include case-study analysis (Ryan-Wenger & Lee, 1997) and problem-based learning/practice-based learning (Barrows, 1994). We suggest a further evolution, using principles and practices of a narrative pedagogy (Diekelmann, 1995) to allow convergence of these several narratively-focused inductive and interpretive approaches. This combination of ways of learning has led us toward a narrative-centered curriculum for family nurse practitioners (FNPs). Specific ways to use narrative in the FNP curriculum are presented to demonstrate how to take the curriculum beyond traditional ways of teaching and learning.

  7. Career trends of master's prepared family nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, J; Zoeller, L H; Talashek, M; Sullivan, J A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career trends of family nurse practitioner (FNP) graduates of one master's program. A questionnaire was mailed to all FNPs (N = 113) who graduated 1-11 years earlier; there was a response rate of 83%. The survey revealed that for both first and present jobs the majority were providing direct patient care as a primary care provider or practicing in an indirect role. The study findings indicate that for these graduates there is a long term commitment (demonstrated through continued employment) as well as opportunity to practice in the nurse practitioner role in a direct or indirect capacity.

  8. Exploring the mental health nurse practitioner scope of practice in youth early psychosis: an anecdotal account.

    PubMed

    Baker, Neville

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Victorian mental health nurse practitioner youth early psychosis, is a pioneer advance in clinical psychiatric/mental health nursing. This paper will explore and describe the scope of practice for the youth early psychosis mental health nurse practitioner candidate, and how the model is informed by relevant literature. The role description and context of the nurse practitioner candidate, which is synonymous with the role of the endorsed nurse practitioner, is described. Advanced practice nursing is discussed in terms of what the nurse practitioner literature says and contrasted with perceptions of a clinical nurse's everyday practice. Inherent challenges and issues are highlighted that need to sit in the background of any picture being painted of the mental health nurse practitioner role in Victoria into the future. An alternative perspective in the mental health care of the young person is proposed for the nurse practitioner scope of practice.

  9. Supporting staff nurses to train as community specialist district nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lorraine

    The removal of district nurses from the Nursing and Midwifery Council's recognised specialist practitioner list has resulted in many employers not commissioning district nurse courses and a lack of clarity about the skills required to be a team leader. This article discusses a practice development initiative to support learning through a practice based competency programme, to develop skills of local staff members.

  10. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  11. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  12. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  13. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  14. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  15. The Employment of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in U.S. Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vince; Gifford, David; Bourbonniere, Meg; Zinn, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing facilities with nurse practitioners or physician assistants (NPs or PAs) have been reported to provide better care to residents. Assuming that freestanding nursing homes in urban areas that employ these professionals are making an investment in medical infrastructure, we test the hypotheses that facilities in states with higher…

  16. A fellowship program preparing students for employment as new graduate nurses in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Amanda Bulette; Ghiloni, Carol A

    2009-01-01

    The Carol A. Ghiloni Oncology Fellowship Program (OFP), developed in 2001, provides an opportunity for student nurses between their junior and senior years in a baccalaureate program to learn about the role that nurses play in providing care to patients with cancer. To explore whether former fellows felt prepared for employment in oncology nursing after their fellowship experience, a focus group discussion with former student nurse oncology fellows was conducted. The discussion was audiotaped and transcribed. Content analysis of the transcripts revealed four key findings: OFP provides an opportunity to make informed career choices; OFP provides confidence-building experience; OFP provides an experience of preceptor role modeling; and OFP provides an opportunity to build relationships with staff, patients, and patients' families.

  17. A Descriptive Study of Military Nurse Practitioners’ Practice Settings and Clinical Practice Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    prevention, wellness promotion and patient education are not new concepts to nurses . For hundreds of years it has been the nurse who carried this...f orward. With this nursing experience and the acquisition of advanced education , the Nurse Practitioner is capable of providing a broad range of...Member . .. . ....... 43 Table 5 : Educational Background of Military Nurse Practitioners . ... ... ............ .. ..... . . . . . 45 Table 6

  18. Development of a Post-Master's Fellowship Program in Oncology Nursing Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegele, Dorothy; Henderson, Billie

    A one-year Post-Master's Fellowship in Oncology Nursing Education for nurse educators was developed through the collaboration of San Jose State University (California) and University of Alabama at Birmingham. The project was designed to: develop or update undergraduate/graduate oncology nursing programs; provide continuing education for practicing…

  19. Big Data and Pharmacovigilance: The Role of Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David G

    2016-10-01

    When new anticancer medications are approved, their safety profiles are often not fully understood. Oncology nurses have a responsibility to file reports of adverse drug events with safety registries such as MedWatch. If these registries receive prompt, complete, and accurate data from clinicians, agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will have a stronger ability to detect hazards and to issue safety recommendations.
.

  20. Professional development utilizing an oncology summer nursing internship.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Michelle; Hyman, Zena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an oncology student nursing internship on role socialization and professional self-concept. This mixed-methods study utilized a convergent parallel approach that incorporated a quasi-experimental and qualitative design. Data was collected through pre and post-survey and open-ended questions. Participants were 11 baccalaureate nursing students participating in a summer oncology student nursing internship between their junior and senior years. Investigators completed a content analysis of qualitative questionnaires resulted in categories of meaning, while the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to compare pre and post internship scores. Aggregated mean scores from all instruments showed an increase in professionalism, role socialization, and sense of belonging from pre to post-internship, although no differences were significant. Qualitative data showed participants refined their personal philosophy of nursing and solidified their commitment to the profession. Participants did indicate, however, that the internship, combined with weekly debriefing forums and conferences, proved to have a positive impact on the students' role socialization and sense of belonging. Despite quantitative results, there is a need for longitudinal research to confirm the effect of nursing student internships on the transition from student to professional.

  1. With nurse practitioners, who needs house officers?

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, S.; Barrett, S.; West, R.

    1995-01-01

    The boundaries between the work of doctors and that of nurses are changing, with nurses taking over important parts of junior hospital doctors' clinical work. In 1993 an exploratory study was carried out to identify the professional, educational, and management issues that such developments raise. Interviews were carried out with a range of stakeholders in three innovatory posts in which nurses were doing much of the clinical work of house officers. A complex picture of perceived benefits and problems for patients, junior doctors, and nurses emerged. These seemed to be associated with (a) the extent to which the contribution of professional nursing was valued in the new role and (b) the amount of clinical discretion which the postholder was allowed, this depending on the type of preparatory education provided and the management of the post. The study points to the need for strategic issues--such as the development of appropriate education and the professional recognition of these new clinical roles--to be addressed at a national and regional level. Images p312-a PMID:7633246

  2. Advanced nurse practitioner-led abdominal therapeutic paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Neal

    2017-03-10

    Liver disease is a common cause of death in England and Wales, and ascites is associated with a 50% mortality rate. Most patients who present with ascites have underlying liver cirrhosis, and often require therapeutic paracentesis for symptomatic relief. This article describes a competency framework that was developed to enable advanced nurse practitioners to perform therapeutic paracentesis in an ambulatory care unit.

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  4. Physician Assistant and Nurse Practitioner Prescribing: 1997-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Cipher, Daisha J.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) have licensure to practice in all states and they have prescriptive authority in 47 and 40 states, respectively. However, there have been no published studies from a national standpoint comparing urban and rural settings. Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the…

  5. An Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Student Experiences with Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heale, Roberta; Gorham, Robyn; Fournier, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Many nurse practitioner (NP) education programs have embraced distance education opportunities. A comparison of the experiences of NP students in one course delivered across nine sites was undertaken. Some sites offer traditional face-to-face sessions and others provide tutorials online. A survey of all the students evaluated barriers with respect…

  6. Defining the characteristics of the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Eve, Lisa

    The role of the nurse practitioner (NP) has recently expanded and is now recognised in a range of health care delivery settings including primary care. In addition, the last few years have seen a proliferation of use of the NP title. This article outlines a set of competencies that aim to bring clarity to the role.

  7. Utilization of Nurse Practitioners in Emergency Medical Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    study protocol as described in this report was submitted forSr- v’ew to nurse researchers familiar to and with the ANC and to e0mergency cure...Emergency Department Nurses’ Association in their published Core Curriculum. If the ENP concept is still considered a researchable question, recommend the...and Fo>, .. 1 c c Vi. , and Nurse Practitioners: A Survey of Baltimore Urban Residents. Vedical Care, 1979, 17:5 (May) 526-35 18. Waeckerle, J.F

  8. Where is family in the family nurse practitioner program? Results of a U.S. family nurse practitioner program survey.

    PubMed

    Nyirati, Christina M; Denham, Sharon A; Raffle, Holly; Ware, Lezlee

    2012-08-01

    Though recent progress in family nursing science can serve the family nurse practitioner (FNP) to intervene in the regulation of family health, whether those advances are taught to FNP students has been unclear. All 266 FNP programs in the United States were invited to participate in a survey to assess the content and clinical application of family nursing theories in the curriculum. The majority of FNP programs frame family as the context of care for the individual. Though FNP students receive a foundation in family nursing theory in core courses, they are not usually expected to use family assessment methods in clinical practicum courses or to plan interventions for the family as the unit of care. The authors challenge educators to consider family nursing science as an essential component of the FNP program as the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) evolves and becomes requisite for entry into advanced practice.

  9. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1) General...

  10. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1) General...

  11. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  12. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  13. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  14. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, M. Katherine; Stanley, Joan; Werner, Kathryn E.; Schmid, Emily

    This document presents the nurse practitioner primary care competencies that a national panel of representatives of nine national organizations of the five primary care nurse practitioner specialties--adult, family, gerontological, pediatric, and women's health--identified as necessary for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners. Section 1…

  15. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  16. e-Mentorship: Navigation strategy for promoting oncology nurse engagement in research.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise

    2015-01-01

    There is a high need for research mentorship among Canadian oncology nurses. E-mentorship is an effective vehicle for linking oncology nurses with experienced researchers across the country who can help them navigate the road and increase their engagement in research. E-mentorship also has the potential to build research capacity more broadly by strengthening national networks and connections among researchers, cancer care organizations and oncology nurses at the point of care. Innovative strategies are needed to more easily identify and recruit researchers who are committed to advancing oncology nursing practice through effective mentorship.

  17. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  18. Anti-mutagenicity Effects of Vitamin E on Oncology and Non-oncology Hospital Nurses by Ames Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Basiri, Majid; Rezazadeh, Hassan; Aswadi-Kermani, Iraj; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmud

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to determine the anti-mutagenic effects of Vitamin E among nurses of oncology and non-oncology hospitals exposed to chemotherapy drugs. Several studies have demonstrated that nurses occupationally exposes to cytostatic drugs. Material and Methods: A total of 138 female nurses from oncology and non-oncology hospitals participated in the study. All urine samples of nurses before and after Vitamin E consumption (200 mg/day) were evaluated by Ames Salmonella typhimorium mutagenicity test using histidine negative of tester strain TA100 with and without S-9mix. In all steps the collected urine samples extracts were prepared using amberlit XAD-2 resins and examined for mutagenicity activity. The data of Ames assay were analyzed with Anova one way and t-test statistical. Results: In the present study 25% of oncology nursing staff excrete carcinogenic compounds in their urine and oral consumption of Vitamin E for two weeks showed significant anti-mutagenic effects. Discussion: It was appeared that the urinary mutagenic activity will decrease by receiving Vitamin E. However, after Vitamin E consumption there was significantly depletion of urinary mutagenic activity in urine extracts among the exposed nursing personnel. Conclusion: We conclude that mild effects of Vitamin E against poor safety and significant adverse events among nurses handling cytotoxic drugs. There is, therefore, a need to improve the safety of the work environment, make available protective equipment, develop standard practice guidelines for oncology nurses and higher therapeutic doses of Vitamin E may be a promising compound for reducing mutagenic effects of anti-neoplastic drugs among oncology hospital nurses. PMID:24551674

  19. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  20. Nurse Practitioners’ Experience With Herbal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Nursing Services Approval Letter APPENDIX B: USUHS IRB Approval Letter APPENDIX C: Malcolm Grow IRB Approval Letter APPENDIX D: Research Study...schools are beginning to recognize the growing trend of patients resorting to complementary and non-traditional therapies, including the use of herbal...response to this growing trend has not been well documented. Because patients are at an increased risk for medication-herb interactions, adverse side

  1. A clinical internship model for the nurse practitioner programme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geraldine A; Fitzgerald, Les

    2008-11-01

    Nurse practitioners in Victoria, Australia must be prepared to Masters level before seeking nurse practitioner (NP) endorsement. The challenge from a university curriculum development perspective was to develop a programme that prepares the NP theoretically and clinically for their advanced practice role. The aim of this discussion paper is to outline how the internship model was developed and report the students' opinions on the model. The NP students complete the internship with a suitably qualified mentor which requires them to work together to develop and maintain a clinical learning plan, keep a log of the weekly meetings that shows how the objectives have been achieved. The internship includes advanced clinical assessment, prescribing, diagnostic and treatment skills and knowledge related to the nurse's specialty. The clinical assessment tool incorporates the National Competency Standards for the Nurse Practitioner and allows students and mentors to identify the level of practice and set clinical objectives. Students were asked to give feedback on the clinical internship and overall their comments were favourable, reporting benefits of a clinical mentor in their work and the clinical case presentations. The clinical internship allows the acquisition of knowledge and clinical skills in the clinical specialty with an expert clinical mentor in this innovative programme.

  2. Investigating the Nursing Practitioners Perspectives about Undergraduate Nursing Internship and Apprenticeship Courses: Is Renewing Required?

    PubMed Central

    Jamalmohammadi, Ali; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Shajari, Jila; Modares, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Nurses’ professional capacity plays an important role in the health system to achieve their mission. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses and possible ways of renewing the courses. This cross sectional survey was performed over 258 bachelors and practitioners of nursing graduates of Alborz University of medical sciences in the second half of 2012. Based on a multi-stage sampling schedule, questionnaires were used to collect data about the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses. There were 81.4% of females and 80.6%, 17.1% and 2.3% of organizational post of participants were nurse, head nurse and supervisor respectively. The occupied posts for 60.1%, 25.6% and 14.1% of subjects, respectively were nurse, head nurse and the supervisor. The application of the internship and apprenticeship courses in bachelor of nursing were in moderate to high levels. The highest percentages of responses for internship and apprenticeship training courses were in internal surgery nursing and special nursing and the minimum percentage of responses were for community hygiene nursing and mental health nursing. Due to observing moderate to high levels of fulfillment and lack of compliance of training courses, renewing to improve the quality and effectiveness of training programs are highly recommended. This can be effective in the future of nursing career and provide a practical training environment to achieve the goals of theoretical training and can lead nurses to become specialized in their field. PMID:23985116

  3. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  4. A comparative study of physicians' and nurses' conceptions of the role of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, G L; Parken-Harris, M; Kuhn, J C; Escovitz, G H

    1978-01-01

    Attempts to define the role of the nurse practitioner as a new health care provider raise questions about the traditional health care division of labor. In order to determine nurses' and physicians' conceptions of the NP's role, parallel surveys were conducted among registered nurses and primary care physicians in southeastern Pennsylvania (including Philadelphia). Respondents (679 nurses and 597 physicians) indicated their opinions on the issue of autonomy for NPs and on the issue of specific tasks appropriate to the NP's role. There were significant differences between nurses and physicians with respect to both of the issues under consideration, but there were also important differences within each of these groups. Nurses were more likely to assert that an NP might practice independently, and also had a higher conception of the NP's capabilities. Physicians who were interested in employing a nurse practitioner had opinions which were closest to those of nurses. These findings suggest that conflict between nurses and physicians might be minimal as long as the nurse practitioner movement remains relatively small, but that there may be latent conflict inherent in any large scale attempt to change the health care division of labor at the present time. PMID:717617

  5. A Study of Family Nurse Practitioners: Perceived Competencies and Some of Their Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Mary Jane Morrow

    This study was designed to determine the most common health needs and problems that family nurse practitioners (FNP) deal with, to determine how competent FNPs judge themselves to be, to determine what sources in nursing education FNPs judge to be most valuable, and to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the level of…

  6. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services. 405.2414 Section 405.2414 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414...

  7. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that explain NP role transition is important to inform the discipline how best to support NPs during entry into practice. PMID:25685113

  8. [Paediatric emergency: creation of an independent nurse practitioner consultation].

    PubMed

    Rey-Bellet Gasser, C; Gehri, M; Yersin, C

    2015-01-14

    Consultations in the Paediatric Emergency Department (PED) continue to climb regularly. Emergency Nurse Practitioner consultations have long been created in the English speaking countries. Since January 2013, an indepen- dent nurse consultation, under delegated medical responsibility, exists in the multidisciplinary PED of the Children's Hospital of Lausanne. The mean consultation time is the same as the medical consultation and the overall waiting time hasn't decreased yet. But a well definite working frame, a systematic approach, as well as the continual medical supervision possibility, make it a safe, efficient and appreciated consultation, by both patients and professionals.

  9. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-02-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that explain NP role transition is important to inform the discipline how best to support NPs during entry into practice.

  10. Family nurse practitioner clinical competencies in alcohol and substance use.

    PubMed

    Talashek, M L; Gerace, L M; Miller, A G; Lindsey, M

    1995-02-01

    The prevalence of substance use among patients presenting to primary health care settings mandates clinical competency in the area for nurse practitioners (NPs). An educational intervention with an evaluation component is described. The effect of incorporating substance use content into a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) curriculum was tested with a convenience sample of 16 FNP students and 8 practicing NPs. Students' knowledge increased significantly; however, differences in students' and practicing NPs' knowledge did not reach significance. Students' clinical competency increased significantly, as demonstrated by standardized patient clinical evaluations, and was significantly better than the practicing NPs in the skill domains of evaluation and record keeping. Educational intervention can improve NP identification of substance-abusing patients in primary health care settings.

  11. Differential Effectiveness of Coping in Managing Stress and Burnout in Oncology Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, James B., Jr.; Zevon, Michael A.

    High levels of stress experienced by primary care oncology nursing staff, and the competency impairment which results from such stress, has become a matter of much concern in health care settings. This study was conducted to identify the coping strategies employed by oncology nurses, and to relate these strategies to differential indices of stress…

  12. Online tutors as a solution to the shortage of nurse practitioner educators.

    PubMed

    Bruce, T Joyce

    2007-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty in Canada, particularly those qualified to teach students in nurse practitioner programs, has contributed to the use of adjunct teachers and online methodologies. The author discusses 1 nurse practitioner online program's use of nurse practitioners who work in full-time clinical roles as tutors. Learning through experience, the author shares how the online tutor role was developed to assist those who are considering using tutors as a program delivery strategy.

  13. Financial savvy: the value of business acumen in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Rishel, Cindy J

    2014-05-01

    Have you given serious thought to your individual ability to affect the high cost of health care? If so, you may have determined that the opportunity to have any meaningful effect on cost of services for patients with cancer is limited. You may believe that budgets are the responsibility of nursing leadership. Indeed, the development of the unit or department budget is an activity that many of us have no direct (or even indirect) role in completing. Once the budget is finalized, we are frequently given directives to control our costs and improve the financial bottom line for our employers. One could argue that this is a particularly difficult missive for oncology nurses with the soaring costs of chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs, the expenses incurred to provide supportive care needed by patients with cancer, and the need to provide services to the increasing number of cancer survivors.

  14. Oncology Nurse Retreat: A Strength-Based Approach to Self-Care and Personal Resilience
.

    PubMed

    Kuglin Jones, Ann

    2017-04-01

    Oncology nurses are at high risk for burnout and compassion fatigue. Self-care is an essential element that oncology nurses should incorporate into their daily lives but, instead, is often deprioritized. As a result, nurses do not seek out educational opportunities that focus on self-care or personal growth. This article describes the curriculum that was developed for an oncology nurse retreat that promoted self-care and building personal resilience using tools that could be adapted for use with patients and families.
.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine research initiatives in the Children's Oncology Group and the role of the pediatric oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Hawks, Ria

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has emerged as a new area of investigation in cancer research and treatment. CAM modalities are widely used, but little is known about their efficacy. The Children's Oncology Group has made a major commitment to CAM research in childhood and adolescent cancer, beginning with studies of CAM in the area of supportive care. Pediatric oncology nurses, as implementing clinicians and collaborating researchers, are critical to the success of these studies.

  16. Two approaches to bridging the knowledge-practice gap in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Peek, Gloanna J

    2015-01-01

    The field of oncology nursing is continually changing. New drugs to aid in the fight against cancer are being developed, complementary therapies to ease symptoms are gaining prominence, and survivorship care is becoming a welcome yet challenging area of subspecialty. For oncology nurses to provide quality care and to develop improved care delivery systems, they must not only have access to the most current knowledge in the field, but also be equipped with the skills necessary to integrate that knowledge into practice for the benefit of patients and families (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). The importance of nursing research and its relationship to the practice of oncology nursing cannot be minimized (Moore & Badger, 2014). Oncology nurse researchers advance knowledge and, consequently, improve the quality of care for patients with cancer and their families. For example, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) regularly surveys its membership to identify key areas of research focus that then guide the work of nurse investigators (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014; ONS Research Agenda Team, 2009). Unfortunately, the shortage of nurse scientists, particularly in oncology nursing, continues to increase as senior doctoral faculty reach retirement age and doctoral education program development remains stagnant (Glasgow & Dreher, 2010; LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). This shortage has and will continue to lead to gaps in the generation and implementation of new knowledge, negatively affecting the quality of patient care. As a result, an urgent need exists for innovative and quality doctoral educational programs to develop nurse scientists (Moore & Badger, 2014).

  17. Nurse practitioner succession planning: forward thinking or just an after-thought?

    PubMed

    Raftery, Chris

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines the concept of backfill and succession planning for an elite speciality nursing group, nurse practitioners. Nurse practitioners work in many public, private, inpatient and outpatient settings across the country. This discussion is relevant to all practicing nurse practitioners, but especially those with their own specific patient group. A nurse practitioner is an elite nursing specialist with specific speciality skills. While present, nurse practitioners can be most effective at holistically managing their patient group. However, if an endorsed nurse practitioner is no longer present, for a short or long interval, their specific skills and abilities cannot be easily substituted or replaced in the short term. This potential compromise in patient care can be detrimental to the developing reputation of the role of the nurse practitioner. In order to address the shortage of specifically skilled nurse practitioners across the country in all specialties, there is a need to forward plan and consider contingencies for succession in the event of short- or long-term absences from the clinical environment. Succession planning is the key to patient safety and the successful implementation of the role of the nurse practitioner.

  18. The use of a clinical resource nurse for newly graduated nurses in a pediatric oncology setting.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Lyndsay Jerusha; Bellamy-Stack, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The pediatric oncology nursing unit at the Alberta Children's Hospital experienced a large influx of new staff nurses between May 2008 and November 2008. There were 16 in total, and only a few had previous experience, whereas the majority was newly graduated nurses. As a solution to the high numbers of new staff nurses, the role of a Resource Nurse was developed as a temporary position to assist new staff nurses with their patient assignment, prioritize their day, and deal with complex patient procedures/treatments. Also, the Resource Nurse assisted all staff on the unit in dealing with increased patient acuity, chemotherapy administration, acuity issues, family teaching, and complicated family situations. A total of 55 prebooked shifts were scheduled from November 2008 to January 2009. A questionnaire was handed out to the staff nurses as a means to determine the effectiveness of having a Resource Nurse work on the unit. Twenty-three nurses responded by filling out the confidential questionnaire. Overall, respondents reported that the Resource Nurse was beneficial to their practice on the unit.

  19. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  20. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  3. Use of the isabel decision support system to improve diagnostic accuracy of pediatric nurse practitioner and family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    John, Rita Marie; Hall, Elizabeth; Bakken, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is a priority for healthcare today. Despite a large proportion of malpractice claims the result of diagnostic error, the use of diagnostic decision support to improve diagnostic accuracy has not been widely used among healthcare professionals. Moreover, while the use of diagnostic decision support has been studied in attending physicians, residents, medical students and advanced practice nurses, the use of decision support among Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) students has not been studied. The authors have implemented the Isabel diagnostic decision support system into the curriculum and are evaluating its impact. The goals of the evaluation study are to describe the diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) and Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) students over the course of their programs, to examine changes in diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels over the study period, and to evaluate differences between FNP and PNP students in diagnostic accuracy and self-reported confidence levels for pediatric cases. This paper summarizes establishment of the academic/industry collaboration, case generation, integration of Isabel into the curriculum, and evaluation design.

  4. Exercise in cancer care in Ireland: a survey of oncology nurses and physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, E; Kennedy, N

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the extent of exercise prescription within cancer care. This cross-sectional survey aims to identify Irish oncology nurses and physiotherapists' current knowledge and practice in prescribing exercise for cancer care and barriers to such prescription. An online survey was distributed to the Chartered Physiotherapists in Oncology and Palliative Care (n = 35) and the Irish Association for Nurses in Oncology (n = 170). The response rate was 74% (26/35) for physiotherapists and 34% (58/170) for oncology nurses. Three quarters of physiotherapists recommended/prescribed exercise with 81% or more of cancer patients in the past 6 months, with the exercises prescribed largely in line with current guidelines. Patients' family/friends advising rest was the most commonly reported exercise barrier by physiotherapists [89% (17/19)], with a lack of exercise guidelines for cancer patients being most problematic for oncology nurses [93% (50/54)]. Only 33% (18/54) of oncology nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge regarding exercise in cancer care. In conclusion, exercise prescription by physiotherapists largely corresponds with current guidelines. A minority of nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge of exercise for this population. Further formal postgraduate educational opportunities are needed for oncology nurses and physiotherapists in this area.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary and specialised ambulatory care: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Reid, Kim; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners delivering primary and specialised ambulatory care. Design A systematic review of randomised controlled trials reported since 1980. Data sources 10 electronic bibliographic databases, handsearches, contact with authors, bibliographies and websites. Included studies Randomised controlled trials that evaluated nurse practitioners in alternative and complementary ambulatory care roles and reported health system outcomes. Results 11 trials were included. In four trials of alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but seven patient outcomes favouring nurse practitioner care and in all but four health system outcomes, one favouring nurse practitioner care and three favouring physician care. In a meta-analysis of two studies (2689 patients) with minimal heterogeneity and high-quality evidence, nurse practitioner care resulted in lower mean health services costs per consultation (mean difference: −€6.41; 95% CI −€9.28 to −€3.55; p<0.0001) (2006 euros). In two trials of alternative provider specialised ambulatory care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but three patient outcomes and one health system outcome favouring nurse practitioner care. In five trials of complementary provider specialised ambulatory care roles, 16 patient/provider outcomes favouring nurse practitioner plus usual care, and 16 were equivalent. Two health system outcomes favoured nurse practitioner plus usual care, four favoured usual care and 14 were equivalent. Four studies of complementary specialised ambulatory care compared costs, but only one assessed costs and outcomes jointly. Conclusions Nurse practitioners in alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles have equivalent or better patient outcomes than comparators and are potentially cost-saving. Evidence for their cost-effectiveness in alternative provider

  6. Understanding the Challenges of Providing Holistic Oncology Nursing Care in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwozichi, Chinomso Ugochukwu; Ojewole, Foluso; Oluwatosin, Abimbola O.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the current state of cancer nursing and the various challenges that hinder the provision of effective nursing care to cancer patients in Nigeria. The major issue identified was the lack of specialized oncology nursing education which should actually form a basis for nurses to practice in the oncology setting. Other issues include poor facilities for oncology nursing care, lack of specific cancer centers resulting in the management of cancer patients in non-specialist wards. It is therefore recommended that solidified structure be put in place in order to establish and strengthen the nursing curriculum which has a strong potential for improving the knowledge and skills of nurses to care for people living with cancer in Nigeria. PMID:28217725

  7. In their own words: oncology nurses respond to patient requests for assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Matzo, M L; Schwarz, J K

    2001-05-01

    Little is currently known about the context, nature, or frequency of nurses' responses to patient requests for help in dying. Only two empirical studies have surveyed American nurses about their actual responses to such requests. In one of those studies, 441 New England oncology nurses described how often patients ask them for help in ending their lives and also indicated how often they participated in assisted suicide and patient-requested euthanasia. One hundred and ten of those 441 nurses wrote comments on their returned questionnaires. This article describes the content analysis of those comments. Those oncology nurses who wrote have much to say about caring for patients at the end of life.

  8. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    PubMed

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  9. The Development of an HIV Training Program for Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    McGee, Kara S; Relf, Michael; Harmon, James L

    2016-01-01

    Responding to a national need for a new workforce of HIV care providers as the first generation of providers decrease their practices or retire, the Duke University School of Nursing, with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration, developed and implemented a program to train nurse practitioners (NP) to assume the full spectrum of primary care services needed by people living with HIV infection and various co-morbidities. The 12-credit program includes course work in HIV-related epidemiology; pathogenesis; psychosocial, political, ethical, and legal issues; and pharmacology and clinical management. Students complete 392 hours of HIV-specific clinical practice in addition to clinical hours required of all NP students. The program is the only distance-based program of its kind in the United States. Online didactic instruction is complemented by campus-based sessions with interprofessional faculty. We describe the 5 overarching goals that frame the program, and challenges and progress toward achieving those goals.

  10. The application of qualitative research findings to oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Colleen Ann; Moules, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has established an ambitious research agenda and professional priorities based on a survey by LoBiondo-Wood et al. (2014). With the overall goal to "improve cancer care and the lives of individuals with cancer" (Moore & Badger, 2014, p. 93) through research activities, translating those research findings to direct clinical practice can be overwhelming. As clinicians, understanding how to critique research for quality prior to incorporating research findings into practice is important. The ultimate goal in this critique is to ensure that decisions made about patient care are based on strong evidence. However, the process for appraisal of qualitative research can be ambiguous and often contradictory as a result of the elusive aspect of quality in qualitative research methods (Seale, 1999). In addition, with more than 100 tools available to evaluate qualitative research studies (Higgins & Green, 2011), a lack of consensus exists on how to critically appraise research findings.

  11. For Elderly Needing Home Medical Care, Are Nurse Practitioners the Answer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Virginia Medical School's department of public health sciences. Nurse practitioners are nurses with advanced training. In some states, they can prescribe medicine and practice without direct supervision of a doctor the study authors noted. ...

  12. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  13. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into “value” is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) “Critical Reflective Inquiry” (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to “products” of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of “products” into “value” and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  14. The potential for nurse practitioners in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Fraser, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

  15. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  16. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners: rural-urban settings and reimbursement for services.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Hampton, M B

    1999-01-01

    Evidence based on productivity measures, salaries and costs of medical education indicates that physician assistants and nurse practitioners are cost-effective. Managed care suggests that health maintenance organizations (HMOs) would seek to utilize these professionals. Moreover, underserved rural areas would utilize physician assistants and nurse practitioners to provide access. This study examined the role of payment sources in the utilization of physician assistants and nurse practitioners using the 1994 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rural vs. urban results were compared. The study found that significant rural-urban differences exist in the relationships between payment sources and the utilization of physician assistants and nurse practitioners. The study also found that payment source affects varied for physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners who saw outpatients in hospital settings. Surprisingly, prepaid and HMO types of reimbursements are shown to have no relationship with physician assistant and nurse practitioner utilization, and this finding is the same for both rural and urban patient visits. After controlling for other influences, the study shows that physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners are each as likely as the other to be present at a rural managed care visit. However, physicians are much more likely than physician assistants and nurse practitioners to be present at an urban managed care visit.

  17. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  1. Nurse practitioner knowledge of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Cathy; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Lewin, Linda; Kilanowski, Jill

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the knowledge level of nurse practitioners regarding symptoms of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities. A total sample of 43 nurse practitioners from two professional nurse practitioner organizations was surveyed to assess child sexual abuse symptoms identification in intellectually disabled children using a revised edition of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Survey. Data collected showed nurse practitioners have deficits in identifying various parts of prepubescent female genitalia. The majority of nurse practitioners did not check genitalia in regular physical exams, did not feel competent to perform this type of evaluation, and were not aware of their professional organizations' position regarding checking for child sexual abuse. When assessing a child with an intellectual disability, nurse practitioners must accurately assess physical symptoms and behaviors that could have resulted from sexual abuse. Examining children for sexual abuse is a required duty of the nurse practitioner as evidenced by the position statements of the various professional organizations and nurse practitioners must be aware of their required scope of practice.

  2. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework.

  3. Adherence to Precautionary Guidelines for Compounding Antineoplastic Drugs: A Survey of Nurses and Pharmacy Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary guidelines detailing standards of practice and equipment to eliminate or minimize exposure to antineoplastic drugs during handling activities have been available for nearly three decades. To evaluate practices for compounding antineoplastic drugs, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing primarily oncology nurses, pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians. This national survey is the first in over 20 years to examine self-reported use of engineering, administrative, and work practice controls and PPE by pharmacy practitioners for minimizing exposure to antineoplastic drugs. The survey was completed by 241 nurses and 183 pharmacy practitioners who compounded antineoplastic drugs in the seven days prior to the survey. They reported: not always wearing two pairs of chemotherapy gloves (85%, 47%, respectively) or even a single pair (8%, 10%); not always using closed system drug-transfer devices (75%, 53%); not always wearing recommended gown (38%, 20%); I.V. lines sometimes/always primed with antineoplastic drug (19%, 30%); and not always using either a biological safety cabinet or isolator (9%, 15%). They also reported lack of: hazard awareness training (9%, 13%); safe handling procedures (20%, 11%); and medical surveillance programs (61%, 45%). Both employers and healthcare workers share responsibility for adhering to precautionary guidelines and other best practices. Employers can ensure that: workers are trained regularly; facility safe-handling procedures reflecting national guidelines are in place and support for their implementation is understood; engineering controls and PPE are available and workers know how to use them; and medical surveillance, exposure monitoring, and other administrative controls are in place. Workers can seek out training, understand and follow facility procedures, be role models for junior staff, ask questions, and report

  4. Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Calmelat, A

    1993-04-01

    The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness.

