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Sample records for oncolytic vaccinia virus

  1. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  2. Polymeric Cups for Cavitation-mediated Delivery of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Rachel; Coviello, Christian; Erbs, Philippe; Foloppe, Johann; Rowe, Cliff; Kwan, James; Crake, Calum; Finn, Seán; Jackson, Edward; Balloul, Jean-Marc; Story, Colin; Coussios, Constantin; Carlisle, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) could become the most powerful and selective cancer therapies. However, the limited transport of OV into and throughout tumors following intravenous injection means their clinical administration is often restricted to direct intratumoral dosing. Application of physical stimuli, such as focused ultrasound, offers a means of achieving enhanced mass transport. In particular, shockwaves and microstreaming resulting from the instigation of an ultrasound-induced event known as inertial cavitation can propel OV hundreds of microns. We have recently developed a polymeric cup formulation which, when delivered intravenously, provides the nuclei for instigation of sustained inertial cavitation events within tumors. Here we report that exposure of tumors to focused ultrasound after intravenous coinjection of cups and oncolytic vaccinia virus , leads to substantial and significant increases in activity. When cavitation was instigated within SKOV-3 or HepG2 xenografts, reporter gene expression from vaccinia virus was enhanced 1,000-fold (P < 0.0001) or 10,000-fold (P < 0.001), respectively. Similar increases in the number of vaccinia virus genomes recovered from tumors were also observed. In survival studies, the application of cup mediated cavitation to a vaccinia virus expressing a prodrug converting enzyme provided significant (P < 0.05) retardation of tumor growth. This technology could improve the clinical utility of all biological therapeutics including OV. PMID:27375160

  3. Preclinical Evaluation of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus for Therapy of Canine Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Josupeit, Rafael; Rudolph, Stephan; Ehrig, Klaas; Donat, Ulrike; Weibel, Stephanie; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Zhang, Qian; Heisig, Martin; Thamm, Douglas; Stritzker, Jochen; MacNeill, Amy; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2012-01-01

    Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS) using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS. PMID:22615950

  4. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer.

  5. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Price, Daniel L.; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Szalay, Aladar A.; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Methods Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. Results GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. Conclusion The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25244076

  6. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  7. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-04-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice.

  8. Engineering of double recombinant vaccinia virus with enhanced oncolytic potential for solid tumor virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kochneva, Galina; Sivolobova, Galina; Tkacheva, Anastasiya; Grazhdantseva, Antonina; Troitskaya, Olga; Nushtaeva, Anna; Tkachenko, Anastasiya; Kuligina, Elena; Richter, Vladimir; Koval, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) oncolytic therapy has been successful in a number of tumor models. In this study our goal was to generate a double recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-GMCSF-Lact) with enhanced antitumor activity that expresses exogenous proteins: the antitumor protein lactaptin and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Lactaptin has previously been demonstrated to act as a tumor suppressor in mouse hepatoma as well as MDA-MB-231 human adenocarcinoma cells grafted into SCID mice. VV-GMCSF-Lact was engineered from Lister strain (L-IVP) vaccinia virus and has deletions of the viral thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes. Cell culture experiments revealed that engineered VV-GMCSF-Lact induced the death of cultured cancer cells more efficiently than recombinant VACV coding only GM-CSF (VV-GMCSF-dGF). Normal human MCF-10A cells were resistant to both recombinants up to 10 PFU/cell. The selectivity index for breast cancer cells measured in pair cultures MCF-7/MCF-10A was 200 for recombinant VV-GMCSF-Lact coding lactaptin and 100 for VV-GMCSF-dGF. Using flow cytometry we demonstrated that both recombinants induced apoptosis in treated cells but that the rate in the cells with active caspase −3 and −7 was higher after treatment with VV-GMCSF-Lact than with VV-GMCSF-dGF. Tumor growth inhibition and survival outcomes after VV-GMCSF-Lact treatment were estimated using immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice models. We observed that VV-GMCSF-Lact efficiently delays the growth of sensitive and chemoresistant tumors. These results demonstrate that recombinant VACVs coding an apoptosis-inducing protein have good therapeutic potential against chemoresistant tumors. Our data will also stimulate further investigation of coding lactaptin double recombinant VACV in clinical settings. PMID:27708236

  9. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian carcinomatosis using a replication-selective vaccinia virus armed with a yeast cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Chalikonda, S; Kivlen, M H; O'Malley, M E; Eric Dong, X D; McCart, J A; Gorry, M C; Yin, X-Y; Brown, C K; Zeh, H J; Guo, Z S; Bartlett, D L

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the ability of a highly tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia virus armed with a yeast cytosine deaminase gene to infect and lyse human and murine ovarian tumors both in vitro and in vivo. The virus vvDD-CD could infect, replicate in and effectively lyse both human and mouse ovarian cancer cells in vitro. In two different treatment schedules involving either murine MOSEC or human A2780 ovarian carcinomatosis models, regional delivery of vvDD-CD selectively targeted tumor cells and ovarian tissue, effectively delaying the development of either tumor or ascites and leading to significant survival advantages. Oncolytic virotherapy using vvDD-CD in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine conferred an additional long-term survival advantage upon tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice. These findings demonstrate that a tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia combined with gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy is a highly effective strategy for treating advanced ovarian cancers in both syngeneic mouse and human xenograft models. Given the biological safety, tumor selectivity and oncolytic potency of this armed oncolytic virus, this dual therapy merits further investigation as a promising new treatment for metastatic ovarian cancer.

  10. Evaluation of a New Recombinant Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strain GLV-5b451 for Feline Mammary Carcinoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weibel, Stephanie; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Härtl, Barbara; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Nolte, Ingo; Chen, Nanhai G.; Aguilar, Richard J.; Yu, Yong A.; Zhang, Qian; Frentzen, Alexa; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) infection is a promising approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of a new preclinical model of feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) using a recently established cancer cell line, DT09/06. In addition, we evaluated a recombinant vaccinia virus strain, GLV-5b451, expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) single-chain antibody (scAb) GLAF-2 as an oncolytic agent against FMC. Cell culture data demonstrate that GLV-5b451 virus efficiently infected, replicated in and destroyed DT09/06 cancer cells. In the selected xenografts of FMC, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in comparison to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to overproduction of functional scAb GLAF-2, which caused drastic reduction of intratumoral VEGF levels and inhibition of angiogenesis. In summary, here we have shown, for the first time, that the vaccinia virus strains and especially GLV-5b451 have great potential for effective treatment of FMC in animal model. PMID:25093734

  11. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  12. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  13. Rational combination of oncolytic vaccinia virus and PD-L1 blockade works synergistically to enhance therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Kalinski, Pawel; Guo, Z. Sheng; Bartlett, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Both anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy and oncolytic virotherapy have demonstrated promise, yet have exhibited efficacy in only a small fraction of cancer patients. Here we hypothesized that an oncolytic poxvirus would attract T cells into the tumour, and induce PD-L1 expression in cancer and immune cells, leading to more susceptible targets for anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Our results demonstrate in colon and ovarian cancer models that an oncolytic vaccinia virus attracts effector T cells and induces PD-L1 expression on both cancer and immune cells in the tumour. The dual therapy reduces PD-L1+ cells and facilitates non-redundant tumour infiltration of effector CD8+, CD4+ T cells, with increased IFN-γ, ICOS, granzyme B and perforin expression. Furthermore, the treatment reduces the virus-induced PD-L1+ DC, MDSC, TAM and Treg, as well as co-inhibitory molecules-double-positive, severely exhausted PD-1+CD8+ T cells, leading to reduced tumour burden and improved survival. This combinatorial therapy may be applicable to a much wider population of cancer patients. PMID:28345650

  14. Phase 1 study of intratumoral Pexa-Vec (JX-594), an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus, in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Timothy P; Ngo, Minhtran C; Geller, James I; Louis, Chrystal U; Currier, Mark A; Racadio, John M; Towbin, Alexander J; Rooney, Cliona M; Pelusio, Adina; Moon, Anne; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Burke, James M; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Breitbach, Caroline J

    2015-03-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec, JX-594) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus designed to destroy cancer cells through viral lysis and induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-driven tumor-specific immunity. Pexa-Vec has undergone phase 1 and 2 testing alone and in combination with other therapies in adult patients, via both intratumoral and intravenous administration routes. We sought to determine the safety of intratumoral administration in pediatric patients. In a dose-escalation study using either 10(6) or 10(7) plaque-forming units per kilogram, we performed one-time injections in up to three tumor sites in five pediatric patients and two injections in one patient. Ages at study entry ranged from 4 to 21 years, and their cancer diagnoses included neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and Ewing sarcoma. All toxicities were ≤ grade 3. The most common side effects were sinus fever and sinus tachycardia. All three patients at the higher dose developed asymptomatic grade 1 treatment-related skin pustules that resolved within 3-4 weeks. One patient showed imaging evidence suggestive of antitumor biological activity. The two patients tested for cellular immunoreactivity to vaccinia antigens showed strong responses. Overall, our study suggests Pexa-Vec is safe to administer to pediatric patients by intratumoral administration and could be studied further in this patient population.

  15. Combination treatment with oncolytic Vaccinia virus and cyclophosphamide results in synergistic antitumor effects in human lung adenocarcinoma bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity of the recombinant Vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 as a single agent to efficiently treat different human or canine cancers has been shown in several preclinical studies. Currently, its human safety and efficacy are investigated in phase I/II clinical trials. In this study we set out to evaluate the oncolytic activity of GLV-1h68 in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line PC14PE6-RFP in cell cultures and analyzed the antitumor potency of a combined treatment strategy consisting of GLV-1h68 and cyclophosphamide (CPA) in a mouse model of PC14PE6-RFP lung adenocarcinoma. Methods PC14PE6-RFP cells were treated in cell culture with GLV-1h68. Viral replication and cell survival were determined by plaque assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, respectively. Subcutaneously implanted PC14PE6-RFP xenografts were treated by systemic injection of GLV-1h68, CPA or a combination of both. Tumor growth and viral biodistribution were monitored and immune-related antigen profiling of tumor lysates was performed. Results GLV-1h68 efficiently infected, replicated in and lysed human PC14PE6-RFP cells in cell cultures. PC14PE6-RFP tumors were efficiently colonized by GLV-1h68 leading to much delayed tumor growth in PC14PE6-RFP tumor-bearing nude mice. Combination treatment with GLV-1h68 and CPA significantly improved the antitumor efficacy of GLV-1h68 and led to an increased viral distribution within the tumors. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were distinctly elevated in tumors of GLV-1h68-treated mice. Factors expressed by endothelial cells or present in the blood were decreased after combination treatment. A complete loss in the hemorrhagic phenotype of the PC14PE6-RFP tumors and a decrease in the number of blood vessels after combination treatment could be observed. Conclusions CPA and GLV-1h68 have synergistic antitumor effects on PC14PE6-RFP xenografts. We strongly suppose that in the PC14PE6-RFP model the

  16. Isolated limb perfusion with melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and oncolytic vaccinia virus improves tumour targeting and prolongs survival in a rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pencavel, Tim D; Wilkinson, Michelle J; Mansfield, David C; Khan, Aadil A; Seth, Rohit; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Roulstone, Victoria; Aguilar, Richard J; Chen, Nanhai G; Szalay, Aladar A; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2015-02-15

    Isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a treatment for advanced extremity sarcoma and in-transit melanoma. Advancing this procedure by investigating the addition of novel agents, such as cancer-selective oncolytic viruses, may improve both the therapeutic efficacy of ILP and the tumour-targeted delivery of oncolytic virotherapy. Standard in vitro assays were used to characterise single agent and combinatorial activities of melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Lister strain vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) against BN175 rat sarcoma cells. An orthotopic model of advanced extremity sarcoma was used to evaluate survival of animals after ILP with combinations of TNF-α, melphalan and GLV-1h68. We investigated the efficiency of viral tumour delivery by ILP compared to intravenous therapy, the locoregional and systemic biodistribution of virus after ILP, and the effect of mode of administration on antibody response. The combination of melphalan and GLV-1h68 was synergistic in vitro. The addition of virus to standard ILP regimens was well tolerated and demonstrated superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous administration. Triple therapy (melphalan/TNF-α/GLV-1h68) resulted in increased tumour growth delay and enhanced survival compared to other treatment regimens. Live virus was recovered in large amounts from perfused regions, but in smaller amounts from systemic organs. The addition of oncolytic vaccinia virus to existing TNF-α/melphalan-based ILP strategies results in survival advantage in an immunocompetent rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma. Virus administered by ILP has superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous delivery. Further evaluation and clinical translation of this approach is warranted.

  17. Oncolytic virotherapy with an armed vaccinia virus in an orthotopic model of renal carcinoma is associated with modification of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Fend, Laetitia; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Foloppe, Johann; Kempf, Juliette; Cochin, Sandrine; Barraud, Luc; Accart, Nathalie; Erbs, Philippe; Fournel, Sylvie; Préville, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is an emergent promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. We have constructed a vaccinia virus (WR strain) deleted for thymidine kinase (TK) and ribonucleotide reductase (RR) genes that expressed the fusion suicide gene FCU1 derived from the yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase genes. We evaluated this construct (VV-FCU1) in the orthotopic model of renal carcinoma (RenCa). Systemic administration of VV-FCU1 resulted in orthotopic tumor growth inhibition, despite temporary expression of viral proteins. VV-FCU1 treatment was associated with an infiltration of tumors by CD8(+) T lymphocytes and a decrease in the proportion of infiltrating Tregs, thus modifying the ratio of CD8(+)/CD4(+) Treg in favor of CD8(+)cytotoxic T cells. We demonstrated that VV-FCU1 treatment prolonged survival of animals implanted with RenCa cells in kidney. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells abolished the therapeutic effect of VV-FCU1 while depletion of CD4(+) T cells enhanced its protective activity. Administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) resulted in a sustained control of tumor growth but did not extend survival. This study shows the importance of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vaccinia virus-mediated oncolytic virotherapy and suggests that this approach may be evaluated for the treatment of human renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Preclinical Testing Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strain GLV-5b451 Expressing an Anti-VEGF Single-Chain Antibody for Canine Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Adelfinger, Marion; Bessler, Simon; Frentzen, Alexa; Cecil, Alexander; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Szalay, Aladar A

    2015-07-20

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for canine cancer therapy. Here we describe, for the first time, the characterization and the use of VACV strain GLV-5b451 expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) single-chain antibody (scAb) GLAF-2 as therapeutic agent against different canine cancers. Cell culture data demonstrated that GLV-5b451 efficiently infected and destroyed all four tested canine cancer cell lines including: mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). The GLV-5b451 virus-mediated production of GLAF-2 antibody was observed in all four cancer cell lines. In addition, this antibody specifically recognized canine VEGF. Finally, in canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS) xenografted mice, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 was found to be safe and led to anti-tumor effects resulting in the significant reduction and substantial long-term inhibition of tumor growth. A CD31-based immuno-staining showed significantly decreased neo-angiogenesis in GLV-5b451-treated tumors compared to the controls. In summary, these findings indicate that GLV-5b451 has potential for use as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of CSTS.

  19. Preclinical Testing Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strain GLV-5b451 Expressing an Anti-VEGF Single-Chain Antibody for Canine Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adelfinger, Marion; Bessler, Simon; Frentzen, Alexa; Cecil, Alexander; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2015-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for canine cancer therapy. Here we describe, for the first time, the characterization and the use of VACV strain GLV-5b451 expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) single-chain antibody (scAb) GLAF-2 as therapeutic agent against different canine cancers. Cell culture data demonstrated that GLV-5b451 efficiently infected and destroyed all four tested canine cancer cell lines including: mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). The GLV-5b451 virus-mediated production of GLAF-2 antibody was observed in all four cancer cell lines. In addition, this antibody specifically recognized canine VEGF. Finally, in canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS) xenografted mice, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 was found to be safe and led to anti-tumor effects resulting in the significant reduction and substantial long-term inhibition of tumor growth. A CD31-based immuno-staining showed significantly decreased neo-angiogenesis in GLV-5b451-treated tumors compared to the controls. In summary, these findings indicate that GLV-5b451 has potential for use as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of CSTS. PMID:26205404

  20. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors.

  1. Group 2 Vaccinia Virus, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Felipe Lopes; Borges, Iara Apolinario; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado; Mesquita, Vaz; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, vaccinia virus caused an outbreak of bovine vaccinia, affecting dairy cattle and dairy workers in Brazil. Genetic and phenotypic analyses identified this isolate as distinct from others recently identified, thereby reinforcing the hypothesis that different vaccinia virus strains co-circulate in Brazil. PMID:23171598

  2. Vectorization in an oncolytic vaccinia virus of an antibody, a Fab and a scFv against programmed cell death -1 (PD-1) allows their intratumoral delivery and an improved tumor-growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kleinpeter, Patricia; Fend, Laetitia; Thioudellet, Christine; Geist, Michel; Sfrontato, Nathalie; Koerper, Véronique; Fahrner, Catherine; Schmitt, Doris; Gantzer, Murielle; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Brandely, Renée; Villeval, Dominique; Rittner, Karola; Silvestre, Nathalie; Erbs, Philippe; Zitvogel, Laurence; Quéméneur, Eric; Préville, Xavier; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the successful vectorization of a hamster monoclonal IgG (namely J43) recognizing the murine Programmed cell death-1 (mPD-1) in Western Reserve (WR) oncolytic vaccinia virus. Three forms of mPD-1 binders have been inserted into the virus: whole antibody (mAb), Fragment antigen-binding (Fab) or single-chain variable fragment (scFv). MAb, Fab and scFv were produced and assembled with the expected patterns in supernatants of cells infected by the recombinant viruses. The three purified mPD-1 binders were able to block the binding of mPD-1 ligand to mPD-1 in vitro. Moreover, mAb was detected in tumor and in serum of C57BL/6 mice when the recombinant WR-mAb was injected intratumorally (IT) in B16F10 and MCA 205 tumors. The concentration of circulating mAb detected after IT injection was up to 1,900-fold higher than the level obtained after a subcutaneous (SC) injection (i.e., without tumor) confirming the virus tropism for tumoral cells and/or microenvironment. Moreover, the overall tumoral accumulation of the mAb was higher and lasted longer after IT injection of WR-mAb1, than after IT administration of 10 µg of J43. The IT injection of viruses induced a massive infiltration of immune cells including activated lymphocytes (CD8+ and CD4+). Interestingly, in the MCA 205 tumor model, WR-mAb1 and WR-scFv induced a therapeutic control of tumor growth similar to unarmed WR combined to systemically administered J43 and superior to that obtained with an unarmed WR. These results pave the way for next generation of oncolytic vaccinia armed with immunomodulatory therapeutic proteins such as mAbs. PMID:27853644

  3. Vaccinia virus, a promising new therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yaghchi, Chadwan Al; Zhang, Zhongxian; Alusi, Ghassan; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Wang, Yaohe

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients signifies a need for radically new therapeutic strategies. Tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses have emerged as attractive therapeutic candidates for cancer treatment due to their inherent ability to specifically target and lyse tumor cells as well as induce antitumor effects by multiple action mechanisms. Vaccinia virus has several inherent features that make it particularly suitable for use as an oncolytic agent. In this review, we will discuss the potential of vaccinia virus in the management of pancreatic cancer in light of our increased understanding of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in the disease process as well as our extending knowledge in the biology of vaccinia virus. PMID:26595180

  4. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  5. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  6. Current status of clinical trials assessing oncolytic virus therapy for urological cancers.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Homma, Yukio; Todo, Tomoki

    2017-03-21

    Oncolytic virus therapy has recently been recognized as a promising new option for cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in cancer cells, thus killing them without harming normal cells. Notably, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly called OncoVEX(GM)(-)(CSF) ), an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable melanoma in October 2015, and was subsequently approved in Europe and Australia in 2016. The efficacies of many types of oncolytic viruses against urological cancers have been investigated in preclinical studies during the past decade, and some have already been tested in clinical trials. For example, a phase I trial of the third-generation oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type 1, G47Δ, in patients with prostate cancer was completed in 2016. We summarize the current status of clinical trials of oncolytic virus therapy in patients with the three major urological cancers: prostate, bladder and renal cell cancers. In addition to Herpes simplex virus type 1, adenoviruses, reoviruses, vaccinia virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus have also been used as parental viruses in these trials. We believe that oncolytic virus therapy is likely to become an important and major treatment option for urological cancers in the near future.

  7. Virus, Oncolytic virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2016-12-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. In this review, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years.

  8. Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells which are shown to be relatively resistant to conventional anticancer therapies and have been correlated to disease recurrence. Oncolytic viruses utilize methods of cell killing that differ from traditional therapies and thus are able to elude the typical mechanisms that CSCs use to resist current chemotherapies and radiotherapies. Moreover, genetically engineered oncolytic viruses may further augment the oncolytic effects. Here we review the recent data regarding the ability of several oncolytic viruses to eradicate CSCs. PMID:27358866

  9. Oncolytic Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Current standard treatments of cancer can prolong survival of many cancer patients but usually do not effectively cure the disease. Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging therapeutic for the treatment of cancer that exploits replication-competent viruses to selectively infect and destroy cancerous cells while sparing normal cells and tissues. Clinical and/or preclinical studies on oncolytic viruses have revealed that the candidate viruses being tested in trials are remarkably safe and offer potential for treating many classes of currently incurable cancers. Among these candidates are vaccinia and myxoma viruses, which belong to the family Poxviridae and possess promising oncolytic features. This article describes poxviruses that are being developed for oncolytic virotherapy and summarizes the outcomes of both clinical and preclinical studies. Additionally, studies demonstrating superior efficacy when poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy is combined with conventional therapies are described. PMID:25839047

  10. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start. PMID:25482233

  11. Neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.C.; Eschete, M.L.; Cox, M.E.; King, J.W.

    1987-10-01

    We studied human neutrophils for uptake of vaccinia virus. Uptake was determined radiometrically and by electron microscopy. Vaccinia virus was labeled with /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, incubated with neutrophils, and quantified in neutrophil pellets in a new radiometric phagocytosis assay. Better results were obtained from assays of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled virus; uptake increased through 1 hr and then plateaued. Phagocytosis of 3H-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was normal. Uptake of virus was serum dependent. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was measured by two methods. No /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (/sup 14/C)1-glucose accompanied uptake of vaccinia virus, in contrast to the respiratory burst accompanying bacterial phagocytosis. Electron microscopy showed intact to slightly digested intraphagolysosomal vaccinia virus. Pock reduction assay showed a decrease in viral content due to neutrophils until 6 hr of incubation, when a modest but significant increase was observed. Thus, neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus is distinguished from bacterial phagocytosis.

  12. Oncolytic virus therapy: A new era of cancer treatment at dawn.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is perhaps the next major breakthrough in cancer treatment following the success in immunotherapy using immune checkpoint inhibitors. Oncolytic viruses are defined as genetically engineered or naturally occurring viruses that selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells without harming the normal tissues. T-Vec (talimogene laherparepvec), a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) armed with GM-CSF, was recently approved as the first oncolytic virus drug in the USA and Europe. The phase III trial proved that local intralesional injections with T-Vec in advanced malignant melanoma patients can not only suppress the growth of injected tumors but also act systemically and prolong overall survival. Other oncolytic viruses that are closing in on drug approval in North America and Europe include vaccinia virus JX-594 (pexastimogene devacirepvec) for hepatocellular carcinoma, GM-CSF-expressing adenovirus CG0070 for bladder cancer, and Reolysin (pelareorep), a wild-type variant of reovirus, for head and neck cancer. In Japan, a phase II clinical trial of G47∆, a third-generation oncolytic HSV-1, is ongoing in glioblastoma patients. G47∆ was recently designated as a "Sakigake" breakthrough therapy drug in Japan. This new system by the Japanese government should provide G47∆ with priority reviews and a fast-track drug approval by the regulatory authorities. Whereas numerous oncolytic viruses have been subjected to clinical trials, the common feature that is expected to play a major role in prolonging the survival of cancer patients is an induction of specific antitumor immunity in the course of tumor-specific viral replication. It appears that it will not be long before oncolytic virus therapy becomes a standard therapeutic option for all cancer patients.

  13. Vaccinia virus infection in monkeys, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Jônatas S; Silva-Fernandes, André T; Lima, Larissa S; Campos, Rafael K; Guedes, Maria I M C; Cota, Marcela M G; Assis, Felipe L; Borges, Iara A; Souza-Júnior, Milton F; Lobato, Zélia I P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Trindade, Giliane S; Kroon, Erna G

    2010-06-01

    To detect orthopoxvirus in the Brazilian Amazon, we conducted a serosurvey of 344 wild animals. Neutralizing antibodies against orthopoxvirus were detected by plaque-reduction neutralizing tests in 84 serum samples. Amplicons from 6 monkey samples were sequenced. These amplicons identified vaccinia virus genetically similar to strains from bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil.

  14. Vaccinia Virus Infection in Monkeys, Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Abrahão, Jônatas S.; Silva-Fernandes, André T.; Lima, Larissa S.; Campos, Rafael K.; Guedes, Maria I.M.C.; Cota, Marcela M.G.; Assis, Felipe L.; Borges, Iara A.; Souza-Júnior, Milton F.; Lobato, Zélia I.P.; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Ferreira, Paulo C.P.; Trindade, Giliane S.

    2010-01-01

    To detect orthopoxvirus in the Brazilian Amazon, we conducted a serosurvey of 344 wild animals. Neutralizing antibodies against orthopoxvirus were detected by plaque-reduction neutralizing tests in 84 serum samples. Amplicons from 6 monkey samples were sequenced. These amplicons identified vaccinia virus genetically similar to strains from bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. PMID:20507750

  15. Oncolytic myxoma virus: the path to clinic.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2013-09-06

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials.

  16. Oncolytic Myxoma Virus: The path to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials. PMID:23726825

  17. Oncolytic Virus: Regulatory Aspects from Quality Control to Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Uchida, Eriko

    2017-02-22

    Oncolytic viruses, which include both naturally occurring wild-type viruses/attenuated viruses and genetically modified viruses, have recently been developed for use in innovative cancer therapies. Genetically modified oncolytic viruses possess the unique ability to replicate conditionally as a unique gene therapy product. Since oncolytic viruses exhibit prolonged persistence in patients, viral shedding and transmission to third parties should be major concerns for clinical trials, along with the clinical safety and efficacy. Accordingly, studies are now underway to establish the safety and efficacy of oncolytic viruses.

  18. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  19. Vaccinia virus infections in martial arts gym, Maryland, USA, 2008.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christine M; Blythe, David; Li, Yu; Reddy, Ramani; Jordan, Carol; Edwards, Cindy; Adams, Celia; Conners, Holly; Rasa, Catherine; Wilby, Sue; Russell, Jamaal; Russo, Kelly S; Somsel, Patricia; Wiedbrauk, Danny L; Dougherty, Cindy; Allen, Christopher; Frace, Mike; Emerson, Ginny; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Braden, Zachary; Abel, Jason; Davidson, Whitni; Reynolds, Mary; Damon, Inger K

    2011-04-01

    Vaccinia virus is an orthopoxvirus used in the live vaccine against smallpox. Vaccinia virus infections can be transmissible and can cause severe complications in those with weakened immune systems. We report on a cluster of 4 cases of vaccinia virus infection in Maryland, USA, likely acquired at a martial arts gym.

  20. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  1. Environmental persistence of vaccinia virus on materials.

    PubMed

    Wood, J P; Choi, Y W; Wendling, M Q; Rogers, J V; Chappie, D J

    2013-11-01

    Smallpox is caused by the variola virus, and ranks as one of the most serious diseases that could originate from a biological weapon. However, limited data exist on the persistence of variola and related viruses on materials (that may act as fomites), under controlled environmental conditions. To fill these data gaps, we determined the persistence of the vaccinia virus (an established surrogate for the variola virus) as a function of temperature, relative humidity and material. Experiments were conducted with vaccinia virus in a freeze-dried form, using four materials under four sets of environmental conditions. After elapsed times ranging from 1 to 56 days, the virus was extracted from small coupons and quantified via plaque-forming units (PFU). The vaccinia virus was most persistent at low temperature and low relative humidity, with greater than 10(4) PFU recovered from glass, galvanized steel and painted cinder block at 56 days (equivalent to only a c. 2 log reduction). Thus, vaccinia virus may persist from weeks to months, depending on the material and environmental conditions. This study may aid those responsible for infection control to make informed decisions regarding the need for environmental decontamination following the release of an agent such as variola.

  2. Oncolytic virus therapy using genetically engineered herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer. They can replicate in situ, spread, and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. In addition, oncolytic HSV-1 can transfer and express foreign genes in host cells. The phase I clinical study with G207, a double-mutated HSV-1, in recurrent malignant glioma patients has shown that oncolytic HSV-1 can be safely administered into human brains. The therapeutic benefits of oncolytic HSV-1 depend on the extent of both intratumoral viral replication and induction of host antitumor immune responses. We develop new-generation oncolytic HSV-1 by enhancing these properties while retaining the safety features. G47delta was created from G207 by introducing another genetic mutation. Compared with G207, G47delta showed 1) better stimulation of human antitumor immune cells, 2) better growth properties leading to higher virus yields and increased cytopathic effect in vitro, 3) better antitumor efficacy in both immuno-competent and -incompetent animals, and 4) preserved safety in the brain of HSV-1-sensitive mice. Preparation is under way for a clinical trial using G47delta in progressive glioblastoma patients. G47delta is also suited as a backbone vector for expressing foreign molecules. Using bacterial artificial chromosome and two DNA recombinases, we have created an "armed" oncolytic HSV-1 generation system that allows insertion of transgene(s) into the genome of G47delta in a rapid and accurate manner. We found that expression of immunostimulatory molecules can significantly enhance the antitumor efficacy of G47delta. Based on these advances, we anticipate that oncolytic virus therapy using oncolytic HSV-1 will soon be established as an important modality of cancer treatment.

  3. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors’ binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules. PMID:26927159

  4. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-02-26

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors' binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules.

  5. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. PMID:27512666

  6. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT.

  7. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandeep S; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Nolte, Ingo; Ogilvie, Gregory; Szalay, Aladar A

    2012-01-04

    Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future.

  8. Trial Watch-Oncolytic viruses and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pol, Jonathan; Buqué, Aitziber; Aranda, Fernando; Bloy, Norma; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Erbs, Philippe; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Preville, Xavier; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Spisek, Radek; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy relies on the administration of non-pathogenic viral strains that selectively infect and kill malignant cells while favoring the elicitation of a therapeutically relevant tumor-targeting immune response. During the past few years, great efforts have been dedicated to the development of oncolytic viruses with improved specificity and potency. Such an intense wave of investigation has culminated this year in the regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of a genetically engineered oncolytic viral strain for use in melanoma patients. Here, we summarize recent preclinical and clinical advances in oncolytic virotherapy.

  9. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  10. Myxoma and Vaccinia Viruses Bind Differentially to Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Bartee, Eric C.; Moreb, Jan S.; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes. PMID:23388707

  11. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  12. Susceptibility of Vaccinia Virus to Chemical Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Tércia Moreira Ludolfo; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Coelho Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the cause of bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonotic disease that affects dairy cows and milkers. Some chemical disinfectants have been used on farms affected by BV to disinfect cow teats and milkers' hands. To date, there is no information about the efficacy of disinfectants against VACV. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the virucidal activity of some active disinfectants commonly used in the field. Sodium hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium combined with chlorhexidine, and quaternary ammonium combined with glutaraldehyde were effective in inactivating the virus at all concentrations tested. Iodine and quaternary ammonium as the only active component were partially effective. The presence of bovine feces as organic matter and light decreased the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite. These results show that an appropriated disinfection and asepsis of teats and hands may be helpful in the control and prevention of BV and other infections with VACV. PMID:21734141

  13. Therapeutic potential of oncolytic Newcastle disease virus: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Shay; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Panet, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) features a natural preference for replication in many tumor cells compared with normal cells. The observed antitumor effect of NDV appears to be a result of both selective killing of tumor cells and induction of immune responses. Genetic manipulations to change viral tropism and arming the virus with genes encoding for cytokines improved the oncolytic capacity of NDV. Several intracellular proteins in tumor cells, including antiapoptotic proteins (Livin) and oncogenic proteins (H-Ras), are relevant for the oncolytic activity of NDV. Defects in the interferon system, found in some tumor cells, also contribute to the oncolytic selectivity of NDV. Notwithstanding, NDV displays effective oncolytic activity in many tumor types, despite having intact interferon signaling. Taken together, several cellular systems appear to dictate the selective oncolytic activity of NDV. Some barriers, such as neutralizing antibodies elicited during NDV treatment and the extracellular matrix in tumor tissue appear to interfere with spread of NDV and reduce oncolysis. To further understand the oncolytic activity of NDV, we compared two NDV strains, ie, an attenuated virus (NDV-HUJ) and a pathogenic virus (NDV-MTH-68/H). Significant differences in amino acid sequence were noted in several viral proteins, including the fusion precursor (F0) glycoprotein, an important determinant of replication and pathogenicity. However, no difference in the oncolytic activity of the two strains was noted using human tumor tissues maintained as organ cultures or in mouse tumor models. To optimize virotherapy in clinical trials, we describe here a unique organ culture methodology, using a biopsy taken from a patient’s tumor before treatment for ex vivo infection with NDV to determine the oncolytic potential on an individual basis. In conclusion, oncolytic NDV is an excellent candidate for cancer therapy, but more knowledge is needed to ensure success in clinical trials. PMID

  14. Attenuated oncolytic Measles Virus strains as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, P.; Iankov, I.D.; Dispenzieri, A.; Galanis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Attenuated measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic vector platform, having shown significant anti-tumor activity against a broad range of malignant neoplasms. Measles virus strains derived from the attenuated Edmonston-B (MV-Edm) vaccine lineage have been shown to selectively infect, replicate in and lyse cancer cells while causing minimal cytopathic effect on normal tissues. This review summarizes the preclinical data that led to the rapid clinical translation of oncolytic measles vaccine strains and provides an overview of early clinical data using this oncolytic platform. Furthermore, novel approaches currently under development to further enhance the oncolytic efficacy of MV-Edm strains, including strategies to circumvent immunity or modulate immune system responses, combinatorial approaches with standard treatment modalities, virus retargeting as well as strategies for in vivo monitoring of viral replication are discussed. PMID:21740361

  15. "Armed" oncolytic herpes simplex viruses for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for brain tumors and other solid cancers. They can replicate in situ, spread and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. One of the advantages of HSV-1 is the capacity to incorporate large and/or multiple transgenes within the viral genome. Oncolytic HSV-1 can therefore be "armed" to add certain functions. Recently, the field of armed oncolytic HSV-1 has drastically advanced, due to development of recombinant HSV-1 generation systems that utilize bacterial artificial chromosome and multiple DNA recombinases. Because antitumor immunity is induced in the course of oncolytic activities of HSV-1, transgenes encoding immunomodulatory molecules have been most frequently used for arming. Other armed oncolytic HSV-1 include those that express antiangiogenic factors, fusogenic membrane glycoproteins, suicide gene products, and proapoptotic proteins. Provided that the transgene product does not interfere with viral replication, such arming of oncolytic HSV-1 results in augmentation of antitumor efficacy. Immediate-early viral promoters are often used to control the arming transgenes, but strict-late viral promoters have been shown useful to restrict the expression in the late stage of viral replication when desirable. Some armed oncolytic HSV-1 have been created for the purpose of noninvasive in vivo imaging of viral infection and replication. Development of a wide variety of armed oncolytic HSV-1 will lead to an establishment of a new genre of therapy for brain tumors as well as other cancers.