  5. Developing a strategic plan for a neonatal nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laurie A; Jones, Luann R

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have been in practice for over 3 decades. More recently, NNPs have begun to take ownership for building their group practice models. The purpose of this article is to present a detailed case study demonstrating how one NNP group used a 4-phase strategic planning process to turn a crisis into an opportunity. The article describes data obtained during the strategic planning process from an informal national survey of NNP managers that focused on key benchmarks, such as role definition, responsibilities, protected nonclinical time, NNP salary and benefits, and educational and professional development support. Using the strategic planning process, the group defined mutually agreed upon minimum safe staffing levels for NNPs, interns, residents and neonatologists in their setting. Based on the data generated, the group successfully justified additional NNP positions and organizational support for 10% protected nonclinical time. A sample operational budget, comparison of 3 staffing scenarios, and a timeline are also provided.

  6. A model of succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Sally; Procter, Nicholas; Deuter, Kate

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews current literature on succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners (NPs) and discusses a model of succession planning that is underpinned by principals of leadership development, workforce participation and client engagement. The paper identifies succession planning as a means of managing a present and future workforce, while simultaneously addressing individual and organizational learning and practice development needs. A discussion of the processes attendant upon sustainable succession planning - collegial support, career planning and development, information exchange, capacity building, and mentoring is framed within the potential interrelationships between existing NP, developing NP and service directors and/or team managers. Done effectively and in partnership with wider clinical services, succession planning has the potential to build NP leadership development and leadership transition more broadly within mental health services.

  7. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Satisfaction in Rural Settings.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A

    2016-01-29

    Rural primary care shortages may be alleviated if more nurse practitioners (NPs) practiced there. This study compares urban and rural primary care NPs (classified by practice location in urban, large rural, small rural, or isolated small rural areas) using descriptive analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of NPs. A higher share of rural NPs worked in states without physician oversight requirements, had a DEA (drug enforcement administration) number, hospital admitting privileges, and billed using their own provider identifier. Rural NPs more often reported they were fully using their NP skills, practicing to the fullest extent of the legal scope of practice, satisfied with their work, and planning to stay in their jobs. We found lower per capita NP supply in rural areas, but the proportion in primary care increased with rurality. To meet rural primary care needs, states should support rural NP practice, in concert with support for rural physician practice.

  8. Interpersonal styles of nurse practitioner students during simulated patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Miller, A M; Wilbur, J; Dedhiya, S; Talashek, M L; Mrtek, R

    1998-05-01

    Evaluation methods are needed to assess nurse practitioners' (NPs') interpersonal skills and provide students with systematic, qualitative feedback. The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics and styles of students' interpersonal behavior from patients' perspectives during simulated encounters. The 29-item Clinical Encounter Q-Set for NPs was generated pertaining to patients' perceptions of their interactions with NP students. Using Q-methodology, simulated patients (SPs) sorted the items immediately after each of their encounters with 45 NP students. Items were rank-ordered along a continuum, ranging from "most like my feelings regarding the encounter" to "least like my feelings." Three interpersonal styles were identified. "Nonjudgmental professionalism" characterized student behavior during the simulation portraying a patient with a sexually transmitted disease. "Competence/confidence" and "empathy/respect" were predominant styles exhibited during the hypertension simulation. The potential value of this method for teaching and evaluation is discussed.

  9. Nurse practitioners on the cutting edge of leadership.

    PubMed

    Kodiath, M F

    1995-01-01

    For the past 10 to 15 years nurse practitioners (NPs) have been pioneers in the development of their roles within the health care system. My journey over the past 8 years has been to develop an interdependent role as the co-founder of a chronic pain rehabilitation program. Now, I believe, it is no longer sufficient to be an effective pioneer. The pioneer stage is over. We need to stop practicing from an industrial paradigm that views leadership as great men and great women who have certain preferred traits influencing followers to do what leaders want (Rost, 1994). NPs need interdependent team-based practices with the patient as a team member. We need to experience influential relationships between leaders and collaborators intending real change for mutual purposes.

  10. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  11. Current Directions in Family Nurse Practitioner Curricula. Proceedings of a National Conference of Representatives from Family Nurse Practitioner Programs (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, January 29-31, 1976)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, C. Glenn, Jr., Ed.; Watkins, Julia D., Ed.

    The conference reported here was held for nurse faculty and physicians from twenty-five family nurse practitioner (FNP) programs based in twenty-one states to provide the participants with an opportunity to consider their common curriculum problems and successes in FNP education. The first half of this booklet contains five paper presentations…

  12. Addressing the Shortage of Geriatricians: What Medical Educators Can Learn From the Nurse Practitioner Training Model.

    PubMed

    Golden, Adam G; Silverman, Michael A; Issenberg, S Barry

    2015-09-01

    Physicians' career interest in geriatric medicine continues to wane at a time when the health care needs of older adults are increasing. Nurse practitioners have helped fill the U.S. physician gap by delivering outpatient care to older adults and can practice with full autonomy in many states. Nursing graduate school programs are preparing adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioners to successfully deliver outpatient care services using a model of training with fewer requirements that is more flexible and of shorter duration compared with the training model for geriatricians. Nurse practitioners can also obtain initial certification and recertification with less time commitment and at lower cost than geriatricians. Whether the outpatient care provided by nurse practitioners is comparable to the care provided by physicians remains a subject of debate. However, as nurse practitioners' scope of practice expands, the perception exists that the outpatient clinical roles of adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioners and geriatricians are similar. This raises questions about whether there are too many educational and certification requirements for geriatricians. The authors encourage medical educators to learn from the success of the nurse practitioner education model for training large numbers of primary care providers. They propose decreasing the duration of medical school and graduate medical education training for geriatricians and providing educational debt repayment programs as potential incentives to stimulate career interest in geriatric medicine.

  13. Training and Education in Practice Nursing: The Perspectives of the Practice Nurse, Employing General Practitioner and Family Health Service Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Karl; Lunt, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with 56 practice nurses, 29 general practitioners (GPs), 23 health administrators, and 1 government official revealed that nurses use a variety of education and training opportunities; GPs largely let nurses take responsibility for their continuing education. The informal nature of training opportunities and lack of funding were…

  14. Knowing the nurse practitioner: dominant discourses shaping our horizons.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Judy

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the various discourses, particularly the dominant instrumental and economic discourses that have brought the phenomena of the nurse practitioner (NP) into being. It is proposed that NPs have been constituted as an object of nature and therefore understood metaphorically as a tool or instrument within the health care system to be used efficiently and effectively. Heidegger's philosophical analysis of the question concerning technology is used to argue that our current ways of knowing the NP through these discourses, with their emphasis on calculative logic, have resulted from our modern view of the essence of technology. It is also argued that there is now a need to shape our horizons concerning the NP in new and different ways. There is a need to engage in dialogical forms of research in order to evoke the richness and depth of what it means to be an NP, that is, to reveal the other modes of expression by which we define ourselves, understand others and nursing.

  15. Oncology nurses' communication challenges with patients and families: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Shen, Megan Johnson; Pehrson, Cassandra; Zaider, Talia; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A; Parker, Patricia A; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions.

  16. Demystifying the role of nurse practitioners in hospice: nurse practitioners as an integral part of the hospice plan of care.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Beginning January 1, 2011, as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act healthcare-reform law that was signed in March 2010, Medicare requires that all patients entering their third or later hospice benefit period must have a face-to-face encounter with a hospice physician or nurse practitioner (NP) to validate hospice eligibility. Medicare has allowed NPs to function as a patient's hospice attending physician since 2003, but they may not certify or recertify a patient's terminal illness or function in the role of the hospice physician in the hospice interdisciplinary team. The allowance of Medicare for the NP to complete the hospice face-to-face encounter allows a greater role for a NP in the realm of hospice care.

  17. Self-determination, end-of-life decisions, and the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Nurse practitioners should be aware that societal changes could lead to their being asked to actively assist terminally ill patients who wish to end their lives, as opposed to their current supportive role in palliative care. With physician staff shortages and the need for nurse practitioners to fill the gaps, end-of-life responsibilities could be placed in the hands of nurse practitioners, rather than being reserved for physicians alone (Sagon, 2013). End-of-life matters raise uncertainties about the nurse practitioner role because it differs state by state, relates to ethics, reflects the religious beliefs of those involved, and concerns the conflict of nurses simultaneously caring for their patients while advocating for their right to self-determination in choosing to end their lives.

  18. Preparing Nursing Students for Interprofessional Practice: The Interdisciplinary Curriculum for Oncology Palliative Care Education.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Carla P; Head, Barbara A; Black, Karen; Singleton, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional educational experiences for baccalaureate nursing students are essential to prepare them for interprofessional communication, collaboration, and team work. Nurse educators are ideally positioned to develop and lead such initiatives. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of an interprofessional education (IPE) project involving students in nursing, medicine, social work, and chaplaincy. The Interdisciplinary Curriculum for Oncology Palliative Care Education project uses team-based palliative oncology education as the framework for teaching students interprofessional practice skills. The need for IPE is apparent, but there are very few comprehensive, successful projects for nurse educators to use as models. This article describes the development of the curriculum by the interprofessional faculty team. Issues encountered by nursing faculty members as they implemented the IPE experience are discussed. Solutions developed to address the issues and ongoing challenges are presented. This project can serve as a model of a successful IPE initiative involving nursing students.

  19. Central venous access devices: an investigation of oncology nurses' troubleshooting techniques.

    PubMed

    Mason, Tina M; Ferrall, Sheila M; Boyington, Alice R; Reich, Richard R

    2014-08-01

    Experienced oncology nurses use different troubleshooting techniques for clearing occluded central venous access devices (CVADs) with varying degrees of success. The purpose of this study was to explore troubleshooting techniques used for clearing occluded CVADs by experienced oncology RNs and identify the perceived effectiveness of each technique. An invitation for a web-based survey was sent to select RN members of the Oncology Nursing Society. All nurses (N = 224) reported asking patients to raise and/or move their arm. Most nurses asked patients to lie down, cough, and take deep breaths. Respondents considered instilling a thrombolytic agent to be the most effective technique. No associations were found between techniques and respondents' years in oncology nursing, work setting, certification, or academic degree. The findings contribute to knowledge about care of patients with occluded devices and will help formulate direction for additional investigation of CVADs. Establishing the appropriateness of practice-related troubleshooting techniques may eliminate unnecessary steps and save nursing time. Educating nurses on the topic will also help reduce techniques that are not expected to yield results or are contraindicated.

  20. The nurse practitioner and policy in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Janet C; Reed, Pamela G

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this column is the interface between policy and end-of-life care, particularly as provided by advanced nurse practitioners. The complexities of end-of-life along with barriers in practice can diminish quality of life for patients and their families. Changes in policy are needed to enable nurse practitioners their full scope of practice in a way that benefits patients and families at end-of-life. Three areas particularly relevant to policy for nursing practitioners and end-of-life care are addressed: scope of practice, reimbursement, and prescribing practices. Other recommendations for policy and end-of-life care are discussed.

  1. Creating a Healthy Practice Environment: A Call to Action for Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Lacovara, Jane E

    2015-09-01

    When nurse researcher Marlene Kramer published Reality Shock: Why Nurses Leave Nursing in 1974, her seminal work launched a national discussion related to the distress felt by many baccalaureate-prepared novice nurses about leaving the academic setting and transitioning to the clinical setting. In particular, Kramer (1974) highlighted conflict between the values these new nurses had been taught in school and the reality of practicing as a professional nurse in a clinical setting. For example, in an educational setting, nursing students may focus on one or two patients at a time, whereas in the clinical setting, nurses must practice simultaneously with multiple patients with varied and numerous health deficits. This conflict is felt acutely by novice and experienced oncology nurses who are tasked with providing quality physical care, as well as emotional care and support to patients with cancer and their families
.

  2. Knowledge Level on Administration of Chemotherapy through Peripheral and Central Venous Catheter among Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Özkaraman, Ayşe Özaydın; Uysal, Neşe; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Şeref, Ferhan Çetin; Elöz, Aygül

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge levels of oncology nurses about peripheral and central venous catheter during their chemotherapy administration. Methods: Data collection of this descriptive study was started on April 15, 2015–July 15, 2015. The data presented in this summary belong to 165 nurses. Data were collected with data collection form including questions related to sociodemographic qualifications and knowledge levels of nurses. Data collection forms were E-mailed to the members of Turkish Oncology Nursing Society. Data presented with numbers, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. Results: The mean age of nurses was 33.60 ± 7.34 years and mean duration for oncology nursing experience was 2.65 ± 0.91 years. Nurses had correct information about the importance of selecting peripheral venous catheter and choosing the placement area for chemotherapy administration (63.6%), control of catheter before the administration (93.9%), influence of chemotherapeutic agent on length of catheter (40.6%), and management of extravasation (75.7%). Nurses also had correct information about the first use of port catheter (67.3%) and checking the catheter whether it is working properly or not (75.8%). Conclusions: In General, nurses’ level of knowledge related to catheter is 50% and higher. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of nurses about evidence-based information for catheter care as a step to safe chemotherapy practice. PMID:28217732

  3. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  4. Canada's First Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic: A Case Study in Healthcare Innovation.

    PubMed

    Heale, Roberta; Butcher, Marilyn

    2010-09-01

    Canada's first nurse practitioner-led clinic opened in 2007 after a period of intense lobbying. The development of this clinic has received a great deal of attention in the nursing world and among the general public, but the factors that enabled it have not been examined. The antecedents outlined in healthcare innovation concept analysis - including leadership, financial considerations, idea generation, teamwork, culture and demand - provide a framework for examination of the campaign for the nurse practitioner-led clinic. This review demonstrates the complex interplay of factors that drive healthcare innovation and expands understanding of the leadership and change competencies of the advanced practice nurse.

  5. Clients' understanding of the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Jane; Allnutt, Nissa; McMaster, Rose; O'Connell, Jane; Middleton, Sandy; Hillege, Sharon; Della, Phillip R; Gardner, Glenn E; Gardner, Anne

    2010-03-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have an emerging role in the Australian health care system. However, there remains a dearth of data about public understanding of the NP role. The aim of this study was to evaluate clients' understanding of the role of the NP and their satisfaction with education received, quality of care and NP knowledge and skill. All authorised NPs working in a designated NP position in Western Australia and those working in three area health services in New South Wales were invited to recruit five consecutive clients to complete the self-administered survey. Thirty-two NPs (NP response rate 93%) recruited 129 clients (client response rate 90%). Two-thirds of clients (63%) were aware they were consulting an NP. The majority rated the following NP-related outcomes as 'excellent' or 'very good': education provided (89%); quality of care (95%); and knowledge and skill (93%). Less than half reported an understanding that NPs could prescribe medications (40.5%) or interpret X-rays (33.6%). Clients of NPs practising in a rural or remote setting were more likely than those in an urban setting to have previously consulted an NP (P = 0.005), and where applicable would to prefer to see an NP rather than a doctor (P = 0.022). Successful implementation and expansion of the NP role requires NP visibility in the community. Despite high levels of satisfaction, more awareness of the scope of the NP role is required.

  6. Methamphetamine use among suburban women: Implications for nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Bairan, Annette; Boeri, Miriam; Morian, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with more effective strategies to diagnose methamphetamine (MA) use and assess healthcare needs of MA-using women. Data Sources The researchers collected data from 65 suburban women who were MA users living in the suburbs of a large southeastern city in the US. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups examining their life history, drug history, risk behaviors, and access to healthcare. The qualitative findings are examined here. Conclusions Three main themes emerged from the data: 1) gendered stigmatization of MA use; 2) MA related health risk behaviors; and 3) barriers to health and social services, which resulted in a domino effect that led to further life and health complications. When these factors are not effectively addressed, the result is more serious health problems for the women and their children. Implications for Practice This article offers awareness and assessment tools to provide NPs adequate knowledge about the factors associated with MA use in order to treat patients holistically. NPs are strategically positioned to effectively assess, diagnose, treat, and provide linkage to health and social services, especially for suburban females who are a hidden population of drug users. PMID:24510626

  7. Trends in State Regulation of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants, 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Gadbois, Emily A.; Miller, Edward Alan; Tyler, Denise; Intrator, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners and physician assistants can alleviate some of the primary care shortage facing the United States, but their scope-of-practice is limited by state regulation. This study reports both cross-sectional and longitudinal trends in state scope-of-practice regulations for nurse practitioners and physician assistants over a 10-year period. Regulations from 2001 to 2010 were compiled and described with respect to entry-to-practice standards, physician involvement in treatment/diagnosis, prescriptive authority, and controlled substances. Findings indicate that most states loosened regulations, granting greater autonomy to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, particularly with respect to prescriptive authority and physician involvement in treatment and diagnosis. Many states also increased barriers to entry, requiring high levels of education before entering practice. Knowledge of state trends in nurse practitioner and physician assistant regulation should inform current efforts to standardize scope-of-practice nationally. PMID:25542195

  8. Theoretical links supporting the use of problem-based learning in the education of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Chikotas, Noreen Elaine

    2008-01-01

    The need to evaluate current strategies in educating the advanced practice nurse, specifically the nurse practitioner, is becoming more and more imperative due to the ever-changing health care environment. This article addresses the role of problem-based learning (PBL) as an instructional strategy in educating and preparing the nurse practitioner for future practice.Two theoretical frameworks supporting PBL, andragogy and constructivism, are presented as important to the use of PBL in the education of the nurse practitioner.

  9. Best practice in nurse-led chemotherapy review: a position statement from the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society

    PubMed Central

    Lennan, E; Vidall, C; Roe, H; Jones, P; Smith, J; Farrell, C

    2012-01-01

    This position statement has been formulated by nurses from the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society (UKONS) to provide guidance on the provision of nurse-led chemotherapy review clinics for adult patients. For the purposes of this statement, a nurse-led chemotherapy clinic is defined as one that conducts formal review (in a consultation room) before the decision to proceed and prescribe the next cycle of chemotherapy. This statement does not address the toxicity checks that take place immediately prior to the administration of chemotherapy, although many of the same principles will apply to both settings. PMID:22879834

  10. Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, and Certified Nurse-Midwives: A Policy Analysis. Health Technology Case Study 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This case study was conducted to analyze the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners (NPs), physicians' assistants (PAs), and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) by examining (1) the contributions of each group in meeting health-care needs; (2) the effect of changing the method of payment for their services on the health-care delivery system; and…

  11. Responding to Challenging Interactions With Families: A Training Module for Inpatient Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Zaider, Talia I.; Banerjee, Smita C.; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Pehrson, Cassandra; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sustaining the well-being of the caregiving family is a critical agenda in cancer care. In the multidisciplinary team, nurses often serve as a bridge between the family and oncology team. Evidence suggests that dealing with difficult family dynamics is a common source of stress for oncology nurses, yet nurses typically receive very little guidance on how to achieve an effective partnership with families under these circumstances. We report on the application and preliminary evaluation of a new training module for improving nurses’ skills in responding collaborative to challenging family situations. Method Training was delivered to 282 inpatient oncology nurses at a comprehensive cancer center over 2 years. Posttraining surveys measured perceived changes in confidence working with families, as well as the utility and relevance of this training. A 6-month follow-up survey measured continued use of skills. Results Of the nurses, 75%–90% reported that the skills learned were useful and relevant to their setting. Retrospective pre–post ratings suggested increased confidence in managing stressful encounters with families. Discussion Further investigation is needed to observe how nurses transport these skills into their practice settings and to understand the role of the nurse-as-family champion within the larger multidisciplinary team. PMID:27632541

  12. Perceptions of a Primary Nursing Care Model in a Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Unit.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Katie; Pinner, Kerri; Murphy, Katie; Belderson, Kristin M

    2016-02-22

    The primary nursing care model optimizes relationship-based care. Despite using a primary nursing model on a pediatric hematology/oncology inpatient unit, it was hypothesized patients and nurses were dissatisfied with the structure of primary care teams and inconsistency of primary assignments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient/family and nurse perceptions of our current care model through assessing gaps in its operationalization and satisfaction. This study used a descriptive cross-sectional design featuring patient/family and nurse surveys. Of the 59 patient/family respondents, 93.2% prefer to have a primary nurse care for them and 85% are satisfied with how often they are assigned a primary care team member. Similarly, 63% of the 57 nurse respondents are satisfied with the current implementation of our primary nursing model and 61% state the model reflects good continuity of care. Yet 80.7% of nurses believe safety would improve for a patient whose nurse works shifts consecutively even if not a primary nurse. Overall, patients, families, and nurses value care continuity and meaningful nurse-patient relationships, which is fundamental to primary nursing.

  13. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants in physician offices.

    PubMed

    Park, Melissa; Cherry, Donald; Decker, Sandra L

    2011-08-01

    The expansion of health insurance coverage through health care reform, along with the aging of the population, are expected to strain the capacity for providing health care. Projections of the future physician workforce predict declines in the supply of physicians and decreasing physician work hours for primary care. An expansion of care delivered by nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), and physician assistants (PAs) is often cited as a solution to the predicted surge in demand for health care services and calls for an examination of current reliance on these providers. Using a nationally based physician survey, we have described the employment of NPs, CNMs, and PAs among office-based physicians by selected physician and practice characteristics.

  14. [Standardization of activities in an oncology surgical center according to nursing intervention classification].

    PubMed

    Possari, João Francisco; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Kurcgant, Paulina

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken in a surgical center specializing in oncology, and it aimed to identify nursing activities performed during the perioperative period and to classify and validate intervention activities according to the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). A survey of activities was conducted using records and by direct observation of nursing care across four shifts. Activities were classified as NIC nursing interventions using the cross-mapping technique. The list of interventions was validated by nursing professionals in workshops. Forty-nine interventions were identified: 34 of direct care and 15 of indirect care. Identifying nursing interventions facilitates measuring the time spent in their execution, which is a fundamental variable in the quantification and qualification of nurses' workloads.

  15. Does Contact by a Family Nurse Practitioner Decrease Early School Absence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Jill; Price, Marva; Kotch, Jonathan; Willis, Stephanie; Fisher, Michael; Silva, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic early school absence (preschool through third grade) is associated with school failure. The presence of school nurses may lead to fewer absences, and nurse practitioners in school-based health centers (SBHCs) can facilitate a healthier population resulting in improved attendance. Efforts to get students back to school are unexplored in…

  16. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  17. Assessing the need for family nurse practitioners--the Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Graham, M V; Pierce, P M

    1989-01-01

    This article presents results of a descriptive study designed to assess the need for Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) in Florida. The need for FNPs was examined within the context of the current crisis in access to health care in the United States and in Florida, where unique features of the state's population and economy combined to create inequities in the health care system. Data were also collected related to the number of primary care agencies already employing nurse practitioners, the educational preparation of these nurses, and the likelihood of agency nurses enrolling in an FNP program if such a program were available. A ten-item questionnaire was mailed to nursing service administrators at 330 health care agencies involved in the delivery of primary care. Ninety-seven questionnaires were returned. Results from the study indicated that the agencies will require increased numbers of primary care providers in the next 5 years. Further, a minority of nurse practitioners are prepared at the Master's level in the surveyed agencies, suggesting a need for increased educational opportunities for nurses if they are to enter advanced practice. The study represents one approach to establishing needs for FNPs that might be used in other states both to develop educational programs and to influence legislators regarding health and nurse practitioner issues affecting access to care.

  18. Master's-Level Nurse Practitioner Educational Programs: Findings from the 2000-2001 Collaborative Curriculum Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Harper, Doreen; Werner, Kathryn E.; Stennett, Janis

    Based on a survey of master's level nurse practitioner (NP) educational programs, this report presents data on: (1) types of programs and their characteristics; (2) programs by NP role preparation (single track, dual track, or combined NP/clinical nurse specialist); (3) course content areas included in core master's and clinical (didactic and/or…

  19. Meeting the needs of new-graduate nurse practitioners: a model to support transition.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Lana; Olmedo, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The transition of newly graduated nurse practitioners (NPs) into practice can be challenging for the employer and the NPs. A new-graduate residency model for NPs along with evaluative criteria is presented from a primary care setting. Residency models are of benefit for new-graduate NPs to ease the transition to practice and promote patient care quality, and nurse retention, and satisfaction.

  20. Moral distress in nurses providing direct care on inpatient oncology units.

    PubMed

    Sirilla, Janet

    2014-10-01

    Moral distress is defined as knowing the right thing to do when policy constraints do not allow for appropriate choices. The purpose of the current study was to explore the existence of moral distress in oncology nurses with a cross-sectional survey completed by nurses working on inpatient units at a midwestern cancer hospital. Investigators distributed the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to all direct care staff nurses. The main research variables were moral distress, level of education, age, and type of unit. Most of the 73 nurses had low to moderate scores, and two had high scores. No significant correlations were observed among age or years of experience. Type of unit and level of moral distress were correlated, and an inverse relationship between level of education and moral distress was found. Moral distress exists in nurses who work on oncology units irrespective of experience in oncology or the specific unit. Nurses must be aware of the existence of moral distress and finds ways to reduce potential emotional problems.

  1. Ethical Issues of Air Force Nurse Practitioners in Clinical Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    cognitive theory of moral development as set forth by Kohlberg. Crisham explained building on the works of Piaget in the early 30’s, Kohlberg (1976...late 1980s, nursing research has addressed caring as a central theme to nursing. In 1989, Jean Watson’s philosophy and theory of human caring in nursing

  2. Conducting Nursing Intervention Research in a Cooperative Group Setting – A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Heidi S.; Nolte, Susan; Edwards, Robert P.; Wenzel, Lari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide a history on nursing science within the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG); to discuss challenges and facilitators of nursing science in the cooperative group (CG) using a current nurse-led protocol (GOG-0259) as an exemplar; and to propose recommendations aimed at advancing nursing science in the CG setting. Data Source GOG reports and protocol databases, online databases of indexed citations, and experiences from the development and implementation of GOG-0259. Conclusions Benefits of CG research include opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration and ability to rapidly accrue large national samples. Challenges include limited financial resources to support non-treatment trials, a cumbersome protocol approval process, and lack of experience with nursing/quality of life intervention studies. Formal structures within GOG need to be created to encourage nurse scientists to become active members; promote collaboration between experienced GOG advanced practice nurses and new nurse scientists to identify nursing research priorities; and consider innovative funding structures to support pilot intervention studies. Implications for Nursing Practice Understanding the CG research process is critical for nurse scientists. A multi-disciplinary team of CG leaders can help investigators navigate a complex research environment and can increase awareness of the value of nursing research. PMID:24559780

  3. The Difference in Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction When Treated by an Emergency Nurse Practitioner vs. Medical Doctors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-15

    and 1980s (Hayden, Clore, & Davies, 1982), an NP working in the ED was educated as a family nurse practitioner (FNP) with a focus on primary care...needs ofchildren. It also sought to augment the skills of nursing professionals through advanced education . Although originally a pediatric focus, the...L. & Ramirez, E. (1997). The emergency nurse practitioner: An educational model. Journal of Emergency Nursing . 23.112-115. 53 Donabedian, A

  4. Acquisition and maintenance of competencies through simulation for neonatal nurse practitioners: beyond the basics.

    PubMed

    Cates, Leigh Ann; Wilson, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Turmoil in the economy, looming health care reform, and the convergence of a shortage of nursing professionals accompanied by the demand for improving patient safety and decreasing medical errors with limited resources has created an environment likened to the perfect storm. As nurses make up the single largest component of the health care system, it is imperative that nurses achieve and maintain the highest level of competency. The Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing identified simulation as a key technological component in facilitating nurses in acquiring and maintaining competencies. This article will review the evidence supporting simulation, define the core elements of health care simulation, describe the bodies that regulate advanced practice nursing, identify the principle areas in which neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) must maintain proficiency and expertise, and illustrate how simulation is utilized in acquisition, maintenance and competency evaluation for NNPs in 1 of the largest NICUs in the country.

  5. [The diagnostic nurse consultation in head and neck oncology].

    PubMed

    Cambreleng, Christine; Goujon, Géraldine

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis announcement nurse consultation is carried out with the patient and/or their family. It is a time of exchange, listening and sharing of information. The diagnosis announcement nurse is available to answer questions from the patient and their family about the disease, the treatments and the follow-up care.

  6. Novice Nurse Practitioner Workforce Transition Into Primary Care: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Faraz, Asefeh

    2016-05-18

    The purpose of this integrative review was to analyze the current state of the science related to the novice nurse practitioner (NP) transition into primary care. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the databases Pubmed, MEDLINE, Ovid, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) with the terms nurse practitioner, role, and transition to search articles published after 1997. Three major themes emerged from the literature related to the novice NP transition into primary care. These themes were categorized as "experiencing role ambiguity," "quality of professional and interpersonal relationships," and "facing intrinsic and extrinsic obstacles." Strategies to reduce role ambiguity, improve the quality of professional relationships, and mitigate extrinsic obstacles faced by novice NPs may improve their transition into the primary care workforce. Educational institutions, employers, and novice NPs all have a stake in the successful transition from student to primary care practitioner and should be engaged in developing effective NP transition-to-practice programs.

  7. Challenges of assessing critical thinking and clinical judgment in nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Gorton, Karen L; Hayes, Janice

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a relationship between critical thinking skills and clinical judgment in nurse practitioner students. The study used a convenience, nonprobability sampling technique, engaging participants from across the United States. Correlational analysis demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between critical thinking skills and examination-style questions, critical thinking skills and scores on the evaluation and reevaluation of consequences subscale of the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale, and critical thinking skills and the preceptor evaluation tool. The study found no statistically significant relationships between critical thinking skills and clinical judgment. Educators and practitioners could consider further research in these areas to gain insight into how critical thinking is and could be measured, to gain insight into the clinical decision making skills of nurse practitioner students, and to gain insight into the development and measurement of critical thinking skills in advanced practice educational programs.

  8. Survey shows consumers open to a greater role for physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dill, Michael J; Pankow, Stacie; Erikson, Clese; Shipman, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Impending physician shortages in the United States will necessitate greater reliance on physician assistants and nurse practitioners, particularly in primary care. But how willing are Americans to accept that change? This study examines provider preferences from patients' perspective, using data from the Association of American Medical Colleges' Consumer Survey. We found that about half of the respondents preferred to have a physician as their primary care provider. However, when presented with scenarios wherein they could see a physician assistant or a nurse practitioner sooner than a physician, most elected to see one of the other health care professionals instead of waiting. Although our findings provide evidence that US consumers are open to the idea of receiving care from physician assistants and nurse practitioners, it is important to consider barriers to more widespread use, such as scope-of-practice regulations. Policy makers should incorporate such evidence into solutions for the physician shortage.

  9. Improving practice one patient, one nurse, one day at a time: design and evaluation of a quality education workshop for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Lillington, Linda; Scaramuzzo, Leah; Friese, Christopher; Sein, Elaine; Harrison, Karen; Lefebvre, Kristine B; Fessele, Kristen

    2013-12-01

    High-quality nursing care is not delivered consistently to the millions of Americans treated for invasive cancer in the United States. As part of its quality initiative, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) developed and tested nursing-sensitive quality measures for breast cancer care. Findings from the pilot testing suggested significant knowledge and practice gaps that could be addressed through member education.

  10. The relationship between job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Rujnan; Baykal, Ülkü

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses increase day-by-day in connection with rapidly increasing cancer cases worldwide as well as in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to establish job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses and the relationship in between. Methods: The sample of this descriptive study comprised of 189 nurses that are selected by nonprobability sampling method, employed by 11 hospitals in Istanbul. Survey form of 20 questions, Job Stressors Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were used during collection of data. Data were evaluated using percentage, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney U and Spearman correlation analyses. Results: In the study, there was a positively weak correlation between “Work Role Ambiguity” subdimension of Job Stressors Scale and “Emotional Exhaustion” and “Personal Accomplishment” subdimensions, whereas a positively weak and medium correlation was encountered between “Work Role Conflict” subdimension and “Emotional Exhaustion” and “Depersonalization” subdimensions. A negatively weak correlation was found between “Work Role Overload” subdimension and “Emotional Exhaustion” and “Depersonalization” subdimensions. Conclusion: A significant relationship was established between subdimensions of job stress level and of burnout level, that a lot of oncology nurses who have participated in the study wanted to change their units, because of the high attrition rate. PMID:27981080

  11. Virtual Learning Environment in Continuing Education for Nursing in Oncology: an Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    das Graças Silva Matsubara, Maria; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2016-12-01

    Nurses working in oncology require continuing education and nowadays distance education is a possibility. To compare learning outcomes of the professionals participating in classroom learning versus distance learning; describing the sociodemographic characteristics and digital fluency of participants; comparing learning outcomes with independent variables; assessing the adequacy of educational practices in Virtual Environment Moodle Learning through the constructivist online learning environment survey. An experimental, randomized controlled study; conducted at the A C Camargo Cancer Center, located in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The study included 97 nurses, with average training of 1 to 2 years. A control group (n = 44) had face to face training and the experiment group (n = 53) had training by distance learning, both with identical program content. The dependent variable was the result of learning, measured by applying a pre-assessment questionnaire and post-intervention for both groups. The sociodemographic and digital fluency data were uniform among the groups. The performance of both groups was statistically significant (p 0.005), and the control group had a greater advantage (40.4 %). Distance education has proven to be an effective alternative for training nurses, especially when they have more complex knowledge, more experience in the area and institutional time. Distance Education may be a possibility for the training of nurses for work in oncology. The association of age, training time and the institution, and the experience in Oncology interfered in the performance of both groups.

  12. Between two roles - Experiences of newly trained nurse practitioners in surgical care in Sweden: A qualitative study using repeated interviews.

    PubMed

    Jangland, Eva; Yngman Uhlin, Pia; Arakelian, Erebouni

    2016-11-01

    The position of Nurse Practitioner is a new role in Nordic countries. The transition from a registered nurse to the Nurse Practitioner role has been reported to be a personal challenge. This study, guided by the Nordic theoretical model for use in the education of advanced practice nurses, represents a unique opportunity to describe this transition for newly graduated Nurse Practitioners in an interprofessional surgical care team in Sweden. The aim was to explore how the first Nurse Practitioners in surgical care experienced the transition into a new role and what competences they used in the team. Eight new Nurse Practitioners with parallel work in clinical practice were interviewed twice around the time of their graduation. The qualitative analyses show that the participants integrated several central competences, but the focus in this early stage in their new role was on direct clinical praxis, consultation, cooperation, case management, and coaching. Transition from the role of clinical nurse specialist to nurse practitioner was a challenging process in which the positive response from patients was a driving force for the new Nurse Practitioners. The participants felt prepared for and determined to solve the challenging situations they approached working in the interprofessional team.

  13. Air Force Family Nurse Practitioner and Air Force Family Physician Perception of the Family Nurse Practitioner Role in Military Operations Other Than War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Back pain (low) 1.25 .7993 Neck pain (postural) 1.28 .5345 Condromalacia 1.39 .4973 Tendonitis 1.17 .3900 Bursitis 1.25 .4410 Sprain 1.14 .3563... Condromalacia 1.565 .003 Tendonitis 2.973 .000 Neck pain(injury) 5.155 .040 Neck pain (postural) 3.243 .033 Nurse Practitioner Role 60 Table 46

  14. Nursing staff shortage and in-hospital informal care in an oncology hospital in Greece: the nursing staff's perceptions.

    PubMed

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Arsenos, Panagiotis; Paralikas, Theodossios; Triantafylidou, Paraskevi; Georgiadou, Charikleia

    2008-06-01

    There is a broad variety of factors that are contributing to the nursing staff shortage. They include low wages, poor image of nursing, job satisfaction, ageing of the nursing workforce and cost reductions. In the Greek National Health System, there is a policy of open-visiting hours in hospitals. Family members stay with the patients for many hours and provide in-hospital informal care. The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of nursing staff about the nursing staff shortage and the in-hospital informal care in a Greek oncology hospital. For the data collection we used a 30-item questionnaire. The majority of the participants (82.9%) stated that most patients have a family member staying longer than the official visiting hours for assisting with care. A main reason according to the nurses' opinion (37.4%) is the nursing staff shortage. In addition, most nurses disagree with relatives providing some of the informal caregiving activities. The findings are consistent with the findings of other studies. They might be of interest to Greek health authorities, to nurses and to Greek citizens in order to implement possible solutions to improve the hospitalization in Greek hospitals.

  15. Alleviating emotional exhaustion in oncology nurses: an evaluation of Wellspring's "Care for the Professional Caregiver Program".

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Claire; Lockwood, Gina M; Bezjak, Andrea; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

    2012-03-01

    A high level of burnout has been demonstrated in oncologists, nurses, and other health professionals. Interventions developed in response demonstrate mixed results. Wellspring, a community cancer support organization, has developed a 1-day session called Care for the Professional Caregiver Program (CPCP) and has delivered it to over 700 healthcare workers. The present study assessed the effects of the CPCP on three groups of oncology nurses (pediatric, surgical, and general oncology staff) and one group of nurse managers. Subjects completed the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI), the General health questionnaire (GHQ) and the short form of the Marlowe-Crowne social desirability scale (M-C) prior to receiving the intervention. They then completed the MBI and GHQ at 1-month and 7-month follow-ups. Six months after the original session, a small subset of subjects was randomly selected to participate in a 1-day CPCP booster session. At baseline, one third of the nurses showed high burnout on the MBI. The nurses demonstrated a significant decrease in emotional exhaustion and an improvement on the GHQ, at the 1-month follow-up testing (p = 0.003 and 0.001, respectively) and 7-month follow-up testing (p = 0.002 and 0.001). The booster session proved difficult to deliver because of institutional scheduling problems due to nurse shortages, so only a small percentage (22%) of the sample participated; however, it was well received. Thus, the CPCP is effective in ameliorating emotional exhaustion, an intrinsic aspect of burnout.

  16. A computerized system for tracking practice and prescriptive patterns of family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Fontana, S A; Kelber, S T; Devine, E C

    2001-03-01

    Decisions about the fit between advanced practice nursing curricula and the real world of primary care practice should be based on data and not on intuition. The purpose of this article is to describe a computerized database system that can be used to: 1) track practice (including prescribing) patterns of nurse practitioner (NP) students; 2) address data issues that commonly arise; and 3) describe NP students' practice during their education to prospective employers. The database system uses both the Family Nurse Practitioners Log (FNPLOG), a faculty-developed software program, and Epi Info, a companion public domain software program. Variables are categorized as being related to sociodemographic, diagnostic, or prescriptive components of primary care. The system provides a simple, efficient, and feasible way of computerizing, analyzing, and evaluating students' clinical experience and practice patterns. The implications for advanced practice nursing education will be illustrated along with other potential uses of the database system.

  17. An Exemplar Interprofessional Academic Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program: A Blueprint for Success.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dian Dowling; Ashooh, Meredith Pollock; Kimble, Laura P; Heilpern, Katherine L

    Emergency department census rates and manpower gaps have continued to rise over the past decade, creating a demand for well-prepared emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). The implementation of the consensus model for advanced practice nurses has brought acknowledgment by leading health care, physician, and nursing organizations of the ENP specialty as critical to building a high-quality emergency care workforce. Recognition of the ENP's unique skill set, and therefore need of specialty certification, has led to a growing interest in the expansion of nurse practitioner curricula in emergency care. This article describes a novel approach for ENP education based on an interprofessional training model, with an in-depth discussion of curriculum development and clinical placement, as well as program outcomes and implications.

  18. Exploring the evidence in pediatric hematology and oncology nursing through the "article of the month".

    PubMed

    Linder, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    As the scope of pediatric hematology and oncology nursing expands, nurses are challenged with staying current in the evidence guiding their practice. Nurse-reported barriers to accessing and utilizing research include lack of time as well as difficulty in accessing, understanding, and synthesizing findings. Journal clubs provide a process to guide nurses in the review of current literature related to their practice and promote utilization of research and evidence-based practice among nurses. This article describes the transition of an in-person journal club to an electronically delivered "Article of the Month." The "Article of the Month" is offered six times each year and is posted on the service line's password-protected intranet website. Oversight of the "Article of the Month" is provided by the service line clinical nurse specialist who selects articles based on an annual learning needs assessment and develops a quiz to assess learning and promote critical thinking among nursing staff. Outcomes include anecdotal reports of increased staff confidence in managing emergent patient care needs and greater appreciation of nursing care issues for children with cancer. Areas for future development include exploring options for increasing in-person discussion of issues addressed in the "Article of the Month" among staff members, extending the "Article of the Month" to nurses in other service areas who care for children with cancer, and increasing staff participation in article selection and quiz item development. An ultimate goal is to develop formal evaluation strategies to link this educational strategy to clinical outcomes.

  19. Multiple myeloma and treatment-related thromboembolism: oncology nurses' role in prevention, assessment, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kathleen E

    2007-12-01

    Immunomodulating agents such as thalidomide and its newly emerged derivative, lenalidomide, are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of multiple myeloma because of their ability to combat drug resistance. Clinical trials suggest that thalidomide and lenalidomide are effective in all stages of multiple myeloma treatment-new diagnoses, stem cell transplantations, maintenance therapy, and relapsed or refractory disease. The drugs are most efficacious when combined with additional chemotherapeutic agents and/or corticosteroids. However, deep vein thrombosis and other thromboembolic events are associated with the treatment regimens. Oncology nurses must understand the pharmacologic properties of the drugs and the potentially life-threatening complications associated with them. To provide the highest standard of care, oncology nurses must play a vital role in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of thromboembolic events through awareness of the clinical problem, assessment tools, and thromboembolic prophylactic regimens.

  20. The implementation and evaluation of a communication skills training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Penn, Stacey; Gallegos, Tess E; Zaider, Talia; Krueger, Carol A; Bialer, Philip A; Bylund, Carma L; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-02-16

    Many nurses express difficulty in communicating with their patients, especially in oncology settings where there are numerous challenges and high-stake decisions during the course of diagnosis and treatment. Providing specific training in communication skills is one way to enhance the communication between nurses and their patients. We developed and implemented a communication skills training program for nurses, consisting of three teaching modules: responding empathically to patients; discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care; and responding to challenging interactions with families. Training included didactic and experiential small group role plays. This paper presents results on program evaluation, self-efficacy, and behavioral demonstration of learned communication skills. Three hundred forty-two inpatient oncology nurses participated in a 1-day communication skills training program and completed course evaluations, self-reports, and pre- and post-standardized patient assessments. Participants rated the training favorably, and they reported significant gains in self-efficacy in their ability to communicate with patients in various contexts. Participants also demonstrated significant improvement in several empathic skills, as well as in clarifying skill. Our work demonstrates that implementation of a nurse communication skills training program at a major cancer center is feasible and acceptable and has a significant impact on participants' self-efficacy and uptake of communication skills.

  1. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners as a Usual Source of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Christine M.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Wright, Alexandra; Smith, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify characteristics and outcomes of patients who use physician assistants and nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) as a usual source of care. Methods: Cross sectional analysis using the telephone and mail surveys of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), a prospective cohort study of Wisconsin high school graduates and selected siblings…

  2. Expanding the Role of Nurse Practitioners: Effects on Rural Access to Care for Injured Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Jeanne M.; Wickizer, Thomas M.; Franklin, Gary M.; Cheadle, Allen D.; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2008-01-01

    Context: A 3-year pilot program to expand the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in the Washington State workers' compensation system was implemented in 2004 (SHB 1691), amid concern about disparities in access to health care for injured workers in rural areas. SHB 1691 authorized NPs to independently perform most functions of an attending…

  3. Attitudes of Adult Nurse Practitioner Students toward Women Experiencing Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessette, Heidi D.; Peterson, Sonja Stone

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 34 nurse practitioner graduate students (93% female) found that 32 had personal experience of abuse; 68% did not feel educational prepared to treat victims of domestic violence. Although a large majority was sympathetic toward victims, small percentages indicated abuse was sometimes justified and the victim bore some responsibility.…

  4. Evolution of a Family Nurse Practitioner Program to Improve Primary Care Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Len Hughes; Fenley, Mary D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a Family Nurse Practitioner Program that has effectively improved the distribution of primary health care manpower in rural areas. Program characteristics include selection of personnel from areas of need, decentralization of clinical and didactic training sites, competency-based portable curriculum, and circuit-riding institutionally…

  5. Designing and Evaluation for a Nurse Practitioner Program: Emphasis on Tailored, Functional Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repicky, Paul A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The design of a nurse practitioner program evaluation should (1) account for program complexity; (2) allow for judgmental and objective data; (3) provide formative data for decision making; (4) be tailored to the individual program; and (5) be relevant and meaningful to the audience. (SK)

  6. Nurse practitioner clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Deborah; Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; Gephart, Sheila; Alfonzo, Paige M

    2015-05-15

    Evidence-based practice is key to improving patient outcomes but can be challenging for busy nurse practitioners to implement. This article describes the process of critically appraising evidence for use in clinical practice and offers strategies for implementing evidence-based innovations and disseminating the findings.

  7. A Comparison of Physicians and Nurse Practitioners as Instructors in a Physical Diagnosis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillman, Paula L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In 1976-77 a physical examination course taught by nurse practitioners (NPs) at the University of Arizona College of Medicine was implemented. In 1977-78 a research project examined whether students' ability to perform varied according to whether they were taught by NPs, residents, or physicians; no significant differences were found. (Author/MLW)

  8. Discourse and Occupational Perspective: A Comparison of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drass, Kriss A.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the differences in perspective and training of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and effects of these on their interactive strategies with patients. Shows how the macro issue of differences in occupational perspective can be incorporated into micro studies of the form and content of talk in social interactions. (SR)

  9. [Nursing coordination for adolescents and young adults in oncology].

    PubMed

    Dagorne, Loïc; Bruckner, Tania; Gaudry, Bruno; Dumont, Sarah; Gaspar, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The medical-psycho-socio-educational characteristics of adolescents and young adults affected by cancer require adapted management. Dedicated programmes and life spaces, as well as the availability of a mobile and transversal multidisciplinary team allow care to be customised. In this context, the coordinating nurse is an essential linchpin in the care team.

  10. [An oncology nursing coordination platform for the return home].

    PubMed

    Rey, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The Onc'Idec platform created in the Auvergne region mobilizes coordinating private practice nurses to ensure a link between the various people intervening in homes and in hospitals. It has undertaken to describe the entire cancer patient pathway in the area in order to improve care. It meets the needs of professionals and patients in the field.

  11. Curriculum vitae: An important tool for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Roberts, Mary Ellen E

    2016-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) should maintain a curriculum vitae (CV) that comprehensively reflects the individual's work and professional accomplishments. This article guides APNs through best practices for development of a CV. Tips are offered to help guide the content, format, and maintenance of the CV.

  12. Learning opportunities in case studies for becoming a reflective nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    ter Maten-Speksnijder, Ada J; Grypdonck, Mieke H F; Pool, Aart; Streumer, Jan N

    2012-10-01

    The transition from RN to nurse practitioner presents challenges. Because nurse practitioners require deeper critical decision-making abilities to provide safe and quality health care, the Master in Advanced Nursing Practice curriculum implemented reflective case studies to facilitate active and reflective learning. To identify the learning opportunities, we performed a qualitative interpretative study of 77 reflective case studies written by students enrolled in the program. Analysis revealed two categories of learning opportunities-(a) Direct Care, with subcategories of focusing on patients' needs, exploring one's own values, and providing comprehensive care; and (b) Increased Performance Demands, with subcategories of handling independence and dependence, and dealing with emotions. The reflective case study is a powerful educational tool to create and guide a new professional with increased responsibilities for a comprehensive and compassionate response to patients' needs.

  13. Voices of oncology nursing society members matter in advocacy and decisions related to U.S. Health Policy.

    PubMed

    Saria, Marlon Garzo; Stone, Alec; Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Brown, Gean; Norton, Vicki; Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2014-12-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), a member of the Nursing Organizations Alliance, invests in advocating for health and public policy decisions by sending members to the Nurse in Washington Internship (NIWI) program annually. NIWI provides a forum to educate nurses on the legislative process, giving attendees a better understanding of political, legislative, and regulatory issues facing nurses. The 2014 ONS delegation participated in training and lobbying focused on federal funding issues, nursing education, workforce oversight, and funding for nursing research. The three-day program ended with a Capitol Hill visit where nurses met with their respective legislators or their staff, using skills learned at NIWI briefings to influence policy for nurses and the patients they serve. Critical health and public policy decisions affecting nurses, their practice, and their patients require participation in and understanding of the legislative process. This article provides a glimpse into the three-day experience of the delegates attending the 2014 NIWI.

  14. The Role of the Nurse Practitioner in Military Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-04

    work days could be 20 hours. For instance ... It is not that nursing are bad people . I think we have different agendas, we speak different...May 1996 Vlt DEDICATION To the most important people in my life, [dedicate this thesis and the attairunent of my goals. I am fondly appreciative...of the following special people : My mother. who taught me that the possibilities are endless and completely attainable, and for her constant support

  15. Analysis of a general practitioner's work in a private nursing home for the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative analysis was made over a fouryear period (1984-87) of the work and time involved for one rural general practitioner in caring for 42 elderly patients living in a private nursing home. The results were compared with those for the rest of the practice. The study showed that the consultation rate for nursing home patients was 50% higher than the rate for the remaining practice patients aged 65 years or over, and more than twice that for the whole practice. The prescribing rate in the nursing home was twice that of the 65+ years group and six times the rate for the whole practice. The hospital referral rate for nursing home patients was twice that of the 65-74 years group, and four times that for the whole practice. The time involved per year in looking after each nursing home patient was nearly twice that for the remaining practice patients aged 65-74 years, and three times that for practice patients aged under 65 years. From this study it would appear that concentrations of elderly patients in nursing homes in areas served by only a few general practitioners can cause considerable increases in workload. This could present problems in the organization of suitable care. PMID:3267743

  16. Cancer genetics and genomics: essentials for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jean; Habin, Karleen; Underhill, Meghan

    2014-06-01

    Cancer genetics and genomics are rapidly evolving, with new discoveries emerging in genetic mutations, variants, genomic sequencing, risk-reduction methods, and targeted therapies. To educate patients and families, state-of-the-art care requires nurses to understand terminology, scientific and technological advances, and pharmacogenomics. Clinical application of cancer genetics and genomics involves working in interdisciplinary teams to properly identify patient risk through assessing family history, facilitating genetic testing and counseling services, applying risk-reduction methods, and administering and monitoring targeted therapies.

  17. The Oncology Nursing Society Leadership Competency project: developing a road map to professional excellence.

    PubMed

    Day, Donald D; Hand, Mikel W; Jones, Ann R; Harrington, Nancy Kay; Best, Robyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B

    2014-08-01

    Combining the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing, an Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) leadership think tank, and current evidence, the ONS Leadership Competencies were developed to provide all nurses with a pathway to advance their leadership skills and abilities. Generated through a systematic approach of literature review, data synthesis, and peer and expert review, the ONS Leadership Competencies are divided into five domains: vision, knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, systems thinking, and personal mastery. Each of the competencies can be measured at the individual, group, and governance levels. They serve as a means of self-assessment, growth, future planning, and professional development. This article describes the process used to develop the ONS Leadership Competencies and offers examples of how they may be used in practice.

  18. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  19. Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma & Society of Trauma Nurses Advanced Practitioner Position Paper: Optimizing the integration of advanced practitioners in trauma and critical care.

    PubMed

    Messing, Jonathan; Garces-King, Jasmine; Taylor, Dennis; Van Horn, Jonathan; Sarani, Babak; Christmas, A Britton

    2017-03-21

    Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants, collectively known as advanced practitioners (APs), enhance the provision of care for the acutely injured patient. Despite their prevalence, institutions employ, train, and utilize these providers with significant variability. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST), the Society of Trauma Nurses (STN), and the American Association of Surgical Physicians Assistants (AASPA) acknowledge the value of APs and support their utilization in the management of injured and critically ill patients. This position paper offers insight into the history of, scope of practice for, and opportunities for optimal utilization of APs in trauma, critical care, and acute care surgery services.

  20. Acute mental health nurses: comprehensive practitioners or specialist therapists?

    PubMed

    Mathers, B

    2012-02-01

    This paper examines the aids and barriers to implementing the psychosocial interventions (PSI) which trainees learned on two teaching modules. The main purpose of the modules is to teach trainees PSI to help them be more effective in their care of patients with severe mental illness. The trainees were qualified nurses working in acute mental health wards in various London hospitals. PSI has been found to be helpful for patients with psychotic symptoms in community contexts. In this study, the implementation of PSI specific to acute inpatient mental health settings is explored. This was achieved by conducting semi-structured audiotaped interviews with all 20 trainees from a single cohort. The data were analysed by categories and themes to elicit not only the problems but also helpful strategies which can be used when working with PSI in acute inpatient mental health settings. The paper concludes by offering recommendations for future good practice for this area of mental health service.

  1. The consultant nurse - expert practitioner and much more.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Theresa; Butler-Williams, Carole; Easton, Karen; Ingledew, Ian; Parkin, Donna; Wade, Sharon; Warner, Richard

    The consultant nurse (CN) role is usually described in terms of four domains devised by the Department of Health - clinical practice, education and training, leadership, and research and service development. This study set out to explicate the diversity and complexity of CN roles in an NHS trust; to describe aspects of extraordinary practice and to identify perceived differences between this role and other advanced practice roles. Accounts were written by six CNs and subjected to concept mapping to facilitate identification of extraordinary practice. Four themes emerged: entrepreneurial activity and innovation; clinical autonomy and role dynamism; influential national and international research conduct; consultancy and education across discipline boundaries. These included descriptions of higher order skills that surpass usual requirements of 'expert' or 'advanced' practice. Comparisons with other advanced practice roles are drawn from the literature and data collected in this study. Differences between the roles have implications for sustainability.

  2. Re-envisioning clinical education for nurse practitioner programs: themes from a national leaders' dialogue.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Lauzon-Clabo, Laurie; Morton, Patricia Gonce; Jeffries, Pamela; McQuade-Jones, Bambi; Ryan, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    As the need for primary care providers increases, nursing education programs face significant challenges to meet future workforce needs. A more resource-efficient approach for the clinical education of nurse practitioner students is needed. A think tank involving 20 thought leaders representing multiple disciplines was convened to discuss this issue. This article presents seven themes that emerged from this national leaders' dialog: academic practice co-design, standardized preclinical preparation, standardized student assessment, entrustable professional activities, immersive clinical experiences, interprofessional education for team-based care, and innovative education practices.

  3. Experience of Military Nurse Practitioners During Their First Year of Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    left over from the budget. The active duty patients, of course, got the most of it, which I understand. But if your kid is sick, you re not going to...appy that had perforated in a kid and I was not trained to treat that as a nurse practitioner. I only knew because I had been a surgical nurse. I...t teach these kids . I don t know anything! But, it turned out to be a positive experience. We both learned because they were back in that academic

  4. Decisions behind career choice for nurse practitioners: independent versus collaborative practice and motivational-needs behavior.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, S B; Corey, E H

    2000-09-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) can take an active role in defining and establishing their careers. Prepared as advanced practice nurses with specific assessment skills, primary care NPs have the opportunity to become independent or collaborative practitioners. This report examines the published work in the area of practice choice and motivational-needs behavior. Interviews with collaborative and independent primary care NPs were conducted. Against the framework of well-established personality testing methods, open-ended interview questions were developed to elicit specific motivational-needs-based behavior characteristics. The motivational needs examined included the need for achievement, power, and affiliation. The interview findings were then synthesized using needs-based behavior theory. This new platform for role decision ultimately can prepare NPs to make informed career choices.

  5. A nurse practitioner-managed after-hours clinic for a Native American reservation.

    PubMed

    Berry, R A

    1997-04-01

    The Indian Health Service implemented a plan for an after-hours clinic which has been providing services since May 1991 on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming. Integral to the plan for the after-hours clinic was the family nurse practitioner as primary care provider. The after-hours clinic expands the health care services of the clinic by 3 hours on weekdays and 8 hours on Sundays. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary care provider was introduced to the Wind River Service Unit, along with an after-hours clinic operation. Since the inception of the after-hours clinic, behavioral health and dental services and a women's clinic have been added.

  6. Nurse practitioners in aged care: documentary analysis of successful project proposals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Shannon J; Parker, Rhian M; Davey, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Meeting the primary health care needs of an aging population is an increasing challenge for many Western nations. In Australia, the federal government introduced a program to develop, test, and evaluate nurse practitioner models in aged care settings. In this article, we present a documentary analysis of 32 project proposals awarded funding under the Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program. Successfully funded models were diverse and were operated by a range of organizations across Australia. We identified three key priorities as underlying the proposed models: "The right care," "in the right place," and "at the right time." In this article, we explore how these priorities were presented by different applicants in different ways. Through the presentation of their models, the program's applicants identified and proposed to address current gaps in health services. Applicants contrasted their proposed models with available services to create persuasive and competitive applications for funding.

  7. Effective case presentations--an important clinical skill for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Coralli, Connie H

    2006-05-01

    Effective case presentations are an important component of the nurse practitioner's skills, yet very little literature exists to guide the development of this skill, and frequently little priority is given to teaching this skill during the education of the nurse practitioner. This report discusses the importance of effective case presentations, describes the organization of the presentation, and outlines the appropriate information to be included. The main components of a case presentation-introduction, history of the present illness, physical examination, diagnostic studies, differential diagnosis, management, and summary of the case-are discussed in detail. Examples of a formal and an informal case presentation are presented and used to illustrate key points in the text.

  8. Expanding the role of the nurse practitioner in the deployed setting.

    PubMed

    Dargis, Julie; Horne, Theresa; Tillman-Ortiz, Sophie; Scherr, Diane; Yackel, Edward E

    2006-08-01

    Today's military is experiencing rapid advances in technology and in manpower utilization. The Army Medical Department is redesigning the structure and function of deployable hospital systems as part of this effort. The transformation of deployable hospital systems requires that a critical analysis of manpower utilization be undertaken to optimize the employment of soldier-medics. The objective of this article was to describe the use of nurse practitioners as primary care providers during deployment. The lived experiences of five nurse practitioners deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom are presented. Data gathered during the deployment and an analysis of the literature clearly support expanded and legitimized roles for these health care professionals in future conflicts and peacekeeping operations.

  9. Team science of nursing, engineering, statistics, and practitioner in the development of a robotic reflexology device.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; Bush, Tamara Reid; Mukherjee, Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned in forming an interdisciplinary team that implements a team science approach to integrative medicine (IM) research. The disciplines of nursing, statistics, and engineering, along with consultants and a reflexology practitioner, formed this university-based team to conceptualize and develop a prototype robotic device for reflexology for breast cancer patients. The nurse investigator contributed the intervention background and access to the population; the statistician guided the team thinking on factors that needed to be controlled for; the engineers provided the expertise in device design and development; consultants facilitated the team's thinking in new directions; and the reflexology practitioner prescribed the protocol. We discuss the contributions and achievements of each discipline, as well as the challenges, and share the team experiences with the intent to help guide the formation of new IM teams that promote a conducive atmosphere for carrying out cutting-edge IM research and advancing the science.

  10. Awareness and acceptance of the nurse practitioner role in one BC health authority.

    PubMed

    Sawchenko, Linda; Fulton, Tom; Gamroth, Lucia; Budgen, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The Interior Health Authority (IH) is one of six health authorities in British Columbia, whose goal of delivering the best possible healthcare services to its residents requires proven and innovative healthcare delivery strategies. The nurse practitioner initiative is one such strategy used by IH. The following paper describes marketing strategies and early evaluation results of the awareness and acceptance of the nurse practitioner (NP) role in IH. Multiple marketing strategies were used prior to and after NP hiring. Three evaluation questions focused on people's awareness of and willingness to be seen by a NP instead of a doctor for minor illnesses or health maintenance. Evaluation results were consistent with evaluation results of other provincial and national studies.

  11. Nurse Practitioners: Knowledge, Skills, and Leadership for the End-of-Life Conversation in Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    McRee, Laura; Reed, Pamela G

    2016-01-01

    An impending policy change in Medicare will provide reimbursement for the end-of-life conversation. The rise in numbers of older adults who face serious illness coupled with advances in healthcare technology are increasing the need for providers to address end of life issues in the acute care setting. Doctoral-level nurse practitioners who specialize in acute care of older adults are poised to be leaders and facilitators of this conversation in a particularly challenging context-the intensive care unit. The focus of this article is the new end-of-life policy in relation to the particular contributions that adult gerontology acute care nurse practitioners offer in the acute care setting.

  12. Tuberculosis education for nurse practitioner students: where we are and where we need to go.

    PubMed

    Benkert, Ramona; Resnick, Barbara; Brackley, Margaret; Simpson, Terri; Fair, Betty; Esch, Trudy; Field, Kim

    2009-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has reemerged as a public health concern. This study tested the reliability and validity of an instrument examining self-efficacy in providing TB care, beliefs about educational preparation, and knowledge about TB among nurse practitioner students from diverse programs. A one-time self-report instrument was distributed during a final clinical course. Rasch analysis was used to assess the instrument's reliability and validity. Most of the 92 respondents were from family nurse practitioner programs and had received TB education via lecture. Students were moderately knowledgeable on TB content and had a moderate level of perceived self-efficacy. They valued TB education as it related to both their current program and their clinical practice. The instrument had excellent reliability (alpha = 0.96 to 0.98), and it appears to be an effective measure to help faculty understand student knowledge and confidence in the care of individuals with TB.

  13. Attitudes of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Towards Parental Use of Corporal Punishment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    military pediatric nurse practitioners responded to a questionnaire concerning attitudes and beliefs related to the spanking of children . Respondents...justifying the use of spanking found three themes of research that indicated some spanking is beneficial, the treatment of autistic children , the...of animals, but little on the effectiveness of spanking children . In fact, he found what little research there was on children , agreed with the

  14. "The Keepers of Stories": Personal Growth and Wisdom Among Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Vishnevsky, Tanya; Quinlan, Margaret M; Kilmer, Ryan P; Cann, Arnie; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2015-12-01

    This study examined whether oncology nurses experience personal growth and wisdom as a result of caring for patients. Using a grounded theory approach, 30 nurses were interviewed regarding their experiences caring for cancer patients. Every nurse in this sample cited at least one example of growth and wisdom. Subthemes of personal growth were largely consistent with the documented domains of posttraumatic growth and included appreciation of life, new perspective on life, relating to others, spiritual/religious growth, and personal strength. Subthemes of wisdom were more varied, reflecting the diversity of this construct in the context of nursing. Benevolence arose as a unifying theme between personal growth and wisdom, with subthemes centering on altruistic attitudes and behavior toward patients and the greater community. Findings suggest that nurses develop personal growth, wisdom, and benevolence as a result of the emotional connections formed with patients and the subsequent struggle to cope with their loss. This process accords well with findings in other populations experiencing trauma and adversity directly.

  15. Collaborative arrangements and privately practising nurse practitioners in Australia: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Currie, Jane; Chiarella, Mary; Buckley, Thomas

    2016-09-09

    Objective Since the introduction of legislative changes in 2010, services provided by privately practising nurse practitioners (PPNPs) in Australia have been eligible for subsidisation through the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). To provide eligible services, PPNPs must collaborate formally with a medical practitioner or an entity that employs medical practitioners. This paper provides data from a national survey on these collaborative arrangements in Australia. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of PPNP services on patient access to care in Australia.Methods PPNPs in Australia were invited to complete an electronic survey. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, whereas qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Seventy-three surveys were completed.Results Ninety-three per cent of participants reported having a collaborative arrangement in place. Frequency of communication ranged from daily (27%) to never (1%). Participants reported that collaborative arrangements facilitate learning, patient care and offer support to PPNPs. However, for some PPNPs, organising a formal collaborative arrangement is demanding because it is dependent on the availability and willingness of medical practitioners and the open interpretation of the arrangement. Only 19% of participants believed that collaborative arrangements should be a prerequisite for PPNPs to access the MBS and PBS.Conclusion Although there are benefits to collaborative arrangements, there is also concern from PPNPs that mandating such arrangements through legislation presents a barrier to establishing PPNP services and potentially reduces patient access to care. Collaboration with medical practitioners is intrinsic to nursing practice. Thus, legislating for collaborative arrangements is unnecessary, because it makes the normal abnormal.What is known about the topic? To access the MBS and PBS, PPNPs are required by law to have a

  16. Pediatric nurse practitioner salary and practice: results of a Midwest metropolitan area survey.

    PubMed

    Loman, Deborah G; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2007-01-01

    The St. Louis Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners has conducted a local biennial salary, practice, and benefits survey since the mid 1990s. This cross-sectional, descriptive study investigated demographic characteristics, salary, benefits, and practice patterns of pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) in the St. Louis area in fall, 2005. The survey was sent to 199 PNPs who lived within 100 miles of Saint Louis, with a return rate of 60%. The mean salary for full time PNPs engaged in practice was $72,788, which was a 6.3% increase from the 2003 survey results. PNPs with more years of experience received significantly higher salaries than those with less experience; however, there was no difference in salary based on type of practice (primary versus specialty care) or type of practice setting. Increasing numbers of PNPs are reporting their practice focus as specialty care (53%) rather than primary care (47%) in this region, with 70% of full time PNPs indicating specialty care. PNPs with less than 3 years experience were working equally in primary and specialty care. Practice challenges such as reimbursement and prescriptive issues were identified. Only 37% of PNPs indicated that they were credentialed by insurance plans. Nurse practitioners may find a local survey helpful as they negotiate changes in their salaries and benefits. Members of advance practice nursing organizations and educators may find the survey process useful as they observe local practice trends over time. It is essential that nursing education and continuing education conferences address the basic and continuing education needs of PNPs in both primary care and common specialty practices.

  17. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  18. Effective Prevention and Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome in Children With Cancer: The Important Contributions of Pediatric Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Li, Ho Cheung William; Chung, Oi Kwan Joyce; Tam, Ching Janice; Chiu, Sau Ying

    2015-01-01

    The practice guidelines aimed to identify appropriate nursing management for the prevention and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome, in line with the current evidence-based medical guidelines. Using a systematic approach, 15 relevant articles were identified for the review. The evaluation of patient risk factors for tumor lysis syndrome and the appropriate medical and nursing assessment were identified. The treatment algorithms for the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome from both the medical and nursing perspectives have been established. In particular, the guidelines highlight the importance of pediatric oncology nurses in contributing to the prevention and management of tumor lysis syndrome.

  19. Partnership in Education: Preparation of the Family Nurse-Practitioner for Primary Care in Rural Health Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Judith T.