  16. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-07-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a "one-size fits all" approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  17. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  18. Myxoma Virus Oncolytic Efficiency Can Be Enhanced Through Chemical or Genetic Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.; Favis, Nicole A.; Agopsowicz, Kate C.; Hitt, Mary M.; Evans, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L+) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies. PMID:24391902

  19. Vaccinia Virus: A Tool for Research and Vaccine Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1991-06-01

    Vaccinia virus is no longer needed for smallpox immunization, but now serves as a useful vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize biologically active proteins and analyze structure-function relations, determine the targets of humoral- and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the immune responses needed for protection against specific infectious diseases. When more data on safety and efficacy are available, recombinant vaccinia and related poxviruses may be candidates for live vaccines and for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. PMID:27660749

  1. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  2. Active immunotherapy: oncolytic virus therapy using HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2012-01-01

    Conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses Type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for glioma. They can replicate in situ, spread and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. In addition, specific antitumor immunity is effectively induced in the course of oncolytic activities. G47Δ is a genetically engineered HSV-1 with triple mutations that realized augmented viral replication in tumor cells, strong induction of antitumor immunity and enhanced safety in normal tissues. A clinical trial of G47Δ in patients with recurrent glioblastoma has started in 2009. One of the advantages of HSV-1 is its capacity to incorporate large and/or multiple transgenes within the viral genome. In preclinical studies, "arming" of an oncolytic HSV-1 with transgenes encoding immunomodulatory molecules, such as interleukin 12, has been shown to greatly augment the efficacy of oncolytic HSV-1 therapy. Oncolytic virus therapy using HSV-1 may be a useful treatment for glioma that can also function as an efficient in situ tumor vaccination.

  3. Vaccinia Virus Vaccines: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bertram L.; Langland, Jeffrey O.; Kibler, Karen V.; Denzler, Karen L.; White, Stacy D.; Holechek, Susan A.; Wong, Shukmei; Huynh, Trung; Baskin, Carole R.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been used more extensively for human immunization than any other vaccine. For almost two centuries, VACV was employed to provide cross-protection against variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, until the disease was eradicated in the late 1970s. Since that time, continued research on VACV has produced a number of modified vaccines with improved safety profiles. Attenuation has been achieved through several strategies, including sequential passage in an alternative host, deletion of specific genes or genetic engineering of viral genes encoding immunomodulatory proteins. Some highly attenuated third- and fourth-generation VACV vaccines are now being considered for stockpiling against a possible re-introduction of smallpox through bioterrorism. Researchers have also taken advantage of the ability of the VACV genome to accommodate additional genetic material to produce novel vaccines against a wide variety of infectious agents, including a recombinant VACV encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein that is administered orally to wild animals. This review provides an in-depth examination of these successive generations of VACV vaccines, focusing on how the understanding of poxviral replication and viral gene function permits the deliberate modification of VACV immunogenicity and virulence. PMID:19563829

  4. Aptamer-facilitated Protection of Oncolytic Virus from Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Muharemagic, Darija; Zamay, Anna; Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M; Evgin, Laura; Savitskaya, Anna; Bell, John C; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses promise to significantly improve current cancer treatments through their tumor-selective replication and multimodal attack against cancer cells. However, one of the biggest setbacks for oncolytic virus therapy is the intravenous delivery of the virus, as it can be cleared from the bloodstream by neutralizing antibodies before it reaches the tumor cells. We have selected DNA aptamers against an oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, using a competitive binding approach, as well as against the antigen binding fragment (Fab) of antivesicular stomatitis virus polyclonal antibodies, in order to shield the virus from nAbs and enhance its in vivo survival. We used flow cytometry to identify these aptamers and evaluated their efficiency to shield vesicular stomatitis virus in a cell-based plaque forming assay. These oligonucleotides were then modified to obtain multivalent binders, which led to a decrease of viral aggregation, an increase in its infectivity and an increase in its stability in serum. The aptamers were also incubated in nondiluted serum, showing their effectiveness under conditions mimicking those in vivo. With this approach, we were able to increase viral infectivity by more than 70% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, this method has the potential to enhance the delivery of vesicular stomatitis virus through the bloodstream without compromising the patient's immune system. PMID:24892725

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Oncolytic Sendai virus Strain Moscow

    PubMed Central

    Zainutdinov, Sergei S.; Tikunov, Artem Y.; Matveeva, Olga V.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Sendai virus Moscow strain. Anecdotal evidence for the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy exists for this strain. The RNA genome of the Moscow strain is 15,384 nucleotides in length and differs from the nearest strain, BB1, by 18 nucleotides and 11 amino acids. PMID:27516510

  6. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  7. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Oncolytic Therapy for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-01-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population. PMID:19367259

  9. Herpes simplex virus oncolytic therapy for pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-07-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population.

  10. Cryo-electron tomography of vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Cyrklaff, Marek; Risco, Cristina; Fernández, Jose Jesús; Jiménez, Maria Victoria; Estéban, Mariano; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of cryo-microscopy and electron tomographic reconstruction has allowed us to determine the structure of one of the more complex viruses, intracellular mature vaccinia virus, at a resolution of 4–6 nm. The tomographic reconstruction allows us to dissect the different structural components of the viral particle, avoiding projection artifacts derived from previous microscopic observations. A surface-rendering representation revealed brick-shaped viral particles with slightly rounded edges and dimensions of ≈360 × 270 × 250 nm. The outer layer was consistent with a lipid membrane (5–6 nm thick), below which usually two lateral bodies were found, built up by a heterogeneous material without apparent ordering or repetitive features. The internal core presented an inner cavity with electron dense coils of presumptive DNA–protein complexes, together with areas of very low density. The core was surrounded by two layers comprising an overall thickness of ≈18–19 nm; the inner layer was consistent with a lipid membrane. The outer layer was discontinuous, formed by a periodic palisade built by the side interaction of T-shaped protein spikes that were anchored in the lower membrane and were arranged into small hexagonal crystallites. It was possible to detect a few pore-like structures that communicated the inner side of the core with the region outside the layer built by the T-shaped spike palisade. PMID:15699328

  11. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  12. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma using replication-competent viruses.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kengo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shiiba, Masashi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2009-12-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy utilizes viruses that can selectively destroy cancer cells without harming normal tissues. Clinical trials of oncolytic viruses show that most oncolytic agents are well tolerated and safe. The virotherapeutic agents currently in use have limited potency when administered alone; however, combination therapy using virotherapeutic agents and conventional anticancer agents, such as chemotherapeutics, radiation, and gene therapy, exhibits encouraging levels of efficacy. Advances in recombinant DNA technology have allowed the development of viruses that are tumor-selective and armed with transgenes, increasing the application potential and efficacy of this novel anticancer therapy. Here, we review the development of oncolytic viruses and the clinical trials of oncolytic virotherapy for oral cancers. We discuss current issues and perspectives of this evolving anticancer therapy, highlighting the potential applications of a unique, naturally occurring oncolytic virus, Sindbis virus.

  14. Detection of Vaccinia Virus in Dairy Cattle Serum Samples from 2009, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Pereira, Alexandre Fagundes; Gasparini, Mirela Cristina Soares; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Puentes, Rodrigo; Furtado, Agustin; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2016-01-01

    We detected orthopoxvirus in 28 of 125 serum samples collected during 2009 from cattle in Uruguay. Two samples were PCR-positive for vaccinia virus and had sequences similar to those for vaccinia virus associated with outbreaks in Brazil. Autochthonous circulation of vaccinia virus in Uruguay and other South American countries cannot be ruled out. PMID:27869601

  15. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  16. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0434 TITLE: A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect of the virus. Three specific aims have been proposed and they are: 1

  17. Vaccinia virus vectors: new strategies for producing recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, D E

    1990-01-01

    The development and continued refinement of techniques for the efficient insertion and expression of heterologous DNA sequences from within the genomic context of infectious vaccinia virus recombinants are among the most promising current approaches towards effective immunoprophylaxis against a variety of protozoan, viral, and bacterial human pathogens. Because of its medical relevance, this area is the subject of intense research interest and has evolved rapidly during the past several years. This review (i) provides an updated overview of the technology that exists for assembling recombinant vaccinia virus strains, (ii) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches, (iii) outlines the areas of outgoing research directed towards overcoming the limitations of current techniques, and (iv) provides some insight (i.e., speculation) about probable future refinements in the use of vaccinia virus as a vector. PMID:2187593

  18. Vaccinia virus as a subhelper for AAV replication and packaging.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrea R; Dong, Biao; Chen, Lingxia; Xiao, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been widely used as a gene therapy vector to treat a variety of disorders. While these vectors are increasingly popular and successful in the clinic, there is still much to learn about the viruses. Understanding the biology of these viruses is essential in engineering better vectors and generating vectors more efficiently for large-scale use. AAV requires a helper for production and replication making this aspect of the viral life cycle crucial. Vaccinia virus (VV) has been widely cited as a helper virus for AAV. However, to date, there are no detailed analyses of its helper function. Here, the helper role of VV was studied in detail. In contrast to common belief, we demonstrated that VV was not a sufficient helper virus for AAV replication. Vaccinia failed to produce rAAV and activate AAV promoters. While this virus could not support rAAV production, Vaccinia could initiate AAV replication and packaging when AAV promoter activation is not necessary. This activity is due to the ability of Vaccinia-driven Rep78 to transcribe in the cytoplasm and subsequently translate in the nucleus and undergo typical functions in the AAV life cycle. As such, VV is subhelper for AAV compared to complete helper functions of adenovirus.

  19. Measles to the Rescue: A Review of Oncolytic Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Aref, Sarah; Bailey, Katharine; Fielding, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapeutic agents are likely to become serious contenders in cancer treatment. The vaccine strain of measles virus is an agent with an impressive range of oncolytic activity in pre-clinical trials with increasing evidence of safety and efficacy in early clinical trials. This paramyxovirus vaccine has a proven safety record and is amenable to careful genetic modification in the laboratory. Overexpression of the measles virus (MV) receptor CD46 in many tumour cells may direct the virus to preferentially enter transformed cells and there is increasing awareness of the importance of nectin-4 and signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in oncolysis. Successful attempts to retarget MV by inserting genes for tumour-specific ligands to antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CD20, CD38, and by engineering the virus to express synthetic microRNA targeting sequences, and “blinding” the virus to the natural viral receptors are exciting measures to increase viral specificity and enhance the oncolytic effect. Sodium iodine symporter (NIS) can also be expressed by MV, which enables in vivo tracking of MV infection. Radiovirotherapy using MV-NIS, chemo-virotherapy to convert prodrugs to their toxic metabolites, and immune-virotherapy including incorporating antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors can also increase the oncolytic potential. Anti-viral host immune responses are a recognized barrier to the success of MV, and approaches such as transporting MV to the tumour sites by carrier cells, are showing promise. MV Clinical trials are producing encouraging preliminary results in ovarian cancer, myeloma and cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the outcome of currently open trials in glioblastoma multiforme, mesothelioma and squamous cell carcinoma are eagerly anticipated. PMID:27782084

  20. Oncolytic Measles Virus Strains as Novel Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Domingo Musibay, Evidio; Galanis, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Replication-competent oncolytic measles virus (MV) strains preferentially infect and destroy a wide variety of cancer tissues. Clinical translation of engineered attenuated MV vaccine derivatives is demonstrating the therapeutic potential and negligible pathogenicity of these strains in humans. Areas covered The present review summarizes the mechanisms of MV tumor selectivity and cytopathic activity as well as the current data on the oncolytic efficacy and preclinical testing of MV strains. Investigational strategies to reprogram MV selectivity, escape antiviral immunity and modulate the immune system to enhance viral delivery and tumor oncolysis are also discussed. Expert Opinion Clinical viral kinetic data derived from non-invasive monitoring of reporter transgene expression will guide future protocols to enhance oncolytic MV efficacy. Anti-measles immunity is a major challenge of measles-based therapeutics and various strategies are being investigated to modulate immunity. These include the combination of MV therapy with immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide, the use of cell carriers and the introduction of immunomodulatory transgenes and wild-type virulence genes. Available MV retargeting technologies can address safety considerations that may arise as more potent oncolytic MV vectors are being developed. PMID:23289598

  1. UNIT 14A.4 Generation of Recombinant Vaccinia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Wyatt, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes how to infect cells with vaccinia virus and then transfect them with a plasmid-transfer vector or PCR fragment to generate a recombinant virus. Selection and screening methods used to isolate recombinant viruses and a method for the amplification of recombinant viruses are described. Finally, a method for live immunostaining that has been used primarily for detection of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is presented. This unit first describes how to infect cells with vaccinia virus and then transfect them with a plasmid-transfer vector or PCR fragment to generate a recombinant virus (see Basic Protocol 1). Also presented are selection and screening methods used to isolate recombinant viruses (see Basic Protocol 2) and a method for the amplification of recombinant viruses (see Basic Protocol 3). Finally, a method for live immunostaining that has been used primarily for detection of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is presented (see Basic Protocol 4). HeLa S3 cells are recommended for large-scale growth of vaccinia virus. BS-C-1 cells may be used for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (XGPRT) and plaque size selection, fluorescent protein screening, transfection and determination of virus titer (UNIT 14A.3). For thymidine kinase (TK) selection, HuTK− 143B cells are used. With MVA, all steps are carried out in CEF or BHK-21 cells (UNIT 14A.3). CAUTION Proceed carefully and follow biosafety level 2 (BL-2) practices when working with standard vaccinia virus (see UNIT 14A.3 for safety precautions). [*Copy Editor: The original CPMB unit referenced CPMB Unit 16.15 for safety. The chapter editor asked that the authors include some of the safety information in the revised units – CPMB 16.16 and 16.17 – which are now CPMC Unit 14A.3 and 14A.4. As a result, the authors changed the safety citation here to “Unit 14A.3”, which doesn’t have nearly as much information as the original CPMB Unit 16.15. Perhaps the

  2. Oncolytic viruses & their specific targeting to tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prafull K.; Doley, Juwar; Kumar, G. Ravi; Sahoo, A.P.; Tiwari, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In spite of achieving significant successes in medical sciences in the past few decades, the number of deaths due to cancer remains unchecked. The conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have limited therapeutic index and a plethora of treatment related side effects. This situation has provided an impetus for search of novel therapeutic strategies that can selectively destroy the tumour cells, leaving the normal cells unharmed. Viral oncotherapy is such a promising treatment modality that offers unique opportunity for tumour targeting. Numerous viruses with inherent anti-cancer activity have been identified and are in different phases of clinical trials. In the era of modern biotechnology and with better understanding of cancer biology and virology, it has become feasible to engineer the oncolytic viruses (OVs) to increase their tumour selectivity and enhance their oncolytic activity. In this review, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill the tumour cells have been discussed as also the development made in virotherapy for cancer treatment with emphasis on their tumour specific targeting. PMID:23168697

  3. Oncolytic Virus Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme – Concepts and Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years of oncolytic virus (OV) development have created a field that is driven by the potential promise of lasting impact on our cancer treatment repertoire. With the field constantly expanding – over 20 viruses have been recognized as potential OVs – new virus candidates continue to emerge even as established viruses reach clinical trials. They all share the defining commonalities of selective replication in tumors, subsequent tumor cell lysis, and dispersion within the tumor. Members from diverse virus classes with distinctly different biologies and host species have been identified. Of these viruses, 15 have been tested on human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). So far, 20 clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using attenuated strains of 7 different oncolytic viruses against GBM. In this review, we present an overview of viruses that have been developed or considered for GBM treatment. We outline the principles of tumor targeting and selective viral replication, which include mechanisms of tumor-selective binding, and molecular elements usurping cellular biosynthetic machinery in transformed cells. Results from clinical trials have clearly established the proof of concept and have confirmed the general safety of OV application in the brain. The moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the promising preclinical lab results; next-generation OVs that are either “armed” with therapeutic genes or that are embedded in a multimodality treatment regimen should enhance the clinical results. PMID:22290260

  4. Detection of Vaccinia Virus in Urban Domestic Cats, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Galileu Barbosa; Miranda, Júlia Bahia; Almeida, Gregório Guilherme; Silva de Oliveira, Jaqueline; Pinheiro, Mariana Siqueira; Gonçalves, Stefanne Aparecida; Pimenta dos Reis, Jenner Karlisson; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2017-01-01

    We investigated possible vaccinia virus (VACV) in urban house cats in Brazil. Serum samples from 6 cats were positive for VACV by PCR, indicating likely VACV circulation among house cats in urban areas of Brazil. This finding highlights the importance of epidemiologic surveillance to avoid outbreaks among urban human populations. PMID:28098542

  5. [Enhancement of epidermal regeneration by recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V S; Cheshenko, I O; Omigov, V V; Azaev, M Sh; Krendel'shchikov, A V; Ovechkina, L G; Cheshenko, N V; Malygin, E G

    1998-01-01

    Examining the specific activity has showed that recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor binds to appropriate receptors on the A-431 cell surface and prompts the healing acceleration of degree III burns in rats. This recombinant factor did not demonstrate pyrogenicity or toxicogenicity in tests on rabbits, guinea-pits, noninbred albino mice.

  6. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-11-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using (/sup 35/S)methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses.

  7. Integrating the biological characteristics of oncolytic viruses and immune cells can optimize therapeutic benefits of cell-based delivery.

    PubMed

    Thorne, S H; Contag, C H

    2008-05-01

    Despite significant advances in the development of tumor-selective agents, strategies for effective delivery of these agents across biological barriers to cells within the tumor microenvironment has been limiting. One tactical approach to overcoming biological barriers is to use cells as delivery vehicles, and a variety of different cell types have been investigated with a range of agents. In addition to transporting agents with targeted delivery, cells can also produce their own tumoricidal effect, conceal a payload from an immune response, amplify a selective agent at the target site and facilitate an antitumor immune response. We have reported a therapeutic combination consisting of cytokine induced killer cells and an oncolytic vaccinia virus with many of these features that led to therapeutic synergy in animal models of human cancer. The synergy was due to the interaction of the two agents to enhance the antitumor benefits of each individual component. As both of these agents display broad tumor-targeting potential and possess unique tumor killing mechanisms, together they were able to recognize and destroy a far greater number of malignant cells within the heterogeneous tumor than either agent alone. Effective cancer therapy will require recognition and elimination of the root of the disease, the cancer stem cell, and the combination of CIK cells and oncolytic vaccinia viruses has this potential. To create effective tumor-selective agents the viruses are modified to take advantage of the unique biology of the cancer cell. Similarly, if we are to develop targeted therapies that are sufficiently multifaceted to eliminate cancer cells at all stages of disease, we should integrate the virus into the unique biology of the cell delivery vehicle.

  8. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    specific fashion. Ad ditionally, mutated form of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), an oncolytic virus capable of replicating in interferon (IFN) response...Our results indicated that direct injection of VSV (AV3) intra-prostaticaly lead to selective infection, replication, and overall i ncrease i n ap...ully re plication-competent a nd r apidly s pread through a nd ki ll cancerous cells. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus which

  9. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-03-07

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology.

  10. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-01-01

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology. PMID:26959050

  11. Advances in the design and development of oncolytic measles viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hutzen, Brian; Raffel, Corey; Studebaker, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    A successful oncolytic virus is one that selectively propagates and destroys cancerous tissue without causing excessive damage to the normal surrounding tissue. Oncolytic measles virus (MV) is one such virus that exhibits this characteristic and thus has rapidly emerged as a potentially useful anticancer modality. Derivatives of the Edmonston MV vaccine strain possess a remarkable safety record in humans. Promising results in preclinical animal models and evidence of biological activity in early phase trials contribute to the enthusiasm. Genetic modifications have enabled MV to evolve from a vaccine agent to a potential anticancer therapy. Specifically, alterations of the MV genome have led to improved tumor selectivity and delivery, therapeutic potency, and immune system modulation. In this article, we will review the advancements that have been made in the design and development of MV that have led to its use as a cancer therapy. In addition, we will discuss the evidence supporting its use, as well as the challenges associated with MV as a potential cancer therapeutic. PMID:27512675

  12. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Nicolas As; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future.

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Nicolas AS; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. PMID:27512683

  14. Protein Composition of the Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Hixson, Kim K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-02-05

    The protein content of vaccinia virus mature virions, purified by rate zonal and isopycnic centrifugation and solubilized by SDS or a solution of urea and thiourea, was determined by the accurate mass and time tag technology which uses both tandem mass spectrometry and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to detect tryptic peptides separated by high-resolution liquid chromatography. Eighty vaccinia virus-encoded proteins representing 37% of the 218 genes annotated in the complete genome sequence were detected in at least three analyses. Ten proteins accounted for approximately 80% of the mass, while the least abundant proteins made up 1% or less of the mass. Thirteen identified proteins were not previously reported as components of virions. On the other hand, 8 previously described virion proteins were not detected here, presumably due to technical reasons including small size and hydrophobicity. In addition to vaccinia virus-encoded proteins, 24 host proteins omitting isoforms were detected. The most abundant of these were cytoskeletal proteins, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in translation.

  15. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Fully Retargeted to Tumor-Associated Antigens.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroaki; Hamada, Hirofumi; Nakano, Kenji; Kwon, Heechung; Tahara, Hideaki; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2017-02-05

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel therapeutic modality for malignant diseases that exploits selective viral replication in cancer cells. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a promising agent for oncolytic virotherapy due to its broad cell tropism and the identification of mutations that favor its replication in tumor over normal cells. However, these attenuating mutations also tend to limit the potency of current oncolytic HSV vectors that have entered clinical studies. As an alternative, vector retargeting to novel entry receptors has the potential to achieve tumor specificity at the stage of virus entry, eliminating the need for replication-attenuating mutations. Here we summarize the molecular mechanism of HSV entry and recent advances in the development of fully retargeted HSV vectors for oncolytic virotherapy. Retargeted HSV vectors offer an attractive platform for the creation of a new generation of oncolytic HSV with improved efficacy and specificity.

  16. Oncolytic Viruses and Their Application to Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiocca, EA; Rabkin, SD

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells, and spread within the tumor, while not harming normal tissue. In addition to this direct oncolytic activity, OVs are also very effective at inducing immune responses to themselves and to the infected tumor cells. OVs encompass a broad diversity of DNA and RNA viruses that are naturally cancer-selective or can be genetically-engineered. OVs provide a diverse platform for immunotherapy; they act as in situ vaccines, and can be armed with immune modulatory transgenes or combined with other immunotherapies. However, the interactions of OVs with the immune system may affect therapeutic outcomes in opposing fashions: negatively by limiting virus replication and/or spread, or positively by inducing antitumor immune responses. Many aspects of the OV-tumor/host interaction are important in delineating the effectiveness of therapy; they include: (i) innate immune responses and the degree of inflammation induced, (ii) types of virus-induced cell death, (iii) inherent tumor physiology, such as infiltrating and resident immune cells, vascularity/hypoxia, lymphatics, and stromal architecture, and (iv) tumor cell phenotype, including alterations in IFN signaling, oncogenic pathways, cell surface immune markers (MHC, co-stimulatory, NK receptors), and the expression of immunosuppressive factors. Recent clinical trials with a variety of OVs, especially those expressing GM-CSF, have demonstrated efficacy and induction of antitumor immune responses in the absence of significant toxicity. Manipulating the balance between anti-virus and antitumor responses, often involving overlapping immune pathways, will be critical to the clinical success of OVs. PMID:24764576

  17. Characterization of chimpanzee/human monoclonal antibodies to vaccinia virus A33 glycoprotein and its variola virus homolog in vitro and in a vaccinia virus mouse protection model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Earl, Patricia; Americo, Jeffrey; Damon, Inger; Smith, Scott K; Yu, Fujuan; Sebrell, Andrew; Emerson, Suzanne; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Gorshkova, Inna; Schuck, Peter; Satterfield, William; Moss, Bernard; Purcell, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Three distinct chimpanzee Fabs against the A33 envelope glycoprotein of vaccinia virus were isolated and converted into complete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with human gamma 1 heavy-chain constant regions. The three MAbs (6C, 12C, and 12F) displayed high binding affinities to A33 (K(d) of 0.14 nM to 20 nM) and may recognize the same epitope, which was determined to be conformational and located within amino acid residues 99 to 185 at the C terminus of A33. One or more of the MAbs were shown to reduce the spread of vaccinia virus as well as variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox) in vitro and to more effectively protect mice when administered before or 2 days after intranasal challenge with virulent vaccinia virus than a previously isolated mouse anti-A33 MAb (1G10) or vaccinia virus immunoglobulin. The protective efficacy afforded by anti-A33 MAb was comparable to that of a previously isolated chimpanzee/human anti-B5 MAb. The combination of anti-A33 MAb and anti-B5 MAb did not synergize the protective efficacy. These chimpanzee/human anti-A33 MAbs may be useful in the prevention and treatment of vaccinia virus-induced complications of vaccination against smallpox and may also be effective in the immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of smallpox and other orthopoxvirus diseases.

  18. Structure of intracellular mature vaccinia virus observed by cryoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Dubochet, J; Adrian, M; Richter, K; Garces, J; Wittek, R

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular mature vaccinia virus, also called intracellular naked virus, and its core envelope have been observed in their native, unfixed, unstained, hydrated states by cryoelectron microscopy of vitrified samples. The virion appears as a smooth rounded rectangle of ca. 350 by 270 nm. The core seems homogeneous and is surrounded by a 30-nm-thick surface domain delimited by membranes. We show that surface tubules and most likely also the characteristic dumbbell-shaped core with the lateral bodies which are generally observed in negatively stained or conventionally embedded samples are preparation artifacts. Images PMID:8107253

  19. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  20. Efficacy and safety/toxicity study of recombinant vaccinia virus JX-594 in two immunocompetent animal models of glioma.

    PubMed

    Lun, XueQing; Chan, Jennifer; Zhou, Hongyuan; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J P; Stechishin, Owen Owen; Bell, John C; Parato, Kelley; Hu, Kang; Vaillant, Dominique; Wang, Jiahu; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Breitbach, Caroline; Kirn, David; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of the recombinant, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing vaccinia virus (VV) JX-594 in experimental malignant glioma (MGs) in vitro and in immunocompetent rodent models. We have found that JX-594 killed all MG cell lines tested in vitro. Intratumoral (i.t.) administration of JX-594 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in rats-bearing RG2 intracranial (i.c.) tumors and mice-bearing GL261 brain tumors. Combination therapy with JX-594 and rapamycin significantly increased viral replication and further prolonged survival in both immunocompetent i.c. MG models with several animals considered "cured" (three out of seven rats >120 days, terminated experiment). JX-594 infected and killed brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) from patient samples grown ex vivo, and did so more efficiently than other oncolytic viruses MYXV, Reovirus type-3, and VSV(ΔM51). Additional safety/toxicity studies in nontumor-bearing rodents treated with a supratherapeutic dose of JX-594 demonstrated GM-CSF-dependent inflammation and necrosis. These results suggest that i.c. administered JX-594 triggers a predictable GM-CSF-mediated inflammation in murine models. Before proceeding to clinical trials, JX-594 should be evaluated in the brains of nonhuman primates and optimized for the viral doses, delivery routes as well as the combination agents (e.g., mTOR inhibitors).

  1. Efficacy and Safety/Toxicity Study of Recombinant Vaccinia Virus JX-594 in Two Immunocompetent Animal Models of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lun, XueQing; Chan, Jennifer; Zhou, Hongyuan; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John JP; Stechishin, Owen Owen; Bell, John C; Parato, Kelley; Hu, Kang; Vaillant, Dominique; Wang, Jiahu; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Breitbach, Caroline; Kirn, David; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of the recombinant, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing vaccinia virus (VV) JX-594 in experimental malignant glioma (MGs) in vitro and in immunocompetent rodent models. We have found that JX-594 killed all MG cell lines tested in vitro. Intratumoral (i.t.) administration of JX-594 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in rats-bearing RG2 intracranial (i.c.) tumors and mice-bearing GL261 brain tumors. Combination therapy with JX-594 and rapamycin significantly increased viral replication and further prolonged survival in both immunocompetent i.c. MG models with several animals considered “cured” (three out of seven rats >120 days, terminated experiment). JX-594 infected and killed brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) from patient samples grown ex vivo, and did so more efficiently than other oncolytic viruses MYXV, Reovirus type-3, and VSVΔM51. Additional safety/toxicity studies in nontumor-bearing rodents treated with a supratherapeutic dose of JX-594 demonstrated GM-CSF-dependent inflammation and necrosis. These results suggest that i.c. administered JX-594 triggers a predictable GM-CSF-mediated inflammation in murine models. Before proceeding to clinical trials, JX-594 should be evaluated in the brains of nonhuman primates and optimized for the viral doses, delivery routes as well as the combination agents (e.g., mTOR inhibitors). PMID:20808290

  2. A New Inhibitor of Apoptosis from Vaccinia Virus and Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gubser, Caroline; Bergamaschi, Daniele; Hollinshead, Michael; Lu, Xin; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2007-01-01

    A new apoptosis inhibitor is described from vaccinia virus, camelpox virus, and eukaryotic cells. The inhibitor is a hydrophobic, multiple transmembrane protein that is resident in the Golgi and is named GAAP (Golgi anti-apoptotic protein). Stable expression of both viral GAAP (v-GAAP) and human GAAP (h-GAAP), which is expressed in all human tissues tested, inhibited apoptosis induced by intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic stimuli. Conversely, knockout of h-GAAP by siRNA induced cell death by apoptosis. v-GAAP and h-GAAP display overlapping functions as shown by the ability of v-GAAP to complement for the loss of h-GAAP. Lastly, deletion of the v-GAAP gene from vaccinia virus did not affect virus replication in cell culture, but affected virus virulence in a murine infection model. This study identifies a new regulator of cell death that is highly conserved in evolution from plants to insects, amphibians, mammals, and poxviruses. PMID:17319741

  3. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  4. [Oncolytic viruses as a new way of treatment of neoplastic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Urszula; Chronowska, Justyna; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-08-01

    Despite the unceasing progression in chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, neoplasms are still the second, after cardiovascular diseases, cause of death in the world. The creation of oncolytic viruses gives hope for increase of anticancer therapy effectiveness. Oncolytic viruses are the type of viruses that selectively infect and cause the lyse of tumor cells excluding normal cells. This mechanism allows to avoid the consequences of the possible replication of the virus, which having entered to the organism, replicates in organism's cells by using the DNA of host cells. The development of genetic engineering and molecular biology has enabled the creation of this kind of genetically modified viruses, which deprive them of their virulence. Currently, there are many clinical trials in progress including the use of oncolytic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme treatment. There are parallel studies in animals using the subsequent viruses. Oncolytic viruses treatment is generally well tolerated, without significant side effects. It is worth to point out that this method combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy allows to reduce the use of therapeutic doses, which significantly reduces the toxicity of conventional treatment. Further clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of oncolytic viruses will develop more effective and better tolerated therapeutic protocols in the future.

  5. Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Vaccination Provides Long-Term Protection against Nasal Rabbitpox Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dorothy I; McGee, Charles E; Sample, Christopher J; Sempowski, Gregory D; Pickup, David J; Staats, Herman F

    2016-07-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) is a smallpox vaccine candidate. This study was performed to determine if MVA vaccination provides long-term protection against rabbitpox virus (RPXV) challenge, an animal model of smallpox. Two doses of MVA provided 100% protection against a lethal intranasal RPXV challenge administered 9 months after vaccination.

  6. Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Vaccination Provides Long-Term Protection against Nasal Rabbitpox Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dorothy I.; McGee, Charles E.; Sample, Christopher J.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Pickup, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) is a smallpox vaccine candidate. This study was performed to determine if MVA vaccination provides long-term protection against rabbitpox virus (RPXV) challenge, an animal model of smallpox. Two doses of MVA provided 100% protection against a lethal intranasal RPXV challenge administered 9 months after vaccination. PMID:27146001

  7. Deoxyadenosine reverses hydroxyurea inhibition of vaccinia virus growth.

    PubMed Central

    Slabaugh, M B; Howell, M L; Wang, Y; Mathews, C K

    1991-01-01

    Hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, blocks replication of vaccinia virus. However, when medium containing hydroxyurea and dialyzed serum was supplemented with deoxyadenosine, the block to viral reproduction was circumvented, provided that an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase was also present. Deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine, and deoxythymidine were ineffective alone and did not augment the deoxyadenosine effect. In fact, increasing concentrations of deoxyguanosine and deoxythymidine, but not deoxycytidine, eliminated the deoxyadenosine rescue, an effect that was reversed by the addition of low concentrations of deoxycytidine. These results suggested that the inhibition of viral replication by hydroxyurea was primarily due to a deficiency of dATP. Deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pools in vaccinia virus-infected cells were measured at the height of viral DNA synthesis after a synchronous infection. With 0.5 mM hydroxyurea, the dATP pool was greater than 90% depleted, the dCTP and dGTP pools were 40 to 50% reduced, and the dTTP pool was increased. Assay of ribonucleotide reductase activity in intact virus-infected cells suggested that hydroxyurea may differentially affect reduction of the various substrates of the enzyme. PMID:2016760

  8. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ungerechts, Guy; Bossow, Sascha; Leuchs, Barbara; Holm, Per S; Rommelaere, Jean; Coffey, Matt; Coffin, Rob; Bell, John; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention.

  9. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ungerechts, Guy; Bossow, Sascha; Leuchs, Barbara; Holm, Per S; Rommelaere, Jean; Coffey, Matt; Coffin, Rob; Bell, John; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention. PMID:27088104

  10. Optimal Control Model of Tumor Treatment with Oncolytic Virus and MEK Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chen; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are a serious threat to human health. The oncolytic virus is a kind of tumor killer virus which can infect and lyse cancer cells and spread through the tumor, while leaving normal cells largely unharmed. Mathematical models can help us to understand the tumor-virus dynamics and find better treatment strategies. This paper gives a new mathematical model of tumor therapy with oncolytic virus and MEK inhibitor. Stable analysis was given. Because mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) can not only lead to greater oncolytic virus infection into cancer cells, but also limit the replication of the virus, in order to provide the best dosage of MEK inhibitors and balance the positive and negative effect of the inhibitors, we put forward an optimal control problem of the inhibitor. The optimal strategies are given by theory and simulation. PMID:28097139

  11. Initial characterization of Vaccinia Virus B4 suggests a role in virus spread

    SciTech Connect

    Burles, Kristin; Irwin, Chad R.; Burton, Robyn-Lee; Schriewer, Jill; Evans, David H.; Buller, R. Mark; Barry, Michele

    2014-05-15

    Currently, little is known about the ankyrin/F-box protein B4. Here, we report that B4R-null viruses exhibited reduced plaque size in tissue culture, and decreased ability to spread, as assessed by multiple-step growth analysis. Electron microscopy indicated that B4R-null viruses still formed mature and extracellular virions; however, there was a slight decrease of virions released into the media following deletion of B4R. Deletion of B4R did not affect the ability of the virus to rearrange actin; however, VACV811, a large vaccinia virus deletion mutant missing 55 open reading frames, had decreased ability to produce actin tails. Using ectromelia virus, a natural mouse pathogen, we demonstrated that virus devoid of EVM154, the B4R homolog, showed decreased spread to organs and was attenuated during infection. This initial characterization suggests that B4 may play a role in virus spread, and that other unidentified mediators of actin tail formation may exist in vaccinia virus. - Highlights: • B4R-null viruses show reduced plaque size, and decreased ability to spread. • B4R-null viruses formed mature and extracellular virions; and rearranged actin. • Virus devoid of EVM154, the B4R homolog, was attenuated during infection. • Initial characterization suggests that B4 may play a role in virus spread. • Unidentified mediators of actin tail formation may exist in vaccinia virus.