    A model program to educate primary care nurse-practitioners for rural areas illustrates successful collaboration between university and rural health settings. Part of the Intercampus Graduate Studies program of the University of California--San Francisco School of Nursing and the University of California--San Diego School of Medicine, the model…

  20. Positioning clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners as change champions to implement a pain protocol in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Ploeg, Jenny; Donald, Faith; Coker, Esther; Brazil, Kevin; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Dicenso, Alba; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Pain management for older adults in long-term care (LTC) has been recognized as a problem internationally. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) as change champions during the implementation of an evidence-based pain protocol in LTC. In this exploratory, multiple-case design study, we collected data from two LTC homes in Ontario, Canada. Three data sources were used: participant observation of an NP and a CNS for 18 hours each over a 3-week period; CNS and NP diaries recording strategies, barriers, and facilitators to the implementation process; and interviews with members of the interdisciplinary team to explore perceptions about the NP and CNS role in implementing the pain protocol. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The NP and CNS used a variety of effective strategies to promote pain management changes in practice including educational outreach with team members, reminders to nursing staff to highlight the pain protocol and educate about practice changes, chart audits and feedback to the nursing staff, interdisciplinary working group meetings, ad hoc meetings with nursing staff, and resident assessment using advanced skills. The CNS and NP are ideal champions to implement pain management protocols and likely other quality improvement initiatives.

  1. Recommendations for the implementation of distress screening programs in cancer centers: report from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS), Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) joint task force.

    PubMed

    Pirl, William F; Fann, Jesse R; Greer, Joseph A; Braun, Ilana; Deshields, Teresa; Fulcher, Caryl; Harvey, Elizabeth; Holland, Jimmie; Kennedy, Vicki; Lazenby, Mark; Wagner, Lynne; Underhill, Meghan; Walker, Deborah K; Zabora, James; Zebrack, Bradley; Bardwell, Wayne A

    2014-10-01

    In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation. A joint task force from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society, the Association of Oncology Social Work, and the Oncology Nursing Society developed consensus-based recommendations to guide the implementation of this requirement. In this review, the authors provide recommendations regarding each of the 6 components necessary to meet the ACoS standard: 1) inclusion of psychosocial representation on the cancer committee, 2) timing of screening, 3) method/mode of screening, 4) tools for screening, 5) assessment and referral, and 6) documentation.

  2. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  3. Self-assessment of trauma competencies among army family nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Brad E; Carr, Kate V; Padden, Diane L

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to determine whether Army family nurse practitioners perceive themselves as competent in providing trauma care. Using an adaptation of trauma competency outcomes from various trauma courses, all Army family nurse practitioners were asked to evaluate self-perceived level of trauma competence and self-perceived importance of trauma skills. Results (n = 96) indicate a general agreement that all skills identified in the questionnaire were important in the management of a trauma patient. The respondents considered themselves trained/somewhat competent or higher in 50% of the skills identified. Mann-Whitney U analysis was used to compare various groups within the sample. Significant differences on self-perceived competency were noted with intensive care/emergency room, Advanced Trauma Life Support, and deployment experience. Trauma Nursing Core Course experience was not significant to self-perceived trauma competency. Findings support the need for additional trauma training, such as Advanced Trauma Life Support and hands-on trauma experience.

  4. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge.

  5. Balancing health care needs in a changing context: nursing highlights from the 2016 European Oncology Nursing Society Congress (EONS10), 17–18 October 2016, Dublin, Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Lichosik, Danuta; Caruso, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    European cancer nurses have to face many challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economic and political context in which balancing health care needs has become strategic for healthcare delivery. Currently, cancer nurses must overcome many obstacles arising from clinical, organisational, and educational issues. Within this scenario, the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) shaped its tenth congress programme to boost discussion and reflections, to share experiences and research, and to see how cancer nurses try to anticipate and embrace changes. The aim of this was to promote innovative solutions and to address the many issues involved with cancer care. EONS10 was held on 17–18 October in Dublin, Ireland. The congress was attended by more than 500 delegates. The programme covered the following themes: caring for families and carers, inequalities and access to cancer care, caring for patients with haematological cancers, palliative care, communication and information exchange, community cancer care (i.e. parallel sessions), roles and responsibility for advanced nursing practice, International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)-Academy workshops (i.e. workshops), cancer survivorship, clinical leadership and new roles, oncology nursing research, symptom experiences and management, palliative care (i.e. proffered papers), poster presentations, and satellite symposia. The aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss the contents of the EONS10 congress. PMID:28144284

  6. Simulation Pedagogy With Nurse Practitioner Students: Impact of Receiving Immediate Individualized Faculty Feedback.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sheila; Conelius, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Family nurse practitioner (FNP) students must achieve basic competency in managing patients' primary care needs across the lifespan. Students in the FNP program have simulations integrated throughout their clinical theory courses to increase practice time with various patient cases. Students who received individualized faculty feedback immediately after self-evaluation of simulation performance showed statistically significantly increased knowledge (as evidenced by higher grades in course examinations and preceptor evaluations) than a control group of students who received feedback in a group class via a rubric grading guide 2-4 weeks after all students completed their individual simulations.

  7. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  8. The successful use of problem-based learning in an online nurse practitioner course.

    PubMed

    Rounds, Linda R; Rappaport, Bethany A

    2008-01-01

    The development of technology and online education has opened the door to creative use of new and existing teaching methodologies. The authors describe how they used problem-based learning in an online course as a method for teaching clinical decision making to nurse practitioner students. The close match between problem-based learning and the characteristics of adult learners and successful distance learners is outlined as support for use of this methodology. In addition, the authors describe the challenges, rewards, and lessons learned in this innovative approach to online education.

  9. Psychological factors associated with weight loss maintenance: theory-driven practice for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Valek, Rebecca M; Greenwald, Beverly J; Lewis, Carolyn C

    2015-04-01

    The authors discuss the psychological factors associated with weight loss maintenance and the use of Pender's health promotion model as a guide for the construction of clinical interventions to address these factors. The psychological factors include internal drive for weight maintenance, ongoing self-monitoring, long-term flexibility, positive mood and emotions, appropriate goals, and management of external stimuli. Nurse practitioners can help combat obesity trends through caring for patients in a holistic manner. Periodic psychological needs-assessments for patients who desire to maintain weight loss may further promote long-term success in weight management.

  10. Smoking Cessation and Lung Cancer: Oncology Nurses Can Make a Difference

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Mary E.; Sipples, Rebecca L.; Murphy, Meagan; Sarna, Linda

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Provide an overview of the impact of smoking after a diagnosis of lung cancer, discuss the relationship between smoking cessation and improved outcomes during the lung cancer trajectory, present information about tobacco dependence evidence-based treatments, reimbursement for these treatments, and tobacco-related resources available for patients and health care professionals, and emphasize the important role of nurses. DATA SOURCES Published articles, reports, websites, and research studies. CONCLUSION Tobacco use is associated with 30% of cancer deaths. Prevention of tobacco use and cessation are primary ways to prevent lung cancer. However, even after a diagnosis of lung cancer, smoking cessation is important in improving survival and quality of life. Although effective tobacco dependence treatments are available to help smokers quit smoking, persistent efforts over repeated contacts may be necessary to achieve long-term cessation. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING PRACTICE Oncology nursing action is essential in the identification of and intervention with patients who struggle with tobacco dependence after diagnosis. PMID:18222148

  11. Critical analysis of the evolution of a Canadian nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    de Witt, Lorna; Ploeg, Jenny

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critically analyze the evolution of a nurse practitioner (NP) role in Canada using the province of Ontario as an example. Two theoretical models are used to highlight the historical development of this role and provide direction for further NP role development. The evolution of the NP role encompasses 2 critical phases: initiation and discontinuation (early 1970s to mid-1980s) and establishment and impasse (early 1990s to the present). Current barriers to the full integration of NPs within primary health care include the lack of a workable and stable funding plan for NPs, restrictions on scope of practice, work-related tensions between physicians and NPs, and lack of public and professional awareness of the role. Nurses can address these barriers through advocacy, lobbying, and public education.

  12. Addressing the primary care workforce: a study of nurse practitioner students' plans after graduation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Geraldine M; Wolf, Andrea; Haas, Richard Eric

    2015-03-01

    Primary care is a growing area, and nurse practitioners (NPs) hold promise for meeting the need for additional providers. This article reports on the future plans of more than 300 primary care NP students in family, adult, and adult gerontology programs. The sample was obtained through NP faculty, and data were collected via an online survey. Results indicated that although these students chose primary care, only 48% anticipated working in primary care; 26% planned to practice in rural areas, and 16% planned to work in an inner city. Reasons cited as important for pursuing a primary care position included the long-term patient relationship, faculty and preceptor mentors from the NP program, and clinical experiences as a student. Implications include providing more intensive faculty mentoring to increase the number of individuals seeking primary care positions after graduation and help with future career planning to meet personal career and nursing profession needs.

  13. 2016 Oncology Nursing Society Annual Congress: Podium, E-Poster, and Poster Session Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Abstracts appear as they were submitted and have not undergone editing or the Oncology Nursing Forum's review process. Only abstracts that will be presented appear online. Poster numbers are subject to change. For updated poster numbers, visit congress.ons.org or check the Congress guide. Data published in abstracts presented at ONS's Annual Congress are embargoed until the conclusion of the presentation. Coverage and/or distribution of an abstract, poster, or any of its supplemental material to or by the news media, any commercial entity, or individuals, including the authors of said abstract, is strictly prohibited until the embargo is lifted. Promotion of general topics and speakers is encouraged within these guidelines.

  14. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Subjects and Methods: The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The research settings took place in six centers of chemotherapy in Shiraz, Iran. The participants were 86 nurses who worked in oncology units and administered cytotoxic drugs. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist which was developed by the investigators to determine occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Percentage calculations and the independent samples t-test were used to see the general distribution and analysis of data. To statistically analyze of the data, SPSS software (version 16) was applied. Results: The mean age of participants was 30.52 ± 6.50 years and 66.27% of the nurses worked on inpatient oncology wards. The mean practice score was 21.1 ± 3.76 that ranged from 12.5 to 31. The independent samples t-test showed the outpatient nurses were weaker in practice (17.2 ± 2.52) in comparison with university hospitals (23.35 ± 3.02, P < 0.001). Occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs especially during administration and disposal of medicines was poor and rarely trained with this subject and was observed under the standard conditions. Conclusions: There is deficiency in the understanding and related protection practices of clinical nursing staff vocationally exposed to cytotoxic drugs. It is recommended that all clinical nursing staff should receive full occupational protection training about these matters and the authorities provide standard conditions of oncology

  15. Nurse practitioners in primary care. VII. A cohort study of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, K.; Fortin, F.; Spitzer, W. O.; Kergin, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term surveillance of the employment experience and developing roles of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians who participated in the first 5 years of the McMaster University educational program for family practice nurses was undertaken with a descriptive survey. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires; a 97.8% response rate was attained. Sociodemographic profiles of both groups and characteristics of the practice setting where copractitioner teams functioned were determined. Selected noteworthy results show that 92.7% of the nurses were currently employed, and that 82.5% of the graduates continued in their original practice. Nurses' time invested in patient care activities increased by 105%; time devoted to clerical and housekeeping duties decreased by 42%. Changes in roles for both categories of copractitioners were important. The interdisciplinary arrangements resulted in appreciable financial disadvantages to physicians and only modest income incentives to nurses. A series of successes of the model of practice under assessment has been identified; offsetting ongoing difficulties and problems have also been enumerated. The data from this project and preceding studies can facilitate the solution of unresolved problems on the basis of evidence rather than opinion. PMID:856429

  16. Multifactorial intervention with nurse practitioners does not change cardiovascular outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    van Zuilen, Arjan D; Bots, Michiel L; Dulger, Arzu; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; van Buren, Marjolijn; Ten Dam, Marc A G J; Kaasjager, Karin A H; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W J; Sluiter, Henk E; van de Ven, Peter J G; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2012-09-01

    Strict implementation of guidelines directed at multiple targets reduces vascular risk in diabetic patients. Whether this also applies to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is uncertain. To evaluate this, the MASTERPLAN Study randomized 788 patients with CKD (estimated GFR 20-70 ml/min) to receive additional intensive nurse practitioner support (the intervention group) or nephrologist care (the control group). The primary end point was a composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death. During a mean follow-up of 4.62 years, modest but significant decreases were found for blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, anemia, proteinuria along with the increased use of active vitamin D or analogs, aspirin and statins in the intervention group compared to the controls. No differences were found in the rate of smoking cessation, weight reduction, sodium excretion, physical activity, or glycemic control. Intensive control did not reduce the rate of the composite end point (21.3/1000 person-years in the intervention group compared to 23.8/1000 person-years in the controls (hazard ratio 0.90)). No differences were found in the secondary outcomes of vascular interventions, all-cause mortality or end-stage renal disease. Thus, the addition of intensive support by nurse practitioner care in patients with CKD improved some risk factor levels, but did not significantly reduce the rate of the primary or secondary end points.

  17. Nurse practitioners and controlled substances prescriptive authority: improving access to care.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Michelle A; Tarlier, Denise S

    2013-03-01

    In 2007, Health Canada proposed a new framework to regulate prescriptive authority for controlled substances, titled New Classes of Practitioners Regulations (NCPR). The new regulatory framework was passed in November 2012; it gives nurse practitioners (NPs), midwives and podiatrists the authority to prescribe controlled medications under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. It is expected that authorizing NPs to write prescriptions for certain controlled substances commonly used in primary care will enhance flexibility and timeliness in primary care service delivery. Studies from the United States have shown positive outcomes in primary care access, decreased healthcare costs and the evolution and advancement of the NP role when prescriptive authority was expanded to include controlled substances. The purpose of this paper is to examine how NPs' prescriptive authority for controlled substances affects access to primary care and NP role development. Three key issues identified from the experience of one group of NPs in the United States (access to care, professional autonomy and prescriber knowledge) offer insight into the practice changes that may be anticipated for NPs in Canada now that they have acquired prescriptive authority for controlled substances. Recommendations are offered to assist nurse leaders and educators to best support NPs as they take on this new and important role responsibility.

  18. Students' perspectives on the outcomes of the joint international programme for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hae Soo; Choi, Eun Jin; Kang, Se Won; An, Minjeong; Choi, Jungmin; Kim, Eun Jung

    2011-07-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) play a vital role in the primary healthcare systems in several countries. However, the NP system has either only recently been established or has yet to be set up in many Asian countries. The Joint International Programme for Nurse Practitioners (JIPNP), developed by a university in South Korea and one in the United States, has been running since 1998. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this programme by assessing student satisfaction through an e-mail-based questionnaire survey. The results of the survey indicated that the students found that this programme helped refine their professional skills. The students were most satisfied with the practicum. Their responses to the open-ended question regarding their individual experiences during the course indicated that they were most satisfied with their improvement in the following areas: understanding of the role of the NP, the responsibility and limitations of NPs with regard to diagnosing and prescribing, familiarity with culture and language, and understanding of healthcare systems. They were also pleased with the teaching methods deployed. It is anticipated that the graduates who completed this programme will help develop the NP system in Korea by assuming leading positions in many NP fields in South Korea.

  19. Mentoring: Positively Influencing Job Satisfaction and Retention of New Hire Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Horner, Diane Kostrey

    The purpose of study was to determine whether mentoring based on Watson's Caring Model positively influences nurse practitioner (NP) job satisfaction. This nonexperimental mixed-methods study utilized an online survey, administered through Qualtrics containing demographic and mentoring variables. Job satisfaction results were obtained from the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale (MNPJSS). Also, open-ended questions regarding mentoring were reported. There was a 54% response rate in which 37 of the 69 participants responded (n = 37), with statistical significance set at p < .05. All or 100% of participants reported that the mentor experience/relationship positively influenced job satisfaction. Scores from the MNPJSS ranged from 141 to 246, with a mean of 195.26 (SD = 28.29) corresponding to "minimally satisfied" or a mean of 4.44 on the 6-point scale. These results are similar to the MNPJSS score with a mean of 4.39. A mentoring experience can provide a positive environment, which can lead to increased job satisfaction. In turn, a higher level of satisfaction in the work environment can be associated with reduced turnover and improved retention and patient outcomes. Ultimately, a safer health care system will evolve and improve patient care and outcomes. Through Watson's Caring Model, a reciprocal relationship between the mentor and the mentee can provide a new NP hire a sense of community and direct availability. By experiencing a mentor relationship, job satisfaction can improve, which is a key factor in retaining NPs. As E-mentoring is a newer topic in nursing literature, further research is needed. Further studies could also review and develop one-on-one mentoring programs.

  20. A focus group study of the use of video-recorded simulated objective structured clinical examinations in nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Julian

    2010-05-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is a common method of clinical skills assessment used for advanced nurse practitioner students across the United Kingdom. The purpose of an advanced nursing OSCE is to assess a nurse practitioner student's competence and safety in the performance of commonly used advanced clinical practice skills. Students often feel nervous when preparing for and participating in an OSCE. Consideration of these identified anxieties led to the development of an alternative method of meeting students' OSCE learning and preparation needs; namely video-recorded simulated OSCEs. Video-recording was appealing for the following reasons: it provides a flexible usage of staff resources and time; OSCE performance mistakes can be rectified; it is possible to use the same video-recordings with multiple cohorts of students, and the recordings can be made conveniently available for students with video streaming on internet-based video-sharing sites or virtual learning environments. The aim of the study was to explore the value of using such recordings amongst nurse practitioner students, via online and face-to-face focus groups, to see if they are a suitable OSCE educational preparation technique. The study findings indicate that simulated OSCE video-recordings are an effective method for supporting nurse practitioner educational development.

  1. Working in a 'third space': a closer look at the hybridity, identity and agency of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Chulach, Teresa; Gagnon, Marilou

    2016-03-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs), as advanced practice nurses, have evolved over the years to become recognized as an important and growing trend in Canada and worldwide. In spite of sound evidence as to the effectiveness of NPs in primary care and other care settings, role implementation and integration continue to pose significant challenges. This article utilizes postcolonial theory, as articulated by Homi Bhabha, to examine and challenge traditional ideologies and structures that have shaped the development, implementation and integration of the NP role to this day. Specifically, we utilize Bhabha's concepts of third space, hybridity, identity and agency in order to further conceptualize the nurse practitioner role, to examine how the role challenges some of the inherent assumptions within the healthcare system and to explore how development of each to these concepts may prove useful in integration of nurse practitioners within the healthcare system. Our analysis casts light on the importance of a broader, power structure analysis and illustrates how colonial assumptions operating within our current healthcare system entrench, expand and re-invent, as well as mask the structures and practices that serve to impede nurse practitioner full integration and contributions. Suggestions are made for future analysis and research.

  2. The HIV Primary Care Workforce of Tomorrow: The UCSF Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Carmen J; Stringari-Murray, Suzan; Fox, Christopher B; Monasterio, Erica; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for primary care services and the current health care workforce shortage is predicted to cause drastic reductions in the number of clinicians who are competent to provide HIV care. For the past decade, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing has provided HIV specialty education for Advanced Practice Nursing students in the Master's curriculum. In 2013, UCSF was funded by the Health Resources Services Administration to establish a nurse practitioner (NP) HIV primary care education program to expand the number of NPs prepared to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive HIV primary care. To this end, UCSF faculty have developed and validated a set of HIV Primary Care entry-level NP competencies, integrated general HIV knowledge into the NP curriculum, and enhanced our current HIV Specialty curriculum and clinical training. Described herein is UCSF's Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

  3. Taking action: An exploration of the actions of exemplary oncology nurses when there is a sense of hopelessness and futility perceived by registered nurses at diagnosis, during treatment, and in palliative situations.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Katherine J; Perry, Beth

    2015-01-01

    "There is nothing more that can be done" is a phrase that may occasionally cross the minds of oncology nurses. This paper reports on the actions of exemplary oncology nurses who were faced with such situations where their colleagues gave up or turned away. The research question, "What actions do exemplary clinical oncology nurses (RNs) undertake in patient-care situations where further nursing interventions seem futile?" prefaced data collection via a secure website where 14 Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs) provided narratives documenting their actions. Thematic analysis utilized QRS NVivo 10 software and hand coding. Four themes were generated from data analysis: advocacy, not giving up, genuine presence, and moral courage. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  4. A Study to Determine Whether Nurse Practitioners are Appropriately Utilized at Moncrief Army Hospital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    cent are family practice, 17.6 per cent are adult medicine, 10.7 per cent are maternity, 8.4 per cent are midwifery , 13 and 3 per cent are psychiatric...are confronted with an autonomy crisis. Traditionally, nurses did not possess a high degree of autonomy . However, nurse practitioners theoretical- ly...require a high degree of autonomy . In order to perform their duties, they must function with more independence and with more initiative than

  5. [Reflection on the Differences and Similarities of Mental Health Care in Virginia and Taiwan: Geography, History, Culture, and Nurse Practitioners].

    PubMed

    Lu, Chueh-Fen; Tung, Ching-Chuan; Ely, Linda

    2016-12-01

    Sponsored by the pilot overseas internships project of the Ministry of Education, Taiwan, the authors and ten undergraduate students from Taiwan visited several mental health facilities in Virginia for one month. These facilities included the Catawba State Hospital, Salem Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Carilion Saint Albans Behavioral Health (New River Valley Medical Center), Warm Hearth Village, Adult & Child Family Counseling private outpatient clinic, the Free Clinic of the New River Valley, New Life Clubhouse, and Self-Government Program for Assertive Community Treatment. In-depth dialogue and participation in nursing care under the supervision of registered nurses facilitated the authors' reflection on mental health care and the roles and functions of Taiwanese nurse practitioners. The present article adopts a macro view in order to compare the related issues between Taiwan and Virginia, including: geographic features, history, culture of health-seeking behavior, healthcare insurance, and the relationships among various professionals. How these issues relate to social-cultural background and how the overall healthcare environment impacts upon the roles of nurse practitioners in Taiwan are rarely discussed in literature. We expect that this cross-cultural contrast and reflection will elicit a better understanding of how these factors have shaped and affected the roles of Taiwanese nurse practitioners. Further, suggestions about how to improve the nursing profession in Taiwan are presented.

  6. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care in communities. Participants Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Measurements Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Results Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94–1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98–1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84– 0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79– 0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21–1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48–1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67–2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Conclusion Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline–concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. PMID:26480967

  7. Psychiatric nurse practitioners' experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ngako, Kgalabi J; Van Rensburg, Elsie S J; Mataboge, Sanah M L

    2012-05-30

    Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse. The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs) presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations for the advanced PNPs to facilitate promotion of the mental health of PNPs with reference to nursing practice, research and education. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. The target population was PNPs working with MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms in a public mental health care institution in Gauteng. Data were collected by means of four focus group interviews involving 21 PNPs. The researcher made use of drawings, naïve sketches and field notes for the purpose of data triangulation. Data were analysed in accordance with Tesch's method of open coding. The three themes that emerged were: PNPs experienced working with these MHCUs as entering an unsafe world where care became a burden; they experienced negative emotional reactions and attitudes towards these MHCUs that compromised quality nursing care; and they made a plea for a nurturing environment that would enhance quality nursing care. The PNPs suggest skills and competency development, organisational support, and a need for external resources. Creation of a positive environment and mobilisation of resources as well as the identification and bridging of obstacles are essential in the promotion of the overall wellbeing and mental health of PNPs.

  8. Oncology nurses' perceptions of their relations with family members in an ambulatory cancer care setting: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Lobchuk, Michelle; Udod, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Trends signal an increasing prevalence of people living through and beyond a cancer diagnosis with an enhanced reliance on ambulatory cancer care services and family caregiving. Despite this trend, there has been limited focus on nurses' experiences with providing support to families who care for patients in the community. For oncology nurses in ambulatory care settings, job satisfaction has decreased significantly as they are concerned with their ability to consistently provide safe and quality care to patients and their family. Although other studies indicated that the lack of time and limited resources are regrettably accepted aspects of nurses' work environments, our mixed methods small-scale study addressed how work environments still can meet the growing need for enhanced support and relations among nurses, patients, and families in ambulatory cancer care.

  9. Reproductive health in the adolescent and young adult cancer patient: an innovative training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Hutchins, Nicole M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-03-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare. The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change.

  10. The power and politics of collaboration in nurse practitioner role development.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Judith; Purkis, Mary Ellen

    2010-12-01

    This health services study employed participatory action research to engage nurse practitioners (NPs) from two health authorities in British Columbia, Canada, to examine the research question: How does collaboration advance NP role integration within primary health-care? The inquiry was significant and timely because the NP role was recently introduced into the province, supported by passage of legislation and regulation and introduction of graduate education programs. In separate and concurrent inquiry groups, the NPs discussed their practice patterns, role development progress and understanding of collaboration and role integration. The inquiry revealed the political nature of the NP role and the extent to which NPs relied on collaborative relations at all levels of the health system to advance role integration. Given that NP role development is still at an early stage in this province, as well as other provinces in Canada, this study provides important insights into the power and politics of role development, and offers direction for future role advancement.

  11. States with the least restrictive regulations experienced the largest increase in patients seen by nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Loresto, Figaro L; Rounds, Linda R; Goodwin, James S

    2013-07-01

    The use of nurse practitioners (NPs) is one way to address the shortage of physician primary care providers. NP training programs and the number of practicing NPs have increased in the past two decades. However, regulations limiting their scope of practice vary greatly by state. We assessed the impact of state regulations on the increase in care provided by NPs in the United States, using a 5 percent national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We found that between 1998 and 2010 the number of Medicare patients receiving care from NPs increased fifteenfold. By 2010 states with the least restrictive regulations of NP practice had a 2.5-fold greater likelihood of patients' receiving their primary care from NPs than did the most restrictive states. Relaxing state restrictions on NP practice should increase the use of NPs as primary care providers, which in turn would reduce the current national shortage of primary care providers.

  12. Experience of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners in Public Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Bethany J; Hurd, Manton; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of health insurance coverage under the Accountable Care Act has meant that millions of people are now insured for mental health treatment, but with no significant increase in the mental health workforce. Services of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) may be best utilized to improve access to and quality of public mental health services if the financial, political, scope of practice, and treatment model barriers that limit their ability or willingness to practice in these settings are better understood. This article reports qualitative results from a study that assessed barriers and best practices in the use of PMHNPs in county mental health services in California. Results indicate that PMHNPs are valued for their "whole person" perspective, collaborative approach, and interpersonal communication skills, but that significant knowledge gaps, regulatory constraints, and bureaucratic barriers in public mental health systems inhibit PMHNPs from practicing at the top of their scope.

  13. The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: nurse practitioners using behaviour modification strategies.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Todd Charles; Keeping-Burke, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) places great financial strain on the health care system and dramatically affects individual quality of life. As primary health care providers, nurse practitioners (NPs) are ideally positioned to advise clients on risk factor and lifestyle modifications that ameliorate the impact of CVD. While the lifestyle targets for CVD prevention are established, the most effective means of achieving these goals remain uncertain. Behaviour modification strategies, including motivational interviewing (MI) and the transtheoretical model (TTM), have been suggested, but neither approach is established as being more efficacious than the other. In this paper, evidence on the effectiveness of the two approaches for modifying smoking, diet, and exercise behaviour are presented, and a recommendation for NP practice is made.

  14. Specialty distribution of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P; Morgan, Perri; Johnson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Physician workforce projections often include scenarios that forecast physician shortages under different assumptions about the deployment of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs). These scenarios generally assume that PAs and NPs are an interchangeable resource and that their specialty distributions do not change over time. This study investigated changes in PA and NP specialty distribution in North Carolina between 1997 and 2013. The data show that over the study period, PAs and NPs practiced in a wide range of specialties, but each profession had a specific pattern. The proportion of PAs-but not NPs-reporting practice in primary care dropped significantly. PAs were more likely than NPs to report practice in urgent care, emergency medicine, and surgical subspecialties. Physician workforce models need to account for the different and changing specialization trends of NPs and PAs.

  15. Teaching differential diagnosis to nurse practitioner students in a distance program.

    PubMed

    Colella, Christine L; Beery, Theresa A

    2014-08-01

    An interactive case study (ICS) is a novel way to enhance the teaching of differential diagnosis to distance learning nurse practitioner students. Distance education renders the use of many teaching strategies commonly used with face-to-face students difficult, if not impossible. To meet this new pedagogical dilemma and to provide excellence in education, the ICS was developed. Kolb's theory of experiential learning supported efforts to follow the utilization of the ICS. This study sought to determine whether learning outcomes for the distance learning students were equivalent to those of on-campus students who engaged in a live-patient encounter. Accuracy of differential diagnosis lists generated by onsite and online students was compared. Equivalency testing assessed clinical, rather than only statistical, significance in data from 291 students. The ICS responses from the distance learning and onsite students differed by 4.9%, which was within the a priori equivalence estimate of 10%. Narrative data supported the findings.

  16. Revisiting scope of practice facilitators and barriers for primary care nurse practitioners: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Smaldone, Arlene; Clarke, Sean; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Rosato, Barbara G; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2013-02-01

    Revisiting scope of practice (SOP) policies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is necessary in the evolving primary care environment with goals to provide timely access, improve quality, and contain cost. This study utilized qualitative descriptive design to investigate NP roles and responsibilities as primary care providers (PCPs) in Massachusetts and their perceptions about barriers and facilitators to their SOP. Through purposive sampling, 23 NPs were recruited and they participated in group and individual interviews in spring 2011.The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software, and content analysis was applied. In addition to NP roles and responsibilities, three themes affecting NP SOP were: regulatory environment; comprehension of NP role; and work environment. NPs take on similar responsibilities as physicians to deliver primary care services; however, the regulatory environment and billing practices, lack of comprehension of the NP role, and challenging work environments limit successful NP practice.

  17. Musculoskeletal Workforce Needs: Are Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners the Solution? AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Boden, Scott D; Knott, Patrick T; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Yang, Brian W

    2016-06-01

    Growth estimates and demographic shifts of the population of the United States foreshadow a future heightened demand for musculoskeletal care. Although many articles have discussed this growing demand on the musculoskeletal workforce, few address the inevitable need for more musculoskeletal care providers. As we are unable to increase the number of orthopaedic surgeons because of restrictions on graduate medical education slots, physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) represent one potential solution to the impending musculoskeletal care supply shortage. This American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) symposium report investigates models for advanced practice provider integration, considers key issues affecting PAs and NPs, and proposes guidelines to help to assess the logistical and educational possibilities of further incorporating NPs and PAs into the orthopaedic workforce in order to address future musculoskeletal care needs.

  18. Nurse Practitioner Perceptions of a Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in the Retail Clinic Setting.

    PubMed

    Marjama, Kristen L; Oliver, JoAnn S; Hayes, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a study to gain insight into the utility and perceived feasibility of the American Diabetes Association's Diabetes Risk Test (DRT) implemented by nurse practitioners (NPs) in the retail clinic setting. The DRT is intended for those without a known risk for diabetes. Researchers invited 1,097 NPs working in the retail clinics of a nationwide company to participate voluntarily in an online questionnaire. Of the 248 NPs who sent in complete responses, 114 (46%) indicated that they used the DRT in the clinic. Overall mean responses from these NPs indicated that they perceive the DRT as a feasible tool in the retail clinic setting. Use of the DRT or similar risk assessment tools in the retail clinic setting can aid in the identification of people at risk for type 2 diabetes.

  19. Interprofessional education: a nurse practitioner impacts family medicine residents' smoking cessation counselling experiences.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Joan; Brown, Judith Belle; Smith, Carrie

    2009-07-01

    This qualitative research paper describes a successful example of interprofessional education with family medicine residents (FMR) by a nurse practitioner (NP) colleague. The educational impact of the NP role in regard to smoking cessation counselling is revealed by the analysis of 16 semi-structured interviews using a phenomenological approach. The key themes depicted the NP as an educator and mentor, encourager and referral resource. Outcomes of improved knowledge, skills, and motivation towards providing smoking cessation counselling are described. This research provides some understanding of how professional students' learning and practice can be affected by a member of another profession through direct and indirect approaches. The experiences identified how interprofessional education and collaborative clinical practice can affect FMRs' attitudes, knowledge and behaviours. This learning can guide us in enhancing the quality of education provided to all health care professionals.

  20. Use of oral examinations to teach concepts of evidence-based practice to nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Burman, Mary E; Hart, Ann Marie; Brown, Julie; Sherard, Pat

    2007-05-01

    Evidence-based practice has become part of nurse practitioner education. One innovative approach to teaching and evaluating evidence-based practice is the implementation of oral examinations, in which students orally present their review of a research article. Prior to the examination, students are given a research article to critique and can prepare for the examination using their notes and textbooks. At a scheduled time, they meet with a faculty member to respond to both predetermined and unexpected questions requiring critique of the research and thorough explanation of how it will (or will not) influence their practice. Although this approach may produce anxiety in students, it provides another way to evaluate students' ability to communicate about a complex topic and is an excellent complementary evaluation method to other approaches, such as case studies or written examinations.

  1. Exploring the Nurse Practitioner Role in Managing Fractures in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Burgess, Jennifer; Van der Horst, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current level of involvement of nurse practitioners (NPs) in activities related to preventing and managing fractures in long-term care (LTC). This study used a sequential explanatory mixed methods design that included two phases—a cross-sectional survey followed by qualitative interviews. A final sample of 12 NPs completed the online survey for a response rate of 67%. Eleven of the 12 NPs who completed the survey agreed to participate in a follow-up interview. NPs reported that they were quite engaged in managing fractures in LTC; specifically, they were most active in caring for residents post-fracture. NPs described their role as being holistic in nature in their assessment and treatments related to managing fractures. The findings from this mixed method study add to the growing body of knowledge related to how NPs manage fractures in LTC. PMID:25825270

  2. Psych NP-NC: a benchmark graduate nurse practitioner program for meeting the mental health needs in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    UNC-Chapel Hill's Psych NP-NC program prepares clinically and culturally proficient nurse practitioners to provide psychiatric and mental health care in North Carolina areas that are medically underserved and have a greater number of health disparities. This article reviews the program and the role of its graduates and makes policy recommendations for improving mental health care in the state.

  3. Curriculum Guidelines & Regulatory Criteria for Family Nurse Practitioners Seeking Prescriptive Authority To Manage Pharmacotherapeutics in Primary Care. Summary Report 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Chicago, IL.

    This report describes a multi-organizational project to accomplish two goals: (1) to develop pharmacology/pharmacotherapeutics curriculum guidelines designed to prepare family nurse practitioners (FNPs) for full prescriptive authority; and (2) to develop regulatory criteria for evaluating the academic preparation and clinical competencies of FNPs…

  4. Counseling and provision of long-acting reversible contraception in the US: National survey of nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Cynthia C.; Stratton, Laura; Raine, Tina R.; Thompson, Kirsten; Henderson, Jillian T.; Blum, Maya; Postlethwaite, Debbie; Speidel, J Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nurse practitioners (NPs) provide frontline care in women’s health, including contraception, an essential preventive service. Their importance for contraceptive care will grow, with healthcare reforms focused on affordable primary care. This study assessed practice and training needs to prepare NPs to offer high-efficacy contraceptives - IUDs and implants. Method A US nationally representative sample of nurse practitioners in primary care and women’s health was surveyed in 2009 (response rate 69%, n=586) to assess clinician knowledge and practices, guided by the CDC US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Results Two-thirds of women’s health NPs (66%) were trained in IUD insertions, compared to 12% of primary care NPs. Contraceptive counseling that routinely included IUDs was low overall (43%). Nurse practitioners used overly restrictive patient eligibility criteria, inconsistent with CDC guidelines. Insertion training (aOR=2.4, 95%CI: 1.10 5.33) and knowledge of patient eligibility (aOR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.91 4.32) were associated with IUD provision. Contraceptive implant provision was low: 42% of NPs in women’s health and 10% in primary care . Half of NPs desired training in these methods. Conclusion Nurse practitioners have an increasingly important position in addressing high unintended pregnancy in the U.S., but require specific training in long-acting reversible contraceptives. PMID:24128950

  5. Patients' expectations of the health advice conversation with the diabetes nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Grund, Jeanette; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén

    2012-10-01

    Type 2-diabetes usually makes its first appearance in adult age. In order for patients to feel in control of the disease, they need support and information that can easily be understood and which is relevant for the individual. By educating and supporting them, patients can conduct self-care and take control. The aim of this study was to highlight the expectations that patients with type 2-diabetes have of the health advice conversation with the nurse practitioner. A qualitative method using interviews was conducted and the data material was analysed according to manifest and latent content analysis. Three categories emerged in the results. Firstly, providing good accessibility to the diabetes nurse practitioner is of importance. Secondly, there is a demand for group activities in which patients have the opportunity to talk with other individuals who have diabetes. Finally, knowledge about self-care means that the patients themselves are able to change the intake of medication, their eating habits, and exercise according to need, as this leads to increased independence and self-management. The latent content demonstrates that the patient is striving towards competence and self-confidence in order to achieve a balance between lifestyle and the normalisation of blood sugar levels, which means empowerment. In addition, the informants expressed a demand for group activities where they can discuss the disease with others in the same situation. A combination of knowledge about the disease, receiving individual advice, and participation in groups can be beneficial in order to motivate the informants about lifestyle changes and to gain the ability to manage the disease.

  6. Are regulations more consumer-friendly when boards of nursing are the sole regulators of nurse practitioners?

    PubMed

    Rudner Lugo, Nancy; O'Grady, Eileen T; Hodnicki, Donna; Hanson, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    The widely varied regulations in the 50 states often limit consumer access to nurse practitioners (NPs). In 22 states, the Board of Nursing (BON) must share NP regulatory authority with another profession, usually physicians. This study examines the relationship between the BON as the sole authority regulating NPs or sharing that authority with another profession and the NP regulatory environment. Independent t tests compared the NP regulatory environments for consumer access and choice in states with sole BON regulation with those in states with involvement of another profession. The states' NP regulatory environments were quantified with an 11-measure tool assessing domains of consumer access to NPs, NP patients' access to service, and NP patients' access to prescription medications. BON-regulated states were less restrictive (P < .01, effect size 1.02) and supported NP professional autonomy. Entry into practice regulations did not differ in the two groups of states. Having another profession involved in regulation correlates with more restrictions on consumer access to NPs and more restrictions to the full deployment of NPs.

  7. Evaluation of initial implementation of an organized adult health program employing family nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R S; Basden, P; Howell, L J

    1982-11-01

    An organized program for periodic health evaluation of adults was instituted at one Group Health Cooperative Clinic (A) using a fixed exam schedule and two family nurse practitioners (FNPs), working in a team with six family practitioners, to perform as many of the examinations as possible. We evaluated the effects of the FNP program at Clinic A in terms of six specific objectives, comparing it with the preexisting conventional pattern in another clinic (B). The evaluation showed 1) diminished waiting times at Clinic A; 2) no diminution in quality of examinations performed by FNPs; 3) lesser unit costs in Clinic A; 4) no indication of higher overall postexam outpatient utilization or costs for those examined by FNPs; 5) greater patient satisfaction at Clinic A than Clinic B, and for those examined by FNPs, compared with those examined by physicians (MDs); 6) only 17 per cent of FNP time was spent on health evaluations and met one half the overall demand at Clinic A; 7) FNPs made day-to-day practice qualitatively more complex for some MDs; and 8) different staffing ratios are probably necessary when FNPs are teamed with family physicians rather than internists.

  8. Public Health Service--Grants for construction of teaching facilities, educational improvements, scholarships and student loans; grants for nurse practitioner traineeship programs. Interim-final regulations.

    PubMed

    1980-05-06

    These regulations set forth requirements for grants to schools of nursing, medicine, and public health, to public or nonprofit private hospitals, and to other nonprofit entities to meet the costs of traineeships for the training of nurse practitioners. Trainees must reside in health manpower shortage areas and sign a commitment with the Secretary to practice full-time as nurse practitioners in areas having shortages of primary medical care manpower.

  9. Attaining resident duty hours compliance: the acute care nurse practitioners program at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Scott; Wali, Soma; Thomas, Peggy; Cope, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    The institution of resident duty hours limits by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has made it difficult for some programs to cover inpatient teaching services. The medical literature is replete with editorials criticizing the hour limits and the resulting problems but is nearly silent on the topic of constructive solutions to compliance. In this article, the authors describe a new program, initiated in 2003 at the Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, of using acute care nurse practitioners to allow for compliance with the "24 + 6" continuous duty hours limit, as well as the 80-hour workweek limit. Each post-call team is assigned a nurse practitioner for the day, allowing residents to sign out by 2 pm while ensuring quality care for patients. Nurse practitioners participate in evaluation of residents and, in turn, are evaluated by them. Using this system, the authors report 99% compliance with ACGME work-hour restrictions, with average work hours for inpatient ward residents decreasing from 84 to 76 hours per week. Physician satisfaction with the new system is high; anonymous evaluation by residents and faculty returned average scores of 8.8 out of 9 possible points. The authors report that using nurse practitioners on post-call days provides excellent, continuous patient care without impinging on scheduling and without sacrificing responsibility, continuity, or education for the residents. This system has several potential advantages over previously described work-hour solutions. Addition of a nurse practitioner to the post-call team is an effective solution to the problem of compliance with resident duty hours limitations.

  10. Medication double-checking procedures in clinical practice: a cross-sectional survey of oncology nurses' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Taxis, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Double-checking is widely recommended as an essential method to prevent medication errors. However, prior research has shown that the concept of double-checking is not clearly defined, and that little is known about actual practice in oncology, for example, what kind of checking procedures are applied. Objective To study the practice of different double-checking procedures in chemotherapy administration and to explore nurses' experiences, for example, how often they actually find errors using a certain procedure. General evaluations regarding double-checking, for example, frequency of interruptions during and caused by a check, or what is regarded as its essential feature was assessed. Methods In a cross-sectional survey, qualified nurses working in oncology departments of 3 hospitals were asked to rate 5 different scenarios of double-checking procedures regarding dimensions such as frequency of use in practice and appropriateness to prevent medication errors; they were also asked general questions about double-checking. Results Overall, 274 nurses (70% response rate) participated in the survey. The procedure of jointly double-checking (read-read back) was most commonly used (69% of respondents) and rated as very appropriate to prevent medication errors. Jointly checking medication was seen as the essential characteristic of double-checking—more frequently than ‘carrying out checks independently’ (54% vs 24%). Most nurses (78%) found the frequency of double-checking in their department appropriate. Being interrupted in one's own current activity for supporting a double-check was reported to occur frequently. Regression analysis revealed a strong preference towards checks that are currently implemented at the responders' workplace. Conclusions Double-checking is well regarded by oncology nurses as a procedure to help prevent errors, with jointly checking being used most frequently. Our results show that the notion of independent checking needs to be

  11. Examining the potential of nurse practitioners from a critical social justice perspective.

    PubMed

    Browne, Annette J; Tarlier, Denise S

    2008-06-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are increasingly called on to provide high-quality health-care particularly for people who face significant barriers to accessing services. Although discourses of social justice have become relatively common in nursing and health services literature, critical analyses of how NP roles articulate with social justice issues have received less attention. In this study, we examine the role of NPs from a critical social justice perspective. A critical social justice lens raises morally significant questions, for example, why certain individuals and groups bear a disproportionate burden of illness and suffering; what social conditions contribute to disparities in health and social status; and what social mandate NPs ought to develop in response to these realities. In our analysis, we draw on lessons learned from the initial Canadian experience with the introduction of NPs in the 1970s to consider the renewed and burgeoning interest in NPs in Canada, Australia and elsewhere. As we argue, a critical social justice perspective (in addition to the biomedical foci of NP practice) will be essential to sustaining long-term, socially responsive NP roles and achieving greater equity in health and health-care.

  12. More than a prescriber: gerontological nurse practitioners' perspectives on prescribing and pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Ladd, Elissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about nurse practitioners' (NPs') prescriptive decision making for geriatric patients with attention to pharmaceutical marketing influences. Prior research has focused on physician prescribers and identified suboptimal practices. Because the majority of medications are prescribed to older adults, NPs in geriatric practice were targeted as an information-rich group to interview about prescribing issues. Given the exploratory nature of this research, qualitative focus group methods were employed using content analysis. Fifteen NPs were recruited at an annual national geriatric NP conference. They worked in all regions of the United States, had an average of 9 years prescribing experience, and participated in 1 of the 2 focus groups. The key theme that emerged was that they were more than a prescriber. Findings revealed overwhelming consistency among the NP participants that their nursing background instilled a holistic approach that encompassed both nondrug and therapeutic drug options and skepticism about drug marketing, as well as offered a positive difference by tailoring to their patients' biophysical, psychological, and economic needs with an involvement in the interplay of geriatric care issues not typically addressed by physicians. The participants' reported approaches were in alignment with geriatric prescribing recommendations.

  13. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  14. Responding empathically to patients: Development, implementation, and evaluation of a communication skills training module for oncology nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Cassandra; Banerjee, Smita C.; Manna, Ruth; Shen, Megan Johnson; Hammonds, Stacey; Coyle, Nessa; Krueger, Carol A.; Maloney, Erin; Zaider, Talia; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to report on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Communication Skills Training (CST) module for inpatient oncology nurses on how to respond empathically to patients. Methods 248 nurses from a USA cancer center participated in a CST module on responding empathically to patients. Nurses completed pre- and post-training Standardized Patient Assessments (SPAs), a survey on their confidence in and intent to utilize skills taught, and a six-month post-training survey of self-reported use of skills. Results Results indicate that nurses were satisfied with the module, reporting that agreement or strong agreement to 5 out of 6 items assessing satisfaction 96.7%–98.0% of the time. Nurses’ self-efficacy in responding empathically significantly increased pre- to post-training. Additionally, nurses showed empathy skill improvement in the post-SPAs. Finally, 88.2% of nurses reported feeling confident in using the skills they learned post-training and reported an increase of 42–63% in the use of specific empathic skills. Conclusions A CST module for nurses in responding empathically to patients showed feasibility, acceptability, and improvement in self-efficacy as well as skill uptake. Practice implications This CST module provides an easily targeted intervention for improving nurse–patient communication and patient-centered care. PMID:26686992

  15. Nurse views of the adequacy of decision making and nurse distress regarding artificial hydration for terminally ill cancer patients: a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kimura, Rieko; Takahashi, Mikako; Adachi, Isamu

    We evaluated nurse views on the adequacy of decision-making discussion among nurses and physicians regarding artificial hydration for terminally ill cancer patients and nurse distress arising from artificial hydration issues, as well as factors related to this distress. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of 4 questions about nurse views of discussions regarding artificial hydration and 6 questions about nurse distress arising from artificial hydration issues was distributed in participating institutions in October 2002 and returned by mail. A total of 3328 responses (79%) were analyzed. Almost half of the nurses felt that discussion of terminal hydration issues was insufficient. Among responses, 39% of oncology nurses and 78% of palliative care unit (PCU) nurses agreed that patients and medical practitioners discuss the issue of artificial hydration adequately, and 49% and 79%, respectively, agreed that medical practitioners discuss the issue of artificial hydration with other physicians adequately. As for distress on behalf of patients and families who refuse artificial hydration, 44% of oncology nurses and 57% of PCU nurses experienced such distress for patients, and 19% and 28% did so for families, respectively. Furthermore, 48% of oncology nurses and 47% of PCU nurses experienced distress arising from disagreements among medical practitioners about withholding artificial hydration, whereas 44% and 43% experienced distress about medical practitioners refusing artificial hydration, respectively. Discussion among care providers regarding artificial hydration is insufficient, particularly in general wards. Medical practitioners caring for terminally ill cancer patients should engage in greater discussion among patient-centered teams and facilitate individualized decision making.

  16. Evaluating newly acquired authority of nurse practitioners and physician assistants for reserved medical procedures in the Netherlands: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy P; Van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne JL; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2014-01-01

    Aim The study protocol is designed to evaluate the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Background Recent (temporarily) enacted legislation in Dutch health care authorizes nurse practitioners and physician assistants to indicate and perform specified medical procedures, i.e. catheterization, cardioversion, defibrillation, endoscopy, injection, puncture, prescribing and simple surgical procedures, independently. Formerly, these procedures were exclusively reserved to physicians, dentists and midwives. Design A triangulation mixed method design is used to collect quantitative (surveys) and qualitative (interviews) data. Methods Outcomes are selected from evidence-based frameworks and models for assessing the impact of advanced nursing on quality of health care. Data are collected in various manners. Surveys are structured around the domains: (i) quality of care; (ii) costs; (iii) healthcare resource use; and (iv) patient centredness. Focus group and expert interviews aim to ascertain facilitators and barriers to the implementation process. Data are collected before the amendment of the law, 1 and 2·5 years thereafter. Groups of patients, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, supervising physicians and policy makers all participate in this national study. The study is supported by a grant from the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in March 2011. Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained in July 2011. Conclusion This study will provide information about the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Study findings aim to support policy makers and other stakeholders in making related decisions. The study design enables a cross-national comparative analysis. PMID:24684631

  17. The effect of nurses’ preparedness and nurse practitioner status on triage call management in primary care: A secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the ESTEEM trial

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Anna; Warren, Fiona C.; Richards, Suzanne H.; Calitri, Raff; Chaplin, Katherine; Fletcher, Emily; Holt, Tim A.; Lattimer, Valerie; Murdoch, Jamie; Richards, David A.; Campbell, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse-led telephone triage is increasingly used to manage demand for general practitioner consultations in UK general practice. Previous studies are equivocal about the relationship between clinical experience and the call outcomes of nurse triage. Most research is limited to investigating nurse telephone triage in out-of-hours settings. Objective To investigate whether the professional characteristics of primary care nurses undertaking computer decision supported software telephone triage are related to call disposition. Design Questionnaire survey of nurses delivering the nurse intervention arm of the ESTEEM trial, to capture role type (practice nurse or nurse practitioner), prescriber status, number of years’ nursing experience, graduate status, previous experience of triage, and perceived preparedness for triage. Our main outcome was the proportion of triaged patients recommended for follow-up within the practice (call disposition), including all contact types (face-to-face, telephone or home visit), by a general practitioner or nurse. Settings 15 general practices and 7012 patients receiving the nurse triage intervention in four regions of the UK. Participants 45 nurse practitioners and practice nurse trained in the use of clinical decision support software. Methods We investigated the associations between nursing characteristics and triage call disposition for patient ‘same-day’ appointment requests in general practice using multivariable logistic regression modelling. Results Valid responses from 35 nurses (78%) from 14 practices: 31/35 (89%) had ≥10 years’ experience with 24/35 (69%) having ≥20 years. Most patient contacts (3842/4605; 86%) were recommended for follow-up within the practice. Nurse practitioners were less likely to recommend patients for follow-up odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.07; 0.49 than practice nurses. Nurses who reported that their previous experience had prepared them less well for triage were more

  18. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, L; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. Methods: A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. Results: The mean difference in FEV1 was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval –1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference £1497, 95% confidence interval £688 to £2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year (£2625) than in the second year (£411). Conclusions: Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources. PMID:12149523

  19. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  20. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  1. Describing a residency program developed for newly graduated nurse practitioners employed in retail health settings.

    PubMed

    Thabault, Paulette; Mylott, Laura; Patterson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for nurse practitioners (NPs). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, interprofessional collaboration, and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover, and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted Webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral-level academic course that focused on interprofessional collaboration in health care, population health, and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences, and business Webinars. Because their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt that it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program, there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization's educational programs can enable academic

  2. Analysis of touch used by occupational therapy practitioners in skilled nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Morris, Douglas; Henegar, J; Khanin, S; Oberle, G; Thacker, S

    2014-09-01

    Instrumental touch is identified as having purposeful physical contact in order to complete a task. Expressive touch is identified as warm, friendly physical contact and is not solely for performing a task. Expressive touch has been associated with improved client status, increased rapport and greater gains made during therapy. The purpose of the study was to observe the frequency of expressive and instrumental touch utilized by an occupational therapist during an occupational therapy session. Thirty-three occupational therapy professionals, including occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants, employed at skilled nursing facilities in southwest Florida were observed. Data were collected on the Occupational Therapy Interaction Assessment. The results of the data analysis showed a positive relationship between the gender of the therapist and the frequency of expressive touch. The data also showed that a large majority of touches were instrumental touch and pertained to functional mobility. The results of the study can contribute to a better understanding of the holistic aspects of occupational therapy. By the use of more expressive touch, occupational therapy practitioners may have a positive, beneficial effect on both the client and the therapy process as a whole. Further research is needed to determine the effect an occupational therapy setting has on the frequency of instrumental and expressive touch. A larger sample size and a distinction between evaluation and treatment sessions would benefit future studies.

  3. Trends in the Supply and Practice Environment of Nurse Practitioners in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Judge, Shana M; Boursaw, Blake; Cohen, Sally S

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the practice environment for nurse practitioners (NPs) in New Mexico and assesses whether the future supply of NPs will be adequate to meet the health care needs of a varied population in a sparsely populated state with a relatively low average standard of living, yet one that offers a broad scope of practice authority for its NPs. The study's models forecast decreasing numbers of New Mexico NPs between the ages of 40 and 60 in the state's metropolitan counties. These decreases are not offset by gains in other age brackets. Thus, over time, the state's metro areas may not maintain their 2013 NP-to-insured and NP-to-senior population ratios. In contrast, the study's models forecast improving ratios in nonmetropolitan counties. The future need for NPs in New Mexico and similarly situated states may therefore be greatest in fast-growing urban areas, where the number of newly insured individuals with primary care needs is likely to be high.

  4. Activities and Attributes of Nurse Practitioner Leaders: Lessons from a Primary Care System Change.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Tammy; Higuchi, Kathryn Smith

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills, and they have a critical role to play in leading health system reform. The evidence in support of NP-led initiatives is growing; however, in spite of the positive outcomes associated with these initiatives, considerable opposition to and debate about the potential for NPs to lead health system change and interprofessional teams continues. To date, we know very little about NP leadership activities, particularly those activities that contribute to primary care system change, and there are very few examples of this type of leadership. The qualitative descriptive study here was part of a larger case study that examined stakeholder participation in a system change led by NPs. The change involved the introduction of a new NP-led model of team-based primary care delivery in Ontario, Canada. Data from participant interviews and public documents were analyzed to describe the activities and attributes (perseverance, risk-taking and effective communication) of two NP leaders who were the drivers of this change. Knowledge of these activities and attributes has the potential to inform NP leadership roles in health system policy planning and implementation. However, to be able to provide effective leadership in system change, NPs need access to educational content about public policy and opportunities to develop and practice the skills required to work with multiple stakeholders, including those who oppose change.

  5. Family nurse practitioners in primary care: a study of practice and patients.

    PubMed

    Pesznecker, B L; Draye, M A

    1978-10-01

    In this nationwide study 8,905 patients were seen by 356 family nurse practitioners (FNPs) during February through April 1977. The ratio of white to black and white to "other" patients was six to one. Racial minorities were seen significantly more often than were whites in public clinics supported predominantly by public tax monies. The smallest number of patients seen was in the "elderly" age group, 65 and over. Elderly patients were located to a greater extent in the South and they used both private and public clinics. The number of infants and children seen was greater in the Western region and in semi-urban areas. The predominant patient problems seen by FNPs were Prevention/Health Supervision and Respiratory. Although there were similarities between top ranking primary care problems seen by FNPs in this study compared with primary care physicians in other studies, proportionately more FNP patient contacts were for Prevention/Health Supervision and the patients tended to be in the younger age group.

  6. The value of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role: development of a team perspective framework.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; Reeves, Scott; van Soeren, Mary

    2013-11-01

    There is a need to understand nurse practitioner (NP) interprofessional practice within hospital teams to inform effective role integration and evolution. To begin this understanding a supplementary analysis of 30 hospital team member focus groups was carried out using constructivist grounded theory methodology. This conceptual rendering of the team members' shared perspective of NP actions provides insight into the meaning and importance of the NP role. Participants emphasized three hospital-based (HB) NP practice foci as the meaning of role value; easing others' workload, holding patient care together and evolving practice. Trust emerged as a pre-requisite condition for HB NP role efficacy. A team member perspective framework of HB NP practice is presented as the first stage in developing a model of HB NP interprofessional practice within hospitals. The framework provides multiple perspectives to the meaning and value of the HB NP role beyond basic role description. The framework may be used by healthcare professionals, operational leaders, academia and HB NPs to enhance role respect and understanding.

  7. Nurse practitioner and physician assistant students' knowledge, attitudes, and perspectives of chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Briana S.; Ball, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess nurse practitioner (NP) and physician assistant (PA) students' views of chiropractic. As the role of these providers progresses in primary care settings, providers' views and knowledge of chiropractic will impact interprofessional collaboration and patient outcomes. Understanding how NP and PA students perceive chiropractic may be beneficial in building integrative health care systems. Methods: This descriptive quantitative pilot study utilized a 56-item survey to examine attitudes, knowledge, and perspectives of NP and PA students in their 2nd year of graduate studies. Frequencies and binomial and multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine responses to survey totals. Results: Ninety-two (97%) students completed the survey. There were conflicting results as to whether participants viewed chiropractic as mainstream or alternative. The majority of participants indicated lack of awareness regarding current scientific evidence for chiropractic and indicated a positive interest in learning more about the profession. Students who reported prior experience with chiropractic had higher attitude-positive responses compared to those without experience. Participants were found to have substantial knowledge deficits in relation to chiropractic treatments and scope of practice. Conclusion: The results of this study emphasize the need for increased integrative initiatives and chiropractic exposure in NP and PA education to enhance future interprofessional collaboration in health care. PMID:26771903

  8. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners perform effective roles on teams caring for Medicare patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine; Thorpe, Carolyn; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Bartels, Christie; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-11-01

    One approach to the patient-centered medical home, particularly for patients with chronic illnesses, is to include physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) on primary care teams. Using Medicare claims and electronic health record data from a large physician group, we compared outcomes for two groups of adult Medicare patients with diabetes whose conditions were at various levels of complexity: those whose care teams included PAs or NPs in various roles, and those who received care from physicians only. Outcomes were generally equivalent in thirteen comparisons. In four comparisons, outcomes were superior for the patients receiving care from PAs or NPs, but in three other comparisons the outcomes were superior for patients receiving care from physicians only. Specific roles performed by PAs and NPs were associated with different patterns in the measure of the quality of diabetes care and use of health care services. No role was best for all outcomes. Our findings suggest that patient characteristics, as well as patients' and organizations' goals, should be considered when determining when and how to deploy PAs and NPs on primary care teams. Accordingly, training and policy should continue to support role flexibility for these health professionals.

  9. Nurse practitioner organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for professional practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Stone, Patricia W; Smaldone, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care is key to meeting the increased demand for care. Organizational climates in primary care settings affect NP professional practice and the quality of care. This study investigated organizational climate and its domains affecting NP professional practice in primary care settings. A qualitative descriptive design, with purposive sampling, was used to recruit 16 NPs practicing in primary care settings in Massachusetts. An interview guide was developed and pretested with two NPs and in 1 group interview with 7 NPs. Data collection took place in spring of 2011. Individual interviews lasted from 30-70 minutes, were audio recorded, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software by 3 researchers. Content analysis was applied. Three previously identified themes, NP-physician relations, independent practice and autonomy, and professional visibility, as well as two new themes, organizational support and resources and NP-administration relations emerged from the analyses. NPs reported collegial relations with physicians, challenges in establishing independent practice, suboptimal relationships with administration, and lack of support. NP contributions to patient care were invisible. Favorable organizational climates should be promoted to support the expanding of NP workforce in primary care and to optimize recruitment and retention efforts.

  10. Labour saver or building a cohesive interprofessional team? The role of the nurse practitioner within hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Nurse practitioners (NP) are employed within hospital interprofessional (IP) teams in several countries worldwide. There have been some efforts to describe the nature of the NP role within IP teams largely focussing on how the role may augment care processes. Here, using a constructivist grounded theory approach, the perceptions of NPs about their role were compared and integrated into a previously published team perspective as the second phase of a larger study. Seventeen hospital-based (HB) NPs across Ontario, Canada, participated in group and individual interviews. The NP perspective substantiated and expanded the previously reported team perspective, resulting in an IP perspective. The three practice foci illustrating role value meaning of this perspective became: evolve NP role and advance the specialty, focus on team working, and hold patient care together. The IP perspective, juxtaposed with an existing contingency approach, revealed that NPs were promoting IP work, predominantly at the collaboration and teamwork levels, and aiding IP team transitions to appropriate forms of IP work. The practice, "focus on team working"' was strongly related to promoting IP work. The findings were consistent with HB NPs enacting a role in building IP team cohesiveness rather than merely acting as a labour saver. This is the first study to align NP and team understanding of HB NP role value using an IP framework.

  11. Veteran Affairs Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education: transforming nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Watts, Sharon A; Janson, Susan L; Angelo, Laura A; Nash, Melanie; Zapatka, Susan A; Brienza, Rebecca; Gilman, Stuart C; Bowen, Judith L; Saxe, JoAnne M

    2014-01-01

    To integrate health care professional learners into patient-centered primary care delivery models, the Department of Veterans Affairs has funded five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCEs). The main goal of the CoEPCEs is to develop and test innovative structural and curricular models that foster transformation of health care training from profession-specific "silos" to interprofessional, team-based educational and care delivery models in patient-centered primary care settings. CoEPCE implementation emphasizes four core curricular domains: shared decision making, sustained relationships, interprofessional collaboration, and performance improvement. The structural models allow interprofessional learners to have longitudinal learning experiences and sustained and continuous relationships with patients, faculty mentors, and peer learners. This article presents an overview of the innovative curricular models developed at each site, focusing on nurse practitioner (NP) education. Insights on transforming NP education in the practice setting and its impact on traditional NP educational models are offered. Preliminary outcomes and sustainment examples are also provided.

  12. The role of ICT in supporting disruptive innovation: a multi-site qualitative study of nurse practitioners in emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The disruptive potential of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) is evident in their ability to offer services traditionally provided by primary care practitioners and their provision of a health promotion model of care in response to changing health trends. No study has qualitatively investigated the role of the Emergency NP in Australia, nor the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on this disruptive workforce innovation. This study aimed to investigate ways in which Nurse Practitioners (NP) have incorporated the use of ICT as a mechanism to support their new clinical role within Emergency Departments. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken in the Emergency Departments (EDs) of two large Australian metropolitan public teaching hospitals. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with five nurse practitioners, four senior physicians and five senior nurses. Transcribed interviews were analysed using a grounded theory approach to develop themes in relation to the conceptualisation of the ED nurse practitioner role and the influences of ICT upon the role. Member checking of results was achieved by revisiting the sites to clarify findings with participants and further explore emergent themes. Results The role of the ENP was distinguished from those of Emergency nurses and physicians by two elements: advanced practice and holistic care, respectively. ICT supported the advanced practice dimension of the NP role in two ways: availability and completeness of electronic patient information enhanced timeliness and quality of diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making, expediting patient access to appropriate care. The ubiquity of patient data sourced from a central database supported and improved quality of communication between health professionals within and across sites, with wider diffusion of the Electronic Medical Record holding the potential to further facilitate team-based, holistic care. Conclusions ICT is a

  13. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners’ use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2010. Use of communication techniques and opinions about their effectiveness were analyzed using descriptive statistics. General linear models explored provider and practice characteristics to predict differences in the total number and the mean number of communication techniques routinely used in a week. Results More than 80% of NPs (N = 194) routinely used 3 of the 7 basic communication techniques: simple language, limiting teaching to 2–3 concepts, and speaking slowly. More than 75% of respondents believed that 6 of the 7 basic communication techniques are effective. Sociodemographic provider characteristics and practice characteristics were not significant predictors of the mean number or the total number of communication techniques routinely used by NPs in a week. Potential predictors for using more of the 7 basic communication techniques, demonstrating significance in one general linear model each, were: assessing the office for user-friendliness and ever taking a communication course in addition to nursing school. Conclusions NPs in Maryland self-reported routinely using some recommended health-literate communication techniques, with belief in their effectiveness. Our findings suggest that NPs who had assessed the office for patient-friendliness or who had taken a communication course beyond their initial education may be predictors for using more of the 7 basic communication techniques. These self-reported findings should be validated with observational studies

  14. Implementing screening for distress: the joint position statement from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society, Association of Oncology Social Work, and Oncology Nursing Society.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer (CoC) will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation.1 Distress, an indicator of suffering and predictor of poor health and quality of life outcomes throughout the disease trajectory, is common and treatable.2-10 Emerging research suggests that screening for and addressing distress not only enhances quality of life but may also be associated with improved cancer outcomes.11-13 Unfortunately, distress often goes unrecognized in oncology care, necessitating the development of systematic methods for its identification and management.14,15 Our organizations wholly endorse the new CoC standard 3.2 on psychosocial distress screening and recognize that it will help address unmet psychosocial needs and improve "cancer care for the whole patient."16 While the CoC standard articulates basic components and processes that must be included in the implementation of screening, there remain some key issues that we believe are critical to quality patient care. This statement summarizes our position on these issues.

  15. Urology-oncology Macmillan/Prostate Cancer UK specialist nursing team.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sian; Zinyemba, Viv; Richards, Samantha

    2016-10-27

    Sian Fletcher, Viv Zinyemba and Samantha Richards, Great Western Hospital, Swindon, discuss their roles within a urology-oncology service and how they pull together as team to do their best for their patients.

  16. The Relationship between Practitioners and Academics--Anti-Academic Discourse Voiced by Finnish Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laiho, Anne; Ruoholinna, Tarita

    2013-01-01

    Nursing in Western countries has become increasingly more theoretical, and nurse education has been integrated more often with the higher education system. Historically, nursing has been viewed as a non-academic domain. Establishing Nursing Science (NS) in Finland in the 1970s has meant that the new discipline is defined as the core of nurse…

  17. Communication and Outcomes of Visits Between Older Patients and Nurse Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dorothy Ann; Hayes, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective patient-clinician communication is at the heart of good health care and may be even more vital for older patients and their nurse practitioners (NPs). Objectives To examine contributions of older patients’ and NPs’ characteristics and the content and relationship components of their communication to patients’ proximal outcomes (satisfaction and intention to adhere) and longer-term outcomes (changes in presenting problems, physical health, and mental health), and contributions of proximal outcomes to longer-term outcomes. Methods Visits were videorecorded of a statewide sample of 31 NPs and 155 older patients. Patients’ and NPs’ communication during visits were measured using the Roter Interaction Analysis System for verbal activities, a check sheet for nonverbal activities, and an inventory of relationship dimension items. Proximal outcomes were measured with single items after visits. At 4 weeks, change in presenting problems was measured with a single item and physical and mental health changes were measured with the SF-12v2 Health Survey. Mixed models regression with backward deletion was conducted until only predictors with p ≤ .05 remained in the models. Results With the other variables in the models held constant, better outcomes were related to background characteristics of poorer baseline health, nonmanaged care settings, and more NP experience; to a content component of seeking and giving biomedical and psychosocial information; and to a relationship component of more positive talk and greater trust and receptivity and affection, depth, and similarity. Poorer outcomes were associated with higher rates of lifestyle discussion and NPs’ rapport building that patients may have perceived to be patronizing. Greater intention to adhere was associated with greater improvement in presenting problems. Discussion Older patient-NP communication was effective regarding seeking and giving biomedical and psychosocial information other

  18. Barriers to physical activity promotion by general practitioners and practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, J.; Naylor, P. J.; McDowell, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the promotion of physical activity by general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs). METHODS: A questionnaire that examined the types of barriers and the levels of their influence as well as stage of change for activity promotion and for personal behaviour was mailed to 846 subjects. RESULTS: The return rate exceeded 70% in each group with a high proportion (69%) of GPs and PNs reporting that they regularly promote physical activity with their patients. GPs were less likely to regularly promote physical activity with their patients if they indicated lack of time as a barrier (odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58 to 0.93) or lack of incentives (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.94), and more likely to promote exercise if they themselves were regular exercisers (OR = 3.19, 95% CI 1.96 to 5.18). However, for PNs longer consultation times (by 1.5 to 2 minutes) had a higher likelihood of producing regular promotion of activity (OR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62). For PNs personal physical activity stage was the strongest significant predictor of promotion level, but with a stronger effect (OR = 4.77, 95% CI 1.48 to 15.35) than in the GPs. CONCLUSION: The main finding is that GPs in the action or maintenance stage of changing their own physical activity are three times more likely to regularly promote the same behaviour in their patients than those in the other stages; for PNs the same difference quadruples the likelihood of them promoting physical activity. Professional readiness to change is influenced by known system barriers in GPs, and not in PNs, but is more strongly predicted by personal physical activity behaviour in both groups. 