  12. Development of a selective biopharmaceutical from Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I for blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Bucurescu, Septimiu

    2010-12-01

    Future cancer therapies will be molecular cures. They will correct, block or destroy cancer cells by targeting molecular changes that lead to carcinogenesis. Destroying cancer cells can be done using oncolytic viruses. By blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses, Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I could be used in the adjuvant treatment of cancer for improving the chances of oncolytic viruses to kill cancer cells in vivo.

  13. Targeting pediatric cancer stem cells with oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Cassady, Kevin A; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also termed "cancer-initiating cells" or "cancer progenitor cells," which have the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone, have recently been discovered in a wide variety of pediatric tumors. These CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance, aggressiveness, and recurrence due to inherent resistance to current treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation. Oncolytic virotherapy offers a novel, targeted approach for eradicating pediatric CSCs using mechanisms of cell killing that differ from conventional therapies. Moreover, oncolytic viruses have the ability to target specific features of CSCs such as cell-surface proteins, transcription factors, and the CSC microenvironment. Through genetic engineering, a wide variety of foreign genes may be expressed by oncolytic viruses to augment the oncolytic effect. We review the current data regarding the ability of several types of oncolytic viruses (herpes simplex virus-1, adenovirus, reovirus, Seneca Valley virus, vaccinia virus, Newcastle disease virus, myxoma virus, vesicular stomatitis virus) to target and kill both CSCs and tumor cells in pediatric tumors. We highlight advantages and limitations of each virus and potential ways in which next-generation engineered viruses may target resilient CSCs.

  14. Analysis of variola and vaccinia virus neutralization assays for smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christine M; Newman, Frances K; Davidson, Whitni B; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Yan, Lihan; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Karem, Kevin L; Damon, Inger K

    2012-07-01

    Possible smallpox reemergence drives research for third-generation vaccines that effectively neutralize variola virus. A comparison of neutralization assays using different substrates, variola and vaccinia (Dryvax and modified vaccinia Ankara [MVA]), showed significantly different 90% neutralization titers; Dryvax underestimated while MVA overestimated variola neutralization. Third-generation vaccines may rely upon neutralization as a correlate of protection.

  15. Fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses as a potent and personalized cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Xiang; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2012-07-01

    The recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of prostate cancer represents an important milestone of cancer immunotherapy, which, for the first time, validates the concept of bringing true clinical benefit to cancer patients by stimulating patients' own anti-tumor immunity. Among the different experimental cancer immunotherapies, oncolytic virotherapy may represent a low-cost yet potent and personalized cancer vaccine for the treatment of solid tumors. This review describes the constructions of several human herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived oncolytic viruses as candidate cancer vaccines, which induce specific and potent anti-tumor immunity in pre-clinical models, and thus resulting in stronger overall anti-tumor efficacy as compared to oncolytic effect alone. This article also describes the approaches to enhance the antitumor immunity of oncolytic HSVs, and in particular, the key role played by integrating membrane-fusion activity into these viruses. Additionally, this article reviews the potential effect of certain chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. cyclophosphamide) in boosting antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic HSV, and the mechanisms behind it. In summary, all the preclinical and clinical data have suggested that HSV-based oncolytic virotherapies could likely be developed as a new generation of cancer vaccines for the treatment of solid tumors.

  16. Ultrasound-mediated oncolytic virus delivery and uptake for increased therapeutic efficacy: state of art

    PubMed Central

    Nande, Rounak; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The field of ultrasound (US) has changed significantly from medical imaging and diagnosis to treatment strategies. US contrast agents or microbubbles (MB) are currently being used as potential carriers for chemodrugs, small molecules, nucleic acids, small interfering ribonucleic acid, proteins, adenoviruses, and oncolytic viruses. Oncolytic viruses can selectively replicate within and destroy a cancer cell, thus making them a powerful therapeutic in treating late-stage or metastatic cancer. These viruses have been shown to have robust activity in clinical trials when injected directly into tumor nodules. However limitations in oncolytic virus’ effectiveness and its delivery approach have warranted exploration of ultrasound-mediated delivery. Gene therapy bearing adenoviruses or oncolytic viruses can be coupled with MBs and injected intravenously. Following application of US energy to the target region, the MBs cavitate, and the resulting shock wave enhances drug, gene, or adenovirus uptake. Though the underlying mechanism is yet to be fully understood, there is evidence to suggest that mechanical pore formation of cellular membranes allows for the temporary uptake of drugs. This delivery method circumvents the limitations due to stimulation of the immune system that prevented intravenous administration of viruses. This review provides insight into this intriguing new frontier on the delivery of oncolytic viruses to tumor sites. PMID:27512682

  17. Natural Vaccinia Virus Infection: Diagnosis, Isolation, and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Geessien Kroon, Erna; Santos Abrahão, Jônatas; de Souza Trindade, Giliane; Pereira Oliveira, Graziele; Moreira Franco Luiz, Ana Paula; Barbosa Costa, Galileu; Teixeira Lima, Mauricio; Silva Calixto, Rafael; de Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Drumond, Betânia Paiva

    2016-08-12

    Natural infections of Vaccinia virus (VACV)-the prototype species of the Orthopoxvirus genus, from the family Poxviridae and subfamily Chordopoxvirinae-cause an occupational emergent zoonotic disease that is primarily associated with the handling of infected dairy cattle. In humans, VACV infection is characterized by skin lesions, primarily on the hands, and accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever, myalgia, headache, and lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis of VACV is usually performed according to the methods described for other orthopoxviruses. This unit describes the methods utilized to obtain clinical samples, the serological and molecular techniques used for diagnosis, and the isolation methods and techniques used for molecular and biological characterization of the viruses. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Immune Modulation in Primary Vaccinia virus Zoonotic Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Juliana Assis Silva; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Côrrea-Oliveira, Rodrigo; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the WHO celebrated the 30th anniversary of the smallpox eradication. Ironically, infections caused by viruses related to smallpox are being increasingly reported worldwide, including Monkeypox, Cowpox, and Vaccinia virus (VACV). Little is known about the human immunological responses elicited during acute infections caused by orthopoxviruses. We have followed VACV zoonotic outbreaks taking place in Brazil and analyzed cellular immune responses in patients acutely infected by VACV. Results indicated that these patients show a biased immune modulation when compared to noninfected controls. Amounts of B cells are low and less activated in infected patients. Although present, T CD4+ cells are also less activated when compared to noninfected individuals, and so are monocytes/macrophages. Similar results were obtained when Balb/C mice were experimentally infected with a VACV sample isolated during the zoonotic outbreaks. Taking together, the data suggest that zoonotic VACVs modulate specific immune cell compartments during an acute infection in humans. PMID:22229039

  19. Evidence for differential viral oncolytic efficacy in an in vitro model of epithelial ovarian cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jessica G; Valdes, Yudith Ramos; Barrett, John W; Bell, John C; Stojdl, David; McFadden, Grant; McCart, J Andrea; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is unique among most carcinomas in that metastasis occurs by direct dissemination of malignant cells traversing throughout the intraperitoneal fluid. Accordingly, we test new therapeutic strategies using an in vitro three-dimensional spheroid suspension culture model that mimics key steps of this metastatic process. In the present study, we sought to uncover the differential oncolytic efficacy among three different viruses—Myxoma virus, double-deleted vaccinia virus, and Maraba virus—using three ovarian cancer cell lines in our metastasis model system. Herein, we demonstrate that Maraba virus effectively infects, replicates, and kills epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in proliferating adherent cells and with slightly slower kinetics in tumor spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia viruses infect and kill adherent cells to a much lesser extent than Maraba virus, and their oncolytic potential is almost completely attenuated in spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia are able to infect and spread throughout spheroids, but are blocked in the final stages of the lytic cycle, and oncolytic-mediated cell killing is reactivated upon spheroid reattachment. Alternatively, Maraba virus has a remarkably reduced ability to initially enter spheroid cells, yet rapidly infects and spreads throughout spheroids generating significant cell killing effects. We show that low-density lipoprotein receptor expression in ovarian cancer spheroids is reduced and this controls efficient Maraba virus binding and entry into infected cells. Taken together, these results are the first to implicate the potential impact of differential viral oncolytic properties at key steps of ovarian cancer metastasis. PMID:27119108

  20. Domain Organization of Vaccinia Virus Helicase-Primase D5

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Stephanie; Ling, Wai Li; Round, Adam; Effantin, Gregory; Reich, Stefan; Iseni, Frédéric; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Schoehn, Guy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviridae are viruses with a large linear double-stranded DNA genome coding for up to 250 open reading frames and a fully cytoplasmic replication. The double-stranded DNA genome is covalently circularized at both ends. Similar structures of covalently linked extremities of the linear DNA genome are found in the African swine fever virus (asfarvirus) and in the Phycodnaviridae. We are studying the machinery which replicates this peculiar genome structure. From our work with vaccinia virus, we give first insights into the overall structure and function of the essential poxvirus virus helicase-primase D5 and show that the active helicase domain of D5 builds a hexameric ring structure. This hexamer has ATPase and, more generally, nucleoside triphosphatase activities that are indistinguishable from the activities of full-length D5 and that are independent of the nature of the base. In addition, hexameric helicase domains bind tightly to single- and double-stranded DNA. Still, the monomeric D5 helicase construct truncated within the D5N domain leads to a well-defined structure, but it does not have ATPase or DNA-binding activity. This shows that the full D5N domain has to be present for hexamerization. This allowed us to assign a function to the D5N domain which is present not only in D5 but also in other viruses of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) clade. The primase domain and the helicase domain were structurally analyzed via a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering and, when appropriate, electron microscopy, leading to consistent low-resolution models of the different proteins. IMPORTANCE Since the beginning of the 1980s, research on the vaccinia virus replication mechanism has basically stalled due to the absence of structural information. As a result, this important class of pathogens is less well understood than most other viruses. This lack of information concerns in general viruses of the NCLDV clade, which use a superfamily 3 helicase

  1. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  2. Oncolytic viruses: emerging options for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Yogesh R; Zhang, Tiantian; Essani, Karim

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer among women and is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths, following lung cancer. Severe toxicity associated with a long-term use of BC chemo- and radiotherapy makes it essential to look for newer therapeutics. Additionally, molecular heterogeneity at both intratumoral and intertumoral levels among BC subtypes is known to result in a differential response to standard therapeutics. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have emerged as one of the most promising treatment options for BC. Many preclinical and clinical studies have shown that OVs are effective in treating BC, both as a single therapeutic agent and as a part of combination therapies. Combination therapies involving multimodal therapeutics including OVs are becoming popular as they allow to achieve the synergistic therapeutic effects, while minimizing the associated toxicities. Here, we review the OVs for BC therapy in preclinical studies and in clinical trials, both as a monotherapy and as part of a combination therapy. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic targets for BC, as these are likely to be critical for the development of new OVs.

  3. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sarah; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective malaria vaccine is a crucial part of the roadmap to malaria elimination/eradication by the year 2050. Viral-vectored vaccines based on adenoviruses and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing malaria immunogens are currently being used in heterologous prime-boost regimes in clinical trials for induction of strong antigen-specific T-cell responses and high-titer antibodies. Recombinant MVA is a safe and well-tolerated attenuated vector that has consistently shown significant boosting potential. Advances have been made in large-scale MVA manufacture as high-yield producer cell lines and high-throughput purification processes have recently been developed. This review describes the use of MVA as malaria vaccine vector in both preclinical and clinical studies in the past 5 years.

  4. Oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye; Bell, John C

    2012-07-10

    Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging treatment modality that uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancers. Recent advances include preclinical proof of feasibility for a single-shot virotherapy cure, identification of drugs that accelerate intratumoral virus propagation, strategies to maximize the immunotherapeutic action of oncolytic viruses and clinical confirmation of a critical viremic threshold for vascular delivery and intratumoral virus replication. The primary clinical milestone has been completion of accrual in a phase 3 trial of intratumoral herpes simplex virus therapy using talimogene laherparepvec for metastatic melanoma. Key challenges for the field are to select 'winners' from a burgeoning number of oncolytic platforms and engineered derivatives, to transiently suppress but then unleash the power of the immune system to maximize both virus spread and anticancer immunity, to develop more meaningful preclinical virotherapy models and to manufacture viruses with orders-of-magnitude higher yields than is currently possible.

  5. Construction of Poxviruses as Cloning Vectors: Insertion of the Thymidine Kinase Gene from Herpes Simplex Virus into the DNA of Infectious Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicali, Dennis; Paoletti, Enzo

    1982-08-01

    We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses containing the thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus. The gene was inserted into the genome of a variant of vaccinia virus that had undergone spontaneous deletion as well as into the 120-megadalton genome of the large prototypic vaccinia variant. This was accomplished via in vivo recombination by contransfection of eukaryotic tissue culture cells with cloned BamHI-digested thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus containing flanking vaccinia virus DNA sequences and infectious rescuing vaccinia virus. Pure populations of the recombinant viruses were obtained by replica filter techniques or by growth of the recombinant virus in biochemically selective medium. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, as an insert in vaccinia virus, is transcribed in vivo and in vitro, and the fidelity of in vivo transcription into a functional gene product was detected by the phosphorylation of 5-[125I]iodo-2'-deoxycytidine.

  6. Therapy of Experimental Nerve Sheath Tumors Using Oncolytic Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Abstract follows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Oncolytic HSV, angiogenesis, MPNST , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...reliable tumor models for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ). Several existing and novel oncolytic HSV vectors will then be tested on these...from G47A increases cytotoxicity in vitro to human endothelial cells and murine Nfl" MPNST cell lines. Inhibition of MPNST M2 tumor growth in vivo was

  7. [Oncolytic viruses for genetic therapy of gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, M; Lauer, U M

    2003-07-01

    Gastroenterological oncology requires new strategies with new mechanisms of action and without cross-resistance to currently available treatment regimes. Virotherapy which is based on the employment of replication-competent viral vectors exhibiting strong oncolytic properties is such an approach currently under preclinical/clinical investigation. Techniques of molecular virology are required for further improvement of current vectors, particularly with respect to oncolytic activity, tumour selectivity, tumour spread capacity, and safety.

  8. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: Part 3.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-04-13

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression.

  9. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: part 1.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-04-08

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression.

  10. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-04-10

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression.

  11. Vaccinia virus infection after sexual contact with a military smallpox vaccinee -Washington, 2010.

    PubMed

    2010-07-02

    On March 1, 2010, the Washington State Department of Health (WADOH) notified Public Health - Seattle & King County (PHSKC) of a suspected case of contact transmission of vaccinia virus from sexual contact with a member of the military who had been vaccinated against smallpox. Vaccinia virus infection after sexual contact has been reported previously (1-4). Despite the patient's exposure history and clinical presentation, the diagnosis initially was not considered by the patient's physician, who ordered laboratory testing for several common sexually transmitted infections. The patient was seen by a second physician and referred to an infectious disease specialist, who obtained a swab sample of a genital lesion for laboratory testing for vaccinia virus. Vaccinia virus was confirmed by the Washington State Public Health Laboratory (WAPHL) and the CDC Poxvirus Laboratory. The patient resided in a household with an immunosuppressed renal transplant recipient. Appropriate contact precautions were recommended to the patient. No additional cases of contact transmission were reported. This report describes the patient's clinical course and the associated epidemiologic investigation. Health-care providers caring for U.S. military personnel or their contacts should consider vaccinia virus infection in the differential diagnosis of clinically compatible genital lesions. Contact precautions should be emphasized to all persons who are vaccinated, as well as their contacts with unexplained lesions that might represent vaccinia infection from contact transmission.

  12. Non-plaque-forming virions of Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara express viral genes.

    PubMed

    Lülf, Anna-Theresa; Freudenstein, Astrid; Marr, Lisa; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2016-12-01

    In cell culture infections with vaccinia virus the number of counted virus particles is substantially higher than the number of plaques obtained by titration. We found that standard vaccine preparations of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara produce only about 20-30% plaque-forming virions in fully permissive cell cultures. To evaluate the biological activity of the non-plaque-forming particles, we generated recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent reporter proteins under transcriptional control of specific viral early and late promoters. Live cell imaging and automated counting by fluorescent microscopy indicated that virtually all virus particles can enter cells and switch on viral gene expression. Although most of the non-plaque-forming infections are arrested at the level of viral early gene expression, we detected activation of late viral transcription in 10-20% of single infected cells. Thus, non-plaque-forming particles are biologically active, and likely contribute to the immunogenicity of vaccinia virus vaccines.

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-García, Daniel; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2008-01-01

    Current oncolytic virotherapy strategies are based in the accumulated understanding of the common molecular mechanisms displayed during cell transformation and viral infection, like cell cycle and apoptosis deregulations. Oncolytic virotherapy aims to achieve a strong cytolytic effect, highly restricted to transformed cells. Here, we describe the oncolytic virotherapy defined as the use of viruses like antitumor agents (wild and gene-modified oncolytic viruses) and the developed strategies to increase antitumor efficacy and safety. In addition, we discuss the advances and challenges concerning the use virotherapy in animal models and clinical trials. Some clinical trials of virotherapy have demonstrated promising results, particularly when combined with standard antineoplastic therapies. These preliminary accomplishments are opening the field for more research in several aspects, like vector modifications, pharmacodynamics, biosafety, new clinical applications, etc.

  14. Enhanced efficacy of cidofovir combined with vaccinia immune globulin in treating progressive cutaneous vaccinia virus infections in immunosuppressed hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Smee, Donald F; Dagley, Ashley; Downs, Brittney; Hagloch, Joseph; Tarbet, E Bart

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of progressive vaccinia in individuals has involved antiviral drugs, such as cidofovir (CDV), brincidofovir, and/or tecovirimat, combined with vaccinia immune globulin (VIG). VIG is costly, and its supply is limited, so sparing the use of VIG during treatment is an important objective. VIG sparing was modeled in immunosuppressed mice by maximizing the treatment benefits of CDV combined with VIG to determine the effective treatments that delayed the time to death, reduced cutaneous lesion severity, and/or decreased tissue viral titers. SKH-1 hairless mice immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide and hairless SCID mice (SHO strain) were infected cutaneously with vaccinia virus. Monotherapy, dual combinations (CDV plus VIG), or triple therapy (topical CDV, parenteral CDV, and VIG) were initiated 2 days postinfection and were given every 3 to 4 days through day 11. The efficacy assessment included survival rate, cutaneous lesion severity, and viral titers. Delays in the time to death and the reduction in lesion severity occurred in the following order of efficacy: triple therapy had greater efficacy than double combinations (CDV plus VIG or topical plus parenteral CDV), which had greater efficacy than VIG alone. Parenteral administration of CDV or VIG was necessary to suppress virus titers in internal organs (liver, lung, and spleen). The skin viral titers were significantly reduced by triple therapy only. The greatest efficacy was achieved by triple therapy. In humans, this regimen should translate to a faster cure rate, thus sparing the amount of VIG used for treatment.

  15. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S; Evans, David H

    2016-08-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  16. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S.; Evans, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren’t detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories. PMID:27525721

  17. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Aurelian, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD). Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient’s baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs’ function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral immune responses and minimizing pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance. PMID:27226725

  18. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  19. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  20. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  1. Vaccination of vampire bats using recombinant vaccinia-rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Leon, Yolanda Campos; Tesoro, Emiliano Cruz; Kretschmer, Roberto; Brochier, Bernard; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    Adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) were vaccinated by intramuscular, scarification, oral, or aerosol routes (n = 8 in each group) using a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus. Sera were obtained before and 30 days after vaccination. All animals were then challenged intramuscularly with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Neutralizing antirabies antibodies were measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Seroconversion was observed with each of the routes employed, but some aerosol and orally vaccinated animals failed to seroconvert. The highest antibody titers were observed in animals vaccinated by intramuscular and scarification routes. All animals vaccinated by intramuscular, scarification, and oral routes survived the viral challenge, but one of eight vampire bats receiving aerosol vaccination succumbed to the challenge. Of 31 surviving vaccinated and challenged animals, nine lacked detectable antirabies antibodies by RFFIT (five orally and four aerosol immunized animals). In contrast, nine of 10 non-vaccinated control bats succumbed to viral challenge. The surviving control bat had antiviral antibodies 90 days after viral challenge. These results suggest that the recombinant vaccine is an adequate and safe immunogen for bats by all routes tested.

  2. Orf virus encodes a homolog of the vaccinia virus interferon-resistance gene E3L.

    PubMed

    McInnes, C J; Wood, A R; Mercer, A A

    1998-01-01

    A homolog of the vaccinia virus (VAC) interferon resistance gene E3L has been discovered in orf virus strain NZ-2, a parapoxvirus that infects sheep, goats and humans. The gene is located 20 kb from the left terminus of the orf virus genome and is transcribed towards this terminus. RNase protection studies have been used to define the limits of the gene and Northern analysis revealed that it is expressed early in infection. The predicted amino acid sequence of the orf virus protein shares 31% identity (57% similarity) with the VAC E3L protein. Four of the six residues identified as being essential to dsRNA binding in the vaccinia virus protein are conserved in the orf virus protein whilst the other two amino acid changes are conservative substitutions. The orf virus gene has been sequenced in two other orf virus strains which vary markedly in their ability to produce experimental lesions in vivo. Their predicted protein sequences vary by less than 3% from the NZ-2 protein. The recombinant orf virus protein, expressed as a fusion protein in E. coli, bound double-stranded (ds)RNA but not dsDNA, single-stranded (ss)DNA or ssRNA . This is the first demonstration of a VAC E3L-like gene encoded by a parapoxvirus.

  3. Construction of recombinant Newcastle disease virus Italien strain for oncolytic virotherapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ding; Sun, Na; Nan, Gang; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Hong-Qi; Peeters, Ben; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2012-07-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a naturally oncolytic virus that has been shown to be safe and effective for cancer therapy. Tumor virotherapy using NDV emerged in the 1950s and has advanced more recently by the increased availability of reverse genetics technology. In this study, we constructed a reverse genetics system based on the virulent and oncolytic NDV Italien strain, and generated two recombinant NDVs carrying a gene encoding either enhanced green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase. We evaluated the replication and antitumor characteristics of these viruses in vitro and in vivo. Our data showed that the insertion of exogenous reporter genes did not affect NDV replication and sensitivity to type I interferon. The recombinant NDVs kept the property of tumor-selective replication both in vitro and in vivo and strongly induced syncytium formation leading to cell death. Moreover, the recombinant NDVs significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing athymic mice (p=0.017) and suppressed the loss of body weight after intratumoral injection. Taken together, our study provides a novel platform to develop recombinant oncolytic viruses based on the NDV Italien strain and shows the efficiency of recombinant NDV Italien for oncolytic virotherapy of tumors.

  4. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-12-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  5. Interactions of the Vaccinia Virus A19 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Satheshkumar, P. S.; Olano, L. Renee; Hammer, Carl H.; Zhao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The A19 protein of vaccinia virus (VACV) is conserved among chordopoxviruses, expressed late in infection, packaged in the virus core, and required for a late step in morphogenesis. Multiple-sequence alignments of A19 homologs indicated conservation of a series of lysines and arginines, which could represent a nuclear localization or nucleic acid binding motif, and a pair of CXXC motifs that suggested a zinc finger or redox active sites. The importance of the CXXC motif was confirmed by cysteine-to-serine substitutions, which rendered the altered protein unable to trans-complement infectivity of a null mutant. Nevertheless, the cysteines were not required for function of the poxvirus-specific redox pathway. Epitope-tagged A19 proteins were detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm in both infected and uninfected cells, but this distribution was unaffected by alanine substitutions of the arginine residues, which only partially reduced the ability of the mutated protein to trans-complement infectivity. Viral proteins specifically associated with affinity-purified A19 were identified by mass spectrometry as components of the transcription complex, including RNA polymerase subunits, RAP94 (RNA polymerase-associated protein 94), early transcription factors, capping enzyme, and nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase I, and two core proteins required for morphogenesis. Further studies suggested that the interaction of A19 with the RNA polymerase did not require RAP94 or other intermediate or late viral proteins but was reduced by mutation of cysteines in the putative zinc finger domain. Although A19 was not required for incorporation of the transcription complex in virus particles, the transcriptional activity of A19-deficient virus particles was severely reduced. PMID:23885084

  6. Nigericin is a potent inhibitor of the early stage of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Piper, Jessica; Huzarewich, Rhiannon; Booth, Tim F; Cao, Jingxin; He, Runtao

    2010-12-01

    Poxviruses remain a significant public health concern due to their potential use as bioterrorist agents and the spread of animal borne poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus, to humans. Thus, the identification of small molecule inhibitors of poxvirus replication is warranted. Vaccinia virus is the prototypic member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which also includes variola and monkeypox virus. In this study, we demonstrate that the carboxylic ionophore nigericin is a potent inhibitor of vaccinia virus replication in several human cell lines. In HeLa cells, we found that the 50% inhibitory concentration of nigericin against vaccinia virus was 7.9 nM, with a selectivity index of 1038. We present data demonstrating that nigericin targets vaccinia virus replication at a post-entry stage. While nigericin moderately inhibits both early vaccinia gene transcription and translation, viral DNA replication and intermediate and late gene expression are severely compromised in the presence of nigericin. Our results demonstrate that nigericin has the potential to be further developed into an effective antiviral to treat poxvirus infections.

  7. Oncolytic viruses against cancer stem cells: A promising approach for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Bin-Rong; Wu, Ye-Qing; Wang, Fan-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer has been one of the five most commonly diagnosed and leading causes of cancer mortality over the past few decades. Great progress in traditional therapies has been made, which prolonged survival in patients with early cancer, yet tumor relapse and drug resistance still occurred, which is explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Oncolytic virotherapy has attracted increasing interest in cancer because of its ability to infect and lyse CSCs. This paper reviews the basic knowledge, CSC markers and therapeutics of gastrointestinal cancer (liver, gastric, colon and pancreatic cancer), as well as research advances and possible molecular mechanisms of various oncolytic viruses against gastrointestinal CSCs. This paper also summarizes the existing obstacles to oncolytic virotherapy and proposes several alternative suggestions to overcome the therapeutic limitations. PMID:27672294

  8. Systemic therapy of spontaneous prostate cancer in transgenic mice with oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Susan; Rabkin, Samuel D; Nielsen, G Petur; MacGarvey, Usha; Liu, Renbin; Martuza, Robert L

    2007-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are an innovative therapeutic strategy for cancer, wherein viral replication and cytotoxicity are selective for tumor cells. Here we show the efficacy of systemically administered oncolytic viruses for the treatment of spontaneously arising tumors, specifically the use of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSV) administered i.v. to treat spontaneously developing primary and metastatic prostate cancer in the transgenic TRAMP mouse, which recapitulates human prostate cancer progression. Four administrations of systemically delivered NV1023 virus, an HSV-1/HSV-2 oncolytic recombinant, to TRAMP mice at 12 or 18 weeks of age (presence of prostate adenocarcinoma or metastatic disease, respectively) inhibited primary tumor growth and metastases to lymph nodes. Expression of interleukin 12 (IL-12) from NV1042 virus, a derivative of NV1023, was additionally effective, significantly reducing the frequency of development of prostate cancer and lung metastases, even when the mice were treated after the onset of metastasis at 18 weeks of age. NV1042-infected cells, as detected by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside staining for Lac Z expressed by the virus, were present in prostate tumors 1 week after the final virus injection and viral DNA was detected at 2 weeks after final virus injection by real-time PCR in primary and metastatic tumors but not in liver or blood. No toxicity was observed in any of the treated mice. The efficacy of the IL-12-expressing NV1042 virus in this aggressive prostate cancer model using a clinically relevant treatment paradigm merits its consideration for clinical studies.

  9. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Timothy P; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Gillespie, George Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Friedman, Gregory K

    Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors.

  10. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stafman, Laura L; Garner, Evan F; Mruthyunjayappa, Smitha; Stewart, Jerry E; Friedman, Gregory K; Coleman, Jennifer M; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV), are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  11. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Nosaki, Kaname; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Takashima, Yuto; Sagara, Miyako; Matsumura, Yumiko; Miyamoto, Shohei; Hijikata, Yasuki; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-01-01

    Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL) and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future. PMID:27847861

  12. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Nosaki, Kaname; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Takashima, Yuto; Sagara, Miyako; Matsumura, Yumiko; Miyamoto, Shohei; Hijikata, Yasuki; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-01-01

    Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL) and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future.

  13. Vaccinia Virus Recombinants: Expression of VSV Genes and Protective Immunization of Mice and Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackett, M.; Yilma, T.; Rose, J. K.; Moss, B.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a contagious disease of horses, cattle, and pigs. When DNA copies of messenger RNA's for the G or N proteins of VSV were linked to a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the vaccinia genome, the recombinants retained infectivity and synthesized VSV polypeptides. After intradermal vaccination with live recombinant virus expressing the G protein, mice produced VSV-neutralizing antibodies and were protected against lethal encephalitis upon intravenous challenge with VSV. In cattle, the degree of protection against intradermalingually injected VSV was correlated with the level of neutralizing antibody produced following vaccination.

  14. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  15. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non- skin carcinoma, and one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths in North American men. Presently...primary and metastatic cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus which is able to replicate in...capable of selectively infecting and killing malignant prostate cells while sparing normal cells. This cancer-specific cell death was not due to

  16. Effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Aldabe, R; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-15

    The effects of transient expression of poliovirus 2A(pro) on p220 cleavage in COS cells have been analyzed. When 2A(pro) was cloned in plasmid pTM1 and transiently expressed in COS cells, efficient cleavage of p220 occurred after infection of these cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus bearing phage T7 RNA polymerase. High numbers of COS cells were transfected with pTM1-2A, as judged by p220 cleavage, thereby allowing an analysis of the effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression. A 40-50% cleavage of p220 by transfected poliovirus 2A(pro) was observed ten hours post infection and cleavage was almost complete (80-90%) 20-25 hours post infection with vaccinia virus. Profound inhibition of vaccinia virus protein synthesis was detectable ten hours post infection and was maximal 20-25 hours post infection. This inhibition resulted from neither a blockade of transcription of vaccinia virus nor a lack of translatability of the mRNAs present in cells that synthesize poliovirus 2A(pro). Addition of ara-C inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and allowed the continued synthesis of cellular proteins. Under these conditions, 2A(pro) is expressed and blocks cellular translation. Finally, p220 cleavage by 2A(pro) did not inhibit the translation of a mRNA encoding poliovirus protein 2C, as directed by the 5' leader sequences of encephalomiocarditis virus. Therefore, these findings show a correlation between p220 cleavage and inhibition of translation from newly made mRNAs. Our results are discussed in the light of present knowledge of p220 function, and new approaches are considered that might provide further insights into the function(s) of initiation factor eIF-4F.

  17. Immunization with vaccinia virus induces polyfunctional and phenotypically distinctive CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Precopio, Melissa L.; Betts, Michael R.; Parrino, Janie; Price, David A.; Gostick, Emma; Ambrozak, David R.; Asher, Tedi E.; Douek, Daniel C.; Harari, Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Bailer, Robert; Graham, Barney S.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus immunization provides lifelong protection against smallpox, but the mechanisms of this exquisite protection are unknown. We used polychromatic flow cytometry to characterize the functional and phenotypic profile of CD8+ T cells induced by vaccinia virus immunization in a comparative vaccine trial of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) versus Dryvax immunization in which protection was assessed against subsequent Dryvax challenge. Vaccinia virus–specific CD8+ T cells induced by both MVA and Dryvax were highly polyfunctional; they degranulated and produced interferon γ, interleukin 2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and tumor necrosis factor α after antigenic stimulation. Responding CD8+ T cells exhibited an unusual phenotype (CD45RO−CD27intermediate). The unique phenotype and high degree of polyfunctionality induced by vaccinia virus also extended to inserted HIV gene products of recombinant NYVAC. This quality of the CD8+ T cell response may be at least partially responsible for the profound efficacy of these vaccines in protection against smallpox and serves as a benchmark against which other vaccines can be evaluated. PMID:17535971

  18. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  19. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been extensively used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo “purging” strategy with oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy. PMID:20211576

  20. Perfusion Pressure Is a Critical Determinant of the Intratumoral Extravasation of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amber; Nace, Rebecca; Ayala-Breton C, Camilo; Steele, Michael; Bailey, Kent; Peng, Kah Whye; Russell, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy is determined by the density and distribution of infectious centers within the tumor, which may be heavily influenced by the permeability and blood flow in tumor microvessels. Here, we investigated whether systemic perfusion pressure, a key driver of tumor blood flow, could influence the intratumoral extravasation of systemically administered oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in myeloma tumor-bearing mice. Exercise was used to increase mean arterial pressure, and general anesthesia to decrease it. A recombinant VSV expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), which concentrates radiotracers at sites of infection, was administered intravenously to exercising or anesthetized mice, and nuclear NIS reporter gene imaging was used to noninvasively track the density and spatial distribution of intratumoral infectious centers. Anesthesia resulted in decreased intratumoral infection density, while exercise increased the density and uniformity of infectious centers. Perfusion state also had a significant impact on the antitumor efficacy of the VSV therapy. In conclusion, quantitative dynamic radiohistologic imaging was used to noninvasively interrogate delivery of oncolytic virotherapy, highlighting the critical importance of perfusion pressure as a driver of intratumoral delivery and efficacy of oncolytic viruses. PMID:26647825

  1. Horizontal study of vaccinia virus infections in an endemic area: epidemiologic, phylogenetic and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Assis, Felipe L; Franco-Luiz, Ana Paula M; Paim, Luis M; Oliveira, Graziele P; Pereira, Alexandre F; de Almeida, Gabriel M F; Figueiredo, Leandra B; Tanus, Adriano; Trindade, Giliane S; Ferreira, Paulo P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2015-11-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), the etiological agent of bovine vaccinia (BV), is widespread in Brazil and present in most of the milk-producing regions. We conducted a horizontal study of BV in Bahia, a state of Brazil in which the production of milk is increasing. During 2011, human and bovine clinical samples were collected during outbreaks for BV diagnosis, virus isolation and molecular analysis. We collected data for epidemiological inferences. Vaccinia virus was detected in 87.7% of the analyzed outbreaks, highlighting the effective circulation of VACV in Bahia. The molecular data showed the spreading of group 1 Brazilian VACV to Bahia. We observed a seasonal profile of BV, with its peak in the drier and cooler season. Manual milking was observed in 96 % of the visited properties, showing its importance to viral spread in herds. Under-notification of BV, ineffective animal trade surveillance, and bad milking practices have contributed to the spread of VACV in Brazil.