 PMID:9773175

  19. Breaking New Ground: An Exploratory Study of the Role and Education of the Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Researching Professional Education. Research Reports Series Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redshaw, M. E.; Harris, A.

    A British research study documented and defined the level of functioning of advanced neonatal nurse practitioners (ANNPs) in comparison with qualified nurses and junior pediatric medical staff working in the same neonatal units. Subjects were ANNPs, ANNP students, and clinician mentors in 10 units. Data were collected through interviews,…

  20. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and

  1. Knowledge Elicitation and Techniques of Representing Nurse Practitioner Knowledge Use: Establishing Capability and Social Integration within Busy Nursing Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessey, Christine

    The progression of qualified surgical nurses toward capable proficiency was examined in an ethnographic study during which 25 nurses, including 4 who transferred to other wards, were observed to determine whether social mediation affects the process of proficiency development. The nurses were observed for 18 months. Data were also gathered through…

  2. You Want Me in Outpatient Oncology Nursing? A New Graduate Story.

    PubMed

    Hawley, McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    When I was in nursing school, I was one of a handful of students presented with a unique opportunity to fulfill our medical-surgical nursing requirement: a six-week clinical rotation at a large, outpatient, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. This opportunity was an innovative experiment between the College of Nursing at Seattle University and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA). The collaboration was coined the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by nursing management.

  3. Care Management by Oncology Nurses To Address Palliative Care Needs: A Pilot Trial To Assess Feasibility, Acceptability, and Perceived Effectiveness of the CONNECT Intervention

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Chu, Edward; Moore, Charity; Ellis, Peter; Nikolajski, Peggy; Ford, Colleen; Tiver, Greer; McCarthy, Lauren; Arnold, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Specialty palliative care is not accessible for many patients with advanced cancer. There is a need to find alternative palliative care strategies in oncology clinics. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of an oncology nurse-led care management approach to improve primary palliative care. Methods: The study design was a single-arm pilot trial of the Care Management by Oncology Nurses (CONNECT) intervention, in which registered oncology nurses receive specialized training and work closely with oncologists to (1) address symptom needs; (2) engage patients and caregivers in advance care planning; (3) provide emotional support; and (4) coordinate care. The subjects were 23 patients with advanced cancer, 19 caregivers, and 5 oncologists from a community oncology clinic in western Pennsylvania. Feasibility was assessed through enrollment rates, outcome assessment rates, and visit checklists. Patients, caregivers, and oncologists completed three-month assessments of acceptability and perceived effectiveness. Results: The consent-to-approach rate was 86% and enrolled-to-consent rate, 77%. CONNECT was implemented according to protocol for all participants. No participants withdrew after enrollment. Four patients died during the study; three-month outcome assessments were completed with all remaining participants (83%). Patients and caregivers reported high satisfaction with CONNECT and perceived the intervention as helpful in addressing symptoms (85%), coping (91%), and planning for the future (82%). Oncologists unanimously agreed that CONNECT improved the quality of care provided for patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: An oncology nurse-led care management intervention is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective for improving provision of primary palliative care. A randomized trial of CONNECT is warranted. PMID:25517219

  4. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Hazardous Drug Spills among Ambulatory Oncology Nurses: Results from a Mailed Survey

    PubMed Central

    He, Bei Y.; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Friese, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To examine patterns and organizational correlates of personal protective equipment (PPE) use and hazardous drug spills. Design Cross-sectional mailed survey. Setting Ambulatory practices in California, Georgia, and Michigan. Sample 252 Oncology Nursing Society members who administer hazardous drugs. Methods Bivariate and multivariable regression analyses. Main Research Variables Outcomes were PPE use and hazardous drug spills. Covariates included nursing workloads, nurses’ practice environments, and barriers to PPE use. Findings 26% reported a recent drug spill. 90% wore only one pair of chemotherapy-tested gloves. Increased PPE use was significantly associated with nurse participation in practice affairs (β = 0.25, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.41), non-private ownership (β= 0.37, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.64), increased nursing workloads (β = 0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04), and fewer barriers to PPE use (β = 0.65, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.93). Spills were significantly associated with less favorable manager leadership and support (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.98), and higher workloads (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06). Conclusions Drug spills occur often in ambulatory settings. PPE use remains low and barriers to use persist. Higher workloads are associated with both lower PPE use and more spills. Implications Managers should monitor and correct aberrant workloads and assure PPE is available and staff are trained. Knowledge Translation 1) Workloads are an important factor to consider in reducing hazardous drug exposures. 2) Nurses report substantial barriers to exposure prevention, including absence of equipment and lack of training. 3) Educational interventions are needed to improve use of PPE and reduction in hazardous drug exposures PMID:28067030

  5. Nurse Practitioners' attitudes about cancer clinical trials and willingness to recommend research participation

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Connie M.; Zhou, Quiping; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Ye, Lichuan; Grady, Christine; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruitment and retention of human participants in cancer clinical trials remains challenging for all investigators. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are in a prime position to discuss, educate and refer patients to clinical trials as many NPs work in ethnically and geographically diverse primary care settings in the U.S., yet they remain an untapped resource. We examined NPs' general attitudes toward cancer clinical trial recommendations and assessed their willingness to recommend such trials. Methods We randomly surveyed 455 primary care NPs in the state of Pennsylvania during 2008 with an adjusted response rate of 55.3%. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize NPs' demographic and practice characteristics, and logistic regression was used to assess the relative influence of the various attitudes and beliefs on the likelihood that the NP would bring up clinical trials as a treatment option. Results NPs were more likely to bring up the topic of clinical trials with at least some patients if they were comfortable discussing treatment options with their cancer patients (OR = 4.29, p = 0.001), were comfortable discussing options of entering a clinical trial for treatment (OR = 3.54, p = 0.003), had adequate time during patients' visit to explain clinical trials (OR = 3.40, p = 0.008), and if they believed that patients in clinical trials were receiving the best medical treatment (OR = 3.34, p = 0.019). NPs who were comfortable discussing cancer clinical trials were almost 5 times more likely to think clinical trials were useful (OR = 4.70; 95% CI = 1.81–12.19; p = 0.001). Nearly three-quarters (72.6%) of the entire responder sample reported three or more ethical concerns associated with clinical trials, including issues of randomization, informed consent, and patient burden. Conclusions NPs are willing to recommend clinical trials but need more education about the benefits and burdens of clinical trials, the associated ethical concerns, and evidence

  6. Parental Evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner-Developed Pediatric Neurosurgery Website

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Tina Kovacs; Kleib, Manal; Davidson, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents often turn to the Internet to seek health information about their child’s diagnosis and condition. Information, support, and resources regarding pediatric neurosurgery are scarce, hard to find, and difficult to comprehend. To address this gap, a pediatric nurse practitioner designed a website called the Neurosurgery Kids Fund (NKF). Analyzing the legitimacy of the NKF website for parents seeking health information and fulfilling their social and resource needs is critical to the website’s future development and success. Objective To explore parental usage of the NKF website, track visitor behavior, evaluate usability and design, establish ways to improve user experience, and identify ways to redesign the website. The aim of this study was to assess and evaluate whether a custom-designed health website could meet parents’ health information, support, and resource needs. Methods A multimethod approach was used. Google Analytic usage reports were collected and analyzed for the period of April 23, 2013, to November 30, 2013. Fifty-two online questionnaires that targeted the website’s usability were collected between June 18, 2014, and July 30, 2014. Finally, a focus group was conducted on August 20, 2014, to explore parents’ perceptions and user experiences. Findings were analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach. Results There were a total of 2998 sessions and 8818 page views, with 2.94 pages viewed per session, a 56.20% bounce rate, an average session duration of 2 minutes 24 seconds, and a 56.24% new sessions rate. Results from 52 eligible surveys included that the majority of NKF users were Caucasian (90%), females (92%), aged 36-45 years (48%), with a university or college degree or diploma (69%). Half plan to use the health information. Over half reported turning to the Internet for health information and spending 2 to 4 hours a day online. The most common reasons for using the NKF website were to (1) gather information

  7. Detection of missed injuries in a pediatric trauma center with the addition of acute care pediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Resler, Julia; Hackworth, Jodi; Mayo, Erin; Rouse, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries contribute to increased morbidity in trauma patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted of pediatric trauma patients from 2010 to 2013 with a documented missed injury. A significant percentage of missed injuries were identified (3.01% during July 2012 to December 2013 vs 0.39% during January 2010 to July 2012) with the addition of acute care trained pediatric nurse practitioners to the trauma service at a pediatric trauma center. The increase is thought to be due to improvement in charting, consistent personnel performing tertiary examinations, and improved radiology reads of outside films.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of a nurse practitioner-led home-based congestive heart failure clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jo-Ann Mary

    2016-01-01

    Frequent exacerbations of symptoms and financial penalties for 30-day hospital readmissions of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have led to new disease management approaches. A nurse practitioner (NP)-led interdisciplinary program for CHF management that included home telemonitoring and early NP assessments and interventions was piloted by a home health agency. A 4-month evaluation of the efficacy of a clinical pathway for CHF patients resulted in the enrollment of 22 CHF patients in the program. Two clients were readmitted within 30 days. The new program was effective in reducing 30-day readmission rates to 9% compared to the national average of 23%.

  9. An Online Educational Program Improves Pediatric Oncology Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Spiritual Care Competence.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Cheryl L; Callahan, Margaret Faut; McCarthy, Donna O; Hughes, Ronda G; White-Traut, Rosemary; Bansal, Naveen K

    This study evaluated the potential impact of an online spiritual care educational program on pediatric nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and their competence to provide spiritual care to children with cancer at the end of life. It was hypothesized that the intervention would increase nurses' positive attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and increase nurses' level of perceived spiritual care competence. A positive correlation was expected between change in nurses' perceived attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and change in nurses' perceived spiritual care competence. A prospective, longitudinal design was employed, and analyses included one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance, linear regression, and partial correlation. Statistically significant differences were found in nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and nurses' perceived spiritual care competence. There was a positive relationship between change scores in nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and nurses' spiritual care competence. Online spiritual care educational programs may exert a lasting impact on nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and their competence to provide spiritual care to children with cancer at the end of life. Additional studies are required to evaluate the direct effects of educational interventions patient outcomes.

  10. Recovering from disaster: Comparing the experiences of nurses and general practitioners after the Canterbury, New Zealand earthquake sequence 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Johal, Sarbjit Singh; Mounsey, Zoe Rachel

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes, elaborates upon, and contrasts the findings of two research projects that explored how general practitioners and nurses coped with the dual challenge of personal and work demands following the earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010 and 2011. Qualitative data from two separate studies - the first with general practitioners and the second with nurses - are compared to identify the challenges faced during and following the earthquakes. Semi-structured interviews took place with eight general practitioners two years after the start of the earthquake sequence and 11 nurses a year later to enable exploration of the longer-term aspects of the recovery process. The interview transcripts were analyzed and coded using a constructivist grounded theory approach. The analysis identified that the earthquakes had a significant impact on nurses and general practitioners both in terms of their professional and personal lives. The nurses and general practitioners commented on the emotional impact and their support needs, as well as some of the longer-term recovery issues.

  11. Assessing Health Practitioner Knowledge of Appropriate Psychotropic Medication Use in Nursing Homes: Validation of the Older Age Psychotropic Quiz.

    PubMed

    Brown, Donnamay Tegan; Westbury, Juanita Louise

    2016-07-05

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS XX contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Assessing Health Practitioner Knowledge of Appropriate Psychotropic Medication Use in Nursing Homes: Validation of the Older Age Psychotropic Quiz" found on pages XX-XX, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until MONTH XX, 20XX. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. XXX 2. XXX DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

  12. A survey on hematology-oncology pediatric AIEOP centers: prophylaxis, empirical therapy and nursing prevention procedures of infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Livadiotti, Susanna; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Serra, Annalisa; Folgori, Laura; Jenkner, Alessandro; Castagnola, Elio; Cesaro, Simone; Rossi, Mario R; Barone, Angelica; Zanazzo, Giulio; Nesi, Francesca; Licciardello, Maria; De Santis, Raffaella; Ziino, Ottavio; Cellini, Monica; Porta, Fulvio; Caselli, Desiree; Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A nationwide questionnaire-based survey was designed to evaluate the management and prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients admitted to hematology-oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant units. Of the 34 participating centers, 40 and 63%, respectively, continue to prescribe antibacterial and antimycotic prophylaxis in low-risk subjects and 78 and 94% in transplant patients. Approximately half of the centers prescribe a combination antibiotic regimen as first-line therapy in low-risk patients and up to 81% in high-risk patients. When initial empirical therapy fails after seven days, 63% of the centers add empirical antimycotic therapy in low-and 81% in high-risk patients. Overall management varies significantly across centers. Preventive nursing procedures are in accordance with international guidelines. This survey is the first to focus on prescribing practices in children with cancer and could help to implement practice guidelines.

  13. MASTERPLAN: study of the role of nurse practitioners in a multifactorial intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Van Zuilen, Arjan D; Wetzels, Jack F M; Bots, Michiel L; Van Blankestijn, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Usually nephrologists are primarily responsible for the care of CKD patients. However, in many cases treatment goals, as formulated in guidelines, are not met. The addition of a nurse practitioner might improve the quality of care. The Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study is a randomized controlled multicenter trial, aimed at investigating whether a multifactorial approach in patients with moderate to severe CKD (stage 3 and 4) to achieving treatment goals using both a polydrug strategy and lifestyle treatment either with or without the addition of a nurse practitioner will reduce cardiovascular risk and slow the decline of kidney function. Patients (n=793) have been randomized to nurse care or physician care. In the nurse-care arm of the study, nurse practitioners use flowcharts to address risk factors requiring drug and/or lifestyle modification. They have been trained to coach patients by motivational interviewing with the aim of improving patient self-management. At baseline, both treatment groups show equal distributions with regard to key variables in the study. Moreover, in only 1 patient were all risk factors within the limits as defined in various guidelines, which underscores the relevance of our initiative.

  14. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  15. Entry-Level Competencies Required of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners Providing HIV Specialty Care: A National Practice Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Harmon, James L

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only 30% of HIV-infected persons are diagnosed, engaged in care, provided antiretroviral therapy, and virologically suppressed. Competent HIV care providers are needed to achieve optimal clinical outcomes for all people living with HIV, but 69% of Ryan White Clinics in the United States report difficulty recruiting HIV clinicians, and one in three current HIV specialty physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Nurse practitioners who specialize in HIV and have caseloads with large numbers of HIV-infected patients have care outcomes that are equal to or better than that provided by physicians, especially generalist non-HIV specialist physicians. We designed a national practice validation study to help prepare the next generation of primary care nurse practitioners who desire to specialize in HIV. This manuscript reports the results of the national study and identifies entry-level competencies for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners specializing in HIV.

  16. Empowering Oncology Nurses to Lead Change Through a Shared Governance Project.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeanine N

    2016-11-01

    Nurses at the bed- or chairside are knowledgeable about clinical and operational concerns that need improvement and, consequently, are in the best position to generate and evaluate practical options and potential solutions to improve efficacy and care processes. Implementation of a shared governance model is effective in engaging staff nurses to make meaningful and sustainable change in patient care processes.

  17. Comparison of Oncology Nurse and Physician Use of the Internet for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan C.

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of surveys in 2001 (807 nurses, 111 doctors) and 2002 (1,127 and 201) showed that Internet use and frequency of use for continuing education among both nurses and physicians have been increasing. Low cost or free and easier access would increase usage. (SK)

  18. Direct Reimbursement of Nurse Practitioners in Health Insurance Plans of Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Cynthia Luna; Harrison, O. Anne

    1990-01-01

    Results of a survey of 77 public research universities indicated that, in spite of the presence of state legislation for third-party reimbursement of nursing services, legislation is not being implemented in many states by employers in their purchase of group health insurance policies. Nursing services covered by these policies include private…

  19. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

  20. A value-added benefit of nurse practitioners in long-term care settings: increased nursing staff's ability to care for residents.

    PubMed

    Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Carter, Nancy; Donald, Faith; Misener, Ruth Martin; Ploeg, Jenny; Kaasalainen, Sharon; McAiney, Carrie; Martin, Lori Schindel; Taniguchi, Alan; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail

    2013-09-01

    The number of people living longer is increasing, and those with physical or cognitive impairments may need admission into long-term care settings. In long-term care there is a need to increase nursing staff's capacity to meet the care needs of residents, develop a team approach to providing care and provide opportunities for staff to improve their knowledge and skills. One approach to meet these needs has been to employ a nurse practitioner (NP). The purpose of this paper is to examine nursing staff's perceptions of how working with an NP affected their ability to provide care, function as a team and increase their knowledge and skill. Data used in this paper were obtained from nursing staff and managers who participated in focus groups that were part of case studies conducted in the second phase of a larger sequential, two-phase mixed-methods study. NPs used multiple approaches to increase staff knowledge and skills and improve quality of care. These findings describe the benefits of employing NPs in long-term care settings.

  1. The tortuous journey of introducing the nurse practitioner as a new member of the healthcare team: a meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Andregård, Anna-Carin; Jangland, Eva

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the obstacles to and the opportunities for achieving optimal interprofessional team collaboration with the introduction of the nurse practitioner (NP). A team approach can contribute importantly to sustainable and safe patient care, and NPs have been added to the healthcare team in many countries. Following the international trend towards the development of the acute care NP, the role has recently been initiated in surgical care in Sweden. The introduction of an advanced nursing role into existing organisations raises questions about how the role will be developed and what its effects will be on collaboration between the different professions. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies using the meta-ethnographic approach developed by Noblit and Hare. Literature in the field of nursing was searched on PubMed and CINAHL, and empirical qualitative studies from outpatient and inpatient care in seven countries were included. The studies were appraised according to national guidelines and templates and were analysed and synthesised according to the meta-ethnographic approach. A total of 26 studies were included in the synthesis. The analysis revealed four themes: (i) a threat to professional boundaries, (ii) a resource for the team, (iii) the quest for autonomy and control, and (iv) necessary properties of a developing interprofessional collaboration. Based on these themes, the synthesis was created and presented as a metaphorical journey. The implementation of a new nursing role in a traditional healthcare team is a complex process influenced by many factors and can be described as "a tortuous journey towards a partially unknown destination". The synthesised obstacles and opportunities drawn from international studies may help healthcare organisations and new NPs prepare for, and optimise, the implementation of a new nursing role.

  2. Neuro-oncology update: radiation safety and nursing care during interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.M.; Drake, D.K.; Sewchand, W.

    1987-12-01

    Radiation control and safety are major considerations for nursing personnel during the care of patients receiving brachytherapy. Since the theory and practice of radiation applications are not part of the routine curriculum of nursing programs, the education of nurses and other health care professionals in radiation safety procedures is important. Regulatory agencies recommend that an annual safety course be given to all persons frequenting, using, or associated with patients containing radioactive materials. This article presents pertinent aspects of the principles and procedures of radiation safety, the role of personnel dose-monitoring devices, and the value of additional radiation control features, such as a lead cubicle, during interstitial brain implants. One institution's protocol and procedures for the care of high-intensity iridium-192 brain implants are discussed. Preoperative teaching guidelines and nursing interventions included in the protocol focus on radiation control principles.

  3. Preparation of Family Nurse Practitioners at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences for Their Role in Humanitarian Assistance Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    violations. IV ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preparation of family nurse practitioners ( FNPs ) in the Graduate School of Nursing...providers. Based on these data, a tool was developed to allow all 53 FNP Master’s Degree graduates from USUHS to evaluate the preparation they received...three USUHS FNP faculty members’ review of the tool, and reliability of the tool was determined by the test-retest method, with Class of 2000 FNP

  4. Medical care of asylum seekers: a descriptive study of the appropriateness of nurse practitioners' care compared to traditional physician-based care in a gatekeeping system

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmann, Patrick; Althaus, Fabrice; Burnand, Bernard; Vaucher, Paul; Pécoud, Alain; Genton, Blaise

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical care for asylum seekers is a complex and critical issue worldwide. It is influenced by social, political, and economic pressures, as well as premigration conditions, the process of migration, and postmigration conditions in the host country. Increasing needs and healthcare costs have led public health authorities to put nurse practitioners in charge of the management of a gatekeeping system for asylum seekers. The quality of this system has never been evaluated. We assessed the competencies of nurses and physicians in identifying the medical needs of asylum seekers and providing them with appropriate treatment that reflects good clinical practice. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the appropriateness of care provided to asylum seekers by trained nurse practitioners in nursing healthcare centers and by physicians in private practices, an academic medical outpatient clinic, and the emergency unit of the university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1687 asylum seeking patients who had consulted each setting between June and December 2003, 450 were randomly selected to participate. A panel of experts reviewed their medical records and assessed the appropriateness of medical care received according to three parameters: 1) use of appropriate procedures to identify medical needs (medical history, clinical examination, complementary investigations, and referral), 2) provision of access to treatment meeting medical needs, and 3) absence of unnecessary medical procedures. Results In the nurse practitioner group, the procedures used to identify medical needs were less often appropriate (79% of reports vs. 92.4% of reports; p < 0.001). Nevertheless, access to treatment was judged satisfactory and was similar (p = 0.264) between nurse practitioners and physicians (99% and 97.6% of patients, respectively, received adequate care). Excessive care was observed in only 2 physician reports (0.8%) and 3 nurse reports (1.5%) (p = 0

  5. Perceptions of the Utilization of Family Nurse Practitioners by Current Air Force Outpatient Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-26

    setting. The nurses had constant caseloads, did patient education , instruction, interpretation of laboratory work, though they neither examined...increase the amount of patient education " , were obtained from a 1985 study in which physician perceptions were surveyed for association with nurse...Utjlization *To increase the amount of patient education provided? *To increase the amount of counseling given to patients? *To allow physicians to

  6. Assessment of advanced practice palliative care nursing competencies in nurse practitioner students: implications for the integration of ELNEC curricular modules.

    PubMed

    Shea, Joyce; Grossman, Sheila; Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APRNs) have key roles in the care of patients who are nearing death and those living with a disabling chronic disease. This article describes a mixed-method formative assessment of 36 graduate nursing students' knowledge about and attitudes toward palliative care preliminary to curricular integration of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) graduate core modules. Students' knowledge about palliative care was assessed using the 106-item ELNEC examination. In addition, qualitative data were gathered regarding students' definitions of palliative care, the role of the APRN in palliative care, and their definitions of a "good" and "bad" death. Results revealed students' limited knowledge about palliative care. Qualitative findings indicated that most students exclusively linked palliative care with end-of-life care and believed that the treatment they provide should have the goal of prolonging life over maintaining quality of life. Implications for curriculum design, advanced practice role development, and collaboration with community health partners are discussed.

  7. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV disease: a guide for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Jones-Parker, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection elevates a patient's risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), due in part to direct effects of increased infection-producing inflammation and to drugs used to treat the infection, which can have untoward effects on serum lipid profiles. HIV-infected older adults often present with multiple comorbidities, including CVD, making disease management more challenging. Treatment paradigms are evolving, and nurse practitioners (NPs) are expected to play an ever-larger role in the management of HIV infection. Due to their accessibility and close patient contact, NPs are especially well suited to work with and educate patients to manage multiple risk factors. Appropriate use of primary, secondary, and tertiary CVD prevention strategies, including education to modify lifestyle risks, individualized antiretroviral treatment regimens to achieve serum lipid targets, and use of additional lipid-modifying strategies to minimize a patient's overall CVD risk profile will be important throughout the treatment lifecycle.

  8. Nurse practitioner-staffed clinic at Virginia Mason improves care and lowers costs for women with benign breast conditions.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, C Craig; Edwards, Jordan W; Searles, Carly; Wechter, Debra; Mecklenburg, Robert; Kaplan, Gary S

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of a breast clinic based on the use of an advanced registered nurse practitioner at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, substantially improved care timeliness and efficiency for women with symptomatic benign breast conditions. Women received their final benign diagnosis in an average of four rather than sixteen days, with fewer imaging studies and physician visits, when compared to a control group. Savings to the employer were estimated at $316 per woman, primarily from increased work productivity. Direct care costs decreased an estimated 19 percent, to $213 per woman. By decreasing both direct medical costs and indirect costs such as work absenteeism and presenteeism, the Virginia Mason Breast Clinic has created substantial savings for providers and employers while delivering care that patients rate highly. This model demonstrates the feasibility of achieving higher quality at lower cost through integrated care.

  9. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  10. Nurse practitioners can effectively deliver pain coping skills training to osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joan E; Keefe, Francis J; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Junghaenel, Doerte U; Schneider, Stefan; Schwartz, Joseph E; Kaell, Alan T; Caldwell, David S; McKee, Daphne; Reed, Shelby; Gould, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    A multisite, randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial was conducted for osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain of the knee or hip. Adult health nurse practitioners provided a 10-session intervention, pain coping skills training (PCST), in patients' doctors' offices (N=129 patients); the control group received usual care (N=127 patients). Primary outcomes assessed at baseline, posttreatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up were: pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, use of coping strategies, and quality of life. Secondary measures included fatigue, social functioning, health satisfaction, and use of pain medication. Methods favoring external validity, consistent with pragmatic, effectiveness research, were utilized. Primary ITT and secondary per-protocol analyses were conducted. Attrition was within the expected range: 11% at posttreatment and 29% at 12-month follow-up; rates did not differ between groups. Omnibus ITT analyses across all assessment points indicated significant improvement for the PCST group compared with the control group for pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, use of pain coping strategies, and self-efficacy, as well as fatigue, satisfaction with health, and reduced use of pain medication. Treatment effects were robust to covariates (demographics and clinical sites). Trends in the outcomes across the assessments were examined. All outcomes, except for self-efficacy, were maintained through the 12-month follow-up; effects for self-efficacy degraded over time. Per-protocol analyses did not yield greater effect sizes. Comparisons of PCST patients who were more vs less treatment adherent suggested greater effectiveness for patients with high adherence. Results support the effectiveness of nurse practitioner delivery of PCST for chronic osteoarthritis pain.

  11. Experiences of general practitioners and practice nurses of training courses in evidence-based health care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, T; Douglas, H R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical governance will require general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) to become competent in finding, appraising, and implementing research evidence--the skills of evidence-based health care (EBHC). AIM: To report the experiences of GPs and PNs in training in this area. METHOD: We held 30 in-depth, semi-structured interviews throughout North Thames region with three groups of informants: primary care practitioners recruited from the mailing lists of established EBHC courses; organizers and teachers on these courses; and educational advisers from Royal Colleges, universities, and postgraduate departments. Detailed qualitative analysis was undertaken to identify themes from each of these interview groups. RESULTS: At the time of the fieldwork for this study (late 1997), remarkably few GPs or PNs had attended any formal EBHC courses in our region. Perceived barriers to attendance on courses included inconsistency in marketing terminology, cultural issues (e.g. EBHC being perceived as one aspect of rapid and unwanted change in the workplace), lack of confidence in the subject matter (especially mathematics and statistics), lack of time, and practical and financial constraints. Our interviews suggested, however, that the principles and philosophy of EBHC are beginning to permeate traditional lecture-based continuing medical education courses, and consultant colleagues increasingly seek to make their advice 'evidence based'. CONCLUSION: We offer some preliminary recommendations for the organizers of EBHC courses for primary care. These include offering a range of flexible training, being explicit about course content, recognizing differences in professional culture between primary and secondary care and between doctors and nurses, and addressing issues of funding and accreditation at national level. Introducing EBHC through traditional topic-based postgraduate teaching programmes may be more acceptable and more effective than providing

  12. Early return visits by primary care patients: a retail nurse practitioner clinic versus standard medical office care.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, James E; Angstman, Kurt B; Garrison, Gregory

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare return visits made by patients within 2 weeks after using retail nurse practitioner clinics to return visits made by similar patients after using standard medical office clinics. Retail medicine clinics have become widely available. However, their impact on return visit rates compared to standard medical office visits for similar patients has not been extensively studied. Electronic medical records of adult primary care patients seen in a large group practice in Minnesota in 2009 were analyzed for this study. Patients who were treated for sinusitis were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: those who used one of 2 retail walk-in clinics staffed by nurse practitioners and a comparison group who used one of 4 regular office clinics. The dependent variable was a return office visit to any site within 2 weeks. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for case-mix differences between groups. Unadjusted odds of return visits were lower for retail clinic patients than for standard office care patients. After adjustment for case mix, patients with more outpatient visits in the previous 6 months had higher odds of return visits within 2 weeks (2-6 prior visits: odds ratio [OR]=1.99, P=0.00; 6 or more prior visits: OR=6.80, P=0.00). The odds of a return visit within 2 weeks were not different by clinic type after adjusting for propensity to use services (OR=1.17, P=0.28). After adjusting for case mix differences, return visit rates did not differ by clinic type.

  13. Evaluating Quality Management of Acute Low Back Problems Provided by Air Force Nurse Practitioners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-18

    spinal stenosis, herniated disc, and spinal dislocations. "Red flags" were found to be age dependent. Ankylosing spondylitis is more frequently seen in...encouraged to alleviate the pain. Additional treatment modalities were described to include patient education guides on exercise to strengthen the lower...advice about activities of daily living, back exercises , or physical fitness. However, the majority of general practitioners were aware of the danger

  14. Financial and organizational factors affecting the employment of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in medical group practices.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer; Kralewski, John; Dowd, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the financial and organizational factors that are associated with the employment of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) in medical group practices. The source of the data is a survey of 128 medical group practices in Minnesota. The findings suggest that the employment of NPs and PAs and their ratios to primary care physicians (PCPs) in practices that employ them are influenced by the organizational characteristics of the group practice but not by the degree of financial risk sharing for patient care. Although neither the number of years of experience in financial risk sharing nor more revenue from capitation payment contracts were related to employment of these midlevel practitioners (MLPs), large practices, those located in rural locations, not-for-profit practices, and those that scored low on cohesive cultural traits were more likely to employ MLPs. The data provide insights into the market for MLPs and the potential for these clinicians in the future health care system. As medical group practices become larger and have more organizational capacity, they can likely be expected to increase the employment of MLPs and integrate them into their organizations.

  15. Coping with Workplace Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Heilongjiang Province, China: Social Supports and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siqi; Qu, Lijun; Liu, He; Gao, Lijun; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Libo; Zhao, Yanming; Wu, Qunhong

    2016-01-01

    The study's objectives were to: 1) use social support theory to examine factors influencing healthcare workers' opinions about workplace violence (WPV) prevention strategies, and 2) to determine the types of support that general practitioners (GPs) and general nurses sought and expected to use after WPV exposure. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess a sample of 448 GPs and 412 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China. Results revealed that workers exposed to physical, psychological or both WPV types had a strong opinion about the necessity of improving diagnosis/treatment competence, developing violence prevention guidelines and plans, using protective equipment, and reinforcing staff by providing back-up support. The last two strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers in our previous study. In addition, workers with high anxiety selected the following prevention strategies as most effective: improving doctor-patient communication skills; installing cameras on wards; keeping work areas bright; improvements in violence reporting, statistics, and interventions; security patrols in the key departments; reinforcing staff; and correcting inaccurate media perspectives and reports. The last four strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers. All respondents expected to receive organisational and social support. In conclusion, these prevention strategies should be tailored to the different requirements of specific populations. Furthermore, it is necessary for organisations, the public, and policymakers to provide powerful support in WPV prevention.

  16. Coping with Workplace Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Heilongjiang Province, China: Social Supports and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Gao, Lijun; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Libo; Zhao, Yanming; Wu, Qunhong

    2016-01-01

    The study’s objectives were to: 1) use social support theory to examine factors influencing healthcare workers’ opinions about workplace violence (WPV) prevention strategies, and 2) to determine the types of support that general practitioners (GPs) and general nurses sought and expected to use after WPV exposure. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess a sample of 448 GPs and 412 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China. Results revealed that workers exposed to physical, psychological or both WPV types had a strong opinion about the necessity of improving diagnosis/treatment competence, developing violence prevention guidelines and plans, using protective equipment, and reinforcing staff by providing back-up support. The last two strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers in our previous study. In addition, workers with high anxiety selected the following prevention strategies as most effective: improving doctor-patient communication skills; installing cameras on wards; keeping work areas bright; improvements in violence reporting, statistics, and interventions; security patrols in the key departments; reinforcing staff; and correcting inaccurate media perspectives and reports. The last four strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers. All respondents expected to receive organisational and social support. In conclusion, these prevention strategies should be tailored to the different requirements of specific populations. Furthermore, it is necessary for organisations, the public, and policymakers to provide powerful support in WPV prevention. PMID:27326460

  17. Minimal changes and missed opportunities: a decade look at nurse practitioners in the lower Mississippi River Delta states.

    PubMed

    Kippenbrock, Thomas; Buron, Bill; Odell, Ellen; Narcisse, Marie-Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. southern region has one of most socioeconomically deprived and poorest health care outcomes in the county. The aims of this study were to determine changes of nurse practitioners (NPs) and their practice in lower Mississippi River Delta over the past decade and to examine differences of NPs' employment in health professional storage areas (HPSAs) and rural areas. A nonexperimental quantitative survey technique was used in the years 2000 and 2010. Other data sources included Health Resources and Services Administration that identified HPSA and the U.S. Census Bureau used to distinguish urban and rural areas. NPs are younger, and more are graduates of master's and doctorate degrees, but they are not reflective of the race they serve. Approximately, 25% of NPs worked in HPSA, and 50% worked in the rural area both in 2000 and in 2010. This proportion has remained blatantly steady during the past decade. Employment in rural health centers and family practice as a specialty declined; however, self-employment was on the rise. Nursing schools and health care institutions should be collaborating to develop plans and implementation strategies to recruit and retain NPs in the Mississippi River Delta rural and HPSAs.

  18. Essentials for effective communication in oncology nursing: assertiveness, conflict management, delegation, and motivation.

    PubMed

    Walczak, M B; Absolon, P L

    2001-01-01

    The ability to communicate effectively with a multidisciplinary team in an assertive manner to resolve conflict, motivate others, and delegate tasks is a prerequisite skill to promote a harmonious work environment. Acquisition of this skill is often a combination of inherent attributes and learned experiences. This article describes a program on assertiveness, conflict resolution, motivation of others, and delegation. Nurses are encouraged to seek expertise from other departments (e.g., Human Resources) to help them develop similar programs.

  19. Malpractice and the National Practitioner Data Bank: what OR nurses need to know.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R S

    1991-08-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank will record any payments made for any reason related to a malpractice suit in a central data bank available to a number of designated parties. Hospitals will be required to request this information to screen applicants and at least every 2 years for appointment renewals. The data bank may also be consulted by hospitals and state licensing boards as they deem necessary and by professional societies when reviewing membership applications. It is in the best interests of all malpractice defendants to insist on adequate representation of their personal, professional, and financial interests, which may necessitate insurance carriers providing each defendant with individual counsel.

  20. Adoption and Cancer Survivors: Findings from a Learning Activity for Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Zebrack, Bradley; Sehovic, Ivana; Bowman, Meghan; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the rate at which cancer survivors successfully adopt a child or about their experiences negotiating a costly, and perhaps discriminatory, process regarding the prospective parent's health history. The current study describes the results of a learning activity where nurses contacted an adoption agency to learn more about the process for survivors with the goal of helping nurses provide patients with accurate information for making a well-informed decision regarding adoption. Methods Training program participants identified an adoption agency (local, state, or international) and conducted an interview using a semi-structured guide. Following the interview, participants created a summary of responses to the questions. We examined responses to each question using qualitative content analysis. Results Seventy-seven participants (98% completion rate) across 15 states provided a summary. Responses were distributed across these categories: adoption costs; steps required for survivors seeking adoption; challenges for survivors seeking adoption; birth parents’ reservations; and planned institutional changes to increase adoption awareness. The majority of respondents reported improving their knowledge of adoption and cancer, increased challenges for survivors, and the need to educate patients about the realities of adoption policies. The need for a letter stating the survivor was five years cancer-free was identified as a significant obstacle for survivors. Conclusion Nurses are charged with following practice guidelines that include recommendations for appropriate reproductive health referrals. Cancer survivors would benefit from a healthcare provider who can provide education and concrete information when patients are making a decision about fertility and adoption. PMID:26180029

  1. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a review and implications for oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Rita

    2007-06-01

    Advances in supportive care have increased the likelihood that previously less common adverse effects of chemotherapy will be more evident. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is increasing because more neurotoxic drugs have been developed and because patients are living longer and receiving multiple chemotherapy regimens. This article reviews the anatomy of the peripheral nervous system, the proposed mechanisms of CIPN, and manifestations of CIPN from vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and platinum analogs. Major topics of this article are evidence-based data regarding symptom management, a review of medical management, and a synthesis of nursing care for patients at risk for or experiencing CIPN.

  2. Identifying and evaluating electronic learning resources for use in adult-gerontology nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Belza, Basia; Baker, Margaret; Christianson, Phyllis; Doorenbos, Ardith; Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing existing curricula to meet newly published adult-gerontology advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) competencies in an efficient manner presents a challenge to nurse educators. Incorporating shared, published electronic learning resources (ELRs) in existing or new courses may be appropriate in order to assist students in achieving competencies. The purposes of this project were to (a) identify relevant available ELR for use in enhancing geriatric APRN education and (b) to evaluate the educational utility of identified ELRs based on established criteria. A multilevel search strategy was used. Two independent team members reviewed identified ELR against established criteria to ensure utility. Only resources meeting all criteria were retained. Resources were found for each of the competency areas and included formats such as podcasts, Web casts, case studies, and teaching videos. In many cases, resources were identified using supplemental strategies and not through traditional search or search of existing geriatric repositories. Resources identified have been useful to advanced practice educators in improving lecture and seminar content in a particular topic area and providing students and preceptors with additional self-learning resources. Addressing sustainability within geriatric APRN education is critical for sharing of best practices among educators and for sustainability of teaching and related resources.

  3. Quality of Diabetes Care in Family Medicine Practices: Influence of Nurse-Practitioners and Physician’s Assistants

    PubMed Central

    Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Orzano, A. John; Hudson, Shawna V.; Solberg, Leif I.; DiCiccio-Bloom, Barbara; O’Malley, Dena; Tallia, Alfred F.; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to assess whether the quality of diabetes care differs among practices employing nurse-practitioners (NPs), physician’s assistants (PAs), or neither, and which practice attributes contribute to any differences in care. METHODS This cross-sectional study of 46 family medicine practices from New Jersey and Pennsylvania measured adherence to American Diabetes Association diabetes guidelines via chart audits of 846 patients with diabetes. Practice characteristics were identified by staff surveys. Hierarchical models determined differences between practices with and without NPs or PAs. RESULTS Compared with practices employing PAs, practices employing NPs were more likely to measure hemoglobin A1c levels (66% vs 33%), lipid levels (80% vs 58%), and urinary microalbumin levels (32% vs 6%); to have treated for high lipid levels (77% vs 56%); and to have patients attain lipid targets (54% vs 37%) (P ≤ .005 for each). Practices with NPs were more likely than physician-only practices to assess hemoglobin A1c levels (66% vs 49%) and lipid levels (80% vs 68%) (P≤.007 for each). These effects could not be attributed to use of diabetes registries, health risk assessments, nurses for counseling, or patient reminder systems. Practices with either PAs or NPs were perceived as busier (P=.03) and had larger total staff (P <.001) than physician-only practices. CONCLUSIONS Family practices employing NPs performed better than those with physicians only and those employing PAs, especially with regard to diabetes process measures. The reasons for these differences are not clear. PMID:18195310

  4. [Inspection of a corpse by the family physician (general practitioner) in practice and nursing home].

    PubMed

    Peschel, O; Graw, M

    2005-05-12

    Inspection of a corpse by the physician is a responsible last service he can offer his patient. Apart from reliably establishing death and the time of its occurrence, the physician must thoroughly inspect the corpse to clarify the cause of death. Regrettably, the results of an autopsy are often at odds with the cause of death as entered in the death certificate. Poor nursing care and homicides can be detected only on the basis of correct information about the cause of death. Only then do statistics on causes of death in the population make sense and can provide useful data. If an unnatural cause of death is suspected, or if it is not possible to ascertain the cause, the police or public prosecutor (coroner) must be notified.

  5. 'It is a dilemma': perspectives of nurse practitioners on health screening of newly arrived migrants.

    PubMed

    Kalengayi, Faustine K Nkulu; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Nordstrand, Annika; Ahlm, Clas; Ahlberg, Beth M

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening newly arrived migrants from countries with high burden of communicable diseases of public health significance is part of the Swedish national strategy against the spread of these diseases. However, little is known about its implementation. Objective This study aimed at exploring caregivers' experiences in screening newly arrived migrants to generate knowledge that could inform policy and clinical practice. Design Using an interpretive description framework, we conducted semistructured interviews between November and December 2011 in four Swedish counties, with 15 purposively selected nurses with experience in screening migrants. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Participants described a range of challenges including discordant views between migrants and the nurses about medical screening, inconsistencies in rules and practices, and conflicting policies. Participants indicated that sociocultural differences resulted in divergent expectations with migrants viewing the participants as agents of migration authorities. They also expressed concern over being given a new assignment without training and being expected to share responsibilities with staff from other agencies without adequate coordination. Finally, they indicated that existing policies can be confusing and raise ethical issues. All these were compounded by language barriers, making their work environment extremely complex and stressful. Conclusions These findings illuminate complex challenges that could limit access to, uptake, and delivery of health screening and undermine public health goals, and highlight the need for a multilevel approach. This entails avoiding the conflation of migration with health issues, harmonizing existing policies to make health care services more accessible and acceptable to migrants, and facilitating health professionals' work in promoting public health, improving interagency collaboration and the skills of all staff involved in

  6. Developing a public health policy-research nexus: an evaluation of Nurse Practitioner models in aged care.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Brenton; Clark, Shannon; Davey, Rachel; Parker, Rhian

    2013-10-01

    A frustration often expressed by researchers and policy-makers in public health is an apparent mismatch between respective priorities and expectations for research. Academics bemoan an oversimplification of their work, a reticence for independent critique and the constant pressure to pursue evaluation funding. Meanwhile, policy-makers look for research reports written in plain language with clear application, which are attuned to current policy settings and produced quickly. In a context where there are calls in western nations for evidence based policy with stronger links to academic research, such a mismatch can present significant challenges to policy program evaluation. The purpose of this paper is to present one attempt to overcome these challenges. Specifically, the paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for a large-scale, multifaceted evaluation of an Australian Government health initiative to expand Nurse Practitioner models of practice in aged care service delivery. In doing so, the paper provides a brief review of key points for the facilitation of a strong research-policy nexus in public health evaluations, as well as describes how this particular evaluation embodies these key points. As such, the paper presents an evaluation approach which may be adopted and adapted by others undertaking public health policy program evaluations.

  7. A path analytic model of ethical conflict in practice and autonomy in a sample of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Soeken, Karen L

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a causal model of ethical conflict in practice and autonomy in a sample of 254 nurse practitioners working in the primary care areas of family health, pediatrics, adult health and obstetrics/gynecology in the state of Maryland. A test of the model was conducted using a path analytic approach with LISREL 8.30 hypothesizing individual, organizational and societal/market factors influencing ethical conflict in practice and autonomy. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the parameters most likely to have generated the data. Forty-five percent of the total variance in ethical conflict was explained by the variables of ethical environment and ethical concern. Ethical concern, idealistic philosophy, ethics education in continuing education, percentage of client population enrolled in managed care, and market penetration explained 15% of the total variance in autonomy. The findings of this study indicate that the causal model of ethical conflict in practice and autonomy is consistent with the data and contributed to a fuller understanding of clinical decision making associated with practicing in a managed care environment. The final model supported a conceptual framework that is inclusive of three domains: individual, organizational and societal/market variables.

  8. Nurse practitioner coverage is associated with a decrease in length of stay in a pediatric chronic ventilator dependent unit

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Courtney M; Cristea, A Ioana; Hamilton, Jennifer C; Taylor, Nicole M; Nitu, Mara E; Ackerman, Veda L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize a dedicated critical care nurse practitioner (NP) is associated with a decreased length of stay (LOS) from a pediatric chronic ventilator dependent unit (PCVDU). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients requiring care in the PCVDU from May 2001 through May 2011 comparing the 5 years prior to the 5 years post implementation of the critical care NP in 2005. LOS and room charges were obtained. RESULTS: The average LOS decreased from a median of 55 d [interquartile range (IQR): 9.8-108.3] to a median of 12 (IQR: 4.0-41.0) with the implementation of a dedicated critical care NP (P < 1.0001). Post implementation of a dedicated NP, a savings of 25738049 in room charges was noted over 5 years. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrates a critical care NP coverage model in a PCVDU is associated with a significantly reduced LOS demonstrating that the NP is an efficient and likely cost-effective addition to a medically comprehensive service. PMID:27170929

  9. Scope-of-practice laws for nurse practitioners limit cost savings that can be achieved in retail clinics.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Parente, Stephen T; Town, Robert J; Bazarko, Dawn

    2013-11-01

    Retail clinics have the potential to reduce health spending by offering convenient, low-cost access to basic health care services. Retail clinics are often staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs), whose services are regulated by state scope-of-practice regulations. By limiting NPs' work scope, restrictive regulations could affect possible cost savings. Using multistate insurance claims data from 2004-07, a period in which many retail clinics opened, we analyzed whether the cost per episode associated with the use of retail clinics was lower in states where NPs are allowed to practice independently and to prescribe independently. We also examined whether retail clinic use and scope of practice were associated with emergency department visits and hospitalizations. We found that visits to retail clinics were associated with lower costs per episode, compared to episodes of care that did not begin with a retail clinic visit, and the costs were even lower when NPs practiced independently. Eliminating restrictions on NPs' scope of practice could have a large impact on the cost savings that can be achieved by retail clinics.

  10. Role Clarification Processes for Better Integration of Nurse Practitioners into Primary Healthcare Teams: A Multiple-Case Study

    PubMed Central

    D'Amour, Danielle; Contandriopoulos, Damien; Chouinard, Véronique; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2014-01-01

    Role clarity is a crucial issue for effective interprofessional collaboration. Poorly defined roles can become a source of conflict in clinical teams and reduce the effectiveness of care and services delivered to the population. Our objective in this paper is to outline processes for clarifying professional roles when a new role is introduced into clinical teams, that of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (PHCNP). To support our empirical analysis we used the Canadian National Interprofessional Competency Framework, which defines the essential components for role clarification among professionals. A qualitative multiple-case study was conducted on six cases in which the PHCNP role was introduced into primary care teams. Data collection included 34 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of the PHCNP role. Our results revealed that the best performing primary care teams were those that used a variety of organizational and individual strategies to carry out role clarification processes. From this study, we conclude that role clarification is both an organizational process to be developed and a competency that each member of the primary care team must mobilize to ensure effective interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25692039

  11. Division of primary care services between physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners for older patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-10-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants and/or nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) in the patient-centered medical home is one approach to improving care quality. However, little is known about how to incorporate PA/NPs into primary care teams. Using data from a large physician group, we describe the division of patients and services (e.g., acute, chronic, preventive, other) between primary care providers for older diabetes patients on panels with varying levels of PA/NP involvement (i.e., no role, supplemental provider, or usual provider of care). Panels with PA/NP usual providers had higher proportions of patients with Medicaid, disability, and depression. Patients with physician usual providers had similar probabilities of visits with supplemental PA/NPs and physicians for all service types. However, patients with PA/NP usual providers had higher probabilities of visits with a supplemental physician. Understanding how patients and services are divided between PA/NPs and physicians will assist in defining provider roles on primary care teams.

  12. Organizational Strategies for Building Capacity in Evidence-Based Oncology Nursing Practice: A Case Report of an Australian Tertiary Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Bowers, Alison; Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2017-03-01

    The ever-increasing cancer care demand has posed a challenge for oncology nurses to deliver evidence-based, innovative care. Despite efforts to promote evidence-based practice, barriers remain and executives find it difficult to implement evidence-based practice efficiently. Using the successful experience of an Australian tertiary cancer center, this paper depicts 4 effective strategies for facilitating evidence-based practice at the organizational level-the Embedded Scholar: Enabler, Enactor, and Engagement (4 Es) Model-includes a 12-week evidence-based practice program that prioritizes relevant research proposed by clinical staff and endorses high-quality, evidence-based point-of-care resources.

  13. Patient-Centered Homes and Integrated Behavioral Health Care: Reclaiming the Role of "Consultant" for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The notion of patient-centered care has long been linked with nursing practice since Florence Nightingale. The discipline of nursing is focused on the holistic care of individuals, families, and communities in times of sickness and/or health. However, in psychiatric-mental health nursing, the concepts of mental health and psychiatric illness still remain marginalized in our health care delivery systems, as well as in nursing education, knowledge development, and practice. Even with the concept of patient-centered homes, acute and primary care providers are reluctant to embrace care of those with psychiatric illness in their respective settings. Psychiatric illness was and continues to be in the shadows, hidden and often ignored by the larger community as well as by health care providers. This paper describes a Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) Advanced Nursing Education (ANE) training grant's objective of reintegrating psychiatric-mental health practice into ALL health care delivery systems using the concept of patient-centered nursing care as a foundation for, and promotion of, the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMH-NP) as the "navigator" for not only the patients and their families, but also for their acute and primary care colleagues using an Interprofessional Education Model. The major barriers and lessons learned from this project as well as the need for psychiatric-mental health nurses to reclaim their role as a consultant/liaison in acute, primary, and long-term care settings will be discussed. The PMHNP as a consultant/liaison is being revitalized as an innovative advanced practice nursing health care model in North Carolina.

  14. Multifactorial approach and superior treatment efficacy in renal patients with the aid of nurse practitioners. Design of The MASTERPLAN Study [ISRCTN73187232

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D; van der Tweel, Ingeborgh; Blankestijn, Peter J; Bots, Michiel L; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc AGJ; Kaasjager, Karin AH; van de Ven, Peter JG; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Wetzels, Jack FM

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a greatly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Recently developed guidelines address multiple risk factors and life-style interventions. However, in current practice few patients reach their targets. A multifactorial approach with the aid of nurse practitioners was effective in achieving treatment goals and reducing vascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus and in patients with heart failure. We propose that this also holds for the CKD population. Design MASTERPLAN is a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial designed to evaluate whether a multifactorial approach with the aid of nurse-practicioners reduces cardiovascular risk in patients with CKD. Approximately 800 patients with a creatinine clearance (estimated by Cockcroft-Gault) between 20 to 70 ml/min, will be included. To all patients the same set of guidelines will be applied and specific cardioprotective medication will be prescribed. In the intervention group the nurse practitioner will provide lifestyle advice and actively address treatment goals. Follow-up will be five years. Primary endpoint is the composite of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular mortality. Secondary endpoints are cardiovascular morbidity, overall mortality, decline of renal function, change in markers of vascular damage and change in quality of life. Enrollment has started in April 2004 and the study is on track with 700 patients included on October 15th, 2005. This article describes the design of the MASTERPLAN study. PMID:16573836

  15. A Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program: Meeting the Needs of the Community and Veterans as Students as Well as Care Recipients.

    PubMed

    Caughill, Ann P; Dunford, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The goal of excellence in nursing education has led to efforts to recruit students into baccalaureate and graduate programs. Additionally, a need exists to prepare practitioners to meet the mental health needs of health care recipients, including veterans. As a strategy for meeting these objectives, educators from an urban private college proposed a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) program. This program was developed in response to an identified need in the community for improved mental health services. Although several groups in need would be served, attention was focused on veterans in need of care as well as those veteran students interested in Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) nursing. Some factors that supported this thinking included the proximity of the campus to the Veterans Administration Medical Center and other veteran community services, the college's significant number of student veterans, and its distinction as among the most veteran friendly campuses in the nation. This article reviews the literature that supports the need for graduate education in this specialty and the value of providing educational opportunities for interested veterans.

  16. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna; Olsen, Christine; Fung, Claire Y.; Hopkins, Shane; Pohar, Surjeet

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  17. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017: Self-Administered Pre-Medications for Taxane Chemotherapy Infusions in an Ambulatory Setting: Improving Practice ONS Journal ... 2017: Self-Administered Pre-Medications for Taxane Chemotherapy Infusions in an Ambulatory Setting: Improving Practice ONS Journal ...

  18. Nurse practitioner (NP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more states are requiring NPs to have a master's or doctorate degree and national certification. In some ... these organizations require that NPs complete an approved master's or doctorate-level NP program before taking the ...

  19. Preparation of Family Nurse Practitioners at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences for Their Role in Humanitarian Assistance Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-11

    The Role of the FNP in Primary Care …………………………………….…...….15 Preparation of Family Nurse Practitioners at USUHS ………………….….……..18 Summary...military health care (Larino, 1997). Until this year, the USAF had not placed FNPs on any of the primary care deployment teams. As of February 29, 2000...there were five primary care treatment teams with the requirement of two FNPs assigned to each team (J.T. Gavron, personal communication, March 25

  20. The costs of training a nurse practitioner in primary care: the importance of allowing for the cost of education and training when making decisions about changing the professional-mix.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Lesley; Netten, Ann

    2007-05-01

    What is already known on this topic * Cost containment through the most effective mix of staff achievable within available resources and organisational priorities is of increasing importance in most health systems. However, there is a dearth of information about the full economic implications of changing skill mix. * In the UK a major shift in the primary care workforce is likely in response to the rapidly developing role of nurse practitioners and policies aimed to encourage GP practices to transfer some of their responsibilities to other, less costly, professionals. * Previous research has developed an approach to incorporating the costs of qualifications, and thus the investment required to develop a skilled workforce, for a variety of health service professionals including GPs. What this study adds * This paper describes a methodology of costing nurse practitioners that incorporates the human capital cost implications of developing a skilled nurse practitioner workforce. With appropriate sources of data the method could be adapted for use internationally. * Including the full cost of qualifications results in nearly a 24 per cent increase in the unit cost of a Nurse Practitioner. * Allowing for all investment costs and adjusting for length of consultation, the cost of a GP consultation was nearly 60 per cent higher than that of a Nurse Practitioner.

  1. A national audit of standards of care for women with vulval conditions and survey of attitudes to nurse practitioners in vulval services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Innamaa, A; Tidy, J A; Nunns, D; Palmer, J E

    2016-01-01

    This national audit assessed whether UK specialist vulval clinics adhere to the British Society of Vulval Diseases (BSSVD) document 'Standards of care for women with vulval conditions' published in 2013 and benchmarked clinician attitudes towards nurse practitioners in vulval services. Audit standards were based on the BSSVD guidance. All BSSVD and British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology or BSCCP members were surveyed via two electronic questionnaires. Results demonstrate that the majority of specialist vulval clinics in the UK are non-compliant with the standards set out for specialist vulval services. The majority of clinicians would support the introduction of clinical nurse specialists to vulval services, but there is need for development of a national training programme. In conclusion, significant improvements are required in provision of patient information, guidelines, access to multidisciplinary services, multidisciplinary team or MDT processes and data recording in UK specialist vulval services.

  2. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  3. The structure of work-related stress and coping among oncology nurses in high-stress medical settings: a transactional analysis.

    PubMed

    Florio, G A; Donnelly, J P; Zevon, M A

    1998-07-01

    A transactional approach was used to examine stress and coping among 59 oncology nurses. Nine work stress clusters were identified: Physician-Related Stress, Organizational Factors, Observing Suffering, Ethical Concerns, Death and Dying, Carryover Stress, Negative Self-Thoughts, Inadequate Resources, and Coworker Stress, with the first 3 rated as most frequent and most intense. Ten coping clusters were also identified: Coworker Support, Positive Reappraisal, Developing a Growth Perspective, Positive Involvement in Treatment, Affective Regulation, Balancing Work Stress, Negative Coping, Apathy, Withdrawal, and Catharsis, with the first 3 rated as most frequently used and most effective. The relationships among the clusters, as well as the theoretical and clinical implications of these results, were discussed.

  4. [Surgeons' hope: expanding the professional role of co-medical staff and introducing the nurse practitioner/physician assistant and team approach to the healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tadaaki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The healthcare system surrounding surgeons is collapsing due to Japan's policy of limiting health expenditure, market fundamentalism, shortage of healthcare providers, unfavorable working environment for surgeons, increasing risk of malpractice suits, and decreasing number of those who desire to pursue the surgery specialty. In the USA, nonphysician and mid-level clinicians such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have been working since the 1960s, and the team approach to medicine which benefits patients is functioning well. One strategy to avoid the collapse of the Japanese surgical healthcare system is introducing the NP/PA system. The division of labor in medicine can provide high-quality, safe healthcare and increase the confidence of the public by contributing to: reduced postoperative complications; increased patient satisfaction; decreased length of postoperative hospital stay: and economic benefits. We have requested that the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare establish a Japanese NP/PA system to care for patients more efficiently perioperatively. The ministry has decided to launch a trial profession called "tokutei (specifically qualified) nurse" in February 2010. These nurses will be trained and educated at the Master's degree level and allowed to practice several predetermined skill sets under physician supervision. We hope that all healthcare providers will assist in transforming the tokutei nurse system into a Japanese NP/PA system.

  5. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self

  6. Relationships among moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave of nurse practitioners in emergency departments: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Jennifer; Epstein, Elizabeth; Rovnyak, Virginia; Snyder, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research study were to investigate moral distress among emergency department (ED) nurse practitioners (NPs) and examine relationships between moral distress and level of practice independence as well as intent to leave a position. Moral distress has been studied regarding registered nurses and physicians (MDs) but less so in NPs. It is important to explore moral distress in NPs because they tread a unique path between nursing and physician roles. Moral distress may play a significant role in staff nurses' intention to leave practice, and level of practice independence is found to have a relationship with NPs' intention to leave. A convenience sample of ED NPs was obtained from a mailing list of a national nursing specialty organization, the Emergency Nurses Association. Using a correlational design, survey methods assessed moral distress with the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R), level of practice independence with the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale, and intent to leave with self-report. Correlational and regression analyses of data were conducted to characterize moral distress among ED NPs and associations between moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave. Results found ED NPs do experience moral distress with poor patient care results from inadequate staff communication and working with incompetent coworkers in their practice. The MDS-R was a significant predictor of intention to leave among respondents. This study is the first of its kind to explore moral distress in ED NPs. Results suggest moral distress influences ED NPs' intent to leave their position. Further studies are needed to explore the findings from this research and to formulate interventions to alleviate moral distress in ED NPs and improve retention in the clinical setting.

  7. The effect of learning via module versus lecture teaching methods on the knowledge and practice of oncology nurses about safety standards with cytotoxic drugs in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohamadi, Nasrin Pourali; Rajaeefard, Abdolreza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have established that all nurses need continuing education, especially those who are working in oncology wards. In the current programs, there are just two general patterns for teaching: Teacher-centered and student-centered patterns. In this study, the effect of teacher-centered (lecture) and student-centered (module) teaching methods in relation to safety standards with cytotoxic drugs on the knowledge and practice of oncology nurses was compared. Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study with two intervention groups (module and lecture) and a control group. In this study, 86 nurses in Shiraz, Fars province in 2011, who participated in the prescription of cytotoxic drugs to patients were selected and randomly divided into three groups. The module group used a self-directed module, the lecture group was taught by an experienced lecturer in the classroom and the control group did not receive any intervention. Data in relation to knowledge and practice of oncology nurses in the three groups were collected before and 8 weeks after the intervention by using a questionnaire and checklist. To analyze the data paired-samples t-test and one way ANOVA analysis were used. Results: Knowledge and practice scores increased significantly from baseline in both intervention groups, but there was no significant difference between the scores of the two groups. No considerable changes were observed in the control group. Conclusions: Both module and lecture methods have similar effects on improving the knowledge and practice of nurses in oncology wards. Therefore, considering the advantages of student-centered educational methods, the work load of nurses and the sensitivity of their jobs, we suggest using module. PMID:24554947

  8. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    PubMed

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally.

  9. PaTz groups for primary palliative care: reinventing cooperation between general practitioners and district nurses in palliative care: an evaluation study combining data from focus groups and a questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background PaTz (an acronym for ‘PAlliatieve Thuis Zorg’; palliative care at home) is an intervention to improve palliative care provision and strengthen the generalist knowledge of palliative care. In PaTz general practitioners and district nurses meet on a regular basis to identify patients with palliative care needs and to discuss care for these patients. This study explores experiences with regard to collaboration between general practitioners and district nurses, and perceived benefits of and barriers for implementation of PaTz. Methods This study is conducted within the primary care setting. Participants were 24 general practitioners who filled in a questionnaire, and seven general practitioners, five district nurses and two palliative care consultants who attended one of two focus groups. Results PaTz led to improved collaboration. Participants felt informational and emotional support from other PaTz participants. Also they felt that continuity of care was enhanced by PaTz. Practical recommendations for implementation were: meetings every 6 to 8 weeks, regular attendance from both general practitioners and district nurses, presence of a palliative care consultant, and a strong chairman. Conclusions PaTz is successful in enhancing collaboration in primary palliative care and easy to implement. Participants felt it improved continuity of care and knowledge on palliative care. Further research is needed to investigate whether patient and carer outcomes improve. PMID:24444024

  10. School-based youth health nurses and adolescent decision-making concerning reproductive and sexual health advice: How can the law guide healthcare practitioners in this context?

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm K; Stepanov, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract School-Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHNs) work in Queensland high schools, providing sexual and reproductive health care/advice (amongst other things) to adolescents. SBYHNs are often responsible for referring high school students to other health care practitioners or external health services/community agencies. One of the difficulties faced in this context is how to assess the issue of capacity in terms of the adolescent's ability to provide consent to his or her own health care without parental involvement. This is important because it enables SBYHNs to maintain confidentiality with adolescents, which encourages adolescents to obtain sexual health advice. In this paper we outline the key legal principles relevant to nurses working in this field. We provide some practical examples of issues faced by SBYHNs and consider how the issue of Gillick competency is relevant to these examples. We demonstrate that the law seeks to prioritise the concept of confidentiality and aims to avoid exposing adolescents to harm that may result from unsafe sexual practices. Importantly, the issues discussed in this paper are relevant to nurses working within this field in all Australian jurisdictions.

  11. School-Based Youth Health Nurses and Adolescent Decision-Making Concerning Reproductive and Sexual Health Advice: How Can the Law Guide Healthcare Practitioners in this Context?

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm K; Stepanov, Nikola

    2014-03-11

    Abstract School-Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHNs) work in Queensland high schools, providing sexual and reproductive health care/advice (amongst other things) to adolescents. SBYHNs are often responsible for referring high school students to other health care practitioners or external health services/community agencies. One of the difficulties faced in this context is how to assess the issue of capacity in terms of the adolescent's ability to provide consent to his or her own health care without parental involvement. This is important because it enables SBYHNs to maintain confidentiality with adolescents, which encourages adolescents to obtain sexual health advice. In this paper we outline the key legal principles relevant to nurses working in this field. We provide some practical examples of issues faced by SBYHNs and consider how the issue of Gillick competency is relevant to these examples. We demonstrate that the law seeks to prioritise the concept of confidentiality and aims to avoid exposing adolescents to harm that may result from unsafe sexual practices. Importantly, the issues discussed in this paper are relevant to nurses working within this field in all Australian jurisdictions.

  12. Effect of Terminal Patient Care Training on the Nurses' Attitudes Toward Death in an Oncology Hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Göriş, Songül; Taşcı, Sultan; Özkan, Birgül; Ceyhan, Özlem; Kartın, Pınar Tekinsoy; Çeliksoy, Aliye; Elmalı, Ferhan; Eser, Bülent

    2017-03-01

    This is an experimental research aiming at identifying the effect of terminal patient care training on the nurses' attitudes toward death. The sample of this study (n = 41) involves 20 nurses in the training group and 21 nurses in the control group. Nurses were offered terminal patient care training and their attitudes toward death were assessed before and after the intervention. The Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R) subscale mean scores for fear of death (3.9-4.6, p < .05) and approach acceptance (2.9-3.3, p < .05) were found to significantly increase at the end of training in the training group while mean scores in the control group displayed no significant change (p > .05) in any of the five DAP-R subscales. In accordance with these findings, this study suggests that terminal patient care training should be implemented in the nursing curriculum more extensively and should be frequently repeated as part of the nurses' in-service education.

  13. Pathways to Results: How Practitioners Address Student Access, Outcomes, and Equity in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickel, Jessica; Bragg, Debra D.

    2015-01-01

    At a time when the nation is focusing so much attention on college completion, what do we know about how students are completing their community college programs? Does the open-access mission of community colleges translate into equitable outcomes? Pathways to Results (PTR) engages practitioners in using data to close equity gaps for student…

  14. [To know to change: the nurses of the Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland (IOSI) and their relationship with the Evidence Based Practise (EBP) and Nursing Research].

    PubMed

    Valcarenghi, Dario; Pedrazzani, Carla; Bianchi, Monica

    2013-01-01

    To promote the development of a culture and a professional practice based on "evidence of effectiveness", the IOSI Nursing Officer instituted a specific Unit which decided to establish its own lines of action based on the results of an internal investigation conducted among nurses employed within IOSI, with reference to the model of action research. In July 2010, a semi-structured questionnaire self compiled was sent to all nurses to find out their opinions and experiences on EBP and nursing research, to recognize their proposals, and willingness to be part of an internal network. 63 out of 98 questionnaire were filled in. Several nurses have knowledge and experience in these fields, but change their professional behavior especially under pressure from the external environment, rather than by autonomous choice. They consider EBP substantially useful, but difficult to implement especially without their direct involvement. Two third of the sample have felt the need of EBP during their professional activity and there is a general willingness to develop nursing research (56%) and/or play an active role of "referent" on these issues within own Unit (35%). The survey showed that at IOSI there is a favorable substrate for EBP and nursing research (for basic knowledge and availability). The data collected have served to define internal lines of action in a narrow relationship with the clinical areas, according to the model of action research. It is a process that requires vision, coordinated efforts, perseverance and time.