  2. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    PubMed Central

    Condit, Richard C.; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. PMID:25863879

  3. Use of a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing interferon gamma for post-exposure protection against vaccinia and ectromelia viruses.

    PubMed

    Holechek, Susan A; Denzler, Karen L; Heck, Michael C; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R Mark; Legrand, Fatema A; Verardi, Paulo H; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2013-01-01

    Post-exposure vaccination with vaccinia virus (VACV) has been suggested to be effective in minimizing death if administered within four days of smallpox exposure. While there is anecdotal evidence for efficacy of post-exposure vaccination this has not been definitively studied in humans. In this study, we analyzed post-exposure prophylaxis using several attenuated recombinant VACV in a mouse model. A recombinant VACV expressing murine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was most effective for post-exposure protection of mice infected with VACV and ectromelia virus (ECTV). Untreated animals infected with VACV exhibited severe weight loss and morbidity leading to 100% mortality by 8 to 10 days post-infection. Animals treated one day post-infection had milder symptoms, decreased weight loss and morbidity, and 100% survival. Treatment on days 2 or 3 post-infection resulted in 40% and 20% survival, respectively. Similar results were seen in ECTV-infected mice. Despite the differences in survival rates in the VACV model, the viral load was similar in both treated and untreated mice while treated mice displayed a high level of IFN-γ in the serum. These results suggest that protection provided by IFN-γ expressed by VACV may be mediated by its immunoregulatory activities rather than its antiviral effects. These results highlight the importance of IFN-γ as a modulator of the immune response for post-exposure prophylaxis and could be used potentially as another post-exposure prophylaxis tool to prevent morbidity following infection with smallpox and other orthopoxviruses.

  4. TRAF2 Facilitates Vaccinia Virus Replication by Promoting Rapid Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Haas, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a pivotal intracellular mediator of signaling pathways downstream of TNFR1 and -2 with known pro- and antiviral effects. We investigated its role in the replication of the prototype poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV). Loss of TRAF2 expression, either through small interfering RNA treatment of HeLa cells or through genetic knockout in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), led to significant reductions in VACV growth following low-multiplicity infection. In single-cycle infections, there was delayed production of both early and late VACV proteins as well as accelerated virus-induced alterations to cell morphology, indicating that TRAF2 influences early stages of virus replication. Consistent with an early role, uncoating assays showed normal virus attachment but delayed virus entry in the absence of TRAF2. Although alterations to c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling were apparent in VACV-infected TRAF2−/− MEFs, treatment of wild-type cells with a JNK inhibitor did not affect virus entry. Instead, treatment with an inhibitor of endosomal acidification greatly reduced virus entry into TRAF2−/− MEFs, suggesting that VACV is reliant on the endosomal route of entry in the absence of TRAF2. Thus, TRAF2 is a proviral factor for VACV that plays a role in promoting efficient viral entry, most likely via the plasma membrane. IMPORTANCE Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) are key facilitators of intracellular signaling with roles in innate and adaptive immunity and stress responses. We have discovered that TRAF2 is a proviral factor in vaccinia virus replication in both HeLa cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts and that its influence is exercised through promotion of efficient virus entry. PMID:24429366

  5. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, Richard C. Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  6. Mechanism of poly(A) synthesis by vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R; Kates, J

    1974-08-01

    Data are presented which indicate that vaccinia DNA does not contain poly(dT) sequences the size of poly(A) sequences (50 to 200 nucleotides in length) found in vaccinia RNA. A hybridization experiment and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of pyrimidine tracts show that poly(dT) sequences can account for no more than 0.1% of vaccinia DNA. Ultraviolet irradiation (which causes thymine dimer formation) and phleomycin (which binds to thymidine) both inhibit RNA synthesis but not poly(A) synthesis by vaccinia cores. These data are consistent with a nontranscriptive mechanism for vaccinia poly(A) synthesis. Both trypsin and 50 C heat treatment inhibit RNA synthesis more than poly(A) synthesis by cores, suggesting that separate enzymes may be involved in these syntheses. When the rate of core RNA synthesis is reduced by lowering the UTP and GTP concentrations, the size of the poly(A) sequences increase. These and other data suggest that transcription is involved in the termination of poly(A) synthesis in cores. This might be due to the displacement of growing poly(A) chains by recently completed RNA 3' termini which have not yet acquired poly(A) sequences.

  7. Generation and evaluation of a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine for rabies.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Jacqueline; Rupprecht, Charles E; Mans, Janet; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Nel, Louis H

    2007-05-22

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has become a vaccine vector of choice for recombinant vaccine development. A MVA-based rabies vaccine would be advantageous for use as a vaccine for dogs (and wildlife), particularly if it proves innocuous and efficacious by the oral route. Here, the generation and immunological testing of a recombinant MVA expressing a rabies virus glycoprotein gene is described. In a murine model, higher dosages of recombinant MVA were needed to induce equivocal immune responses as with Vaccinia Copenhagen or Vaccinia Western Reserve recombinants, when administered by a parenteral route. The MVA recombinant was not immunogenic or efficacious when administered per os in naïve mice. The ability of the recombinant MVA to induce anamnestic responses in dogs and raccoons was also investigated. Recombinant MVA boosted humoral immune responses in these animals when administered peripherally, but not when administered orally.

  8. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics.

  9. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. PMID:27579298

  10. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  11. The vaccinia virus K7 protein promotes histone methylation associated with heterochromatin formation

    PubMed Central

    Noyce, Ryan S.; Shenouda, Mira; Umer, Brittany

    2017-01-01

    It has been well established that many vaccinia virus proteins suppress host antiviral pathways by targeting the transcription of antiviral proteins, thus evading the host innate immune system. However, whether viral proteins have an effect on the host’s overall cellular transcription is less understood. In this study we investigated the regulation of heterochromatin during vaccinia virus infection. Heterochromatin is a highly condensed form of chromatin that is less transcriptionally active and characterized by methylation of histone proteins. We examined the change in methylation of two histone proteins, H3 and H4, which are major markers of heterochromatin, during the course of viral infection. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry we were able to track the overall change in the methylated levels of H3K9 and H4K20. Our results suggest that there is significant increase in methylation of H3K9 and H4K20 during Orthopoxviruses infection compared to mock-infected cells. However, this effect was not seen when we infected cells with Leporipoxviruses. We further screened several vaccinia virus single and multi-gene deletion mutant and identified the vaccinia virus gene K7R as a contributor to the increase in cellular histone methylation during infection. PMID:28257484

  12. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunits encoded within the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, E V; Puckett, C; Moss, B

    1987-01-01

    Antiserum to a multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from vaccinia virions was prepared to carry out genetic studies. This antiserum selectively inhibited the activity of the viral polymerase but had no effect on calf thymus RNA polymerase II. The specificity of the antiserum was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of RNA polymerase subunits from dissociated virus particles. The presence in vaccinia virus-infected cells of mRNA that encodes the polymerase subunits was determined by in vitro translation. Immunoprecipitable polypeptides with Mrs of about 135,000, 128,000, 36,000, 34,000, 31,000, 23,000, 21,000, 20,000, and 17,000 were made when early mRNA was added to reticulocyte extracts. The subunits were encoded within the vaccinia virus genome, as demonstrated by translation of early mRNA that hybridized to vaccinia virus DNA. The locations of the subunit genes were determined initially by hybridization of RNA to a series of overlapping 40-kilobase-pair DNA fragments that were cloned in a cosmid vector. Further mapping was achieved with cloned HindIII restriction fragments. Results of these studies indicated that RNA polymerase subunit genes are transcribed early in infection and are distributed within the highly conserved central portion of the poxvirus genome in HindIII fragments E, J, H, D, and A. Images PMID:3033308

  13. Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara: History, Value in Basic Research, and Current Perspectives for Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Volz, A; Sutter, G

    2017-01-01

    Safety tested Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is licensed as third-generation vaccine against smallpox and serves as a potent vector system for development of new candidate vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Historically, MVA was developed by serial tissue culture passage in primary chicken cells of vaccinia virus strain Ankara, and clinically used to avoid the undesirable side effects of conventional smallpox vaccination. Adapted to growth in avian cells MVA lost the ability to replicate in mammalian hosts and lacks many of the genes orthopoxviruses use to conquer their host (cell) environment. As a biologically well-characterized mutant virus, MVA facilitates fundamental research to elucidate the functions of poxvirus host-interaction factors. As extremely safe viral vectors MVA vaccines have been found immunogenic and protective in various preclinical infection models. Multiple recombinant MVA currently undergo clinical testing for vaccination against human immunodeficiency viruses, Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Plasmodium falciparum. The versatility of the MVA vector vaccine platform is readily demonstrated by the swift development of experimental vaccines for immunization against emerging infections such as the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Recent advances include promising results from the clinical testing of recombinant MVA-producing antigens of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 or Ebola virus. This review summarizes our current knowledge about MVA as a unique strain of vaccinia virus, and discusses the prospects of exploiting this virus as research tool in poxvirus biology or as safe viral vector vaccine to challenge existing and future bottlenecks in vaccinology.

  14. Sensitization with vaccinia virus encoding H5N1 hemagglutinin restores immune potential against H5N1 influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Fumihiko; Itoh, Yasushi; Ikejiri, Ai; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Munekata, Keisuke; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Hayashi, Yukiko; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Nakayama, Misako; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Kohara, Michinori

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 HPAI) virus causes elevated mortality compared with seasonal influenza viruses like H1N1 pandemic influenza (H1N1 pdm) virus. We identified a mechanism associated with the severe symptoms seen with H5N1 HPAI virus infection. H5N1 HPAI virus infection induced a decrease of dendritic cell number in the splenic extrafollicular T-cell zone and impaired formation of the outer layers of B-cell follicles, resulting in insufficient levels of antibody production after infection. However, in animals vaccinated with a live recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the H5 hemagglutinin, infection with H5N1 HPAI virus induced parafollicular dendritic cell accumulation and efficient antibody production. These results indicate that a recombinant vaccinia encoding H5 hemagglutinin gene does not impair dendritic cell recruitment and can be a useful vaccine candidate. PMID:27892498

  15. Using clinically approved cyclophosphamide regimens to control the humoral immune response to oncolytic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, K-W; Myers, R; Greenslade, A; Mader, E; Greiner, S; Federspiel, MJ; Dispenzieri, A; Russell, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses can be neutralized in the bloodstream by antiviral antibodies whose titers increase progressively with each exposure, resulting in faster virus inactivation and further reductions in efficacy with each successive dose. A single dose of cyclophosphamide (CPA) at 370 mg m−2 was not sufficient to control the primary antiviral immune responses in mice, squirrel monkeys and humans. We therefore tested clinically approved multidose CPA regimens, which are known to kill proliferating lymphocytes, to determine if more intensive CPA therapy can more effectively suppress antiviral antibody responses during virotherapy. In virus-susceptible mice, primary antibody responses to intravenously (i.v.) administered oncolytic measles virus (MV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were partially or completely suppressed, respectively, by oral (1 mg × 8 days) or systemic (3 mg × 4 days) CPA regimens initiated 1 day before virus. When MV- or VSV-immune mice were re-challenged with the respective viruses and concurrently treated with four daily systemic doses of CPA, their anamnestic antibody responses were completely suppressed and antiviral antibody titers fell significantly below pre-booster levels. We conclude that the CPA regimen of four daily doses at 370 mg m−2 should be evaluated clinically with i.v. virotherapy to control the antiviral antibody response and facilitate effective repeat dosing. PMID:22476202

  16. Using clinically approved cyclophosphamide regimens to control the humoral immune response to oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Peng, K-W; Myers, R; Greenslade, A; Mader, E; Greiner, S; Federspiel, M J; Dispenzieri, A; Russell, S J

    2013-03-01

    Oncolytic viruses can be neutralized in the bloodstream by antiviral antibodies whose titers increase progressively with each exposure, resulting in faster virus inactivation and further reductions in efficacy with each successive dose. A single dose of cyclophosphamide (CPA) at 370 mg m(-2) was not sufficient to control the primary antiviral immune responses in mice, squirrel monkeys and humans. We therefore tested clinically approved multidose CPA regimens, which are known to kill proliferating lymphocytes, to determine if more intensive CPA therapy can more effectively suppress antiviral antibody responses during virotherapy. In virus-susceptible mice, primary antibody responses to intravenously (i.v.) administered oncolytic measles virus (MV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were partially or completely suppressed, respectively, by oral (1 mg × 8 days) or systemic (3 mg × 4 days) CPA regimens initiated 1 day before virus. When MV- or VSV-immune mice were re-challenged with the respective viruses and concurrently treated with four daily systemic doses of CPA, their anamnestic antibody responses were completely suppressed and antiviral antibody titers fell significantly below pre-booster levels. We conclude that the CPA regimen of four daily doses at 370 mg m(-2) should be evaluated clinically with i.v. virotherapy to control the antiviral antibody response and facilitate effective repeat dosing.

  17. Vaccinia viruses: vaccines against smallpox and vectors against infectious diseases and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stephen R; Dolin, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Less than 200 years after its introduction, widespread use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a smallpox vaccine has eradicated variola virus. Along with the remarkable success of the vaccination program, frequent and sometimes severe adverse reactions to VACV were encountered. After eradication, VACV has been reserved for select populations who might be at significant risk for orthopoxvirus infections. Events over the past decade have renewed concerns over the potential use of variola virus as a biological weapon. Accordingly, interest in VACV and attenuated derivatives has increased, both as vaccines against smallpox and as vectors for other vaccines. This article will focus on new developments in the field of orthopoxvirus immunization and will highlight recent advances in the use of vaccinia viruses as vectors for infectious diseases and malignancies. PMID:21854314

  18. Contact transmission of vaccinia virus from smallpox vaccinees in the United States, 2003-2011.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Ellen R; Olive, Denise S; Brundage, John F; Clark, Leslie L

    2012-02-01

    Since 2002, approximately 40,000 US civilians and 2.1 million military personnel have been vaccinated against smallpox. The vaccine contains live vaccinia virus that can be transferred through physical contact. This report summarizes numbers, rates, and characteristics of contact vaccinia cases that presented between December 2002 and March 2011. Cases were identified from reports in adverse event reporting systems and peer-reviewed literature. One hundred fifteen cases of vaccinia transmission through contact were identified (5.4 per 100,000 vaccinees); 52 reports (45%) noted laboratory confirmation. Three-quarters of vaccinees, but fewer than 8% of contact vaccinia cases, were described as military members. Most cases were household or intimate contacts (n=86, 75%) or wrestling partners (n=18, 16%) of vaccinees. Nearly all cases manifested mild, local skin reactions; of 14 hospitalized cases, one was life-threatening. Vaccinia transmission from vaccinees is relatively infrequent. Continued attention to both vaccinee education and screening for contraindications to vaccination is appropriate.

  19. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Prime and Intramuscular Protein Boost Provides Protection against Intrarectal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge in Macaques.

    PubMed

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Tian, Baoping; Cleveland, Brad; Guo, Wenjin; Polacino, Patricia; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2015-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition occurs predominantly through mucosal transmission. We hypothesized that greater mucosal immune responses and protective efficacy against mucosal HIV-1 infection may be achieved by prime-boost immunization at mucosal sites. We used a macaque model to determine the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of orally delivered, replication-competent but attenuated recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length HIV-1 SF162 envelope (Env) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol proteins. We examined the dose and route that are suitable for oral immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses. We showed that sublingual inoculation of two vaccinia virus-naive pigtailed macaques with 5 × 10(8) PFU of recombinant vaccinia viruses was safe. However, sublingual inoculation with a higher dose or tonsillar inoculation resulted in secondary oral lesions, indicating the need to optimize the dose and route for oral immunization with replication-competent vaccinia virus vectors. Oral priming alone elicited antibody responses to vaccinia virus and to the SF162 Env protein. Intramuscular immunization with the SF162 gp120 protein at either 20 or 21 weeks postpriming resulted in a significant boost in antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. Furthermore, we showed that immune responses induced by recombinant vaccinia virus priming and intramuscular protein boosting provided protection against intrarectal challenge with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162-P4.

  20. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  1. Modulation of the Myxoma Virus Plaque Phenotype by Vaccinia Virus Protein F11

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin. PMID:22514354

  2. Modulation of the myxoma virus plaque phenotype by vaccinia virus protein F11.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Evans, David H

    2012-07-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin.

  3. Targeting the Vaccinia Virus L1 Protein to the Cell Surface Enhances Production of Neutralizing Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-28

    vaccine can protect mice and non-humanprimates from lethal challengewith VACV ormon- keypox virus, respectively [21–23]. Fogg et al. demonstrated...23. 24] Fogg C, Lustig S, Whitbeck JC, Eisenberg RJ, Cohen GH, Moss B. Protective immunity to vaccinia virus induced by vaccination with multiple...Allison TJ, Fogg C, Moss B, Garboczi DN. The 1.51-Angstrom structure of the orthopoxvirus L1 protein, a target of potent neutralizing anti- bodies

  4. Turning killer into cure -- the story of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaun Xiaoliu

    2015-11-01

    Viruses have the intrinsic capability to kill host cells. Even when the initial infection consists of only a few viruses, they can reproduce themselves in large quantities within a short time and quickly spread to nearby cells, causing substantial tissue damage. These same infectious properties become desirable if they can be converted into killer agents with specificity for malignant cells. Cancer virotherapy is doing exactly that by modifying viruses in ways that allow them to replicate in malignant cells but not in normal cells. Although relatively young, the field has seen significant progress in recent years. For example, the most recent phase III trial data on a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based oncolytic virus (T-VEC) show substantial improvement in objective and durable responses over the control arm in melanoma patients, prompting speculation that a virotherapy may receive FDA approval for clinical use in the very near future. This review focuses on HSV-based oncolytic viruses, from their early history to their most recent development, with discussion of promising directions for further improvement.

  5. Complex Dynamics of Virus Spread from Low Infection Multiplicities: Implications for the Spread of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A.; Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung; Wodarz, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    While virus growth dynamics have been well-characterized in several infections, data are typically collected once the virus population becomes easily detectable. Earlier dynamics, however, remain less understood. We recently reported unusual early dynamics in an experimental system using adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney (293) cells. Under identical experimental conditions, inoculation at low infection multiplicities resulted in either robust spread, or in limited spread that eventually stalled, with both outcomes occurring with approximately equal frequencies. The reasons underlying these observations have not been understood. Here, we present further experimental data showing that inhibition of interferon-induced antiviral states in cells results in a significant increase in the percentage of robust infections that are observed, implicating a race between virus replication and the spread of the anti-viral state as a central mechanism. Analysis of a variety of computational models, however, reveals that this alone cannot explain the simultaneous occurrence of both viral growth outcomes under identical conditions, and that additional biological mechanisms have to be invoked to explain the data. One such mechanism is the ability of the virus to overcome the antiviral state through multiple infection of cells. If this is included in the model, two outcomes of viral spread are found to be simultaneously stable, depending on initial conditions. In stochastic versions of such models, the system can go by chance to either state from identical initial conditions, with the relative frequency of the outcomes depending on the strength of the interferon-based anti-viral response, consistent with the experiments. This demonstrates considerable complexity during the early phase of the infection that can influence the ability of a virus to become successfully established. Implications for the initial dynamics of oncolytic virus spread through tumors are discussed

  6. The Vaccinia Virus-Encoded Bcl-2 Homologues Do Not Act as Direct Bax Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Many viruses, including members of several poxvirus genera, encode inhibitors that block apoptosis by simultaneously binding the proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins Bak and Bax. The Orthopoxvirus vaccinia virus encodes the Bcl-2-like F1 protein, which sequesters Bak but not Bax. However, N1, a potent virulence factor, is reported to be antiapoptotic and to interact with Bax. Here we investigated whether vaccinia virus inhibits Bak/Bax-dependent apoptosis via the cooperative action of F1 and N1. We found that Western Reserve (WR) and ΔN1L viruses inhibited drug- and infection-induced apoptosis equally. Meanwhile, infections with ΔF1L or ΔN1L/F1L virus resulted in similar levels of Bax activation and apoptosis. Outside the context of infection, N1 did not block drug- or Bax-induced cell death or interact with Bax. In addition to F1 and N1, vaccinia virus encodes further structural homologs of Bcl-2 proteins that are conserved in orthopoxviruses, including A46, A52, B14, C1, C6, C16/B22, K7, and N2. However, we found that these do not associate with Bax or inhibit drug-induced cell death. Based on our findings that N1 is not an antiapoptotic protein, we propose that the F1 orthologs represent the only orthopoxvirus Bcl-2 homolog to directly inhibit the Bak/Bax checkpoint. PMID:22013032

  7. Protection against Friend retrovirus-induced leukemia by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, M; Nishio, J; Chesebro, B

    1992-01-01

    High sequence variability in the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus has provoked interest in nonenvelope antigens as potential immunogens against retrovirus infection. However, the role of core protein antigens encoded by the gag gene in protective immunity against retroviruses is unclear. By using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) gag gene, we could prime CD4+ T-helper cells and protectively immunize susceptible strains of mice against Friend retrovirus infection. Recovery from leukemic splenomegaly developed more slowly after immunization with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV gag than with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV env; however, genetic nonresponders to the envelope protein could be partially protected with Gag vaccines. Class switching of F-MuLV-neutralizing antibodies from immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G after challenge with Friend virus complex was facilitated in mice immunized with the Gag antigen. Sequential deletion of the gag gene revealed that the major protective epitope was located on the N-terminal hydrophobic protein p15. Images PMID:1534853

  8. Mutations in the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus affect cytopathogenicity: potential for oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Janelle, Valérie; Brassard, Frédérick; Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain; Poliquin, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been widely used to characterize cellular processes, viral resistance, and cytopathogenicity. Recently, VSV has also been used for oncolytic virotherapy due to its capacity to selectively lyse tumor cells. Mutants of the matrix (M) protein of VSV have generally been preferred to the wild-type virus for oncolysis because of their ability to induce type I interferon (IFN) despite causing weaker cytopathic effects. However, due to the large variability of tumor types, it is quite clear that various approaches and combinations of multiple oncolytic viruses will be needed to effectively treat most cancers. With this in mind, our work focused on characterizing the cytopathogenic profiles of four replicative envelope glycoprotein (G) VSV mutants. In contrast to the prototypic M mutant, VSV G mutants are as efficient as wild-type virus at inhibiting cellular transcription and host protein translation. Despite being highly cytopathic, the mutant G(6R) triggers type I interferon secretion as efficiently as the M mutant. Importantly, most VSV G mutants are more effective at killing B16 and MC57 tumor cells in vitro than the M mutant or wild-type virus through apoptosis induction. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VSV G mutants retain the high cytopathogenicity of wild-type VSV, with G(6R) inducing type I IFN secretion at levels similar to that of the M mutant. VSV G protein mutants could therefore prove to be highly valuable for the development of novel oncolytic virotherapy strategies that are both safe and efficient for the treatment of various types of cancer.

  9. Molecular Pathways: Mechanism of Action for Talimogene Laherparepvec, a New Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kohlhapp, Frederick J; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-03-01

    Oncolytic viruses are native or engineered viruses that preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells. Selective tumor cell replication is thought to depend on infection of neoplastic cells, which harbor low levels of protein kinase R (PKR) and dysfunctional type I IFN signaling elements. These changes allow more efficient viral replication, and with selected deletion of specific viral genes, replication in normal cells with activated PKR may not be possible. Direct tumor cell lysis, release of soluble tumor antigens, and danger-associated molecular factors are all thought to help prime and promote tumor-specific immunity. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is a genetically modified herpes simplex virus, type I and is the first oncolytic virus to demonstrate a clinical benefit in patients with melanoma. T-VEC has also been evaluated for the treatment of head and neck cancer, pancreatic cancer, and likely other types of cancer will be targeted in the near future. T-VEC has been modified for improved safety, tumor-selective replication, and induction of host immunity by deletion of several viral genes and expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Although the mechanism of action for T-VEC is incompletely understood, the safety profile of T-VEC and ability to promote immune responses suggest future combination studies with other immunotherapy approaches including checkpoint blockade through PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 to be a high priority for clinical development. Oncolytic viruses also represent unique regulatory and biosafety challenges but offer a potential new class of agents for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Systemic therapy with oncolytic myxoma virus cures established residual multiple myeloma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Bartee, Mee Y; Bogen, Bjarne; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma B-cells. Traditional chemotherapeutic regimes often induce initial tumor regression; however, virtually all patients eventually succumb to relapse caused by either reintroduction of disease during autologous transplant or expansion of chemotherapy resistant minimal residual disease. It has been previously demonstrated that an oncolytic virus known as myxoma can completely prevent myeloma relapse caused by reintroduction of malignant cells during autologous transplant. The ability of this virus to treat established residual disease in vivo, however, remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that intravenous administration of myxoma virus into mice bearing disseminated myeloma results in the elimination of 70–90% of malignant cells within 24 hours. This rapid debulking was dependent on direct contact of myxoma virus with residual myeloma and did not occur through destruction of the hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Importantly, systemic myxoma therapy also induced potent antimyeloma CD8+ T cell responses which localized to the bone marrow and were capable of completely eradicating established myeloma in some animals. These results demonstrate that oncolytic myxoma virus is not only effective at preventing relapse caused by reinfusion of tumor cells during stem cell transplant, but is also potentially curative for patients bearing established minimal residual disease. PMID:27933316

  11. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology position statement on donor suitability of recipients of smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus).

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Although there is presently no definitive evidence linking vaccinia virus transmission through reproductive cells, SART/ASRM accordingly recommends that ART practitioners consider deferring donors who have recently received smallpox vaccine or contracted symptomatic vaccinia virus infection through close contact with a vaccine recipient (until after the vaccine or infectious scab has spontaneously separated). Good donor practice further suggests that donors who are not in good health, including those with recent complications from smallpox vaccine, should be similarly deferred.

  12. Society for assisted reproductive technology position statement on donor suitability of recipients of smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus).

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Although there is presently no definitive evidence linking vaccinia virus transmission through reproductive cells, SART/ASRM accordingly recommends that assisted reproductive technology (ART) practitioners consider deferring donors who have recently received smallpox vaccine or contracted symptomatic vaccinia virus infection through close contact with a vaccine recipient (until after the vaccine or infectious scab has spontaneously separated). Good donor practice further suggests that donors who are not in good health, including those with recent complications from smallpox vaccine, should be similarly deferred.

  13. Society for assisted reproductive technology position statement on donor suitability of recipients of smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus).

    PubMed

    2004-04-01

    Although there is presently no definitive evidence linking vaccinia virus transmission through reproductive cells, SART/ASRM accordingly recommends that assisted reproductive technology (ART) practitioners consider deferring donors who have recently received smallpox vaccine or contracted symptomatic vaccinia virus infection through close contact with a vaccine recipient (until after the vaccine or infectious scab has spontaneously separated). Good donor practice further suggests that donors who are not in good health, including those with recent complications from smallpox vaccine, should be similarly deferred.

  14. Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of Lassa, vaccinia, and Ebola viruses dried on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Lytle, C David

    2011-03-01

    Germicidal UV (also known as UVC) provides a means to decontaminate infected environments as well as a measure of viral sensitivity to sunlight. The present study determined UVC inactivation slopes (and derived D(37) values) of viruses dried onto nonporous (glass) surfaces. The data obtained indicate that the UV resistance of Lassa virus is higher than that of Ebola virus. The UV sensitivity of vaccinia virus (a surrogate for variola virus) appeared intermediate between that of the two virulent viruses studied. In addition, the three viruses dried on surfaces showed a relatively small but significant population of virions (from 3 to 10 % of virus in the inoculum) that appeared substantially more protected by their environment from the effect of UV than the majority of virions tested. The findings reported in this study should assist in estimating the threat posed by the persistence of virus in environments contaminated during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  15. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  16. Active vaccination with vaccinia virus A33 protects mice against lethal vaccinia and ectromelia viruses but not against cowpoxvirus; elucidation of the specific adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; Lustig, Shlomo; Zvi, Anat; Erez, Noam; Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Politi, Boaz; Ben-Nathan, David; Schneider, Paula; Lachmi, Batel; Israeli, Ofir; Stein, Dana; Levin, Reuven; Olshevsky, Udy

    2013-07-10

    Vaccinia virus protein A33 (A33VACV) plays an important role in protection against orthopoxviruses, and hence is included in experimental multi-subunit smallpox vaccines. In this study we show that single-dose vaccination with recombinant Sindbis virus expressing A33VACV, is sufficient to protect mice against lethal challenge with vaccinia virus WR (VACV-WR) and ectromelia virus (ECTV) but not against cowpox virus (CPXV), a closely related orthopoxvirus. Moreover, a subunit vaccine based on the cowpox virus A33 ortholog (A33CPXV) failed to protect against cowpox and only partially protected mice against VACV-WR challenge. We mapped regions of sequence variation between A33VACV and A33CPXVand analyzed the role of such variations in protection. We identified a single protective region located between residues 104-120 that harbors a putative H-2Kd T cell epitope as well as a B cell epitope - a target for the neutralizing antibody MAb-1G10 that blocks spreading of extracellular virions. Both epitopes in A33CPXV are mutated and predicted to be non-functional. Whereas vaccination with A33VACV did not induce in-vivo CTL activity to the predicted epitope, inhibition of virus spread in-vitro, and protection from lethal VACV challenge pointed to the B cell epitope highlighting the critical role of residue L118 and of adjacent compensatory residues in protection. This epitope's critical role in protection, as well as its modifications within the orthopoxvirus genus should be taken in context with the failure of A33 to protect against CPXV as demonstrated here. These findings should be considered when developing new subunit vaccines and monoclonal antibody based therapeutics against orthopoxviruses, especially variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox.

  17. Clinical testing of engineered oncolytic measles virus strains in the treatment of cancer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Dispenzieri, Angela; Galanis, Evanthia

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have adapted through millennia of evolution to effectively invade and lyse cells through diverse mechanisms. Strains of the attenuated measles virus Edmonston (MV-Edm) vaccine lineage can preferentially infect and destroy cancerous cells while sparing the surrounding tissues. This specificity is predominantly due to overexpression of the measles virus receptor CD46 in tumor cells. To facilitate in vivo monitoring of viral gene expression and replication, these oncolytic strains have been engineered to either express soluble marker peptides, such as the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; MV-CEA virus), or genes that facilitate imaging and therapy, such as the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene (MV-NIS). Preclinical efficacy and safety data for engineered oncolytic MV-Edm derivatives that led to their clinical translation are discussed in this review, and an overview of the early experience in three ongoing clinical trials of patients with ovarian cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and multiple myeloma is provided. The information obtained from these ongoing trials will guide the future clinical application and further development of MV strains as anticancer agents. PMID:19169959

  18. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  19. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  20. Use of Reporter Genes in the Generation of Vaccinia Virus-Derived Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Al Ali, Sally; Baldanta, Sara; Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Guerra, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is one of the most extensively-studied viruses of the Poxviridae family. It is easy to genetically modify, so it has become a key tool for many applications. In this context, reporter genes facilitate the study of the role of foreign genes introduced into the genome of VACV. In this review, we describe the type of reporter genes that have been used to generate reporter-expressing VACV and the applications of the recombinant viruses obtained. Reporter-expressing VACV are currently employed in basic and immunology research, in the development of vaccines and cancer treatment. PMID:27213433

  1. Vaccinia Virus Induces Rapid Necrosis in Keratinocytes by a STAT3-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Fisher, Robert; Chowdhury, Soma; Sultana, Ishrat; Pereira, Claudia P.; Bray, Mike; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Humans with a dominant negative mutation in STAT3 are susceptible to severe skin infections, suggesting an essential role for STAT3 signaling in defense against cutaneous pathogens. Methods To focus on innate antiviral defenses in keratinocytes, we used a standard model of cutaneous infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice with the current smallpox vaccine, ACAM-2000. In parallel, early events post-infection with the smallpox vaccine ACAM-2000 were investigated in cultured keratinocytes of human and mouse origin. Results Mice treated topically with a STAT3 inhibitor (Stattic) developed larger vaccinia lesions with higher virus titers and died more rapidly than untreated controls. Cultured human and murine keratinocytes infected with ACAM-2000 underwent rapid necrosis, but when treated with Stattic or with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase or caspase-1, they survived longer, produced higher titers of virus, and showed reduced activation of type I interferon responses and inflammatory cytokines release. Treatment with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase and STAT3, but not caspase-1, also reduced the inflammatory response of keratinocytes to TLR ligands. Vaccinia growth properties in Vero cells, which are known to be defective in some antiviral responses, were unaffected by inhibition of RIP1K, caspase-1, or STAT3. Conclusions Our findings indicate that keratinocytes suppress the replication and spread of vaccinia virus by undergoing rapid programmed cell death, in a process requiring STAT3. These data offer a new framework for understanding susceptibility to skin infection in patients with STAT3 mutations. Interventions which promote prompt necroptosis/pyroptosis of infected keratinocytes may reduce risks associated with vaccination with live vaccinia virus. PMID:25419841

  2. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, George Yancey; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Cripe, Timothy P

    Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  3. Oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sze, Daniel Y; Reid, Tony R; Rose, Steven C

    2013-08-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging technology that uses engineered viruses to treat malignancies. Viruses can be designed with biological specificity to infect cancerous cells preferentially, and to replicate in these cells exclusively. Malignant cells may be killed directly by overwhelming viral infection and lysis, which releases additional viral particles to infect neighboring cells and distant metastases. Viral infections may also activate the immune system, unmask stealthy tumor antigens, and aid the immune system to recognize and attack neoplasms. Delivery of live virus particles is potentially complex, and may require the expertise of the interventional community.

  4. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ember, Stuart W. J.; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors. PMID:22791606

  5. Development of an oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus using a tumor-specific HIF-responsive promoter

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Sharon L.; Griffith, Christopher; Glass, Aaron; Shillitoe, Edward J.; Post, Dawn E.

    2010-01-01

    We exploited the differential activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent gene expression in tumors versus normal tissue for the design of a targeted oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). A gene that is essential for viral replication, ICP4, was placed under the regulation of a HIF-responsive promoter and then introduced into the thymidine kinase locus (UL23) of HSV d120 which contains partial deletions in the two endogenous ICP4 genes. Recombinant HIF-HSV were isolated and their derivation from d120 was verified by expression of a truncated, nonfunctional form of ICP4 protein. Disruption of the UL23 locus was confirmed by loss of thymidine kinase expression and resistance to acyclovir. Unexpectedly, HIF-HSV expressed ICP4 and induced tumor cell lysis at similar levels under normoxia and hypoxia. The lack of HIF-dependent ICP4 transgene expression by HIF-HSV was due to two factors that have not previously been reported- reversion of the ICP4 gene region to its wild-type configuration and increased HIF-transcriptional activity under normoxia when cells were infected with any strain of HSV-1. The findings that an oncolytic HSV-1 is genetically unstable and can activate a tumor-related promoter in a non-specific manner have important implications for any proposed use of this virus in cancer therapy. PMID:20930860

  6. High CD46 receptor density determines preferential killing of tumor cells by oncolytic measles virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bambi D; Nakamura, Takafumi; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2004-07-15

    Live attenuated Edmonston B strain of measles virus (MV-Edm) is a potent and specific oncolytic agent, but the mechanism underlying its tumor selectivity is unknown. The virus causes cytopathic effects (CPEs) of extensive syncytial formation in tumor cells but minimal damage or cell killing in normal cells. The CPE is dependent on expression of viral proteins and the presence of CD46, the major cellular receptor of MV-Edm. Using a virally encoded soluble marker peptide to provide a quantitative readout of the level of viral gene expression, we determined that tumor cells and normal cells expressed comparable levels of viral proteins. CD46 mediates virus attachment, entry, and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. Using engineered cells expressing a range of CD46 densities, we determined that whereas virus entry increased progressively with CD46 density, cell fusion was minimal at low receptor densities but increased dramatically above a threshold density of CD46 receptors. It is well established that tumor cells express abundant CD46 receptors on their surfaces compared with their normal counterparts. Thus, at low CD46 densities typical of normal cells, infection occurs, but intercellular fusion is negligible. At higher densities typical of tumor cells, infection leads to extensive cell fusion. Intercellular fusion also results in enhancement of viral gene expression through recruitment of neighboring uninfected cells into the syncytium, further amplifying the CPE. Discrimination between high and low CD46 receptor density provides a compelling basis for the oncolytic specificity of MV-Edm and establishes MV-Edm as a promising CD46-targeted cancer therapeutic agent.

  7. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Delivering Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Kupke, Alexandra; Song, Fei; Jany, Sylvia; Fux, Robert; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schmidt, Jörg; Becker, Christin; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Sutter, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe respiratory disease in humans. We tested a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein by immunizing BALB/c mice with either intramuscular or subcutaneous regimens. In all cases, MVA-MERS-S induced MERS-CoV-specific CD8(+) T cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccinated mice were protected against MERS-CoV challenge infection after transduction with the human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor. This MERS-CoV infection model demonstrates the safety and efficacy of the candidate vaccine.

  8. Host range, growth property, and virulence of the smallpox vaccine: vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qing; Yang, Lin; Zhu, Weijun; Liu, Li; Wang, Haibo; Yu, Wenbo; Xiao, Genfu; Tien, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2005-05-10

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was used as a vaccine against smallpox in China for millions of people before 1980, yet the biological characteristics of the virus remain unclear. We have characterized VTT with respect to its host cell range, growth properties in vitro, and virulence in vivo. We found that 11 of the 12 mammalian cell lines studied are permissive to VTT infection whereas one, CHO-K1, is non-permissive. Using electron microscopy and sequence analysis, we found that the restriction of VTT replication in CHO-K1 is at a step before viral maturation probably due to the loss of the V025 gene. Moreover, VTT is significantly less virulent than vaccinia WR but remains neurovirulent in mice and causes significant body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. Our data demonstrate the need for further attenuation of VTT to serve either as a safer smallpox vaccine or as a live vaccine vector for other pathogens.

  9. Host range, growth property, and virulence of the smallpox vaccine: Vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Qing; Yang Lin; Zhu Weijun; Liu Li; Wang Haibo; Yu Wenbo; Xiao Genfu; Tien Po; Zhang Linqi; Chen Zhiwei . E-mail: zchen@adarc.org

    2005-05-10

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was used as a vaccine against smallpox in China for millions of people before 1980, yet the biological characteristics of the virus remain unclear. We have characterized VTT with respect to its host cell range, growth properties in vitro, and virulence in vivo. We found that 11 of the 12 mammalian cell lines studied are permissive to VTT infection whereas one, CHO-K1, is non-permissive. Using electron microscopy and sequence analysis, we found that the restriction of VTT replication in CHO-K1 is at a step before viral maturation probably due to the loss of the V025 gene. Moreover, VTT is significantly less virulent than vaccinia WR but remains neurovirulent in mice and causes significant body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. Our data demonstrate the need for further attenuation of VTT to serve either as a safer smallpox vaccine or as a live vaccine vector for other pathogens.

  10. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  11. Oncolytic Virotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Swarna; Bartee, Eric; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Hematological malignancies such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma (MM), and the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) primarily affect adults and are difficult to treat. For high-risk disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) can be used. However, in the setting of autologous HCT, relapse due to contamination of the autograft with cancer cells remains a major challenge. Ex vivo manipulations of the autograft to purge cancer cells using chemotherapies and toxins have been attempted. Because these past strategies lack specificity for malignant cells and often impair the normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, prior efforts to ex vivo purge autografts have resulted in prolonged cytopenias and graft failure. The ideal ex vivo purging agent would selectively target the contaminating cancer cells while spare normal stem and progenitor cells and would be applied quickly without toxicities to the recipient. One agent which meets these criteria is oncolytic viruses. This paper details experimental progress with reovirus, myxoma virus, measles virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, coxsackievirus, and vaccinia virus as well as requirements for translation of these results to the clinic. PMID:22312362

  12. Dynamic monitoring of membrane nanotubes formation induced by vaccinia virus on a high throughput microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Min; Xu, Na; Wang, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Membrane nanotubes (MNTs) are physical connections for intercellular communication and induced by various viruses. However, the formation of vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced MNTs has never been studied. In this report, VACV-induced MNTs formation process was monitored on a microfluidic chip equipped with a series of side chambers, which protected MNTs from fluidic shear stress. MNTs were formed between susceptible cells and be facilitated by VACV infection through three patterns. The formed MNTs varied with cell migration and virus concentration. The length of MNTs was positively correlated with the distance of cell migration. With increasing virus titer, the peak value of the ratio of MNT-carried cell appeared earlier. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that the rearrangement of actin fibers induced by VACV infection may lead to the formation of MNTs. This study presents evidence for the formation of MNTs induced by virus and helps us to understand the relationship between pathogens and MNTs. PMID:28317863

  13. Dynamic monitoring of membrane nanotubes formation induced by vaccinia virus on a high throughput microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Xu, Na; Wang, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Membrane nanotubes (MNTs) are physical connections for intercellular communication and induced by various viruses. However, the formation of vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced MNTs has never been studied. In this report, VACV-induced MNTs formation process was monitored on a microfluidic chip equipped with a series of side chambers, which protected MNTs from fluidic shear stress. MNTs were formed between susceptible cells and be facilitated by VACV infection through three patterns. The formed MNTs varied with cell migration and virus concentration. The length of MNTs was positively correlated with the distance of cell migration. With increasing virus titer, the peak value of the ratio of MNT-carried cell appeared earlier. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that the rearrangement of actin fibers induced by VACV infection may lead to the formation of MNTs. This study presents evidence for the formation of MNTs induced by virus and helps us to understand the relationship between pathogens and MNTs.

  14. Targeting tumor vasculature through oncolytic virotherapy: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Toro Bejarano, Marcela; Merchan, Jaime R

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic virotherapy field has made significant advances in the last decade, with a rapidly increasing number of early- and late-stage clinical trials, some of them showing safety and promising therapeutic efficacy. Targeting tumor vasculature by oncolytic viruses (OVs) is an attractive strategy that offers several advantages over nontargeted viruses, including improved tumor viral entry, direct antivascular effects, and enhanced antitumor efficacy. Current understanding of the biological mechanisms of tumor neovascularization, novel vascular targets, and mechanisms of resistance has allowed the development of oncolytic viral vectors designed to target tumor neovessels. While some OVs (such as vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virus) can intrinsically target tumor vasculature and induce vascular disruption, the majority of reported vascular-targeted viruses are the result of genetic manipulation of their viral genomes. Such strategies include transcriptional or transductional endothelial targeting, "armed" viruses able to downregulate angiogenic factors, or to express antiangiogenic molecules. The above strategies have shown preclinical safety and improved antitumor efficacy, either alone, or in combination with standard or targeted agents. This review focuses on the recent efforts toward the development of vascular-targeted OVs for cancer treatment and provides a translational/clinical perspective into the future development of new generation biological agents for human cancers.

  15. Elements in the Development of a Production Process for Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Ingo; Lohr, Verena; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo; Sandig, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The production of several viral vaccines depends on chicken embryo fibroblasts or embryonated chicken eggs. To replace this logistically demanding substrate, we created continuous anatine suspension cell lines (CR and CR.pIX), developed chemically-defined media, and established production processes for different vaccine viruses. One of the processes investigated in greater detail was developed for modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). MVA is highly attenuated for human recipients and an efficient vector for reactogenic expression of foreign genes. Because direct cell-to-cell spread is one important mechanism for vaccinia virus replication, cultivation of MVA in bioreactors is facilitated if cell aggregates are induced after infection. This dependency may be the mechanism behind our observation that a novel viral genotype (MVA-CR) accumulates with serial passage in suspension cultures. Sequencing of a major part of the genomic DNA of the new strain revealed point mutations in three genes. We hypothesize that these changes confer an advantage because they may allow a greater fraction of MVA-CR viruses to escape the host cells for infection of distant targets. Production and purification of MVA-based vaccines may be simplified by this combination of designed avian cell line, chemically defined media and the novel virus strain.

  16. Vaccinia virus interactions with the cell membrane studied by new chromatic vesicle and cell sensor assays.

    PubMed

    Orynbayeva, Z; Kolusheva, S; Groysman, N; Gavrielov, N; Lobel, L; Jelinek, R

    2007-02-01

    The potential danger of cross-species viral infection points to the significance of understanding the contributions of nonspecific membrane interactions with the viral envelope compared to receptor-mediated uptake as a factor in virus internalization and infection. We present a detailed investigation of the interactions of vaccinia virus particles with lipid bilayers and with epithelial cell membranes using newly developed chromatic biomimetic membrane assays. This analytical platform comprises vesicular particles containing lipids interspersed within reporter polymer units that emit intense fluorescence following viral interactions with the lipid domains. The chromatic vesicles were employed as membrane models in cell-free solutions and were also incorporated into the membranes of epithelial cells, thereby functioning as localized membrane sensors on the cell surface. These experiments provide important insight into membrane interactions with and fusion of virions and the kinetic profiles of these processes. In particular, the data emphasize the significance of cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains (lipid rafts) as a crucial factor promoting bilayer insertion of the viral particles. Our analysis of virus interactions with polymer-labeled living cells exposed the significant role of the epidermal growth factor receptor in vaccinia virus infectivity; however, the data also demonstrated the existence of additional non-receptor-mediated mechanisms contributing to attachment of the virus to the cell surface and its internalization.

  17. Suitability of vaccinia virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) for determining activities of three commonly-used alcohol-based hand rubs against enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Steinmann, Jochen; Rabenau, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Background A procedure for including activity against enveloped viruses in the post-contamination treatment of hands has been recommended, but so far no European standard is available to implement it. In 2004, the German Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) and the German Association for the Control of Virus Disease (DVV) suggested that vaccinia virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) should be used as test viruses in a quantitative suspension test to determine the activity of a disinfectant against all enveloped viruses. Methods We have studied the activities of three commonly-used alcohol-based hand rubs (hand rub A, based on 45% propan-2-ol, 30% propan-1-ol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulfate; hand rub B, based on 80% ethanol; hand rub C, based on 95% ethanol) against vaccinia virus and BVDV, and in addition against four other clinically relevant enveloped viruses: herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and human and avian influenza A virus. The hand rubs were challenged with different organic loads at exposure time of 15, 30 and 60 s. According to the guidelines of both BGA/RKI and DVV, and EN 14476:2005, the reduction of infectivity of each test virus was measured on appropriate cell lines using a quantitative suspension test. Results All three alcohol-based hand rubs reduced the infectivity of vaccinia virus and BVDV by ≥ 4 log10-steps within 15 s, irrespective of the type of organic load. Similar reductions of infectivity were seen against the other four enveloped viruses within 15 s in the presence of different types of organic load. Conclusion Commonly used alcohol-based hand rubs with a total alcohol concentration ≥ 75% can be assumed to be active against clinically relevant enveloped viruses if they effectively reduce the infectivities of vaccinia virus and BVDV in a quantitative suspension test. PMID:17291338

  18. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kuroda, T; Fuchs, B C; He, X; Supko, J G; Schmitt, A; McGinn, C M; Lanuti, M; Tanabe, K K

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. In animal models, 12 days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing-schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng ml⁻¹) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses.

  19. Intracellular Transport of Vaccinia Virus in HeLa Cells Requires WASH-VPEF/FAM21-Retromer Complexes and Recycling Molecules Rab11 and Rab22

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jye-Chian; Chu, Li-Wei; Lo, Yung-Tsun; Lee, Sue-Ping; Chen, Tzu-Jung; Huang, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus, the prototype of the Orthopoxvirus genus in the family Poxviridae, infects a wide range of cell lines and animals. Vaccinia mature virus particles of the WR strain reportedly enter HeLa cells through fluid-phase endocytosis. However, the intracellular trafficking process of the vaccinia mature virus between cellular uptake and membrane fusion remains unknown. We used live imaging of single virus particles with a combination of various cellular vesicle markers, to track fluorescent vaccinia mature virus particle movement in cells. Furthermore, we performed functional interference assays to perturb distinct vesicle trafficking processes in order to delineate the specific route undertaken by vaccinia mature virus prior to membrane fusion and virus core uncoating in cells. Our results showed that vaccinia virus traffics to early endosomes, where recycling endosome markers Rab11 and Rab22 are recruited to participate in subsequent virus trafficking prior to virus core uncoating in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identified WASH-VPEF/FAM21-retromer complexes that mediate endosome fission and sorting of virus-containing vesicles prior to virus core uncoating in the cytoplasm. IMPORTANCE Vaccinia mature virions of the WR strain enter HeLa cells through fluid phase endocytosis. We previously demonstrated that virus-containing vesicles are internalized into phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate positive macropinosomes, which are then fused with Rab5-positive early endosomes. However, the subsequent process of sorting the virion-containing vesicles prior to membrane fusion remains unclear. We dissected the intracellular trafficking pathway of vaccinia mature virions in cells up to virus core uncoating in cytoplasm. We show that vaccinia mature virions first travel to early endosomes. Subsequent trafficking events require the important endosome-tethered protein VPEF/FAM21, which recruits WASH and retromer protein complexes to the endosome. There, the complex

  20. Analysis of genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex viruses in human prostate cancer organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Passer, B J; Wu, C-l; Wu, S; Rabkin, S D; Martuza, R L

    2009-12-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses type 1 (oHSVs) such as G47Delta and G207 are genetically engineered for selective replication competence in cancer cells. Several factors can influence the overall effectiveness of oHSV tropism, including HSV-1 receptor expression, extracellular matrix milieu and cellular permissiveness. We have taken advantage of human prostate organ cultures derived from radical prostatectomies to investigate oHSV tropism. In this study, we show that both G47Delta and G207 specifically replicate in epithelial cells of the prostatic glands but not in the surrounding stroma. In contrast, both the epithelial and stromal cell compartments were readily infected by wild-type HSV-1. Analysis of oHSV replication in prostate surgical specimens 3 days post infection showed that G47Delta generated approximately 30-fold more viral progeny than did G207. This correlated with the enhanced expression of G47Delta-derived glycoprotein gB protein levels as compared with G207. In benign prostate tissues, G207 and G47Delta titers were notably reduced, whereas strain F titers were maintained at similar levels compared with prostate cancer specimens. Overall, our results show that these oncolytic herpes vectors show both target specificity and replication competence in human prostate cancer specimens and point to the utility of using human prostate organ cultures in assessing oHSV tropism and cellular specificity.

  1. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  2. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Megison, Michael L; Gillory, Lauren A; Stewart, Jerry E; Nabers, Hugh C; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Waters, Alicia M; Coleman, Jennifer M; Kelly, Virginia; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1) was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors.

  3. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  4. Efficient cleavage of p220 by poliovirus 2Apro expression in mammalian cells: effects on vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Aldabe, R; Feduchi, E; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-10-24

    Poliovirus protease 2A cleaves p220, a component of initiation factor eIF-4F. Polyclonal antibodies that recognize p220 and the cleaved products from different species have been raised. Transfection of several cell lines with poliovirus 2Apro cloned in different plasmids leads to efficient cleavage of p220 upon infection with VT7, a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the T7 RNA polymerase. Under these conditions vaccinia virus protein synthesis is severely inhibited, while expression of poliovirus protein 2C from a similar plasmid has no effect. These results show by the first time the effects of p220 cleavage on vaccinia virus translation in the infected cells.

  5. Oncolytic Activity of Avian Influenza Virus in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuto, Matteo S.; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Pavone, Silvia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Capua, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal form of human cancer, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. Building on the observation that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a tropism for the pancreas in vivo, the present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of IAVs as oncolytic agents for killing human PDA cell lines. Receptor characterization confirmed that human PDA cell lines express the alpha-2,3- and the alpha-2,6-linked glycan receptor for avian and human IAVs, respectively. PDA cell lines were sensitive to infection by human and avian IAV isolates, which is consistent with this finding. Growth kinetic experiments showed preferential virus replication in PDA cells over that in a nontransformed pancreatic ductal cell line. Finally, at early time points posttreatment, infection with IAVs caused higher levels of apoptosis in PDA cells than gemcitabine and cisplatin, which are the cornerstone of current therapies for PDA. In the BxPC-3 PDA cell line, apoptosis resulted from the engagement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, IAVs did not induce apoptosis in nontransformed pancreatic ductal HPDE6 cells. Using a model based on the growth of a PDA cell line as a xenograft in SCID mice, we also show that a slightly pathogenic avian IAV significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, these results are the first to suggest that IAVs may hold promise as future agents of oncolytic virotherapy against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. IMPORTANCE Despite intensive studies aimed at designing new therapeutic approaches, PDA still retains the most dismal prognosis among human cancers. In the present study, we provide the first evidence indicating that avian IAVs of low pathogenicity display a tropism for human PDA cells, resulting in viral RNA replication and a potent induction of apoptosis in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. These

  6. Complex spatial dynamics of oncolytic viruses in vitro: mathematical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik; Hofacre, Andrew; Lau, John W; Sun, Zhiying; Fan, Hung; Komarova, Natalia L

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in tumor cells and can serve as targeted treatment agents. While promising results have been observed in clinical trials, consistent success of therapy remains elusive. The dynamics of virus spread through tumor cell populations has been studied both experimentally and computationally. However, a basic understanding of the principles underlying virus spread in spatially structured target cell populations has yet to be obtained. This paper studies such dynamics, using a newly constructed recombinant adenovirus type-5 (Ad5) that expresses enhanced jellyfish green fluorescent protein (EGFP), AdEGFPuci, and grows on human 293 embryonic kidney epithelial cells, allowing us to track cell numbers and spatial patterns over time. The cells are arranged in a two-dimensional setting and allow virus spread to occur only to target cells within the local neighborhood. Despite the simplicity of the setup, complex dynamics are observed. Experiments gave rise to three spatial patterns that we call "hollow ring structure", "filled ring structure", and "disperse pattern". An agent-based, stochastic computational model is used to simulate and interpret the experiments. The model can reproduce the experimentally observed patterns, and identifies key parameters that determine which pattern of virus growth arises. The model is further used to study the long-term outcome of the dynamics for the different growth patterns, and to investigate conditions under which the virus population eliminates the target cells. We find that both the filled ring structure and disperse pattern of initial expansion are indicative of treatment failure, where target cells persist in the long run. The hollow ring structure is associated with either target cell extinction or low-level persistence, both of which can be viewed as treatment success. Interestingly, it is found that equilibrium properties of ordinary differential equations describing the dynamics in local

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus as a flexible platform for oncolytic virotherapy against cancer.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2012-12-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an emerging anti-cancer approach that utilizes viruses to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells, while not harming healthy cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic non-segmented, negative-strand RNA virus with inherent OV qualities. Antiviral responses induced by type I interferon pathways are believed to be impaired in most cancer cells, making them more susceptible to VSV than normal cells. Several other factors make VSV a promising OV candidate for clinical use, including its well-studied biology, a small, easily manipulated genome, relative independence of a receptor or cell cycle, cytoplasmic replication without risk of host-cell transformation, and lack of pre-existing immunity in humans. Moreover, various VSV-based recombinant viruses have been engineered via reverse genetics to improve oncoselectivity, safety, oncotoxicity and stimulation of tumour-specific immunity. Alternative delivery methods are also being studied to minimize premature immune clearance of VSV. OV treatment as a monotherapy is being explored, although many studies have employed VSV in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or other OVs. Preclinical studies with various cancers have demonstrated that VSV is a promising OV; as a result, a human clinical trial using VSV is currently in progress.

  8. Vaccinia Virus LC16m8∆ as a Vaccine Vector for Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kidokoro, Minoru; Shida, Hisatoshi

    2014-01-01

    The LC16m8 strain of vaccinia virus, the active ingredient in the Japanese smallpox vaccine, was derived from the Lister/Elstree strain. LC16m8 is replication-competent and has been administered to over 100,000 infants and 3,000 adults with no serious adverse reactions. Despite this outstanding safety profile, the occurrence of spontaneously-generated large plaque-forming virulent LC16m8 revertants following passage in cell culture is a major drawback. We identified the gene responsible for the reversion and deleted the gene (B5R) from LC16m8 to derive LC16m8Δ. LC16m8∆ is non-pathogenic in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, genetically-stable and does not reverse to a large-plaque phenotype upon passage in cell culture, even under conditions in which most LC16m8 populations are replaced by revertants. Moreover, LC16m8∆ is >500-fold more effective than the non-replicating vaccinia virus (VV), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), at inducing murine immune responses against pathogenic VV. LC16m8∆, which expresses the SIV gag gene, also induced anti-Gag CD8+ T-cells more efficiently than MVA and another non-replicating VV, Dairen I minute-pock variants (DIs). Moreover, LC16m8∆ expressing HIV-1 Env in combination with a Sendai virus vector induced the production of anti-Env antibodies and CD8+ T-cells. Thus, the safety and efficacy of LC16m8∆ mean that it represents an outstanding platform for the development of human vaccine vectors. PMID:26344890

  9. Nucleotide sequence of a cluster of early and late genes in a conserved segment of the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Plucienniczak, A; Schroeder, E; Zettlmeissl, G; Streeck, R E

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.6 kb vaccinia DNA segment from a genomic region conserved among different orthopox virus has been determined. This segment contains a tight cluster of 12 partly overlapping open reading frames most of which can be correlated with previously identified early and late proteins and mRNAs. Regulatory signals used by vaccinia virus have been studied. Presumptive promoter regions are rich in A, T and carry the consensus sequences TATA and AATAA spaced at 20-24 base pairs. Tandem repeats of a CTATTC consensus sequence are proposed to be involved in the termination of early transcription. PMID:2987815

  10. Naturally Existing Oncolytic Virus M1 Is Nonpathogenic for the Nonhuman Primates After Multiple Rounds of Repeated Intravenous Injections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haipeng; Lin, Yuan; Li, Kai; Liang, Jiankai; Xiao, Xiao; Cai, Jing; Tan, Yaqian; Xing, Fan; Mai, Jialuo; Li, Yuan; Chen, Wenli; Sheng, Longxiang; Gu, Jiayu; Zhu, Wenbo; Yin, Wei; Qiu, Pengxin; Su, Xingwen; Lu, Bingzheng; Tian, Xuyan; Liu, Jinhui; Lu, Wanjun; Dou, Yunling; Huang, Yijun; Hu, Bing; Kang, Zhuang; Gao, Guangping; Mao, Zixu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Lu, Ling; Bai, Xue-Tao; Gong, Shoufang; Yan, Guangmei; Hu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Cancers figure among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next 2 decades. Development of novel therapeutic agents is urgently needed for clinical cancer therapy. Alphavirus M1 is a Getah-like virus isolated from China with a genome of positive single-strand RNA. We have previously identified that alphavirus M1 is a naturally existing oncolytic virus with significant anticancer activity against different kinds of cancer (e.g., liver cancer, bladder cancer, and colon cancer). To support the incoming clinical trial of intravenous administration of alphavirus M1 to cancer patients, we assessed the safety of M1 in adult nonhuman primates. We previously presented the genome sequencing data of the cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), which was demonstrated as an ideal animal species for virus infection study. Therefore, we chose cynomolgus macaques of either sex for the present safety study of oncolytic virus M1. In the first round of administration, five experimental macaques were intravenously injected with six times of oncolytic virus M1 (1 × 10(9) pfu/dose) in 1 week, compared with five vehicle-injected control animals. The last two rounds of injections were further completed in the following months in the same way as the first round. Body weight, temperature, complete blood count, clinical biochemistries, cytokine profiles, lymphocytes subsets, neutralizing antibody, and clinical symptoms were closely monitored at different time points. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed to assess the possibility of encephalitis or arthritis. As a result, no clinical, biochemical, immunological, or medical imaging or other pathological evidence of toxicity was found during the whole process of the study. Our results in cynomolgus macaques suggested the safety of intravenous administration of oncolytic virus M1 in cancer patients in the future.

  11. Attenuated vaccinia virus-circumsporozoite protein recombinants confer protection against rodent malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Lanar, D E; Tine, J A; de Taisne, C; Seguin, M C; Cox, W I; Winslow, J P; Ware, L A; Kauffman, E B; Gordon, D; Ballou, W R; Paoletti, E; Sadoff, J C

    1996-01-01

    NYVAC-based vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were evaluated in the Plasmodium berghei rodent malaria model system. Immunization of mice with a NYVAC-based CSP recombinant elicited a high level of protection (60 to 100%). Protection did not correlate with CS repeat-specific antibody responses and was abrogated by in vivo CD8+ T-cell depletion. Protection was not enhanced by modification of the subcellular localization of CSP. These results suggest the potential of poxvirus-based vectors for the development of vaccine candidates for human malaria. PMID:8613376

  12. Pharmacological Modulation of Anti-Tumor Immunity Induced by Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Nicole E.; Krishnan, Ramya; Diallo, Jean-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) not only kill cancer cells by direct lysis but also generate a significant anti-tumor immune response that allows for prolonged cancer control and in some cases cures. How to best stimulate this effect is a subject of intense investigation in the OV field. While pharmacological manipulation of the cellular innate anti-viral immune response has been shown by several groups to improve viral oncolysis and spread, it is increasingly clear that pharmacological agents can also impact the anti-tumor immune response generated by OVs and related tumor vaccination strategies. This review covers recent progress in using pharmacological agents to improve the activity of OVs and their ability to generate robust anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25101247

  13. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  14. Resistance to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Induced by Immunization of Cotton Rats with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the RSV G Glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Narayanasamy; Prince, Gregory A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Venkatesan, Sundararajan; Chanock, Robert M.; Moss, Bernard

    1986-03-01

    A cDNA copy of the G glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was placed under control of a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the thymidine kinase locus of the vaccinia virus genome. The recombinant vaccinia virus retained infectivity and expressed a 93-kDa protein that migrated with the authentic RSV G glycoprotein upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glycosylation of the expressed protein and transport to the cell surface were demonstrated in the absence of other RSV proteins. Cotton rats that were inoculated intradermally with the infectious recombinant virus produced serum antibody to the G glycoprotein that neutralized RSV in vitro. Furthermore, the vaccinated animals were resistant to lower respiratory tract infection upon intranasal inoculation with RSV and had reduced titers of RSV in the nose.

  15. Characterization of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complexes expressed by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, R; Thudium, K; Berger, K; Kuo, C; Gervase, B; Hall, J; Selby, M; Kuo, G; Houghton, M; Choo, Q L

    1993-01-01

    We constructed recombinant vaccinia virus vectors for expression of the structural region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Infection of mammalian cells with a vector (vv/HCV1-906) encoding C-E1-E2-NS2 generated major protein species of 22 kDa (C), 33 to 35 kDa (E1), and 70 to 72 kDa (E2), as observed previously with other mammalian expression systems. The bulk of the E1 and E2 expressed by vv/HCV1-906 was found integrated into endoplasmic reticulum membranes as core-glycosylated species, suggesting that these E1 and E2 species represent intracellular forms of the HCV envelope proteins. HCV E1 and E2 formed E1-E2 complexes which were precipitated by either anti-E1 or anti-E2 serum and which sedimented at approximately 15 S on glycerol density gradients. No evidence of intermolecular disulfide bonding between E1 and E2 was detected. E1 and E2 were copurified to approximately 90% purity by mild detergent extraction followed by chromatography on Galanthus nivalus lectin-agarose and DEAE-Fractogel. Immunization of chimpanzees with purified E1-E2 generated high titers of anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies. Further studies, to be reported separately, demonstrated that purified E1-E2 complexes were recognized at high frequency by HCV+ human sera (D. Y. Chien, Q.-L. Choo, R. Ralston, R. Spaete, M. Tong, M. Houghton, and G. Kuo, Lancet, in press) and generated protective immunity in chimpanzees (Q.-L. Choo, G. Kuo, R. Ralston, A. Weiner, D. Chien, G. Van Nest, J. Han, K. Berger, K. Thudium, J. Kansopon, J. McFarland, A. Tabrizi, K. Ching, B. Mass, L. B. Cummins, E. Muchmore, and M. Houghton, submitted for publication), suggesting that these purified HCV envelope proteins display native HCV epitopes. Images PMID:8411378

  16. Treatment strategies for combining immunostimulatory oncolytic virus therapeutics with dendritic cell injections.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Crivelli, Joseph J; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choi, Il-Kyu; Gevertz, Jana L; Kim, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to treat cancer, as they selectively replicate inside of and lyse tumor cells. The efficacy of this process is limited and new OVs are being designed to mediate tumor cell release of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, which attract cytotoxic T cells to target tumor cells, thus increasing the tumor-killing effects of OVs. To further promote treatment efficacy, OVs can be combined with other treatments, such as was done by Huang et al., who showed that combining OV injections with dendritic cell (DC) injections was a more effective treatment than either treatment alone. To further investigate this combination, we built a mathematical model consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations and fit the model to the hierarchical data provided from Huang et al. We used the model to determine the effect of varying doses of OV and DC injections and to test alternative treatment strategies. We found that the DC dose given in Huang et al. was near a bifurcation point and that a slightly larger dose could cause complete eradication of the tumor. Further, the model results suggest that it is more effective to treat a tumor with immunostimulatory oncolytic viruses first and then follow-up with a sequence of DCs than to alternate OV and DC injections. This protocol, which was not considered in the experiments of Huang et al., allows the infection to initially thrive before the immune response is enhanced. Taken together, our work shows how the ordering, temporal spacing, and dosage of OV and DC can be chosen to maximize efficacy and to potentially eliminate tumors altogether.

  17. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    PubMed Central

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. PMID:25462347

  18. Inhibition of Vaccinia virus entry by a broad spectrum antiviral peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Altmann, S.E.; Jones, J.C.; Schultz-Cherry, S.; Brandt, C.R.

    2009-06-05

    Concerns about the possible use of Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, as a weapon for bioterrorism have led to renewed efforts to identify new antivirals against orthopoxviruses. We identified a peptide, EB, which inhibited infection by Vaccinia virus with an EC{sub 50} of 15 muM. A control peptide, EBX, identical in composition to EB but differing in sequence, was inactive (EC{sub 50} > 200 muM), indicating sequence specificity. The inhibition was reversed upon removal of the peptide, and EB treatment had no effect on the physical integrity of virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. Viral adsorption was unaffected by the presence of EB, and the addition of EB post-entry had no effect on viral titers or on early gene expression. The addition of EB post-adsorption resulted in the inhibition of beta-galactosidase expression from an early viral promoter with an EC{sub 50} of 45 muM. A significant reduction in virus entry was detected in the presence of the peptide when the number of viral cores released into the cytoplasm was quantified. Electron microscopy indicated that 88% of the virions remained on the surface of cells in the presence of EB, compared to 37% in the control (p < 0.001). EB also blocked fusion-from-within, suggesting that virus infection is inhibited at the fusion step. Analysis of EB derivatives suggested that peptide length may be important for the activity of EB. The EB peptide is, to our knowledge, the first known small molecule inhibitor of Vaccinia virus entry.

  19. Microbiota is an essential element for mice to initiate a protective immunity against Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Lima, Maurício T; Andrade, Ana C S P; Oliveira, Graziele P; Calixto, Rafael S; Oliveira, Danilo B; Souza, Éricka L S; Trindade, Giliane S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Kroon, Erna G; Martins, Flaviano S; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2016-02-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates harbors one of the most complex ecosystems known in microbial ecology and this indigenous microbiota almost always has a profound influence on host-parasite relationships, which can enhance or reduce the pathology of the infection. In this context, the impact of the microbiota during the infection of several viral groups remains poorly studied, including the family Poxviridae. Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a member of this family and is the causative agent of bovine vaccinia, responsible for outbreaks that affect bovines and humans. To determine the influence of the microbiota in the development of the disease caused by VACV, a comparative study using a murine model was performed. Germ-free and conventional, 6- to 7-week-old Swiss NIH mice were infected by tail scarification and intranasally with VACV. Moreover, immunosuppression and microbiota reposition were performed, to establish the interactions among the host's immune system, microbiota and VACV. The data demonstrate that the microbiota is essential for the effective immune response of mice against VACV in intranasal inoculation and to control the virus at the primary site of infection. Furthermore, this study is the first to show that Swiss conventional mice are refractory to the intranasal infection of VACV.

  20. Structure and Assembly of Intracellular Mature Vaccinia Virus: Thin-Section Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Gareth; Roos, Norbert; Schleich, Sybille; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2001-01-01

    In the preceding study (see accompanying paper), we showed by a variety of different techniques that intracellular mature vaccinia virus (vaccinia IMV) is unexpectedly complex in its structural organization and that this complexity also extends to the underlying viral core, which is highly folded. With that analysis as a foundation, we now present different thin-section electron microscopy approaches for analyzing the IMV and the processes by which it is assembled in infected HeLa cells. We focus on conventional epoxy resin thin sections as well as cryosections to describe key intermediates in the assembly process. We took advantage of streptolysin O's ability to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells to improve membrane contrast, and we used antibodies against bone fide integral membrane proteins of the virus to unequivocally identify membrane profiles in thin sections. All of the images presented here can be rationalized with respect to the model put forward for the assembly of the IMV in the accompanying paper. PMID:11602745

  1. Development of a vaccinia virus based reservoir-targeted vaccine against Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Mecsas, Joan; Hu, Linden T.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative organism of plague, is a zoonotic organism with a worldwide distribution. Although the last plague epidemic occurred in early 1900s, human cases continue to occur due to contact with infected wild animals. In this study, we have developed a reservoir-targeted vaccine against Y. pestis, to interrupt transmission of disease in wild animals as a potential strategy for decreasing human disease. A vaccinia virus delivery system was used to express the F1 capsular protein and the LcrV type III secretion component of Y. pestis as a fusion protein. Here we show that a single dose of this vaccine administered orally, generates a dose-dependent antibody response in mice. Antibody titers peak by 3 weeks after administration and remain elevated for a minimum of 45 weeks. Vaccination provided up to 100% protection against challenge with Y. pestis administered by intranasal challenge at 10 times the lethal dose with protection lasting a minimum of 45 weeks. An orally available, vaccinia virus expressed vaccine against Y. pestis may be a suitable vaccine for a reservoir targeted strategy for the prevention of enzootic plague. PMID:20875494

  2. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Vaccinia Virus Recombinant That Expresses the Influenza Hemagglutinin Gene and Induces Resistance to Influenza Virus Infection in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Moss, Bernard

    1983-12-01

    A DNA copy of the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene, derived from influenza virus A/Jap/305/57 (H2N2) was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of an early vaccinia virus promoter. Tissue culture cells infected with the purified recombinant virus synthesized influenza hemagglutinin, which was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface where it could be cleaved with trypsin into HA1 and HA2 subunits. Rabbits and hamsters inoculated intradermally with recombinant virus produced circulating antibodies that inhibited hemagglutination by influenza virus. Furthermore, vaccinated hamsters achieved levels of antibody similar to those obtained upon primary infection with influenza virus and were protected against respiratory infection with the A/Jap/305/57 influenza virus.