  15. Results and Lessons Learned from a Nurse Practitioner-Guided Dementia Care Intervention for Primary Care Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Delaney, Colleen; Harel, Ofer; Pasquale, Karen; Schjavland, Elena; Lynch, John; Kleppinger, Alison; Crumb, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with dementia care needs often visit primary care physicians (PCPs), but PCP dementia care limitations are widely documented. This study tested the value of employing a nurse practitioner (NP) with geropsychiatric expertise to augment PCP care for newly and recently diagnosed patients and family caregivers. Twenty-one dyads received the NP intervention; 10 dyads were controls. Outcomes included patient neuropsychiatric symptom and quality of life changes, and caregiver depression, burden, and self-efficacy changes. Intervention acceptability by patients, caregivers, and PCPs was determined. No outcome differences were found; however, the NP intervention was deemed highly satisfactory by all stakeholders. Patients experienced no significant cognitive decline during their 12-month study period, helping explain why outcomes did not change. Given widespread acceptability, future tests of this PCP-enhancing intervention should include patients with more progressive cognitive decline at study entry. NPs with geropsychiatric expertise are ideal interventionists for this rapidly growing target population. PMID:24444453

  16. The nurse practitioner's role in managing dyslipidemia and other cardiovascular risk factors in HIV-infected patients: impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The beneficial effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of HIV disease have been accompanied by metabolic changes associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These changes, which include dyslipidemia, change in body fat distribution, and insulin resistance, resemble the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Protease inhibitors, nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have all been associated with dyslipidemia to varying degrees. In addition, patients on ART show an increased risk of myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular events. According to the recommendations of the National Cholesterol Education Program and the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group, health care providers should assess cardiovascular risk before starting ART and then continue to monitor lipid levels. Treatment of ART-associated dyslipidemia should follow the following sequence: therapeutic lifestyle changes, lipid-lowering drug therapy, and finally, modifying ART if necessary. By providing education, support, and follow-up care, nurse practitioners can help to implement these steps.

  17. Enhancing the policy impact of evaluation research: a case study of nurse practitioner role expansion in a state workers' compensation system.

    PubMed

    Sears, Jeanne M; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the Washington State Legislature enacted a 3-year pilot program that authorized nurse practitioners to function as attending providers for injured workers. The bill required an evaluation and report to the Legislature to address stakeholder concerns regarding potential impacts on system quality and costs. Subsequent to the report's dissemination, permanent legislation extending the program was passed. The specific objectives of this case study are (1) to document an example of policy-relevant research that had features facilitating direct policy impact and (2) to describe environmental facilitators/barriers and best practices for enhancing the effective impact of evaluation research on policy. Researchers often seek to have an impact on health, health care, and/or healthcare policy. This case study reinforces the importance of (1) ensuring early and ongoing communication with stakeholders, (2) conducting stakeholder analysis to understand underlying interests and values, and (3) encouraging meaningful stakeholder input into the evaluation design process.

  18. Effects of a graduate-level interprofessional education program on adult nurse practitioner student and internal medicine resident physician attitudes towards interprofessional care.

    PubMed

    Hanyok, Laura A; Walton-Moss, Benita; Tanner, Elizabeth; Stewart, Rosalyn W; Becker, Kathleen

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a longitudinal interprofessional education (IPE) experience for adult nurse practitioner students and internal medicine residents. This experience focused on providing care for complex community based patients during clinic and home visits, preceded by didactic learning that emphasized understanding one another's professional roles and education, teamwork and conflict management. Evaluation demonstrated significant improvements in attitudes and beliefs associated with professional role, respect among health professions' disciplines and conflict management. Results with regards to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional practice, and valuing teamwork training were mixed. In particular, the curricular intervention did not change participants'self-reported skill in communication and did not affect attitudes and beliefs towards effects of interprofessional education on patient outcomes.

  19. Nurse Communication About Goals of Care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Buller, Haley; Neiman, Tammy

    2016-03-01

    Conversations about goals of care with the patient and family are a critical component of advanced practice in oncology. However, there are often inadequate team structures, training, or resources available to assist advanced practitioners in initiating these conversations. We conducted a study to assess nurses' perceived role and communication tasks in such conversations about goals of care. In a cross-sectional survey of 109 nurses attending a comprehensive 2-day end-of-life nursing education course, nurses were asked to describe how they would participate in a "goals of care" meeting in three different scenarios. They were also asked what changes they desired in their clinical settings. Nurses overwhelmingly described that their primary task and communication role was to assess patient/family understanding. Nurses referenced their team members and team support with the least frequency across scenarios. Team roles, structure, and process were reported as areas in greatest need of change in patient/family goals of care meetings. These findings demonstrate that lack of preparation to function as a team is a barrier for nurses in communicating about goals of care, and there is a demand to move such conversations upstream in oncology care.

  20. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients.…

  1. Exploring Oncology Nurses’ Grief: A Self-study

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Oncology nursing, like many other nursing fields, often provides nurses with the opportunity to get to know their patients and their families well. This familiarity allows oncology nurses to show a level of compassion and empathy that is often helpful to the patient and their family during their struggle with cancer. However, this familiarity can also lead to a profound sense of grief if the patient loses that struggle. This self-study provided me the opportunity to systematically explore my own experience with grief as an oncology nurse, helping me to identify specific stressors and also sources of stress release. PMID:27981166

  2. Development of the 24/7 Nurse Practitioner Model on the Inpatient Pediatric General Surgery Service at a Large Tertiary Care Children's Hospital and Associated Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rejtar, Marketa; Ranstrom, Lee; Allcox, Christina

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been providing high-quality and safe patient care for a few decades, and evidence showing the extent of their impact is emerging. This article describes the implementation of a 24/7 NP patient care model on an inpatient pediatric general surgery service in a tertiary free-standing Children's Hospital in the Northeastern United States. The literature shows that there is limited evidence regarding NP models of care and their effect on patient outcomes. In response to policy changes leading to reduction of resident work hours and a more acute and complex inpatient pediatric general surgery patient population, our existing NP model evolved into a 24/7 NP Model in June 2011. The results from two quality improvement projects showed positive registered nurse and attending surgeon staff satisfaction with the 24/7 NP Model of care and a decreased trend of unplanned intensive care unit patient transfers after the 24/7 NP Model implementation. These findings further support the evidence in the literature that NPs provide safe and quality patient care.

  3. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists.

  4. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care: an illustrated example in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlton G

    2014-04-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) improves the quality of patient care and helps control healthcare costs. Numerous EBP models exist to assist nurses and other healthcare providers to integrate best evidence into clinical practice. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care is one model that should be considered. Using an actual clinical example, this article describes how the Iowa Model can be used effectively to implement an actual practice change at the unit or organizational level.

  5. The perceived meaning of a (w)holistic view among general practitioners and district nurses in Swedish primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Eva Lena; Ovhed, Ingvar; Borgquist, Lars; Wilhelmsson, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background The definition of primary care varies between countries. Swedish primary care has developed from a philosophic viewpoint based on quality, accessibility, continuity, co-operation and a holistic view. The meaning of holism in international literature differs between medicine and nursing. The question is, if the difference is due to different educational traditions. Due to the uncertainties in defining holism and a holistic view we wished to study, in depth, how holism is perceived by doctors and nurses in their clinical work. Thus, the aim was to explore the perceived meaning of a holistic view among general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs). Methods Seven focus group interviews with a purposive sample of 22 GPs and 20 nurses working in primary care in two Swedish county councils were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis resulted in three categories, attitude, knowledge, and circumstances, with two, two and four subcategories respectively. A professional attitude involves recognising the whole person; not only fragments of a person with a disease. Factual knowledge is acquired through special training and long professional experience. Tacit knowledge is about feelings and social competence. Circumstances can either be barriers or facilitators. A holistic view is a strong motivator and as such it is a facilitator. The way primary care is organised can be either a barrier or a facilitator and could influence the use of a holistic approach. Defined geographical districts and care teams facilitate a holistic view with house calls being essential, particularly for nurses. In preventive work and palliative care, a holistic view was stated to be specifically important. Consultations and communication with the patient were seen as important tools. Conclusion 'Holistic view' is multidimensional, well implemented and very much alive among both GPs and DNs. The word

  6. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists. The SLAM Emergency Airway Flowchart: a new guide for advanced airway practitioners.

    PubMed

    Rich, James M; Mason, Andrew M; Ramsay, Michael A E

    2004-12-01

    Advanced airway practitioners in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, and prehospital care can suddenly and unexpectedly face difficult airway situations that can surface without warning during mask ventilation or tracheal intubation. Although tracheal intubation remains the "gold standard" in airway management, it is not always achievable, and, when it proves impossible, appropriate alternative interventions must be used rapidly to avoid serious morbidity or mortality. The SLAM Emergency Airway Flowchart (SEAF) is intended to prevent the 3 reported primary causes of adverse respiratory events (ie, inadequate ventilation, undetected esophageal intubation, and difficult intubation). The 5 pathways of the SEAF include primary ventilation, rapid-sequence intubation, difficult intubation, rescue ventilation, and cricothyrotomy. It is intended for use with adult patients by advanced airway practitioners competent in direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, administration of airway drugs, rescue ventilation, and cricothyrotomy. The SEAF has limitations (eg, suitable only for use with adult patients, cannot be used by certain categories of rescue personnel, and depends heavily on assessment of Spo2). A unique benefit is provision of simple alternative techniques that can be used when another technique fails.

  7. Nurse Communication About Goals of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Buller, Haley; Neiman, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Conversations about goals of care with the patient and family are a critical component of advanced practice in oncology. However, there are often inadequate team structures, training, or resources available to assist advanced practitioners in initiating these conversations. We conducted a study to assess nurses’ perceived role and communication tasks in such conversations about goals of care. In a cross-sectional survey of 109 nurses attending a comprehensive 2-day end-of-life nursing education course, nurses were asked to describe how they would participate in a "goals of care" meeting in three different scenarios. They were also asked what changes they desired in their clinical settings. Nurses overwhelmingly described that their primary task and communication role was to assess patient/family understanding. Nurses referenced their team members and team support with the least frequency across scenarios. Team roles, structure, and process were reported as areas in greatest need of change in patient/family goals of care meetings. These findings demonstrate that lack of preparation to function as a team is a barrier for nurses in communicating about goals of care, and there is a demand to move such conversations upstream in oncology care. PMID:28090365

  8. A partnership of a Catholic faith-based health system, nursing and traditional American Indian medicine practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, Ann O

    2008-04-01

    The paper presents a historically unique partnership between an American Southwestern, Catholic faith-based, urban hospital and a program it sponsored on the spirituality of American Indian Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) by a Comanche medicine man. A discussion is offered on the cultural partnerships, experiences and benefits achieved through the cultural accommodations of these spiritual beliefs and practices within this healthcare system. The theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality (Culture Care Theory), including the Sunrise Enabler, is applied in discussion of these past experiences to explore the relationships among and between the participating cultures. The intent of the partnerships within this program was not to 'learn Indian healing ceremonies' but to share the philosophy of TIM with all people (clients and professionals) as a means to enhance their own way of living. Examples of actual nursing decisions and actions are provided including outcomes from the program within the healthcare system and globally.

  9. ‘It is a dilemma’: perspectives of nurse practitioners on health screening of newly arrived migrants

    PubMed Central

    Kalengayi, Faustine K. Nkulu; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Nordstrand, Annika; Ahlm, Clas; Ahlberg, Beth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening newly arrived migrants from countries with high burden of communicable diseases of public health significance is part of the Swedish national strategy against the spread of these diseases. However, little is known about its implementation. Objective This study aimed at exploring caregivers’ experiences in screening newly arrived migrants to generate knowledge that could inform policy and clinical practice. Design Using an interpretive description framework, we conducted semistructured interviews between November and December 2011 in four Swedish counties, with 15 purposively selected nurses with experience in screening migrants. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Participants described a range of challenges including discordant views between migrants and the nurses about medical screening, inconsistencies in rules and practices, and conflicting policies. Participants indicated that sociocultural differences resulted in divergent expectations with migrants viewing the participants as agents of migration authorities. They also expressed concern over being given a new assignment without training and being expected to share responsibilities with staff from other agencies without adequate coordination. Finally, they indicated that existing policies can be confusing and raise ethical issues. All these were compounded by language barriers, making their work environment extremely complex and stressful. Conclusions These findings illuminate complex challenges that could limit access to, uptake, and delivery of health screening and undermine public health goals, and highlight the need for a multilevel approach. This entails avoiding the conflation of migration with health issues, harmonizing existing policies to make health care services more accessible and acceptable to migrants, and facilitating health professionals’ work in promoting public health, improving interagency collaboration and the skills of all staff involved in

  10. [Galen's oncology].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  11. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  12. A pilot project in distance education: nurse practitioner students' experience of personal video capture technology as an assessment method of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Strand, Haakan; Fox-Young, Stephanie; Long, Phil; Bogossian, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a pilot project aimed at exploring postgraduate distance students' experiences using personal video capture technology to complete competency assessments in physical examination. A pre-intervention survey gathered demographic data from nurse practitioner students (n=31) and measured their information communication technology fluency. Subsequently, thirteen (13) students were allocated a hand held video camera to use in their clinical setting. Those participating in the trial completed a post-intervention survey and further data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and deductive content analysis, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh et al., 2003) were used to guide the project. Uptake of the intervention was high (93%) as students recognised the potential benefit. Students were video recorded while performing physical examinations. They described high level of stress and some anxiety, which decreased rapidly while assessment was underway. Barriers experienced were in the areas of facilitating conditions (technical character e.g. upload of files) and social influence (e.g. local ethical approval). Students valued the opportunity to reflect on their recorded performance with their clinical mentors and by themselves. This project highlights the demands and difficulties of introducing technology to support work-based learning.

  13. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  14. COACH trial: A randomized controlled trial of nurse practitioner/community health worker cardiovascular disease risk reduction in urban community health centers: Rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jerilyn K; Himmelfarb, Cheryl R Dennison; Szanton, Sarah L; Bone, Lee; Hill, Martha N; Levine, David M

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite well-publicized guidelines on the appropriate management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, implementation of risk-reducing practices remains poor. This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a comprehensive program of CVD risk reduction delivered by nurse practitioner (NP)/community health worker (CHW) teams versus enhanced usual care in improving the proportion of patients in urban community health centers who achieve goal levels recommended by national guidelines for lipids, blood pressure, HbA1c and prescription of appropriate medications. Methods The COACH (Community Outreach and Cardiovascular Health) trial is a randomized controlled trial in which patients at federally-qualified community health centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: comprehensive intensive management of CVD risk factors for one year by a NP/CHW team or an enhanced usual care control group. Results A total of 3899 patients were assessed for eligibility and 525 were randomized. Groups were comparable at baseline on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with the exception of statistically significant differences in total cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c. Conclusions This study is a novel amalgam of multilevel interdisciplinary strategies to translate highly efficacious therapies to low-income federally-funded health centers that care for patients who carry a disproportionate burden of CVD, type 2 diabetes and uncontrolled CVD risk factors. The impact of such a community clinic-based intervention is potentially enormous. PMID:21241828

  15. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  16. Practitioner as theorist: a reprise.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2008-10-01

    This column addresses the idea of practitioner as theorist as it may inspire new paths of theory development in practice for nursing. Historical and philosophical dimensions of theory development are discussed. Extant theory development strategies as well as new approaches for practice-based theory development are proposed.

  17. Practitioner States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a symposium on practitioner states moderated by Kay Bull at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "The Effect of Locus of Control and Performance-Contingent Incentives on Productivity and Job Satisfaction in Self-Managing Teams" (Bonnie E. Garson, Douglas…

  18. [Analysis of hepato-digestive oncology practices].

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Florence; Cornu, Chloé; Marterer, Justine; Thegarid, Héléne

    2014-09-01

    Help nursing students and new professionals to understand the different facets of care is at the heart of the managerial and pedagogical process coordinated by the health framework. The formalisation and use of learning situations promote the identification of opportunities for learning, modelling and the assessment of practices. Feedback from the hepato-digestive oncology service.

  19. Creating and validating an instrument to identify the workload at an oncology and hematology outpatient service

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lelia Gonçalves Rocha; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2014-01-01

    Objective Construct and to validate an instrument for measuring the time spent by nursing staff in the interventions/activities in Outpatient Oncology and Hematology, interventions based on Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), for key areas of Pediatric Oncology and Oncology Nursing. Methods Cross-sectional study divided into two steps: (1) construction of an instrument to measure the interventions/Nursing activities and (2) validation of this instrument. Results We selected 32 essential interventions from NIC for Pediatric Oncology and Oncology Nursing areas. The judges agreed with removing 13 and including 6 interventions in the instrument, beyond personal activity. Conclusion The choice of essential interventions from NIC is justified by the gain time on research. PMID:25295454

  20. The initiation and administration of drugs for advanced life support by critical care nurses in the absence of a medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Rochelle; Lodder, Teresa; Trapani, Tony; Hanlon, Gabrielle; Cleary, Carmel

    2002-08-01

    Current legislation does not permit the administration of first line resuscitation medications by suitably qualified Division 1 registered nurses (RNs) in the absence of a medical officer. This omission by the Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981 (Vic) and the Drugs, Poisons and The Controlled Substances Regulations 1995 (Vic) leaves many critical care nurses in a vulnerable legal position. The primary aim of this study was to gauge the view of critical care nurses with respect to lobbying for change to the current legislation. In addition, the study aimed to explore and describe the educational preparation, practice perceptions and experiences of RNs working in critical care regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the administration of first line advanced life support (ALS) medications in the absence of a medical officer. It was anticipated that data collected would demonstrate some of the dilemmas associated with the initiation and administration of ALS medications for practising critical care nurses and could be used to inform controlling bodies in order for them to gain an appreciation of the issues facing critical care nurses during resuscitation. A mailout survey was sent to all members of the Victorian Branch of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN). The results showed that the majority of nurses underwent an annual ALS assessment and had current ALS accreditation. Nurses indicated that they felt educationally prepared and were confident to manage cardiopulmonary resuscitation without a medical officer; indeed, the majority had done so. The differences in practice issues for metropolitan, regional and rural nurses were highlighted. There is therefore clear evidence to suggest that legislative amendments are appropriate and necessary, given the time critical nature of cardiopulmonary arrest. There was overwhelming support for ACCCN Vic. Ltd to lobby the Victorian government for changes to the law.

  1. Evaluation of an Individualized Continuing Education Program for Physicians and Nurse Practitioners: An Example of the Situational Nature of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tresolini, Carol P.; Savage, Katherine D.; Hedgpeth, Marian Wells; Curtis, Peter

    The Visiting Clinician Program (VCP) was established in 1996 at a public medical school to provide individualized continuing education to participants and to foster closer ties between academic health center faculty and community practitioners who serve as preceptors for health professions students. Various methods have been used to evaluate the…

  2. How experienced practitioners gain knowledge.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    An evolution in nursing in the United Kingdom in the 1970s from rule-bound toward holistic, autonomous practice engendered an examination of nursing's body of knowledge and how it is incorporated into practice. This article describes Barbara Carper's (1978) Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing (empiric, ethical, aesthetic, and personal knowledge), and links it to three major worldviews of the way in which knowledge is sought (positivism, naturalism, and critical social theory). Carper's model was used in the United Kingdom as the basis for a curriculum of structured reflective practice using workshops, journaling, and clinical supervision. An example from a practitioner's diary demonstrates how Carper's model informs reflection on an interaction with a patient with newly diagnosed cancer.

  3. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  4. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology.

  5. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  6. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  7. [Unproven methods in oncology].

    PubMed

    Jallut, O; Guex, P; Barrelet, L

    1984-09-08

    As in some other chronic diseases (rheumatism, multiple sclerosis, etc.), unproven methods of diagnosis and treatment have long been current in cancer. Since 1960 the American Cancer Society has published an abundant literature on these "unproven methods", which serves as a basis for a historical review: some substances (Krebiozen, Laetrile) have enjoyed tremendous if shortlived success. The present trend is back to nature and "mild medicine". The proponents of this so-called natural medicine are often disciples of a pseudoscientific religion using irrational arguments. Direct attacks on these erroneous theories and their public refutation fail to convince the adepts, who trust in these methods and are not amenable to a scientific approach. Study of their psychological motivations reveals that in fact they seek something more reassuring than plain medical explanation which is aware of its limits. They feel reassured by theories which often bear some resemblance to the old popular medicine. To protect patients against these dangerous methods and all the disillusionment they entail, the Swiss Society of Oncology and the Swiss Cancer League have decided to gather information and draw up a descriptive list of the commonest unproven methods in Switzerland (our File No. 2, "Total anti-cancer cure", is given as an example). The files are published in French, German and English and are available to physicians, nursing teams, and also patients who wish to have more objective information on these methods.

  8. Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Nonpharmacological Interventions for Treatment of Behavior Symptoms Associated with Dementia: A Comparison of Physicians, Psychologists, and Nurse Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Jensen, Barbara; Resnick, Barbara; Norris, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Behavior problems are common in nursing homes. Current guidelines recommend nonpharmacological interventions (NPHIs) as first-line treatment, but pharmacological regimens (PIs) continue to be used. Given differences in background and training of those who treat behavior problems in residents, we compared attitudes of…

  9. Navy Nurse Corps Promotion During War: The Deployment Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    to Commander. The study also finds that being a Nurse Practitioner or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist positively affects promotion across all...negative impact on promotion to Commander. The study also finds that being a Nurse Practitioner or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist ...CRNA Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist CTS Contingency Tracking System DEERS Defense Eligibility Enrollment Reporting System DMDC Defense

  10. A urologic oncology roundtable discussion: issues to consider in choosing treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Berry, William R; Casey, Alison M; Aslo, Angel

    2013-01-01

    A recent Elsevier survey of 100 urologists and 100 medical oncologists who treat patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) identified a knowledge gap in their understanding of the recently approved therapies and what information they wanted to know concerning how and when to properly prescribe these treatments. The survey also revealed that approximately 30% of urologists had yet to prescribe one of the newly approved therapies. In response to these findings, a panel of topic experts in the fields of oncology, nursing, and specialty pharmacy convened for a roundtable discussion and to develop a companion summary article to provide a knowledge-based perspective for physicians treating patients with metastatic CRPC (http://prostatecancer.urologiconcology.org/). These participating oncology experts discussed how CRPC is defined, how the newly approved agents should be sequenced in the management of a typical patient with CRPC, and the clinical considerations regarding the role of specialty pharmacy providers and nurse practitioners as patient advocates when selecting these therapies for treating metastatic CRPC.

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Missouri Oncology Society State Affiliate View Event Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Houston, Texas, United States April 22 Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology MD Anderson Informational; ...

  12. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care

    PubMed Central

    Duker, Leah I. Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care. PMID:27295001

  13. Vascular access in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Pittiruti, Mauro; Biffi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Adequate vascular access is of paramount importance in oncology patients. It is important in the initial phase of surgical treatment or chemotherapy, as well as in the chronic management of advanced cancer and in the palliative care setting. We present an overview of the available vascular access devices and of the most relevant issues regarding insertion and management of vascular access. Particular emphasis is given to the use of ultrasound guidance as the preferred technique of insertion, which has dramatically decreased insertion-related complications. Vascular access management has considerably improved after the publication of effective guidelines for the appropriate nursing of the vascular device, which has reduced the risk of late complications, such as catheter-related bloodstream infection. However, many areas of clinical practice are still lacking an evidence-based background, such as the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in each clinical situation, as well as prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device for the oncology patient, based on the literature available to date.

  14. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  15. Interventional oncology in multidisciplinary cancer treatment in the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Adam, Andreas; Kenny, Lizbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Interventional oncology is an evolving branch of interventional radiology, which relies on rapidly evolving, highly sophisticated treatment tools and precise imaging guidance to target and destroy malignant tumours. The development of this field has important potential benefits for patients and the health-care system, but as a new discipline, interventional oncology has not yet fully established its place in the wider field of oncology; its application does not have a comprehensive evidence base, or a clinical or quality-assurance framework within which to operate. In this regard, radiation oncology, a cornerstone of modern cancer care, has a lot of important information to offer to interventional oncologists. A strong collaboration between radiation oncology and interventional oncology, both of which aim to cure or control tumours or to relieve symptoms with as little collateral damage to normal tissue as possible, will have substantial advantages for both disciplines. A close relationship with radiation oncology will help facilitate the development of a robust quality-assurance framework and accumulation of evidence to support the integration of interventional oncology into multidisciplinary care. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional oncology and radiation oncology fields will have great benefits to practitioners, people affected by cancer, and to the wider field of oncology.

  16. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comprehensive plans of care, of all participants in the program. (a) There must be at least one registered nurse on duty each day of operation of the adult day health care program. This nurse must be currently... that this nurse be a geriatric nurse practitioner or a clinical nurse specialist. (b) The number...

  17. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  18. Now We Know: Assessing Sexual Assault Criminal Justice Case Processing in an Urban Community Using the Sexual Assault Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Julie L; Shaw, Jessica; Lark, Alyssa; Campbell, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Campbell and colleagues developed an evaluation Toolkit for use by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) to assess criminal case outcomes in adult sexual assault cases seen by SANE programs (Campbell, Townsend, Shaw, Karim, & Markowitz, 2014; Campbell, Bybee, et al., 2014). The Toolkit provides step-by-step directions and an easy-to-use statistical program. This study describes implementation of the Toolkit in Salt Lake County, the first site outside the pilot sites to utilize the program. The Toolkit revealed that, in Salt Lake County from 2003 to 2011, only 6% of adult sexual assault cases were successfully prosecuted. These findings prompted multiple community discussions, media attention, and a call to action to improve the investigation and prosecution of adult sexual assault cases. The primary purpose of this case report is to encourage other SANE teams and communities to use the Toolkit by sharing the successful experience of Salt Lake County in implementing the Toolkit.Video Abstract available for additional insights from Dr. Valentine (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JFN/A19).

  19. Prehospital Nursing in Maryland - Legal Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    midwifery . In Massachusetts, the Board of Registration in Nursing is authorized to establish conditions and regulations for nursing practice in the...because as a registered nurse, she could orly practice midwifery after complying with the Prehospital Nursing 41 Board’s rules and regulations regarding...standards for the practice of Certified Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Midwifery (Md. Health Occu. Code Ann. §8-306 & §§8-601-603, 1991). Prehospital nursing

  20. Imaging in interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Stephen B; Silverman, Stuart G

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging in interventional oncology is used differently than in diagnostic radiology and prioritizes different imaging features. Whereas diagnostic imaging prioritizes the highest-quality imaging, interventional imaging prioritizes real-time imaging with lower radiation dose in addition to high-quality imaging. In general, medical imaging plays five key roles in image-guided therapy, and interventional oncology, in particular. These roles are (a) preprocedure planning, (b) intraprocedural targeting, (c) intraprocedural monitoring, (d) intraprocedural control, and (e) postprocedure assessment. Although many of these roles are still relatively basic in interventional oncology, as research and development in medical imaging focuses on interventional needs, it is likely that the role of medical imaging in intervention will become even more integral and more widely applied. In this review, the current status of medical imaging for intervention in oncology will be described and directions for future development will be examined.

  1. Basic Principles in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.

    The evolving field of interventional oncology can only be considered as a small integrative part in the complex area of oncology. The new field of interventional oncology needs a standardization of the procedures, the terminology, and criteria to facilitate the effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison between treatments and new integrative technology. In principle, ablative therapy is a part of locoregional oncological therapy and is defined either as chemical ablation using ethanol or acetic acid, or thermotherapies such as radiofrequency, laser, microwave, and cryoablation. All these new evolving therapies have to be exactly evaluated and an adequate terminology has to be used to define imaging findings and pathology. All the different technologies and evaluated therapies have to be compared, and the results have to be analyzed in order to improve the patient outcome.

  2. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  3. Constructing Practitioner Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ian; Lunt, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The authors draw on a case study evaluation of two networked cohorts of practitioner-researchers in a children's services national social work agency in one of the home countries of the United Kingdom. The aim of the present study was to understand the meaning of practitioner research for social work professionals through an exploration of how…

  4. Comparative oncology today.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, Melissa C; Khanna, Chand

    2007-11-01

    The value of comparative oncology has been increasingly recognized in the field of cancer research, including the identification of cancer-associated genes; the study of environmental risk factors, tumor biology, and progression; and, perhaps most importantly, the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics. The fruits of this effort are expected to be the creation of better and more specific drugs to benefit veterinary and human patients who have cancer. The state of the comparative oncology field is outlined in this article, with an emphasis on cancer in dogs.

  5. Oncology Nurses and the Cancer Moonshot 2020.

    PubMed

    Kennedy Sheldon, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    When Vice President Joe Biden's son, Beau, died of a brain tumor in May 2015, the Vice President's grief was profound. Yet, his grief generated an idea, a big idea: Let's collaborate and focus the talent and resources in our country to eliminate cancer as we know it. When Vice President Biden shared his idea with President Barack Obama in the fall of 2015, not only did President Obama endorse the idea, he announced the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative during his January 2016 State of the Union Address. The goal is to double progress against cancer and break down silos that prevent science and industry from working together. The initiative centers around the development and implementation of new vaccine-based immunotherapies to target individual tumors based on their genomic signature.

  6. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology.

  7. Healthcare practitioners' personal and professional values.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-05-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC databases for articles on personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners and students. We extracted values from included papers and synthesized them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We summarised the framework within the context of healthcare practice. We identified 128 values from 50 included articles from doctors, nurses and allied health professionals. A new framework for the identified values established the following broad healthcare practitioner values, corresponding to Schwartz values (in parentheses): authority (power); capability (achievement); pleasure (hedonism); intellectual stimulation (stimulation); critical-thinking (self-direction); equality (universalism); altruism (benevolence); morality (tradition); professionalism (conformity); safety (security) and spirituality (spirituality). The most prominent values identified were altruism, equality and capability. This review identified a comprehensive set of personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners. We integrated these into a single framework derived from Schwartz's values model. This framework can be used to assess personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners across professional groups, and can help improve practitioners' awareness of their values so they can negotiate more patient-centred decisions. A common values framework across professional groups can support shared education strategies on values and help improve interprofessional teamwork and decision-making.

  8. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Nurse Practitioners Experience With Herbal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Grow IRB Approval Letter APPENDIX D: Research Study Information Sheet Herbal Therapy 1 CHAPTER I: AIM OF THE STUDY Introduction This chapter will...opportunity for intervention. American medical schools are beginning to recognize the growing trend of patients resorting to complementary and non...both in the United States and worldwide. Providers’ response to this growing trend has not been well documented. Because patients are at an increased

  10. The Case Method in Nurse Practitioner Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Anne L.; Bates, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    Given an actual case history, students learn to seek out necessary knowledge, analyze the situation, and make patient care management decisions. Discussed are: use of the method (and its promotion of active learning), the decision-making process, and lack of ready-made materials. A sample case study is included. (Author/MS)

  11. National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts ADHD Conversations Learning Disabilities Youth Violence Prevention Bullying Prevention Medicines and Vaccines Over-the-Counter Medicine ... Be More Likely To Intervene When They See Bullying If Parents Tell Them To, Study Suggests. More ...

  12. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  13. Development and Validation of a Nutritional Education Pamphlet for Low-Literacy Pediatric Oncology Caregivers in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A.; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Methods The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and nurses validated the pamphlet’s content and design. Results and Conclusions Nurses expressed the need for nutrition-related pamphlets in developing countries. The pamphlet was validated positively by experts and nurses and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America. PMID:20300913

  14. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  15. Critique of the Graduate Nurse: An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Nurses in service fault beginning nurses' insufficient clinical and patient management skills. Nurse educators maintain that practicing nurses do not facilitate the transition of entry-level nurses. More collaboration between teachers and practitioners is needed. (Commentaries by Sally Glen, Patrick Crookes, and Pam Walter follow.) (SK)

  16. Pathways to Nursing: A Guide to Library and Online Research in Nursing and Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dennis C.; Craig, Paula

    2004-01-01

    This timely book provides a foundation in library and electronic research in the fields of nursing and allied health. It explains essential sources and techniques that can be used by nursing students, healthcare researchers, and nurse practitioners who need to gather information independently. Pathways to Nursing covers both physical libraries and…

  17. Nursing Professional Development Organizational Value Demonstration Project.

    PubMed

    Harper, Mary G; Aucoin, Julia; Warren, Joan I

    2016-01-01

    A common question nursing professional development (NPD) practitioners ask is, "How many NPD practitioners should my organization have?" This study examined correlations among facility size and structure, NPD practitioner characteristics and time in service, and organizational outcomes. Organizations with a higher rate of NPD full-time equivalents per bed had higher patient satisfaction with nurses' communication and provision of discharge instruction on their HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Provider and Systems) scores.

  18. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  19. Biopsies in oncology.

    PubMed

    de Bazelaire, C; Coffin, A; Cohen, S; Scemama, A; de Kerviler, E

    2014-01-01

    Imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies in patients in oncology provide an accurate diagnosis of malignant tumors. Percutaneous biopsy results are improved by correct use of sampling procedures. The risks of percutaneous biopsy are low and its complications are generally moderate. These risks can be reduced using aids such as blund tip introducers, hydrodissection and correct patient positioning. The multidisciplinary team meetings dialogue between oncologist, surgeon and radiologist correctly defines the indications in order to improve the treatment strategies.

  20. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.