  3. Evaluation of Imiquimod for Topical Treatment of Vaccinia Virus Cutaneous Infections in Immunosuppressed Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tarbet, E. Bart; Larson, Deanna; Anderson, Bentley J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Wong, Min-Hui; Smee, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    Imiquimod is an immune response modifier prescribed as a topical medication for a number of viral and neoplastic conditions. We evaluated the antiviral activity of imiquimod against vaccinia virus (WR strain) cutaneous infections in immunosuppressed (with cyclophosphamide) hairless mice when administered after virus exposure. Primary lesions progressed in severity, satellite lesions developed, and infection eventually killed the mice. Once daily topical treatment with 1% imiquimod cream for three, four, or five days were compared to twice daily topical treatment with 1% cidofovir cream for seven days. Survival time of mice in all treated groups was significantly prolonged compared to placebo controls. The mean day of death for the placebo group, three-day imiquimod, four day imiquimod, five-day imiquimod, and cidofovir groups were 15.5, 20.0, 20.5, 19.5, and 20.5 days post-infection, respectively. All treatment groups showed significant reductions in primary lesion size and in the number of satellite lesions. The cidofovir and 4-day imiquimod treatments delayed the appearance of lung virus titers by 3 and 6 days, respectively, although cutaneous lesion and snout virus titers were not as affected by treatment. Benefits in survival and lesion reduction were observed when imiquimod treatment was delayed from 24, 48 and 72 hours post-infection. However, increasing the treatment dose of imiquimod from 1% to 5% led to a significant decrease in antiviral efficacy. These results demonstrate the protective effects of topically administered imiquimod against a disseminated vaccinia virus infection in this mouse model. PMID:21439326

  4. Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV-1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV - 1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cleo Lee CONTRACTING...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV - 1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment...untranslated region (3’UTR) of a herpes simplex virus- 1 ( HSV - 1 ) essential viral gene, ICP4, to create CMV-ICP4-143T and CMV-ICP4-145T amplicon viruses. Our

  5. Comparison of the replication characteristics of vaccinia virus strains Guang 9 and Tian Tan in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Yu, Yongxin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    Vaccinia virus is widely used as a vector in the development of recombinant vaccines. Vaccinia virus strain Guang 9 (VG9), which was derived from vaccinia virus strain Tian Tan (VTT) by successive plaque-cloning purification, was more attenuated than VTT. In this study, the host cell range and the growth and replication of VG9 were compared with those of VTT. The results showed that both VG9 and VTT could infect permissive cells (Vero, TK-143 and CEF) and semipermissive cells PK (15) and induced a visible cytopathic effect (CPE). Both strains could infect nonpermissive CHO-K1 cells but neither was able to reproduce. The replicative ability of VG9 was a little lower than that of VTT. Additionally, recombinant vaccinia viruses containing a firefly luciferase gene (VG9-L and VTT-L) were constructed, and their expression in vitro and replication and spread in vivo were compared. The expression ability of VG9-L was lower than that of VTT-L. Whole-animal imaging data indicated that VG9-L could reproduce quickly and express the exogenous protein at the site of inoculation, regardless of whether the intramuscular, intracutaneous, subcutaneous or celiac inoculation route was used. VG9-L was better in its ability to express a foreign protein than VTT-L, but the time during which expression occurred was shorter. There was no dissemination of virus in mice inoculated with either strain. In summary, this study demonstrates the possibility of using VG9 for the production of smallpox vaccines or the construction of recombinant vaccinia virus vaccines.

  6. Intravenously injected Newcastle disease virus in non-human primates is safe to use for oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buijs, P R A; van Amerongen, G; van Nieuwkoop, S; Bestebroer, T M; van Run, P R W A; Kuiken, T; Fouchier, R A M; van Eijck, C H J; van den Hoogen, B G

    2014-11-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus with oncolytic potential. Detailed preclinical information regarding the safety of oncolytic NDV is scarce. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity, biodistribution and shedding of intravenously injected oncolytic NDVs in non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis). Two animals were injected with escalating doses of a non-recombinant vaccine strain, a recombinant lentogenic strain or a recombinant mesogenic strain. To study transmission, naive animals were co-housed with the injected animals. Injection with NDV did not lead to severe illness in the animals or abnormalities in hematologic or biochemistry measurements. Injected animals shed low amounts of virus, but this did not lead to seroconversion of the contact animals. Postmortem evaluation demonstrated no pathological changes or evidence of virus replication. This study demonstrates that NDV generated in embryonated chicken eggs is safe for intravenous administration to non-human primates. In addition, our study confirmed results from a previous report that naïve primate and human sera are able to neutralize egg-generated NDV. We discuss the implications of these results for our study and the use of NDV for virotherapy.

  7. Dogs and Opossums Positive for Vaccinia Virus during Outbreak Affecting Cattle and Humans, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peres, Marina G; Barros, Claudenice B; Appolinário, Camila M; Antunes, João M A P; Mioni, Mateus S R; Bacchiega, Thais S; Allendorf, Susan D; Vicente, Acácia F; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    During a vaccinia virus (VACV) outbreak in São Paulo State, Brazil, blood samples were collected from cows, humans, other domestic animals, and wild mammals. Samples from 3 dogs and 3 opossums were positive for VACV by PCR. Results of gene sequencing yielded major questions regarding other mammalian species acting as reservoirs of VACV.

  8. Dogs and Opossums Positive for Vaccinia Virus during Outbreak Affecting Cattle and Humans, São Paulo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Marina G.; Barros, Claudenice B.; Appolinário, Camila M.; Antunes, João M.A.P.; Mioni, Mateus S.R.; Bacchiega, Thais S.; Allendorf, Susan D.; Vicente, Acácia F.; Fonseca, Clóvis R.

    2016-01-01

    During a vaccinia virus (VACV) outbreak in São Paulo State, Brazil, blood samples were collected from cows, humans, other domestic animals, and wild mammals. Samples from 3 dogs and 3 opossums were positive for VACV by PCR. Results of gene sequencing yielded major questions regarding other mammalian species acting as reservoirs of VACV. PMID:26812352

  9. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  10. A36-dependent Actin Filament Nucleation Promotes Release of Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Horsington, Jacquelyn; Lynn, Helena; Turnbull, Lynne; Cheng, Delfine; Braet, Filip; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Karupiah, Guna; Newsome, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transmission of vaccinia virus can be mediated by enveloped virions that remain attached to the outer surface of the cell or those released into the medium. During egress, the outer membrane of the double-enveloped virus fuses with the plasma membrane leaving extracellular virus attached to the cell surface via viral envelope proteins. Here we report that F-actin nucleation by the viral protein A36 promotes the disengagement of virus attachment and release of enveloped virus. Cells infected with the A36YdF virus, which has mutations at two critical tyrosine residues abrogating localised actin nucleation, displayed a 10-fold reduction in virus release. We examined A36YdF infected cells by transmission electron microscopy and observed that during release, virus appeared trapped in small invaginations at the plasma membrane. To further characterise the mechanism by which actin nucleation drives the dissociation of enveloped virus from the cell surface, we examined recombinant viruses by super-resolution microscopy. Fluorescently-tagged A36 was visualised at sub-viral resolution to image cell-virus attachment in mutant and parental backgrounds. We confirmed that A36YdF extracellular virus remained closely associated to the plasma membrane in small membrane pits. Virus-induced actin nucleation reduced the extent of association, thereby promoting the untethering of virus from the cell surface. Virus release can be enhanced via a point mutation in the luminal region of B5 (P189S), another virus envelope protein. We found that the B5P189S mutation led to reduced contact between extracellular virus and the host membrane during release, even in the absence of virus-induced actin nucleation. Our results posit that during release virus is tightly tethered to the host cell through interactions mediated by viral envelope proteins. Untethering of virus into the surrounding extracellular space requires these interactions be relieved, either through the force of actin

  11. Characterization of an attenuated TE3L-deficient vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhang; Kan, Shifu; Du, Shouwen; Qi, Yanxin; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Liming; Ji, Huifan; He, Dongyun; Wu, Na; Li, Chang; Chi, Baorong; Li, Xiao; Jin, Ningyi

    2012-12-01

    An attenuated vaccinia virus (VACV), TE3L(-)VTT, was evaluated for virulence and safety to determine its potential use as a vaccine or as a recombinant virus vector to express foreign genes. The virulence of TE3L(-)VTT was compared with that of the wild-type VTT both in vivo and in vitro. The humoral and cellular immune responses were detected in a mouse model to test the vaccine efficacy of the TE3L mutant. The results suggested that deletion of the TE3L gene decreased the virulence and neurovirulence significantly in mice and rabbit models, yet retained the immunogenicity. Thus, the deletion of TE3L improved the safety of the VTT vector; this approach may yield a valuable resource for studies of recombinant VACV-vectored vaccines.

  12. Vaccinia virus-induced smallpox postvaccinal encephalitis in case of blood-brain barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Garcel, Aude; Fauquette, William; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Crance, Jean-Marc; Favier, Anne-Laure

    2012-02-08

    Smallpox vaccination is the only currently effective mean to combat the threat of variola virus used as a bioterrorism agent, although it is responsible for a rare but serious complication, the postvaccinal encephalitis (PVE). Development of safer vaccines therefore is a high priority as the PVE physiopathology is not well understood to date. If vaccinia virus (VACV) is responsible for PVE by central nervous system (CNS) dissemination, trans-migration of the VACV across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) would be supposed to be essential. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of vaccinia neurovirulence, an in vitro BBB model was used to explore the mechanism of VACV to induce BBB permeability. Two VACV strains were studied, the neurovirulent Western Reserve strain (VACV-WR) and the vaccine reference Lister strain (VACV-List). A mouse model was also developed to study the ability of these two viral strains to propagate in the brain from the blood compartment, their neurovirulence and their neuropathogenesis. In vitro, the loss of permeability resulted from the tight-junctions disruption was induced by virus replication. The ability of VACV to release infectious particles at the abluminal side suggests the capacity of both VACV strains to migrate across the BBB from the blood to the CNS. In vivo, the virus replication in mice CNS was strain-dependent. The VACV-WR laboratory strain proved to be neuroinvasive and neurovirulent, whereas the VACV-List strain is safe in physiological conditions. Mice PVE was observed only with VACV-WR in the co-infection model, when BBB opening was obtained by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. This study suggests that VACV is able to cross the BBB but encephalitis occurs only in the presence of a co-infection by bacteria. So, a model of co-infection, mimicked by LPS treatment, could have important implication towards the assessment of neurovirulence of new vaccines.

  13. Emergence of foreign H-2-like cytotoxicity and transplantation targets on vaccinia and Moloney virus-infected Meth. A tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Matossian-Rogers, A; Garrido, F; Festenstein, H

    1977-01-01

    Using cytotoxic effector cells of different anti-H-2 specificities, new cell-mediated lympholysis targets, normally undetected on Meth. A tumour cells, were shown after passage with vaccinia or Moloney virus. The H-2d CML targets on Meth. A cells recognized by B10.BR anti-B10.D2 effector cells were presented only after simultaneous vaccinia virus passage, while passage with Moloney virus caused the emergence of H-2b targets. Small but significant killing of vaccinia virus-passaged Meth.A was also obtained by anti-H-2k effector cells. These results are discussed in relation to in vivo experiments: retardation of tumour growth was noted in mice which had received several injections of vaccinia or Moloney virus, showing that the new CML targets were probably acting as transplantation targets.

  14. Inactivation of vaccinia virus by natural sunlight and by artificial UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Voss, Luzie; Marschall, Hans-Juergen; Lytle, Carl David

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the sensitivity of vaccinia virus, an orthopox virus commonly used as a surrogate for variola virus (etiological agent of smallpox), exposed to UVB radiation emitted by a solar simulator, or to direct natural sunlight. The data obtained indicate that: (1) the virucidal effect of natural sunlight can be mimicked adequately by an artificial light source with similar spectral characteristics in the UVB, (2) viral sensitivity to UVB or to solar radiation can be correlated with experimental data previously obtained with UVC, (3) the correlation factor between virus inactivation by solar radiation (measured at 300 ± 5 nm) and by UVC (254 nm) is between 33 and 60, and (4) the sensitivity of viruses either dry on glass surfaces or in liquid suspension is similar when in the presence of similar amounts of cellular debris and growth media. The findings reported in this study should assist in estimating the threat posed by the persistence of virus during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  15. Discovery of naturally processed and HLA-presented class I peptides from vaccinia virus infection using mass spectrometry for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth L; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Mason, Christopher J; Bergen, H Robert; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-12-10

    An important approach for developing a safer smallpox vaccine is to identify naturally processed immunogenic vaccinia-derived peptides rather than live whole vaccinia virus. We used two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 116 vaccinia peptides, encoded by 61 open reading frames, from a B-cell line (homozygous for HLA class I A*0201, B*1501, and C*03) after infection with vaccinia virus (Dryvax). Importantly, 68 of these peptides are conserved in variola, providing insight into the peptides that induce protection against smallpox. Twenty-one of these 68 conserved peptides were 11 amino acids long or longer, outside of the range of most predictive algorithms. Thus, direct identification of naturally processed and presented HLA peptides gives important information not provided by current computational methods for identifying potential vaccinia epitopes.

  16. Dendritic Cells in Oncolytic Virus-Based Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youra; Clements, Derek R.; Sterea, Andra M.; Jang, Hyun Woo; Gujar, Shashi A.; Lee, Patrick W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that have a notable role in the initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the context of cancer, appropriately activated DCs can induce anti-tumor immunity by activating innate immune cells and tumor-specific lymphocytes that target cancer cells. However, the tumor microenvironment (TME) imposes different mechanisms that facilitate the impairment of DC functions, such as inefficient antigen presentation or polarization into immunosuppressive DCs. These tumor-associated DCs thus fail to initiate tumor-specific immunity, and indirectly support tumor progression. Hence, there is increasing interest in identifying interventions that can overturn DC impairment within the TME. Many reports thus far have studied oncolytic viruses (OVs), viruses that preferentially target and kill cancer cells, for their capacity to enhance DC-mediated anti-tumor effects. Herein, we describe the general characteristics of DCs, focusing on their role in innate and adaptive immunity in the context of the TME. We also examine how DC-OV interaction affects DC recruitment, OV delivery, and anti-tumor immunity activation. Understanding these roles of DCs in the TME and OV infection is critical in devising strategies to further harness the anti-tumor effects of both DCs and OVs, ultimately enhancing the efficacy of OV-based oncotherapy. PMID:26690204

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of vaccinia virus H1L phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Laura; Knowles, Phillip P.; Fox, Gavin; Juanhuix, Jordi; Scaplehorn, Nicki; Way, Michael; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2008-01-01

    The cysteine-based protein phosphatase H1L was the first reported dual-specificity protein phosphatase. H1L is encapsidated within the vaccinia virus and is required for successful host infection and for the production of viable vaccinia progeny. H1L has therefore been proposed as a target candidate for antiviral compounds. Recombinant H1L has been expressed in a catalytically inactive form using an Escherichia coli host, leading to purification and crystallization by the microbatch method. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 98.31, c = 169.15 Å, and are likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. A sulfur SAD data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution on beamline BM14 at the ESRF to facilitate structure determination. Attempts to derivatize these crystals with xenon gas changed the space group to I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.28, c = 169.68 Å and a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. The relationship between these two crystal forms is discussed. PMID:18323605

  18. Clinical, hematological and biochemical parameters of dairy cows experimentally infected with Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle S; Guedes, Maria Isabel M C; Matos, Ana Carolina D; de Oliveira, Tércia M L; Rivetti, Anselmo V; Moura, Ana Carolina J; Paes, Paulo Ricardo O; do Lago, Luiz Alberto; Kroon, Erna G; Lobato, Zélia Inês P

    2013-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the etiological agent of bovine vaccinia (BV), an important zoonosis that affects dairy cattle. There are many aspects of the disease that remain unknown, and aiming to answer some of these questions, the clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters of VACV experimentally infected cows were evaluated. In the first part of the study, lactating cows were infected with VACV-GP2 strain. In the second part, animals previously infected with VACV-GP2 were divided into two treatment groups: Group 1, immunosuppressed cows; and Group 2, re-infected cows. In this study, BV could be experimentally reproduced, with similar lesions as observed in natural infections. Moreover, a short incubation period and local lymphadenopathy were also observed. VACV could be detected by PCR and isolated from scabs taken from teat lesions of all inoculated and re-inoculated animals. Lymphocytosis and neutrophilia were observed in all animals from the first part of the experiment, and lymphopenia and relative neutrophilia were observed in the immunosuppressed animals. Detection of viral DNA in oral mucosa lesions suggests that viral reactivation might occur in immunosuppressed animals. Moreover, clinical disease with teat lesions may occur in previously VACV-infected cows under the experimental conditions of the present study.

  19. Cross-protective immunity against multiple influenza virus subtypes by a novel modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vectored vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Powell, Tim D; Jones, Jeremy C; Gundlach, Nancy A; Young, Ginger R; Chu, Haiyan; Das, Subash C; Partidos, Charalambos D; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2013-04-03

    Development of an influenza vaccine that provides cross-protective immunity remains a challenge. Candidate vaccines based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) viral vector expressing antigens from influenza (MVA/Flu) viruses were constructed. A vaccine candidate, designated MVA/HA1/C13L/NP, that expresses the hemagglutinin from pandemic H1N1 (A/California/04/09) and the nucleoprotein (NP) from highly pathogenic H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04) fused to a secretory signal sequence from vaccinia virus was highly protective. The vaccine elicited strong antibody titers to homologous H1N1 viruses while cross-reactive antibodies to heterologous viruses were not detectable. In mice, this MVA/HA1/C13L/NP vaccine conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1), A/Norway/3487-2/09 (pandemic H1N1) or A/Influenza/Puerto Rico/8/34 (seasonal H1N1) and partial protection (57.1%) against challenge with seasonal H3N2 virus (A/Aichi/68). The protective efficacy of the vaccine was not affected by pre-existing immunity to vaccinia. Our findings highlight MVA as suitable vector to express multiple influenza antigens that could afford broad cross-protective immunity against multiple subtypes of influenza virus.

  20. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell’s gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Results Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus

  1. Cellular DNA ligase I is recruited to cytoplasmic vaccinia virus factories and masks the role of the vaccinia ligase in viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; De Silva, Frank S; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Moss, Bernard

    2009-12-17

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes DNA polymerase and additional proteins that enable cytoplasmic replication. We confirmed the ability of VACV DNA ligase mutants to replicate and tested the hypothesis that cellular ligases compensate for loss of viral gene expression. RNA silencing of human DNA ligase I expression and a small molecule inhibitor of human DNA ligase I [corrected] severely reduced replication of viral DNA in cells infected with VACV ligase-deficient mutants, indicating that the cellular enzyme plays a complementary role. Replication of ligase-deficient VACV was greatly reduced and delayed in resting primary cells, correlating with initial low levels of ligase I and subsequent viral induction and localization of ligase I in virus factories. These studies indicate that DNA ligation is essential for poxvirus replication and explain the ability of ligase deletion mutants to replicate in dividing cells but exhibit decreased pathogenicity in mice. Encoding its own ligase might allow VACV to "jump-start" DNA synthesis.

  2. Induction of protective immunity in animals vaccinated with recombinant vaccinia viruses that express PreM and E glycoproteins of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, A; Kimura-Kuroda, J; Ogimoto, M; Miyamoto, M; Sata, T; Sato, T; Takamura, C; Kurata, T; Kojima, A; Yasui, K

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone representing the genome of structural proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus strains LC16mO and WR under the control of a strong early-late promoter for the vaccinia virus 7.5-kilodalton polypeptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated flow cytometric analysis revealed that the recombinant vaccinia viruses expressed JEV E protein on the membrane surface, as well as in the cytoplasm, of recombinant-infected cells. In addition, the E protein expressed from the JEV recombinants reacted to nine different characteristic monoclonal antibodies, some of which have hemagglutination-inhibiting and JEV-neutralizing activities. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that two major proteins expressed in recombinant-infected cells were processed and glycosylated as the authentic PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. Inoculation of rabbits with the infectious recombinant vaccinia virus resulted in rapid production of antiserum specific for the PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. This antiserum had both hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing activities against JEV. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with the recombinant also produced JEV-neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to challenge with JEV. Images PMID:2159544

  3. Retrograde Transport from Early Endosomes to the trans-Golgi Network Enables Membrane Wrapping and Egress of Vaccinia Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Gilad; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Americo, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The anterograde pathway, from the endoplasmic reticulum through the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, is utilized by trans-membrane and secretory proteins. The retrograde pathway, which directs traffic in the opposite direction, is used following endocytosis of exogenous molecules and recycling of membrane proteins. Microbes exploit both routes: viruses typically use the anterograde pathway for envelope formation prior to exiting the cell, whereas ricin and Shiga-like toxins and some nonenveloped viruses use the retrograde pathway for cell entry. Mining a human genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen revealed a need for multiple retrograde pathway components for cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia virus. We confirmed and extended these results while discovering that retrograde trafficking was required for virus egress rather than entry. Retro-2, a specific retrograde trafficking inhibitor of protein toxins, potently prevented spread of vaccinia virus as well as monkeypox virus, a human pathogen. Electron and confocal microscopy studies revealed that Retro-2 prevented wrapping of virions with an additional double-membrane envelope that enables microtubular transport, exocytosis, and actin polymerization. The viral B5 and F13 protein components of this membrane, which are required for wrapping, normally colocalize in the trans-Golgi network. However, only B5 traffics through the secretory pathway, suggesting that F13 uses another route to the trans-Golgi network. The retrograde route was demonstrated by finding that F13 was largely confined to early endosomes and failed to colocalize with B5 in the presence of Retro-2. Thus, vaccinia virus makes novel use of the retrograde transport system for formation of the viral wrapping membrane. IMPORTANCE Efficient cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses depends on the wrapping of infectious particles with a double membrane that enables microtubular transport, exocytosis, and actin

  4. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Narayanasamy; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells, is an emerging field in cancer therapy. Some OVs exhibit a specific tropism for cancer cells, whereas others require genetic modification to enhance their binding with and entry into cancer cells. OVs both kill tumor cells and induce the host’s immune response against tumor cells. Armed with antitumor cellular molecules, antibodies, and/or in combination with anticancer drugs, OVs can accelerate the lysis of cancer cells. Among the OVs, vaccinia virus has been the focus of preclinical and clinical research because of its many favorable properties. In this review, the basic mechanisms of action of OVs are presented, including their entry, survival, tumor lysis, and immune activation, and the latest research in vaccinia virus-based virotherapy and its status as an anticancer nanomedicine in prospective clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27703350

  5. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer.

    PubMed

    Badrinath, Narayanasamy; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Young

    Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells, is an emerging field in cancer therapy. Some OVs exhibit a specific tropism for cancer cells, whereas others require genetic modification to enhance their binding with and entry into cancer cells. OVs both kill tumor cells and induce the host's immune response against tumor cells. Armed with antitumor cellular molecules, antibodies, and/or in combination with anticancer drugs, OVs can accelerate the lysis of cancer cells. Among the OVs, vaccinia virus has been the focus of preclinical and clinical research because of its many favorable properties. In this review, the basic mechanisms of action of OVs are presented, including their entry, survival, tumor lysis, and immune activation, and the latest research in vaccinia virus-based virotherapy and its status as an anticancer nanomedicine in prospective clinical trials are discussed.

  6. Environmental Risk Assessment of Clinical Trials Involving Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA)-Based Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Martine; Pauwels, Katia; Willemarck, Nicolas; Breyer, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain, which has been developed as a vaccine against smallpox, is since the nineties widely tested in clinical trials as recombinant vector for vaccination or gene therapy applications. Although MVA is renowned for its safety, several biosafety aspects need to be considered when performing the risk assessment of a recombinant MVA (rMVA). This paper presents the biosafety issues and the main lessons learned from the evaluation of the clinical trials with rMVA performed in Belgium. Factors such as the specific characteristics of the rMVA, the inserted foreign sequences/transgene, its ability for reconversion, recombination and dissemination in the population and the environment are the main points of attention. Measures to prevent or manage identified risks are also discussed. PMID:24397528

  7. Targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling with oncolytic virotherapy disrupts tumor vasculature and inhibits breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Gil, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund; Komorowski, Marcin P; Abrams, Scott I; Kozbor, Danuta

    2013-04-02

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise for the treatment of cancer, but their interaction with the tumor microenvironment needs to be elucidated for optimal tumor cell killing. Because the CXCR4 receptor for the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) chemokine is one of the key stimuli involved in signaling interactions between tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment, we used oncolytic virotherapy with a CXCR4 antagonist to target the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling axis in a triple-negative 4T1 breast carcinoma in syngeneic mice. We show here that CXCR4 antagonist expression from an oncolytic vaccinia virus delivered intravenously to mice with orthotopic tumors attains higher intratumoral concentration than its soluble counterpart and exhibits increased efficacy over that mediated by oncolysis alone. A systemic delivery of the armed virus after resection of the primary tumor was efficacious in inhibiting the development of spontaneous metastasis and increased overall tumor-free survival. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with destruction of tumor vasculature, reductions in expression of CXCL12 and VEGF, and decrease in intratumoral numbers of bone marrow-derived endothelial and myeloid cells. These changes led to induction of antitumor antibody responses and resistance to tumor rechallenge. Engineering an oncolytic virus armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents an innovative strategy that targets multiple elements within the tumor microenvironment. As such, this approach could have a significant therapeutic impact against primary and metastatic breast cancer.

  8. siRNA targeting vaccinia virus double-stranded RNA binding protein [E3L] exerts potent antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Dave, Rajnish S; McGettigan, James P; Qureshi, Tazeen; Schnell, Matthias J; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pomerantz, Roger J

    2006-05-10

    The Vaccinia virus gene, E3L, encodes a double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]-binding protein. We hypothesized that, owing to the critical nature of dsRNA in triggering host innate antiviral responses, E3L-specific small-interfering RNAs [siRNAs] should be effective antiviral agents against pox viruses, for which Vaccinia virus is an appropriate surrogate. In this study, we have utilized two human cell types, namely, HeLa and 293T, one which responds to interferon [IFN]-beta and the other produces and responds to IFN-beta, respectively. The antiviral effects were equally robust in HeLa and 293T cells. However, in the case of 293T cells, several distinct features were observed, when IFN-beta is activated in these cells. Vaccinia virus replication was inhibited by 97% and 98% as compared to control infection in HeLa and 293T cells transfected with E3L-specific siRNAs, respectively. These studies demonstrate the utility of E3L-specific siRNAs as potent antiviral agents for small pox and related pox viruses.

  9. Generation of an attenuated Tiantan vaccinia virus by deletion of the ribonucleotide reductase large subunit.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shifu; Jia, Peng; Sun, Lili; Hu, Ningning; Li, Chang; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Qi, Yanxin; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Attenuation of the virulence of vaccinia Tiantan virus (VTT) underlies the strategy adopted for mass vaccination campaigns. This strategy provides advantages of safety and efficacy over traditional vaccines and is aimed at minimization of adverse health effects. In this study, a mutant form of the virus, MVTT was derived from VTT by deletion of the ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) (TI4L). Compared to wild-type parental (VTT) and revertant (VTT-rev) viruses, virulence of the mutant MVTT was reduced by 100-fold based on body weight reduction and by 3,200-fold based on determination of the intracranial 50% lethal infectious dose. However, the immunogenicity of MVTT was equivalent to that of the parental VTT. We also demonstrated that the TI4L gene is not required for efficient replication. These data support the conclusion that MVTT can be used as a replicating virus vector or as a platform for the development of vaccines against infectious diseases and for cancer therapy.

  10. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    PubMed

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  11. Novel biomarkers of resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) based recombinant viruses (such as VSV-ΔM51) are effective oncolytic viruses (OVs) against a majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines. However, some PDAC cell lines are highly resistant to VSV-ΔM51. We recently showed that treatment of VSV-resistant PDAC cells with ruxolitinib (JAK1/2 inhibitor) or TPCA-1 (IKK-β inhibitor) breaks their resistance to VSV-ΔM51. Here we compared the global effect of ruxolitinib or TPCA-1 treatment on cellular gene expression in PDAC cell lines highly resistant to VSV-ΔM51. Our study identified a distinct subset of 22 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) downregulated by both ruxolitinib and TPCA-1. Further RNA and protein analyses demonstrated that 4 of these genes (MX1, EPSTI1, XAF1, and GBP1) are constitutively co-expressed in VSV-resistant, but not in VSV-permissive PDACs, thus serving as potential biomarkers to predict OV therapy success. Moreover, shRNA-mediated knockdown of one of such ISG, MX1, showed a positive effect on VSV-ΔM51 replication in resistant PDAC cells, suggesting that at least some of the identified ISGs contribute to resistance of PDACs to VSV-ΔM51. As certain oncogene and tumor suppressor gene variants are often associated with increased tropism of OVs to cancer cells, we also analyzed genomic DNA in a set of PDAC cell lines for frequently occurring cancer associated mutations. While no clear correlation was found between such mutations and resistance of PDACs to VSV-ΔM51, the analysis generated valuable genotypic data for future studies. PMID:27533247

  12. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  13. From Lesions to Viral Clones: Biological and Molecular Diversity amongst Autochthonous Brazilian Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Graziele; Assis, Felipe; Almeida, Gabriel; Albarnaz, Jonas; Lima, Maurício; Andrade, Ana Cláudia; Calixto, Rafael; Oliveira, Cairo; Neto, José Diomedes; Trindade, Giliane; Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has had an important role for humanity because of its use during the smallpox eradication campaign. VACV is the etiologic agent of the bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonosis that has been associated with economic, social, veterinary and public health problems, mainly in Brazil and India. Despite the current and historical VACV importance, there is little information about its circulation, prevalence, origins and maintenance in the environment, natural reservoirs and diversity. Brazilian VACV (VACV-BR) are grouped into at least two groups based on genetic and biological diversity: group 1 (G1) and group 2 (G2). In this study, we went to the field and investigated VACV clonal diversity directly from exanthemous lesions, during BV outbreaks. Our results demonstrate that the G1 VACV-BR were more frequently isolated. Furthermore, we were able to co-detect the two variants (G1 and G2) in the same sample. Molecular and biological analysis corroborated previous reports and confirmed the co-circulation of two VACV-BR lineages. The detected G2 clones presented exclusive genetic and biological markers, distinct to reference isolates, including VACV-Western Reserve. Two clones presented a mosaic profile, with both G1 and G2 features based on the molecular analysis of A56R, A26L and C23L genes. Indeed, some SNPs and INDELs in A56R nucleotide sequences were observed among clones of the same virus population, maybe as a result of an increased mutation rate in a mixed population. These results provide information about the diversity profile in VACV populations, highlighting its importance to VACV evolution and maintenance in the environment. PMID:25785515

  14. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  15. Intratumoral modulation of the inducible co-stimulator ICOS by recombinant oncolytic virus promotes systemic anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Ricca, Jacob; Plitt, Tamar; Palese, Peter; Sharma, Padmanee; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that locoregional cancer therapeutic approaches with oncolytic viruses can lead to systemic anti-tumour immunity, although the appropriate targets for intratumoral immunomodulation using this strategy are not known. Here we find that intratumoral therapy with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in addition to the activation of innate immunity, upregulates the expression of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, with the inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) being most notable. To explore ICOS as a direct target in the tumour, we engineered a recombinant NDV-expressing ICOS ligand (NDV-ICOSL). In the bilateral flank tumour models, intratumoral administration of NDV-ICOSL results in enhanced infiltration with activated T cells in both virus-injected and distant tumours, and leads to effective rejection of both tumours when used in combination with systemic CTLA-4 blockade. These findings highlight that intratumoral immunomodulation with an oncolytic virus expressing a rationally selected ligand can be an effective strategy to drive systemic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28194010

  16. A role for vaccinia virus protein C16 in reprogramming cellular energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Michela; Castro, Cecilia; Roberts, Lee D; Griffin, Julian L; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large DNA virus that replicates in the cytoplasm and encodes about 200 proteins of which approximately 50 % may be non-essential for viral replication. These proteins enable VACV to suppress transcription and translation of cellular genes, to inhibit the innate immune response, to exploit microtubule- and actin-based transport for virus entry and spread, and to subvert cellular metabolism for the benefit of the virus. VACV strain WR protein C16 induces stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α by binding to the cellular oxygen sensor prolylhydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD)2. Stabilization of HIF-1α is induced by several virus groups, but the purpose and consequences are unclear. Here, (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry are used to investigate the metabolic alterations during VACV infection in HeLa and 2FTGH cells. The role of C16 in such alterations was examined by comparing infection to WT VACV (strain WR) and a derivative virus lacking gene C16L (vΔC16). Compared with uninfected cells, VACV infection caused increased nucleotide and glutamine metabolism. In addition, there were increased concentrations of glutamine derivatives in cells infected with WT VACV compared with vΔC16. This indicates that C16 contributes to enhanced glutamine metabolism and this may help preserve tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. These data show that VACV infection reprogrammes cellular energy metabolism towards increased synthesis of the metabolic precursors utilized during viral replication, and that C16 contributes to this anabolic reprogramming of the cell, probably via the stabilization of HIF-1α.

  17. A role for vaccinia virus protein C16 in reprogramming cellular energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mazzon, Michela; Castro, Cecilia; Roberts, Lee D.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large DNA virus that replicates in the cytoplasm and encodes about 200 proteins of which approximately 50 % may be non-essential for viral replication. These proteins enable VACV to suppress transcription and translation of cellular genes, to inhibit the innate immune response, to exploit microtubule- and actin-based transport for virus entry and spread, and to subvert cellular metabolism for the benefit of the virus. VACV strain WR protein C16 induces stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α by binding to the cellular oxygen sensor prolylhydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD)2. Stabilization of HIF-1α is induced by several virus groups, but the purpose and consequences are unclear. Here, 1H-NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry are used to investigate the metabolic alterations during VACV infection in HeLa and 2FTGH cells. The role of C16 in such alterations was examined by comparing infection to WT VACV (strain WR) and a derivative virus lacking gene C16L (vΔC16). Compared with uninfected cells, VACV infection caused increased nucleotide and glutamine metabolism. In addition, there were increased concentrations of glutamine derivatives in cells infected with WT VACV compared with vΔC16. This indicates that C16 contributes to enhanced glutamine metabolism and this may help preserve tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. These data show that VACV infection reprogrammes cellular energy metabolism towards increased synthesis of the metabolic precursors utilized during viral replication, and that C16 contributes to this anabolic reprogramming of the cell, probably via the stabilization of HIF-1α. PMID:25351724

  18. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  19. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  20. DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines encoding multiple cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are safe but weakly immunogenic in HIV-1-uninfected, vaccinia virus-naive adults.

    PubMed

    Gorse, Geoffrey J; Newman, Mark J; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Kalams, Spyros A; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins.

  1. Local Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Encoded by Recombinant Vaccinia Virus is Effective in Controlling Viral Replication in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambhi, Sharan K.; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-α. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-α during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo.

  2. Local production of tumor necrosis factor encoded by recombinant vaccinia virus is effective in controlling viral replication in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sambhi, S K; Kohonen-Corish, M R; Ramshaw, I A

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-alpha. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-alpha during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo. Images PMID:2023951

  3. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Doellinger, Joerg; Schaade, Lars; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus’ zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV) and monkeypox virus (MPXV), the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV) is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing. PMID:26556597

  4. [Modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA)--development as recombinant vaccine and prospects for use in veterinary medicine].

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Fux, Robert; Langenmayer, Martin C; Sutter, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses as expression vectors are widely used in medical research for the development of recombinant vaccines and molecular therapies. Here we review recent accomplishments in vaccine research using recombinant modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA). MVA is a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that originated from serial tissue culture passage in chicken embryo fibroblasts more than 40 years ago. Growth adaptation to avian host cells caused deletions and mutations in the viral genome affecting about 15% of the original genetic information. In consequence, MVA is replication-deficient in cells of mammalian origin and fails to produce many of the virulence factors encoded by conventional vaccinia virus. Because of its safety for the general environment MVA can be handled under conditions of biosafety level one. Non-replicating MVA can enter any target cell and activate its molecular life cycle to express all classes of viral and recombinant genes. Therefore, recombinant MVA have been established as an extremely safe and efficient vector system for vaccine development in medical research. By now, various recombinant MVA vaccines have been found safe and immunogenic when used for phase I/II clinical testing in humans, and suitable for industrial scale production following good practice of manufacturing. Thus, there is an obvious usefulness of recombinant MVA vaccines for novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches also in veterinary medicine. Results from first studies in companion and farm animals are highly promising.

  5. Sensitivity of human pleural mesothelioma to oncolytic measles virus depends on defects of the type I interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Carole; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Roulois, David; Nedellec, Steven; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Pain, Mallory; Combredet, Chantal; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Cellerin, Laurent; Magnan, Antoine; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated measles virus (MV) is currently being evaluated as an oncolytic virus in clinical trials and could represent a new therapeutic approach for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Herein, we screened the sensitivity to MV infection and replication of twenty-two human MPM cell lines and some healthy primary cells. We show that MV replicates in fifteen of the twenty-two MPM cell lines. Despite overexpression of CD46 by a majority of MPM cell lines compared to healthy cells, we found that the sensitivity to MV replication did not correlate with this overexpression. We then evaluated the antiviral type I interferon (IFN) responses of MPM cell lines and healthy cells. We found that healthy cells and the seven insensitive MPM cell lines developed a type I IFN response in presence of the virus, thereby inhibiting replication. In contrast, eleven of the fifteen sensitive MPM cell lines were unable to develop a complete type I IFN response in presence of MV. Finally, we show that addition of type I IFN onto MV sensitive tumor cell lines inhibits replication. These results demonstrate that defects in type I IFN response are frequent in MPM and that MV takes advantage of these defects to exert oncolytic activity. PMID:26539644

  6. Myxoma virus sensitizes cancer cells to gemcitabine and is an effective oncolytic virotherapeutic in models of disseminated pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and combination therapy with gemcitabine was also evaluated. In cell culture, MYXV replication was robust in a broad range of pancreatic cancer cells and also showed increased oncolysis in combination with gemcitabine. In animal models, MYXV treatment conferred survival benefits over control or gemcitabine-treated cohorts regardless of the cell line or animal model used. MYXV monotherapy was most effective in an immunocompetent IPD model, and resulted in 60% long-term survivors. In Pan02 engrafted immunocompetent IPD models, sequential treatment in which MYXV was administered first, followed by gemcitabine, was the most effective and resulted in 100% long-term survivors. MYXV is an effective oncolytic virus for pancreatic cancer and can be combined with gemcitabine to enhance survival, particularly in the presence of an intact host immune system.

  7. Genomic identification of human vaccinia virus keratoconjunctivitis and its importance as a laboratory-acquired infection

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Zahra Movahedi; Mokhtari, Azam; Mahzounieh, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a member of orthopoxvirus genus of the family Poxviridae. VACVs are enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses. Several species of this family, for example, molluscum contagiosum, smallpox, deerpox, horsepox, rabbitpox, and VACVs may cause conjunctivitis. Aims: Given the high incidence of keratoconjunctivitis in Iran (approximately 3.6%–53.9%) and insufficient clinical diagnostic measures, laboratory tests for detection of its causes and determination of accurate keratoconjunctivitis/conjunctivitis prevalence due to different pathogens are essential. Settings and Design: In this research, conjunctival samples collected from 100 patients with keratoconjunctivitis signs were referred to an eye hospital of Iran. Subjects and Methods: After DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out for detection of VACV. PCR-positive products were further subjected to DNA sequencing. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: In this study, 28% of the samples were positive and a statistically significant relationship obtained between working in medical or research laboratories and VACV prevalence (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed a high rate of VACV keratoconjunctivitis, and therefore, further studies for its prevention and control are necessary. PMID:27958202

  8. Ethacrynic and alpha-lipoic acids inhibit vaccinia virus late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Spisakova, Martina; Cizek, Zdenek; Melkova, Zora

    2009-02-01

    Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980. However recently, the need of agents effective against poxvirus infection has emerged again. In this paper, we report an original finding that two redox-modulating agents, the ethacrynic and alpha-lipoic acids (EA, LA), inhibit growth of vaccinia virus (VACV) in vitro. The effect of EA and LA was compared with those of beta-mercaptoethanol, DTT and ascorbic acid, but these agents increased VACV growth in HeLa G cells. The inhibitory effects of EA and LA on the growth of VACV were further confirmed in several cell lines of different embryonic origin, in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages and T-lymphocytes. Finally, we have analyzed the mechanism of action of the two agents. They both decreased expression of VACV late genes, as demonstrated by western blot analysis and activity of luciferase expressed under control of different VACV promoters. In contrast, they did not inhibit virus entry into the cell, expression of VACV early genes or VACV DNA synthesis. The results suggest new directions in development of drugs effective against poxvirus infection.

  9. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  10. Increased expression in vivo and in vitro of foreign genes directed by A-type inclusion body hybrid promoters in recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, S; Itamura, S; Iinuma, H; Nerome, K; Sugimoto, M; Shida, H

    1991-01-01

    We constructed A-type inclusion body (ATI) hybrid promoters, that is, late ATI promoters followed by tandemly repeated early regions of the promoter for the 7.5-kDa protein (the 7.5-kDa promoter). The repetition of the whole early promoter sequence of the 7.5-kDa gene, including the upstream consensus sequence and initiation region, efficiently increased the early expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in recombinant vaccinia virus. Recombinant vaccinia virus could express influenza virus hemagglutinin via the hybrid promoter more efficiently, induced higher levels of neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and consequently protected mice more efficiently against challenge with influenza virus than did recombinant vaccinia virus containing the widely used 7.5-kDa promoter. Images PMID:1654453

  11. First North American field release of a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, C A; Niezgoda, M; Hamir, A N; Schumacher, C; Koprowski, H; Rupprecht, C E

    1998-04-01

    Following nearly 10 yr of extensive laboratory evaluation, a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) vaccine was the first recombinant virus to undergo limited North American field release on 20 August 1990. The free-ranging raccoon population on Parramore Island (Virginia, USA) was exposed to a high density (10 baits/ha) of vaccine-laden baits distributed on a 300 ha vaccination area. An annual total of 887 raccoons were live-trapped for sedation, physical examination and blood collection for rabies antibody determination; there was no evidence of adverse effects or lesions due to the vaccine. Age and sex distributions, mean body weights, and live-capture histories of raccoons from the vaccination and non-baited control areas were compared. There were no statistically significant differences in survivorship between the baited and non-baited areas, nor between rabies antibody-positive and antibody-negative raccoons from the vaccination area. There was no trend in field mortality that suggested an association with either tetracycline or sulfadimethoxine, used as biomakers, or with vaccine contact determined by antibody status. No gross or histopathologic lesions due to the vaccine were demonstrated among a subsample of live-trapped raccoons collected for gross necropsy, biomarker analysis, histopathologic examination, and V-RG virus isolation attempts. Recovery of V-RG virus was limited to the tonsils of two biomarker-positive, clinically healthy raccoons collected from the vaccination area for postmortem examination on days 2 and 4 following bait distribution. These data reinforce the extensive body of safety data on the V-RG virus and extend it to include field evaluation where vaccine is offered free-choice in abundance, in baits designed to attract free-ranging raccoons, in a relatively simple ecosystem.

  12. Vaccinia Virus Protein Synthesis Has a Low Requirement for the Intact Translation Initiation Factor eIF4F, the Cap-Binding Complex, within Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Jacqueline; Robertson, Morwenna E. M.; Seamons, Rachael A.; Belsham, Graham J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the cap-binding complex, eIF4F, in the translation of vaccinia virus mRNAs has been analyzed within infected cells. Plasmid DNAs, which express dicistronic mRNAs containing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site, produced within vaccinia virus-infected cells both β-glucuronidase and a cell surface-targeted single-chain antibody (sFv). Cells expressing sFv were selected from nonexpressing cells, enabling analysis of protein synthesis specifically within the transfected cells. Coexpression of poliovirus 2A or foot-and-mouth disease virus Lb proteases, which cleaved translation initiation factor eIF4G, greatly inhibited cap-dependent protein (β-glucuronidase) synthesis. Under these conditions, internal ribosome entry site-directed expression of sFv continued and cell selection was maintained. Furthermore, vaccinia virus protein synthesis persisted in the selected cells containing cleaved eIF4G. Thus, late vaccinia virus protein synthesis has a low requirement for the intact cap-binding complex eIF4F. This may be attributed to the short unstructured 5′ noncoding regions of the vaccinia virus mRNAs, possibly aided by the presence of poly(A) at both 5′ and 3′ termini. PMID:9765426

  13. Pathogenicity and immunogenicity of recombinant Tiantan Vaccinia Virus with deleted C12L and A53R genes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kaifan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Mingjie; Xu, Jianqing; Huang, Wei; Huang, Xianggang; Liu, Lianxing; Wan, Yanmin; Hao, Yanling; Shao, Yiming

    2008-09-15

    Interest is increasing regarding replicating poxvirus as HIV vaccine vector. In China, the Tiantan Vaccinia Virus (TV) has been used most extensively in the battle of eradicating smallpox. Recently, TV was developing as vaccine vector to fight against infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, replicating vaccinia virus sometimes may pose serious post-vaccination complications, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. To develop a safer and more effective TV-based vector, we constructed C12L (vIL-18 binding protein) and A53R (vTNF receptor homolog) gene-deleted mutants which are based on parental TV and VTKgpe (TV expressing HIV gagpol and env gene), respectively. The pathogenicity and immunogenicity were also evaluated. Deleting these two immunomodulatory genes lessened the virulence of the parental virus in both mice and rabbit models. Notably, C12L deletion mutant attenuated the skin virulence of parental virus by as high as approximate 2 logs. Furthermore, VTKgpe with A53R and C12L gene deletion retains the high immunogenicity of the parental virus to elicit strong humoral and cellular responses to the HIV target genes despite the remarkable attenuation. These data suggest that deletion of the cytokine viroceptor gene is feasible to obtain a safer and replication-competent TV vector for vaccination and immunotherapy.

  14. In Vivo Safety, Biodistribution and Antitumor Effects of uPAR Retargeted Oncolytic Measles Virus in Syngeneic Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yuqi; Zaias, Julia; Duncan, Robert; Russell, Stephen J.; Merchan, Jaime R.

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a clinically relevant target for novel biological therapies. We have previously rescued oncolytic measles viruses fully retargeted against human (MV-h-uPA) or murine (MV-m-uPA) uPAR. Here, we investigated the in vivo effects of systemic administration of MV-m-uPA in immunocompetent cancer models. MV-m-uPA induced in vitro cytotoxicity and replicated in a receptor dependent manner in murine mammary (4T1), and colon (MC-38 and CT-26) cancer cells. Intravenous administration of MV-m-uPA to 4T1 tumor bearing mice was not associated with significant clinical or laboratory toxicity. Higher MV-N RNA copy numbers were detected in primary tumors, and viable viral particles were recovered from tumor bearing tissues only. Non-tumor bearing organs did not show histological signs of viral induced toxicity. Serum anti-MV antibodies were detected at day 14 of treatment. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence studies confirmed successful tumor targeting and demonstrated enhanced MV-m-uPA induced tumor cell apoptosis in treated, compared to control mice. Significant antitumor effects and prolonged survival were observed after systemic administration of MV-m-uPA in colon (CT-26) and mammary (4T1) cancer models. The above results demonstrate safety and feasibility of uPAR targeting by an oncolytic virus, and confirm significant antitumor effects in highly aggressive syngeneic immunocompetent cancer models. PMID:24430235

  15. [Current state of oncolytic virotherapy in Japan].

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Mikihito; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-05-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging treatment strategy that uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancers. Recent advances include preclinical proof of feasibility for a single-shot virotherapy cure, identification of drugs that accelerate intratumoral virus propagation, and strategies to maximize the immunotherapeutic action of oncolytic viruses. The primary clinical milestone has been completion of accrual in a phase 3 trial of intratumoral herpes simplex virus therapy using OncoVEX for metastatic melanoma. In Japan, clinical treatments such as oncolytic adenoviruses(OBP-301)for esophageal cancer and oncolytic herpes simplex viruses(G47b)for brain cancer have accelerated considerably. We hope that a steady stream of new oncolytic viruses will enter the clinical arena in our country.

  16. A Loss of Function Analysis of Host Factors Influencing Vaccinia virus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Orland; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tekotte, Hille; Auer, Manfred; Tyers, Mike; Ghazal, Peter; Zimmer, Ralf; Haas, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF) influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics. PMID:24901222

  17. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qicheng; Tian, Meijuan; Feng, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Xu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT) was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1) viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1) and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs). ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  18. Ectopic expression of vaccinia virus E3 and K3 cannot rescue ectromelia virus replication in rabbit RK13 cells.

    PubMed

    Hand, Erin S; Haller, Sherry L; Peng, Chen; Rothenburg, Stefan; Hersperger, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    As a group, poxviruses have been shown to infect a wide variety of animal species. However, there is individual variability in the range of species able to be productively infected. In this study, we observed that ectromelia virus (ECTV) does not replicate efficiently in cultured rabbit RK13 cells. Conversely, vaccinia virus (VACV) replicates well in these cells. Upon infection of RK13 cells, the replication cycle of ECTV is abortive in nature, resulting in a greatly reduced ability to spread among cells in culture. We observed ample levels of early gene expression but reduced detection of virus factories and severely blunted production of enveloped virus at the cell surface. This work focused on two important host range genes, named E3L and K3L, in VACV. Both VACV and ECTV express a functional protein product from the E3L gene, but only VACV contains an intact K3L gene. To better understand the discrepancy in replication capacity of these viruses, we examined the ability of ECTV to replicate in wild-type RK13 cells compared to cells that constitutively express E3 and K3 from VACV. The role these proteins play in the ability of VACV to replicate in RK13 cells was also analyzed to determine their individual contribution to viral replication and PKR activation. Since E3L and K3L are two relevant host range genes, we hypothesized that expression of one or both of them may have a positive impact on the ability of ECTV to replicate in RK13 cells. Using various methods to assess virus growth, we did not detect any significant differences with respect to the replication of ECTV between wild-type RK13 compared to versions of this cell line that stably expressed VACV E3 alone or in combination with K3. Therefore, there remain unanswered questions related to the factors that limit the host range of ECTV.

  19. Serro 2 Virus Highlights the Fundamental Genomic and Biological Features of a Natural Vaccinia Virus Infecting Humans

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Emerson, Ginny L.; Sammons, Scott; Frace, Michael; Govil, Dhwani; Fernandes Mota, Bruno Eduardo; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; de Assis, Felipe Lopes; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Li, Yu; Carroll, Darin; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flavio; Kroon, Erna; Damon, Inger K.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been implicated in infections of dairy cattle and humans, and outbreaks have substantially impacted local economies and public health in Brazil. During a 2005 outbreak, a VACV strain designated Serro 2 virus (S2V) was collected from a 30-year old male milker. Our aim was to phenotypically and genetically characterize this VACV Brazilian isolate. S2V produced small round plaques without associated comets when grown in BSC40 cells. Furthermore, S2V was less virulent than the prototype strain VACV-Western Reserve (WR) in a murine model of intradermal infection, producing a tiny lesion with virtually no surrounding inflammation. The genome of S2V was sequenced by primer walking. The coding region spans 184,572 bp and contains 211 predicted genes. Mutations in envelope genes specifically associated with small plaque phenotypes were not found in S2V; however, other alterations in amino acid sequences within these genes were identified. In addition, some immunomodulatory genes were truncated in S2V. Phylogenetic analysis using immune regulatory-related genes, besides the hemagglutinin gene, segregated the Brazilian viruses into two clusters, grouping the S2V into Brazilian VACV group 1. S2V is the first naturally-circulating human-associated VACV, with a low passage history, to be extensively genetically and phenotypically characterized. PMID:27973399

  20. Serro 2 Virus Highlights the Fundamental Genomic and Biological Features of a Natural Vaccinia Virus Infecting Humans.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Emerson, Ginny L; Sammons, Scott; Frace, Michael; Govil, Dhwani; Fernandes Mota, Bruno Eduardo; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; de Assis, Felipe Lopes; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Li, Yu; Carroll, Darin; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flavio; Kroon, Erna; Damon, Inger K

    2016-12-10

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been implicated in infections of dairy cattle and humans, and outbreaks have substantially impacted local economies and public health in Brazil. During a 2005 outbreak, a VACV strain designated Serro 2 virus (S2V) was collected from a 30-year old male milker. Our aim was to phenotypically and genetically characterize this VACV Brazilian isolate. S2V produced small round plaques without associated comets when grown in BSC40 cells. Furthermore, S2V was less virulent than the prototype strain VACV-Western Reserve (WR) in a murine model of intradermal infection, producing a tiny lesion with virtually no surrounding inflammation. The genome of S2V was sequenced by primer walking. The coding region spans 184,572 bp and contains 211 predicted genes. Mutations in envelope genes specifically associated with small plaque phenotypes were not found in S2V; however, other alterations in amino acid sequences within these genes were identified. In addition, some immunomodulatory genes were truncated in S2V. Phylogenetic analysis using immune regulatory-related genes, besides the hemagglutinin gene, segregated the Brazilian viruses into two clusters, grouping the S2V into Brazilian VACV group 1. S2V is the first naturally-circulating human-associated VACV, with a low passage history, to be extensively genetically and phenotypically characterized.

  1. Concomitant helminth infection downmodulates the Vaccinia virus-specific immune response and potentiates virus-associated pathology.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; de Freitas, Lorena Falabella Daher; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Ana Clara; Coelho, Fabiana; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Nogueira, Denise; Amorim, Chiara; Dhom-Lemos, Lucas de Carvalho; Oliveira, Luciana Maria; da Silveira, Alexandre Barcelos; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the immunopathological mechanisms of how helminths may influence the course of a viral infection, using a murine model. Severe virulence, a relevant increase in the virus titres in the lung and a higher mortality rate were observed in Ascaris and Vaccinia virus (VACV) co-infected mice, compared with VACV mono-infected mice. Immunopathological analysis suggested that the ablation of CD8(+) T cells, the marked reduction of circulating CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ, and the robust pulmonary inflammation were associated with the increase of morbidity/mortality in co-infection and subsequently with the negative impact of concomitant pulmonary ascariasis and respiratory VACV infection for the host. On the other hand, when evaluating the impact of the co-infection on the parasitic burden, co-infected mice presented a marked decrease in the total number of migrating Ascaris lung-stage larvae in comparison with Ascaris mono-infection. Taken together, our major findings suggest that Ascaris and VACV co-infection may potentiate the virus-associated pathology by the downmodulation of the VACV-specific immune response. Moreover, this study provides new evidence of how helminth parasites may influence the course of a coincident viral infection.

  2. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Satheshkumar, P.S.; Chavre, James; Moss, Bernard

    2013-09-15

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function.

  3. Laboratory-acquired vaccinia virus infection in a recently immunized person--Massachusetts, 2013.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christopher H; Farland, Julien; Winters, Thomas; Gunn, Julia; Caron, Donna; Evans, Jennifer; Osadebe, Lynda; Bethune, Leon; McCollum, Andrea M; Patel, Nishi; Wilkins, Kimberly; Davidson, Whitni; Petersen, Brett; Barry, M Anita

    2015-05-01

    On November 26, 2013, the CDC poxvirus laboratory was notified by the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) of an inadvertent inoculation of a recently vaccinated (ACAM2000 smallpox vaccine) laboratory worker with wild type vaccinia virus (VACV) Western Reserve. A joint investigation by CDC and BPHC confirmed orthopoxvirus infection in the worker, who had reported a needle stick in his thumb while inoculating a mouse with VACV. He experienced a non-tender, red rash on his arm, diagnosed at a local emergency department as cellulitis. He subsequently developed a necrotic lesion on his thumb, diagnosed as VACV infection. Three weeks after the injury, the thumb lesion was surgically debrided and at 2 months post-injury, the skin lesion had resolved. The investigation confirmed that the infection was the first reported VACV infection in the United States in a laboratory worker vaccinated according to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations. The incident prompted the academic institution to outline biosafety measures for working with biologic agents, such as biosafety training of laboratory personnel, vaccination (if appropriate), and steps in incident reporting. Though vaccination has been shown to be an effective measure in protecting personnel in the laboratory setting, this case report underscores the importance of proper safety measures and incident reporting.

  4. Multiple Bcl-2 family immunomodulators from vaccinia virus regulate MAPK/AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alice A; Albarnaz, Jonas D; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2016-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a poxvirus and encodes many proteins that modify the host cell metabolism or inhibit the host response to infection. For instance, it is known that VACV infection can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/activator protein 1 (AP-1) pathway and inhibit activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. Since NF-κB and MAPK/AP-1 share common upstream activators we investigated whether six different VACV Bcl-2-like NF-κB inhibitors can also influence MAPK/AP-1 activation. Data presented show that proteins A52, B14 and K7 each contribute to AP-1 activation during VACV infection, and when expressed individually outwith infection. B14 induced the greatest stimulation of AP-1 and further investigation showed B14 activated mainly the MAPKs ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) and JNK (Jun N-terminal kinase), and their substrate c-Jun (a component of AP-1). These data indicate that the same viral protein can have different effects on distinct signalling pathways, in blocking NF-κB activation whilst leading to MAPK/AP-1 activation.

  5. Mapping vaccinia virus DNA replication origins at nucleotide level by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Senkevich, Tatiana G; Bruno, Daniel; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F; Wolf, Yuri I; Moss, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Poxviruses reproduce in the host cytoplasm and encode most or all of the enzymes and factors needed for expression and synthesis of their double-stranded DNA genomes. Nevertheless, the mode of poxvirus DNA replication and the nature and location of the replication origins remain unknown. A current but unsubstantiated model posits only leading strand synthesis starting at a nick near one covalently closed end of the genome and continuing around the other end to generate a concatemer that is subsequently resolved into unit genomes. The existence of specific origins has been questioned because any plasmid can replicate in cells infected by vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus. We applied directional deep sequencing of short single-stranded DNA fragments enriched for RNA-primed nascent strands isolated from the cytoplasm of VACV-infected cells to pinpoint replication origins. The origins were identified as the switching points of the fragment directions, which correspond to the transition from continuous to discontinuous DNA synthesis. Origins containing a prominent initiation point mapped to a sequence within the hairpin loop at one end of the VACV genome and to the same sequence within the concatemeric junction of replication intermediates. These findings support a model for poxvirus genome replication that involves leading and lagging strand synthesis and is consistent with the requirements for primase and ligase activities as well as earlier electron microscopic and biochemical studies implicating a replication origin at the end of the VACV genome.

  6. Products and substrate/template usage of vaccinia virus DNA primase

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Frank S.; Paran, Nir; Moss, Bernard

    2009-01-05

    Vaccinia virus encodes a 90-kDa protein conserved in all poxviruses, with DNA primase and nucleoside triphosphatase activities. DNA primase products, synthesized with a single stranded {phi}X174 DNA template, were resolved as dinucleotides and long RNAs on denaturing polyacrylamide and agarose gels. Following phosphatase treatment, the dinucleotides GpC and ApC in a 4:1 ratio were identified by nearest neighbor analysis in which {sup 32}P was transferred from [{alpha}-{sup 32}P]CTP to initiating purine nucleotides. Differences in the nucleotide binding sites for initiation and elongation were suggested by the absence of CpC and UpC dinucleotides as well as the inability of deoxynucleotides to mediate primer synthesis despite their incorporation into mixed RNA/DNA primers. Strong primase activity was detected with an oligo(dC) template. However, there was only weak activity with an oligo(dT) template and none with oligo(dA) or oligo(dG). The absence of stringent template specificity is consistent with a role for the enzyme in priming DNA synthesis at the replication fork.

  7. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations.

  8. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    therapy of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer, two obstacles need to be overcome before the therapeutic potential of virotherapy could be fully... virotherapy could be fully materialized. Firstly, the potency of oncolytic HSVs needs to be improved. During the first two years of this funded

  9. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer. Herewith we report that oncolytic HSV-1716 generates vaccination effects in the same model. Upon HSV-1716 infection, mouse ovarian tumor cells showed high levels of expression viral glycoproteins B and D and were highly phagocyted by dendritic cells (DCs). Interestingly, increased phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells by DCs was impaired by heparin, and anti-HSV glycoproteins B and D, indicating that viral infection enhances adhesive interactions between DCs and tumor apoptotic bodies. Moreover, HSV-1716 infected cells expressed high levels of heat shock proteins 70 and GRP94, molecules that have been reported to induce maturation of DCs, increase cross-presentation of antigens and promote antitumor immune response. After phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells, DCs acquired a mature status in vitro and in vivo, upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecule and increased migration towards MIP-3beta. Furthermore, HSV-1716 oncolytic treatment markedly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tumor-bearing animals thus abrogating tumor immunosuppressive milieu. These mechanisms may account for the highly enhanced antitumoral immune responses observed in HSV-1716 treated animals. Oncolytic treatment induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFNgamma producing cells, and induced a robust tumor infiltration by T cells. These results indicate that oncolytic therapy with HSV-1716 facilitates antitumor immune responses.

  10. Major neutralizing sites on vaccinia virus glycoprotein B5 are exposed differently on variola virus ortholog B6.

    PubMed

    Aldaz-Carroll, Lydia; Xiao, Yuhong; Whitbeck, J Charles; de Leon, Manuel Ponce; Lou, Huan; Kim, Mikyung; Yu, Jessica; Reinherz, Ellis L; Isaacs, Stuart N; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H

    2007-08-01

    Immunization against smallpox (variola virus) with Dryvax, a live vaccinia virus (VV), was effective, but now safety is a major concern. To overcome this issue, subunit vaccines composed of VV envelope proteins from both forms of infectious virions, including the extracellular enveloped virion (EV) protein B5, are being developed. However, since B5 has 23 amino acid differences compared with its B6 variola virus homologue, B6 might be a better choice for such a strategy. Therefore, we compared the properties of both proteins using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to B5 that we had previously characterized and grouped according to structural and functional properties. The B6 gene was obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the ectodomain was cloned and expressed in baculovirus as previously done with B5, allowing us to compare the antigenic properties of the proteins. Polyclonal antibodies to B5 or B6 cross-reacted with the heterologous protein, and 16 of 26 anti-B5 MAbs cross-reacted with B6. Importantly, 10 anti-B5 MAbs did not cross-react with B6. Of these, three have important anti-VV biologic properties, including their ability to neutralize EV infectivity and block comet formation. Here, we found that one of these three MAbs protected mice from a lethal VV challenge by passive immunization. Thus, epitopes that are present on B5 but not on B6 would generate an antibody response that would not recognize B6. Assuming that B6 contains similar variola virus-specific epitopes, our data suggest that a subunit vaccine using the variola virus homologues might exhibit improved protective efficacy against smallpox.

  11. ET-46ONCOLYTIC VIRAL THERAPY FOR MALIGNANT GLIOMAS USING MYXOMA VIRUS DELETED FOR ANTI-APOPTOTIC M11L GENE

    PubMed Central

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Kenchappa, Rajappa; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Brain Tumour Initiating Cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to mediate recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a promising oncolytic virus, which is highly effective in conventional long term resistant glioma cell lines and less effective in BTICs. We hypothesized that one possible factor limiting efficacy in BTICs is that cell death following infection with MyxV is inhibited by virally encoded anti-apoptotic proteins, such as the Bcl-2 structural homologue, M011L. To test this we evaluated and compared the efficacy of wtMYXV versus the viral construct MyxV-M011L-KO (in which the anti-apoptotic protein M11L has been deleted) in BTICs. We found that WT-MyxV does not induce significant level of apoptosis in infected BTICs, but that MyxV-M011L-KO induces dramatically more apoptosisas shown by caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and Cytochrome C release from the mitochondria M11L from the WT-MyxV localized to the mitochondrial membrane and prevented the association of Bax with the mitochondrial membrane. Finally, silencing of Bax using specific siRNAs significantly blocked the induction of apoptosis and cell death that occurs after infection with mutant MyxV-M011L-KO virus. Therefore MyxV-M011L-KO, which is has the anti-apoptotic virally derived gene M11L, dramatically improves the oncolytic efficacy in BTICs and this is dependent on the presence of the pro-apoptotic host protein, Bax. This is the first demonstration, that the MyxV mutant, genetically modified to promote apoptosis in tumor initiating cells, is significantly more efficacious than the wildtype virus. Strategies, such as this one, that promotes apoptosis in tumor initiating cells might be particularly effective.

  12. Oncolytic polio virotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Dobrikova, Elena Y; Dobrikov, Mikhail I; Walton, Ross W; Gemberling, Sarah L; Nair, Smita K; Desjardins, Annick; Sampson, John H; Friedman, Henry S; Friedman, Allan H; Tyler, Douglas S; Bigner, Darell D; Gromeier, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the century-old idea of targeting cancer with viruses (oncolytic viruses) has come of age, and promise has been documented in early stage and several late-stage clinical trials in a variety of cancers. Although originally prized for their direct tumor cytotoxicity (oncolytic virotherapy), recently, the proinflammatory and immunogenic effects of viral tumor infection (oncolytic immunotherapy) have come into focus. Indeed, a capacity for eliciting broad, sustained antineoplastic effects stemming from combined direct viral cytotoxicity, innate antiviral activation, stromal proinflammatory stimulation, and recruitment of adaptive immune effector responses is the greatest asset of oncolytic viruses. However, it also is the source for enormous mechanistic complexity that must be considered for successful clinical translation. Because of fundamentally different relationships with their hosts (malignant or not), diverse replication strategies, and distinct modes of tumor cytotoxicity/killing, oncolytic viruses should not be referred to collectively. These agents must be evaluated based on their individual merits. In this review, the authors highlight key mechanistic principles of cancer treatment with the polio:rhinovirus chimera PVSRIPO and their implications for oncolytic immunotherapy in the clinic.

  13. Prime-boost vaccinations using recombinant flavivirus replicon and vaccinia virus vaccines: an ELISPOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Anraku, Itaru; Gardner, Joy; Le, Thuy T; Wang, Xiang Ju; Khromykh, Alexander A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant Kunjin replicon virus-like particle (VLP), vaccinia virus (rVV) and DNA vaccines were tested in a large series of prime-boost vaccinations using interferon (IFN)γ ELISPOT assays that reflected effector (E), effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) responses. All vaccine constructs encoded the murine polytope immunogen and responses to four CD8 T-cell epitopes (TYQRTRALV, SYIPSAEKI, YPHFMPTNL and RPQASGVYM) were measured. VLP/rVV out performed (by 14- to 20-fold) DNA/rVV for induction of CM responses, whereas EM responses were only marginally increased. DNA/VLP induced more EM, but not CM responses, than VLP alone, illustrating that DNA priming is not universally beneficial. rVV/VLP gave comparable results to VLP/rVV combinations, although the former induced approximately threefold more E responses, illustrating the utility of poxvirus priming in this setting. Although higher doses of VLP and rVV increased responses after single immunizations, such dose increases provided only marginal benefit in heterologous prime-boost settings. Triple combinations also provided no benefit over two vaccinations. DNA vaccination was associated with broad CM, but not EM responses, and the breadth of EM and E responses was significantly improved by increasing viral vector dose. VLP/rVV, rather than DNA priming, induced T cells with consistently high IFNγ secretion profiles across all ELISPOT measures. Vector-specific CD8 T-cell responses generally correlated well with immunogen-specific responses, although, as expected, single use of each vector reduced the relative levels of vector-specific responses. These experiments illustrate the utility of replicons in heterologous prime-boost vaccinations, and illustrate the diversity of data that can be obtained from ELISPOT analyses.

  14. Combination vascular delivery of herpes simplex oncolytic viruses and amplicon mediated cytokine gene transfer is effective therapy for experimental liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zager, J. S.; Delman, K. A.; Malhotra, S.; Ebright, M. I.; Bennett, J. J.; Kates, T.; Halterman, M.; Federoff, H.; Fong, Y.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex type I (HSV)-based vectors have been used experimentally for suicide gene therapy, immunomodulatory gene delivery, and direct oncolytic therapy. The current study utilizes the novel concept of regional delivery of an oncolytic virus in combination with or serving as the helper virus for packaging herpes-based amplicon vectors carrying a cytokine transgene, with the goal of identifying if this combination is more efficacious than either modality alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A replication competent oncolytic HSV (G207) and a replication incompetent HSV amplicon carrying the gene for the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-2 (HSV-IL2) were tested in murine syngeneic colorectal carcinoma and in rat hepatocellular carcinoma models. Liver tumors were treated with vascular delivery of (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), (2) G207, (3) HSV-IL2, (4) G207 and HSV-IL2 mixed in combination (mG207/HSV- IL2), and (5) G207 as the helper virus for packaging the construct HSV-IL2 (pG207/HSV-IL2). RESULTS: Tumor burden was significantly reduced in all treatment groups in both rats and mice treated with high-dose G207, HSV-IL2, or both (p < 0.02). When a low dose of virus was used in mice, anti-tumor efficacy was improved by use of G207 and HSV-IL2 in combination or with HSV-IL2 packaged by G207 (p < 0.001). This improvement was abolished when CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes were depleted, implying that the enhanced anti-tumor response to low-dose combined therapy is immune mediated. CONCLUSIONS: Vascular regional delivery of oncolytic and amplicon HSV vectors can be used to induce improved anti-tumor efficacy by combining oncolytic and immunostimulatory strategies. PMID:11591892

  15. The N-terminus of vaccinia virus host range protein C7L is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Urban, Stina L.; Leporati, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), a member of the Poxviridae family of large double-stranded DNA viruses, is being used as a smallpox vaccine as well as an expression vector for immunization against other infectious diseases and cancer. The host range of wild type VACV is very broad among mammalian cells. C7L is a host range gene identified in VACV and is well conserved in mammalian poxviruses except for parapoxviruses and molluscum contagiosum virus. The molecular mechanisms by which the C7L gene exerts host range function are not well understood. The C7L protein does not have any known conserved domains or show sequence similarity to cellular proteins or viral proteins other than the C7L homologues in mammalian poxviruses. We generated recombinant vaccinia viruses carrying deletion mutants of the C7L gene using NYVAC as a parental strain and found that the N-terminus is essential for host range function of C7L, which is consistent with a previous report that showed homology among C7L homologues are greater near the N-terminus than the C-terminus. PMID:23001690

  16. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-08-03

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs.

  17. Protective Effect of Surfactant Protein D in Pulmonary Vaccinia Virus Infection: Implication of A27 Viral Protein

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Perino; Thielens, Nicole M.; Crouch, Erika; Spehner, Danièle; Crance, Jean-Marc; Favier, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) was used as a surrogate of variola virus (VARV) (genus Orthopoxvirus), the causative agent of smallpox, to study Orthopoxvirus infection. VARV is principally transmitted between humans by aerosol droplets. Once inhaled, VARV first infects the respiratory tract where it could encounter surfactant components, such as soluble pattern recognition receptors. Surfactant protein D (SP-D), constitutively present in the lining fluids of the respiratory tract, plays important roles in innate host defense against virus infection. We investigated the role of SP-D in VACV infection and studied the A27 viral protein involvement in the interaction with SP-D. Interaction between SP-D and VACV caused viral inhibition in a lung cell model. Interaction of SP-D with VACV was mediated by the A27 viral protein. Binding required Ca2+ and interactions were blocked in the presence of excess of SP-D saccharide ligands. A27, which lacks glycosylation, directly interacted with SP-D. The interaction between SP-D and the viral particle was also observed using electron microscopy. Infection of mice lacking SP-D (SP-D-/-) resulted in increased mortality compared to SP-D+/+ mice. Altogether, our data show that SP-D participates in host defense against the vaccinia virus infection and that the interaction occurs with the viral surface protein A27. PMID:23518578

  18. Molecular Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of the Vaccinia Virus I3 Protein, the Replicative Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Greseth, Matthew D.; Boyle, Kathleen A.; Bluma, Matthew S.; Unger, Bethany; Wiebe, Matthew S.; Soares-Martins, Jamaria A.; Wickramasekera, Nadi T.; Wahlberg, James

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus, the prototypic poxvirus, efficiently and faithfully replicates its ∼200-kb DNA genome within the cytoplasm of infected cells. This intracellular localization dictates that vaccinia virus encodes most, if not all, of its own DNA replication machinery. Included in the repertoire of viral replication proteins is the I3 protein, which binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with great specificity and stability and has been presumed to be the replicative ssDNA binding protein (SSB). We substantiate here that I3 colocalizes with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled nascent viral genomes and that these genomes accumulate in cytoplasmic factories that are delimited by membranes derived from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we report on a structure/function analysis of I3 involving the isolation and characterization of 10 clustered charge-to-alanine mutants. These mutants were analyzed for their biochemical properties (self-interaction and DNA binding) and biological competence. Three of the mutant proteins, encoded by the I3 alleles I3-4, -5, and -7, were deficient in self-interaction and unable to support virus viability, strongly suggesting that the multimerization of I3 is biologically significant. Mutant I3-5 was also deficient in DNA binding. Additionally, we demonstrate that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of I3 causes a significant decrease in the accumulation of progeny genomes and that this reduction diminishes the yield of infectious virus. PMID:22438556

  19. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  20. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-07

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans.

  1. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  2. Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    2004-02-13

    In December 2002, the Department of Defense (DoD) began vaccinating military personnel as part of the pre-event vaccination program. Because vaccinia virus is present on the skin at the site of vaccination, it can spread to other parts of the body (i.e., autoinoculation) or to contacts of vaccinees (i.e., contact transfer). To prevent autoinoculation and contact transfer, DoD gave vaccinees printed information that focused on hand washing, covering the vaccination site, and limiting contact with infants (1,2). This report describes cases of contact transfer of vaccinia virus among vaccinated military personnel since December 2002; findings indicate that contact transfer of vaccinia virus is rare. Continued efforts are needed to educate vaccinees about the importance of proper vaccination-site care in preventing contact transmission, especially in household settings.

  3. Broad Protection against Avian Influenza Virus by Using a Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Expressing a Mosaic Hemagglutinin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. PMID:25210173

  4. Antitumor effects of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei; Zhao, Chunhong; Han, Jixia; Li, Zengjun; Zhen, Yanan; Xiao, Ruixue; Xu, Zhongfa; Sun, Yanlai

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise. Furthermore, late-stage diagnoses and limited efficacious treatment options make CRC a complex clinical challenge. Therefore, a new therapeutic regimen with a completely novel therapeutic mechanism is necessary for CRC. In the present study, the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 (oHSV2) in CRC was assessed in vitro and in vivo. oHSV2 is an oncolytic agent derived from herpes simplex virus type 2 that encodes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Materials and methods We investigated the cytopathic effects of oHSV2 in CRC cell lines using the MTT assay. Then, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of oHSV2 were examined by flow cytometry. We generated a model of CRC with mouse CRC cell CT26 in BALB/c mice. The antitumor effects and adaptive immune response of oHSV2 were assessed in tumor-bearing mice. The therapeutic efficacy of oHSV2 was compared with the traditional chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Results The in vitro data showed that oHSV2 infected the CRC cell lines successfully and that the tumor cells formed a significant number of syncytiae postinfection. The oHSV2 killed cancer cells independent of the cell cycle and mainly caused tumor cells necrosis. The in vivo results showed that oHSV2 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice without weight loss. With virus replication, oHSV2 not only resulted in a reduction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the spleen, but also increased the number of mature dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes and the effective CD4+T and CD8+T-cells in the tumor microenvironment. Conclusion Our study provides the first evidence that oHSV2 induces cell death in CRC in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that oHSV2 is an effective therapeutic cancer candidate that causes an oncolytic effect and recruits adaptive immune responses for an

  5. Response to intra-arterial oncolytic virotherapy with the herpes virus NV1020 evaluated by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sze, Daniel Y; Iagaru, Andrei H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; De Haan, Hans A; Reid, Tony R

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy poses unique challenges to the evaluation of tumor response. We hypothesized that the addition of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to standard computed tomography (CT) evaluation would improve diagnostic and prognostic power of the measurement of tumor response to oncolytic virotherapy. A phase I/II trial was conducted to investigate treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma using intra-arterial administration of the oncolytic herpes virus NV1020. Both contrast-enhanced CT and FDG PET were obtained on each patient at each time point. Quantitative FDG PET and CT responses were correlated with each other and with clinical outcome metrics. A majority of patients showed initial post-viral infusion increases in tumor size (69%) or in standardized uptake value (SUV) (80%) large enough to qualify as progressive disease. Most showed subsequent decreases in tumor size (64%) or SUV (83%) enough to be reclassified as partial response or stable disease. Late PET and CT imaging results correlated well with each other and with clinical outcomes, but results from early in the treatment scheme did not correlate with each other, with later results, or with clinical outcomes. The addition of FDG PET to the evaluation of tumor response to the oncolytic virus NV1020 did not provide useful diagnostic or prognostic data. More sophisticated molecular imaging will need to be developed to monitor the effects of this novel class of antineoplastic agents.

  6. Potent efficacy signals from systemically administered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716) in hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Braidwood, Lynne; Learmonth, Kirsty; Graham, Alex; Conner, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716), lacking the neurovirulence factor ICP34.5, has highly selective replication competence for cancer cells and has been used in clinical studies of glioma, melanoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, pediatric non-central nervous system solid tumors, and malignant pleural mesothelioma. To date, 88 patients have received HSV1716 and the virus is well tolerated, with selective replication in tumor cells and no spread to surrounding normal tissue. We assessed the potential value of HSV1716 in preclinical studies with two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, HuH7 and HepG2-luc. HSV1716 displayed excellent replication kinetics in vitro in HepG2-luc cells, a cell line engineered to express luciferase, and virus-mediated cell killing correlated with loss of light emissions from the cells. In vivo, the HepG2-luc cells readily formed light-emitting xenografts that were easily visualized by an in vivo imaging system and efficiently eliminated by HSV1716 oncolysis after intratumoral injection. HSV1716 also demonstrated strong efficacy signals in subcutaneous HuH7 xenografts in nude mice after intravenous administration of virus. In the HuH7 model, the intravenously injected virus replicated prolifically immediately after efficient tumor localization, resulting in highly significant reductions in tumor growth and enhanced survival. Our preclinical results demonstrate excellent tumor uptake of HSV1716, with prolific replication and potent oncolysis. These observations warrant a clinical study of HSV1716 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Analysis of the Role of Vaccinia Virus H7 in Virion Membrane Biogenesis with an H7-Deletion Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Wu, Xiang; Yan, Bo; Deng, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    Essential vaccinia virus genes are often studied with conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Here, we constructed a deletion mutant lacking the essential H7R gene (the ΔH7 mutant) with an H7-expressing cell line. Compared to an inducible H7 mutant, the ΔH7 mutant showed a defect at an earlier step of virion membrane biogenesis, before the development of short crescent-shaped precursors of the viral envelope. Our studies refine the role of H7 in virion membrane biogenesis and highlight the values of analyzing deletion mutants. PMID:23678177

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of three recombinant mutants of Vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Sartmatova, Darika; Nash, Taishayla; Schormann, Norbert; Nuth, Manunya; Ricciardi, Robert; Banerjee, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2013-03-01

    Amino-acid residues located at a highly flexible area in the uracil DNA glycosylase of Vaccinia virus were mutated. In the crystal structure of wild-type D4 these residues lie at the dimer interface. Specifically, three mutants were generated: (i) residue Arg167 was replaced with an alanine (R167AD4), (ii) residues Glu171, Ser172 and Pro173 were substituted with three glycine residues (3GD4) and (iii) residues Glu171 and Ser172 were deleted (Δ171-172D4). Mutant proteins were expressed, purified and crystallized in order to investigate the effects of these mutations on the structure of the protein.

  9. Spread of vaccinia virus through shaving during military training, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, June 2014.

    PubMed

    Webber, Bryant J; Montgomery, Jay R; Markelz, Ana E; Allen, Kahtonna C; Hunninghake, John C; Ritchie, Simon A; Pawlak, Mary T; Johnston, Lindsay A; Oliver, Tiffany A; Winterton, Brad S

    2014-08-01

    Although naturally occurring smallpox virus was officially declared eradicated in 1980, concern for biological warfare prompted the U.S. Government in 2002 to recommend smallpox vaccination for select individuals. Vaccinia, the smallpox vaccine virus, is administered into the skin, typically on the upper arm, where the virus remains viable and infectious until the scab falls off and the epidermis is fully intact - typically 2-4 weeks. Adverse events following smallpox vaccination may occur in the vaccinee, in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee (i.e., secondary transmission), or in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee's contact (i.e., tertiary transmission). In June 2014 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, two cases of inadvertent inoculation of vaccinia and one case of a non-viral reaction following vaccination occurred in the security forces training squadron. This includes the first reported case of shaving as the likely source of autoinoculation after contact transmission. This paper describes the diagnosis and treatment of these cases, the outbreak investigation, and steps taken to prevent future transmission.

  10. Participation of Vaccinia Virus L2 Protein in the Formation of Crescent Membranes and Immature Virions▿

    PubMed Central

    Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Domi, Arban; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis of vaccinia virus begins with the appearance of crescent-shaped membrane precursors of immature virions in cytoplasmic factories. During the initial characterization of the product of the L2R reading frame, we discovered that it plays an important role in crescent formation. The L2 protein was expressed early in infection and was associated with the detergent-soluble membrane fraction of mature virions, consistent with two potential membrane-spanning domains. All chordopoxviruses have L2 homologs, suggesting an important function. Indeed, we were unable to isolate an infectious L2R deletion mutant. Consequently, we constructed an inducible mutant with a conditional lethal phenotype. When L2 expression was repressed, proteolytic processing of the major core proteins and the A17 protein, which is an essential component of the immature virion membrane, failed to occur, suggesting an early block in viral morphogenesis. At 8 h after infection in the presence of inducer, immature and mature virions were abundantly seen by electron microscopy. In contrast, those structures were rare in the absence of inducer and were replaced by large, dense aggregates of viroplasm. A minority of these aggregates had short spicule-coated membranes, which resembled the beginnings of crescent formation, at their periphery. These short membrane segments at the edge of the dense viroplasm increased in number at later times, and some immature virions were seen. Although the L2 protein was not detected under nonpermissive conditions, minute amounts could account for stunted and delayed viral membrane formation. These findings suggested that L2 is required for the formation or elongation of crescent membranes. PMID:21228235

  11. Seven major genomic deletions of vaccinia virus Tiantan strain are sufficient to decrease pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiquan; Sheng, Yuan; Chu, Yunjie; Ji, Huifan; Jiang, Shuang; Lan, Tian; Li, Min; Chen, Shuang; Fan, Yuanyuan; Li, Wenjie; Li, Xiao; Sun, Lili; Jin, Ningyi

    2016-05-01

    Attenuated strain TTVAC7, as a multi-gene-deleted vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (VTT), was constructed by knocking out parts of non-essential genes related to virulence, host range and immunomodulation of VTT, and by combining double marker screening with exogenous selectable marker knockout techniques. In this study, shuttle vector plasmids pTC-EGFP, pTA35-EGFP, pTA66-EGFP, pTE-EGFP, pTB-EGFP, pTI-EGFP and pTJ-EGFP were constructed, which contained seven pairs of recombinant arms linked to the early and late strong promoter pE/L, as well as to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as an exogenous selectable marker. BHK cells were co-transfected/infected successively with the above plasmids and VTT or gene-deleted VTT, and homologous recombination and fluorescence plaque screening methods were used to knock out the gene fragments (TC: TC7L ∼ TK2L; TA35: TA35L; TA66: TA66R; TE: TE3L ∼ TE4L; TB: TB13R; TI: TI4L; TJ: TJ2R). The Cre/LoxP system was then applied to knock out the exogenous selectable marker, and ultimately the gene-deleted attenuated strain TTVAC7 was obtained. A series of in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that not only the host range of TTVAC7 could be narrowed and its toxicity weakened significantly, but its high immunogenicity was maintained at the same time. These results support the potential of TTVAC7 to be developed as a safe viral vector or vaccine.

  12. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell responses against vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Carl; Yang, Yiping; Huang, Xiaopei

    2017-04-06

    Vaccinia virus (VV) can potently activate NK- and T-cell responses, leading to efficient viral control and generation of long-lasting protective immunity. However, immune responses against viral infections are often tightly controlled to avoid collateral damage and systemic inflammation. We have previously shown that granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells (g-MDSCs) can suppress the NK-cell response to VV infection. It remains unknown what regulates T-cell responses to VV infection in vivo. In this study, we first showed that monocytic MDSCs (m-MDSCs), but not g-MDSCs, from VV-infected mice could directly suppress CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell activation in vitro. We then demonstrated that defective recruitment of m-MDSCs to the site of VV infection in CCR2(-/-) mice enhanced VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and that adoptive transfer of m-MDSCs into VV-infected mice suppressed VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation, leading to a delay in viral clearance. Mechanistically, we further showed that T-cell suppression by m-MDSCs is mediated by indication of iNOS and production of NO upon VV infection, and that IFN-γ is required for activation of m-MDSCs. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for m-MDSCs in regulating T-cell responses against VV infection and may suggest potential strategies using m-MDSCs to modulate T-cell responses during viral infections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccinia Virus Extracellular Enveloped Virion Neutralization In Vitro and Protection In Vivo Depend on Complement▿

    PubMed Central

    Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; McCausland, Megan M.; Moyron, Juan; Laudenslager, John; Granger, Steven; Rickert, Sandra; Koriazova, Lilia; Kubo, Ralph; Kato, Shinichiro; Crotty, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Antibody neutralization is an important component of protective immunity against vaccinia virus (VACV). Two distinct virion forms, mature virion and enveloped virion (MV and EV, respectively), possess separate functions and nonoverlapping immunological properties. In this study we examined the mechanics of EV neutralization, focusing on EV protein B5 (also called B5R). We show that neutralization of EV is predominantly complement dependent. From a panel of high-affinity anti-B5 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), the only potent neutralizer in vitro (90% at 535 ng/ml) was an immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a), and neutralization was complement mediated. This MAb was the most protective in vivo against lethal intranasal VACV challenge. Further studies demonstrated that in vivo depletion of complement caused a >50% loss of anti-B5 IgG2a protection, directly establishing the importance of complement for protection against the EV form. However, the mechanism of protection is not sterilizing immunity via elimination of the inoculum as the viral inoculum consisted of a purified MV form. The prevention of illness in vivo indicated rapid control of infection. We further demonstrate that antibody-mediated killing of VACV-infected cells expressing surface B5 is a second protective mechanism provided by complement-fixing anti-B5 IgG. Cell killing was very efficient, and this effector function was highly isotype specific. These results indicate that anti-B5 antibody-directed cell lysis via complement is a powerful mechanism for clearance of infected cells, keeping poxvirus-infected cells from being invisible to humoral immune responses. These findings highlight the importance of multiple mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against VACV and point to key immunobiological differences between MVs and EVs that impact the outcome of infection. PMID:19019965

  14. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  15. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGES

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; ...

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  16. Isolated limb perfusion with biochemotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy combines with radiotherapy and surgery to overcome treatment resistance in an animal model of extremity soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michelle J; Smith, Henry G; Pencavel, Timothy D; Mansfield, David C; Kyula-Currie, Joan; Khan, Aadil A; McEntee, Gráinne; Roulstone, Victoria; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-15

    The management of locally advanced or recurrent extremity sarcoma often necessitates multimodal therapy to preserve a limb, of which isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a key component. However, with standard chemotherapeutic agents used in ILP, the duration of response is limited. Novel agents or treatment combinations are urgently needed to improve outcomes. Previous work in an animal model has demonstrated the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy when delivered by ILP and, in this study, we report further improvements from combining ILP-delivered oncolytic virotherapy with radiation and surgical resection. In vitro, the combination of radiation with an oncolytic vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) and melphalan demonstrated increased cytotoxicity in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. The effects were mediated through activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In vivo, combinations of radiation, oncolytic virotherapy and standard ILP resulted in delayed tumour growth and prolonged survival when compared with standard ILP alone. However, local disease control could only be secured when such treatment was combined with surgical resection, the timing of which was crucial in determining outcome. Combinations of oncolytic virotherapy with surgical resection and radiation have direct clinical relevance in extremity sarcoma and represent an exciting prospect for improving outcomes in this pathology.

  17. Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) as Production Platform for Vaccines against Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Altenburg, Arwen F.; Kreijtz, Joost H. C. M.; de Vries, Rory D.; Song, Fei; Fux, Robert; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory viruses infections caused by influenza viruses, human parainfluenza virus (hPIV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and coronaviruses are an eminent threat for public health. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for hPIV, RSV and coronaviruses, and the available seasonal influenza vaccines have considerable limitations. With regard to pandemic preparedness, it is important that procedures are in place to respond rapidly and produce tailor made vaccines against these respiratory viruses on short notice. Moreover, especially for influenza there is great need for the development of a universal vaccine that induces broad protective immunity against influenza viruses of various subtypes. Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is a replication-deficient viral vector that holds great promise as a vaccine platform. MVA can encode one or more foreign antigens and thus functions as a multivalent vaccine. The vector can be used at biosafety level 1, has intrinsic adjuvant capacities and induces humoral and cellular immune responses. However, there are some practical and regulatory issues that need to be addressed in order to develop MVA-based vaccines on short notice at the verge of a pandemic. In this review, we discuss promising novel influenza virus vaccine targets and the use of MVA for vaccine development against various respiratory viruses. PMID:25036462

  18. Modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA) as production platform for vaccines against influenza and other viral respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Altenburg, Arwen F; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; de Vries, Rory D; Song, Fei; Fux, Robert; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2014-07-17

    Respiratory viruses infections caused by influenza viruses, human parainfluenza virus (hPIV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and coronaviruses are an eminent threat for public health. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for hPIV, RSV and coronaviruses, and the available seasonal influenza vaccines have considerable limitations. With regard to pandemic preparedness, it is important that procedures are in place to respond rapidly and produce tailor made vaccines against these respiratory viruses on short notice. Moreover, especially for influenza there is great need for the development of a universal vaccine that induces broad protective immunity against influenza viruses of various subtypes. Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is a replication-deficient viral vector that holds great promise as a vaccine platform. MVA can encode one or more foreign antigens and thus functions as a multivalent vaccine. The vector can be used at biosafety level 1, has intrinsic adjuvant capacities and induces humoral and cellular immune responses. However, there are some practical and regulatory issues that need to be addressed in order to develop MVA-based vaccines on short notice at the verge of a pandemic. In this review, we discuss promising novel influenza virus vaccine targets and the use of MVA for vaccine development against various respiratory viruses.

  19. Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic Smallpox Vaccine in Vaccinia-Naive and Experienced Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals: An Open-Label, Controlled Clinical Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Stapleton, Jack; Frank, Ian; Hassler, Shawn; Goepfert, Paul A; Barker, David; Wagner, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Virgin, Garth; Meyer, Thomas Peter; Müller, Jutta; Bädeker, Nicole; Grünert, Robert; Young, Philip; Rösch, Siegfried; Maclennan, Jane; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Background.  First- and second-generation smallpox vaccines are contraindicated in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A new smallpox vaccine is needed to protect this population in the context of biodefense preparedness. The focus of this study was to compare the safety and immunogenicity of a replication-deficient, highly attenuated smallpox vaccine modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) in HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Methods.  An open-label, controlled Phase II trial was conducted at 36 centers in the United States and Puerto Rico for HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Subjects received 2 doses of MVA administered 4 weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events, focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings, and safety laboratories. Immune responses were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Results.  Five hundred seventy-nine subjects were vaccinated at least once and had data available for analysis. Rates of ELISA seropositivity were comparably high in vaccinia-naive healthy and HIV-infected subjects, whereas PRNT seropositivity rates were higher in healthy compared with HIV-infected subjects. Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and well tolerated with no adverse impact on viral load or CD4 counts. There were no cases of myo-/pericarditis reported. Conclusions.  Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and immunogenic in subjects infected with HIV and represents a promising smallpox vaccine candidate for use in immunocompromised populations.

  20. Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic Smallpox Vaccine in Vaccinia-Naive and Experienced Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals: An Open-Label, Controlled Clinical Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Stapleton, Jack; Frank, Ian; Hassler, Shawn; Goepfert, Paul A.; Barker, David; Wagner, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Virgin, Garth; Meyer, Thomas Peter; Müller, Jutta; Bädeker, Nicole; Grünert, Robert; Young, Philip; Rösch, Siegfried; Maclennan, Jane; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. First- and second-generation smallpox vaccines are contraindicated in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A new smallpox vaccine is needed to protect this population in the context of biodefense preparedness. The focus of this study was to compare the safety and immunogenicity of a replication-deficient, highly attenuated smallpox vaccine modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) in HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Methods. An open-label, controlled Phase II trial was conducted at 36 centers in the United States and Puerto Rico for HIV-infected and healthy subjects. Subjects received 2 doses of MVA administered 4 weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events, focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings, and safety laboratories. Immune responses were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Results. Five hundred seventy-nine subjects were vaccinated at least once and had data available for analysis. Rates of ELISA seropositivity were comparably high in vaccinia-naive healthy and HIV-infected subjects, whereas PRNT seropositivity rates were higher in healthy compared with HIV-infected subjects. Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and well tolerated with no adverse impact on viral load or CD4 counts. There were no cases of myo-/pericarditis reported. Conclusions. Modified vaccinia Ankara was safe and immunogenic in subjects infected with HIV and represents a promising smallpox vaccine candidate for use in immunocompromised populations. PMID:26380340

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell carriers protect oncolytic measles viruses from antibody neutralization in an orthotopic ovarian cancer therapy model

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Emily K; Maeyama, Yoshihiro; Lin, Yi; Butler, Greg W; Russell, Holly M; Galanis, Evanthia; Russell, Stephen J; Dietz, Allan B; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pre-existing antiviral antibodies in cancer patients can quickly neutralize oncolytic measles virus (MV) and decrease its anti-tumor potency. In contrast to `naked' viruses, cell-associated viruses are protected from antibody neutralization. Hence, we hypothesized that measles virotherapy of ovarian cancer in measles immune mice might be superior if MV infected mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) carriers are used. Experimental Design Antimeasles antibodies titers in ovarian cancer patients were determined. The protection of MV by MSC from antimeasles antibodies, the in vivo biodistribution profiles and tumor infiltration capability of MSC were determined. Measles naïve or immune tumor-bearing mice were treated with naked virus or MSC-associated virus and mice survivals were compared. Results MSC transferred MV infection to target cells via cell-to-cell heterofusion and induced syncytia formation in the presence of high titers of antimeasles antibody; at levels which completely inactivated naked virus. Athymic mice bearing intraperitoneal human SKOV3ip.1 ovarian tumor xenografts passively immunized with measles immune human serum were treated with saline, naked MV or MV infected MSC. Bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging data indicated that intraperitoneally administered MSC localized to peritoneal tumors, infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma and transferred virus infection to tumors in measles naïve and passively immunized mice. Survival of the measles immune mice was significantly enhanced by treatment with MV-infected MSC. In contrast, survivals of passively immunized mice were not prolonged by treatment with naked virus or uninfected MSC. Conclusions MSC should be used as carriers of MV for intraperitoneal virotherapy in measles-immune ovarian cancer patients. PMID:19934299

  2. De novo Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Contributes Significantly to Establishment of a Bioenergetically Favorable Environment for Vaccinia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Greseth, Matthew D.; Traktman, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The poxvirus life cycle, although physically autonomous from the host nucleus, is nevertheless dependent upon cellular functions. A requirement for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis was implied by our previous demonstration that cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor, impaired vaccinia virus production. Here we show that additional inhibitors of this pathway, TOFA and C75, reduce viral yield significantly, with partial rescue provided by exogenous palmitate, the pathway's end-product. Palmitate's major role during infection is not for phospholipid synthesis or protein palmitoylation. Instead, the mitochondrial import and β-oxidation of palmitate are essential, as shown by the impact of etomoxir and trimetazidine, which target these two processes respectively. Moreover, the impact of these inhibitors is exacerbated in the absence of exogenous glucose, which is otherwise dispensable for infection. In contrast to glucose, glutamine is essential for productive viral infection, providing intermediates that sustain the TCA cycle (anaplerosis). Cumulatively, these data suggest that productive infection requires the mitochondrial β-oxidation of palmitate which drives the TCA cycle and energy production. Additionally, infection causes a significant rise in the cellular oxygen consumption rate (ATP synthesis) that is ablated by etomoxir. The biochemical progression of the vaccinia life cycle is not impaired in the presence of TOFA, C75, or etomoxir, although the levels of viral DNA and proteins synthesized are somewhat diminished. However, by reversibly arresting infections at the onset of morphogenesis, and then monitoring virus production after release of the block, we determined that virion assembly is highly sensitive to TOFA and C75. Electron microscopic analysis of cells released into C75 revealed fragmented aggregates of viroplasm which failed to be enclosed by developing virion membranes. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccinia infection, and in

  3. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased.

  4. A protein-based smallpox vaccine protects mice from vaccinia and ectromelia virus challenges when given as a prime and single boost.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Aldaz-Carroll, Lydia; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Whitbeck, J Charles; Alexander, Edward; Lou, Huan; Davis, Heather L; Braciale, Thomas J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Isaacs, Stuart N

    2007-01-26

    The heightened concern about the intentional release of variola virus has led to the need to develop safer smallpox vaccines. While subunit vaccine strategies are safer than live virus vaccines, subunit vaccines have been hampered by the need for multiple boosts to confer optimal protection. Here we developed a protein-based subunit vaccine strategy that provides rapid protection in mouse models of orthopoxvirus infections after a prime and single boost. Mice vaccinated with vaccinia virus envelope proteins from the mature virus (MV) and extracellular virus (EV) adjuvanted with CpG ODN and alum were protected from lethal intranasal challenge with vaccinia virus and the mouse-specific ectromelia virus. Organs from mice vaccinated with three proteins (A33, B5 and L1) and then sacrificed after challenge contained significantly lower titers of virus when compared to control groups of mice that were not vaccinated or that received sub-optimal formulations of the vaccine. Sera from groups of mice obtained prior to challenge had neutralizing activity against the MV and also inhibited comet formation indicating anti-EV activity. Long-term partial protection was also seen in mice challenged with vaccinia virus 6 months after initial vaccinations. Thus, this work represents a step toward the development of a practical subunit smallpox vaccine.

  5. Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gretchen E.; Sisler, Jerry R.; Chandran, Dev; Moss, Bernard

    2008-10-25

    The vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex (EFC) is comprised of at least eight transmembrane proteins that are conserved in all poxviruses. However, neither the physical structure of the EFC nor the immunogenicity of the individual components has been determined. We prepared soluble forms of two EFC components, A28 and H2, by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide and adding a polyhistidine tail. The proteins were expressed by baculoviruses, secreted from insect cells, purified by affinity chromatography and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The antibodies recognized the viral proteins but only the antibody to recombinant A28 bound intact virions and neutralized infectivity. Analyses with a set of overlapping peptides revealed a neutralizing epitope between residues 73 and 92 of A28. Passive immunization of mice with IgG purified from the anti-A28 serum provided partial protection against a vaccinia virus intranasal challenge, whereas IgG from the anti-H2 serum did not.

  6. A classical PKA inhibitor increases the oncolytic effect of M1 virus via activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haipeng; Xiao, Xiao; Tan, Yaqian; Cai, Jing; Zhu, Wenbo; Xing, Fan; Hu, Jun; Yan, Guangmei

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging and promising treatment modality that uses replicating viruses as selective antitumor agents. Here, we report that a classical protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, synergizes with oncolytic virus M1 in various cancer cells through activation of Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1). H89 substantially increases viral replication in refractory cancer cells, leading to unresolvable Endoplasmic Reticulum stress, and cell apoptosis. Microarray analysis indicates that H89 blunts antiviral response in refractory cancer cells through retarding the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Importantly, in vivo studies show significant antitumor effects during M1/H89 combination treatment. Overall, this study reveals a previously unappreciated role for H89 and demonstrates that activation of the Epac1 activity can improve the responsiveness of biotherapeutic agents for cancer. PMID:27374176

  7. Biophysical analysis of bacterial and viral systems. A shock tube study of bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/nanosims investigation of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Sean Damien

    2013-05-01

    The work presented herein is concerned with the development of biophysical methodology designed to address pertinent questions regarding the behavior and structure of select pathogenic agents. Two distinct studies are documented: a shock tube analysis of endospore-laden bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/NanoSIMS study of the structure of vaccinia virus.

  8. Prime-boost vaccination with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP induced a partial protective immunity to inhibit Babesia gibsoni proliferation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shinuo; Mousa, Ahmed Abdelmoniem; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Zhou, Mo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan

    2013-12-01

    A heterologous prime-boost vaccination regime with DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus (rvv) vectors expressing relevant antigens has been shown to induce effective immune responses against several infectious pathogens. In this study, we describe the effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy by immunizing dogs with a recombinant plasmid followed by vaccinia virus, both of which expressed the glutamic acid-rich protein (BgGARP) of Babesia gibsoni. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime developed a significantly high level of specific antibodies against BgGARP when compared with the control groups. The antibody level was strongly increased after a booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus. Two weeks after the booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP, the dogs were challenged with B. gibsoni parasite. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime showed partial protection, manifested as a significantly low level of parasitemia. These results indicated that this type of DNA/rvv prime-boost immunization approach may have use against B. gibsoni infection in dogs.

  9. A hyperfusogenic F protein enhances the oncolytic potency of a paramyxovirus simian virus 5 P/V mutant without compromising sensitivity to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Maria D; Manuse, Mary J; Parks, Griffith D

    2008-10-01

    Viral fusogenic membrane proteins have been proposed as tools to increase the potency of oncolytic viruses, but there is a need for mechanisms to control the spread of fusogenic viruses in normal versus tumor cells. We have previously shown that a mutant of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that harbors mutations in the P/V gene from the canine parainfluenza virus (P/V-CPI(-)) is a potent inducer of type I interferon (IFN) and apoptosis and is restricted for spread through normal but not tumor cells in vitro. Here, we have used the cytopathic P/V-CPI(-) as a backbone vector to test the hypothesis that a virus expressing a hyperfusogenic glycoprotein will be a more effective oncolytic vector but will retain sensitivity to IFN. A P/V mutant virus expressing an F protein with a glycine-to-alanine substitution in the fusion peptide (P/V-CPI(-)-G3A) was more fusogenic than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant. In two model prostate tumor cell lines which are defective in IFN production (LNCaP and DU145), the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant had normal growth properties at low multiplicities of infection and was more effective than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant at cell killing in vitro. However, in PC3 cells which produce and respond to IFN, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was attenuated for growth and spread. Killing of PC3 cells was equivalent between the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant and the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant. In a nude mouse model using LNCaP cells, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was more effective than P/V-CPI(-) at reducing tumor burden. In the case of DU145 tumors, the two vectors based on P/V-CPI(-) were equally effective at limiting tumor growth. Together, our results provide proof of principle that a cytopathic SV5 P/V mutant can serve as an oncolytic virus and that the oncolytic effectiveness of P/V mutants can be enhanced by a fusogenic membrane protein without compromising sensitivity to IFN. The potential advantages of

  10. Gene expression profiling of hematologic malignant cell lines resistant to oncolytic virus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Hee; Kim, Mikyung; Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, Seong-Geun; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirpvec; JX-594) has emerged as an attractive tool in oncolytic virotherapy. Pexa-Vec demonstrates oncolytic and immunotherapeutic mechanisms of action. But the determinants of resistance to Pexa-Vec are mostly unknown. We treated hemoatologic malignant cells with Pexa-Vec and examined the gene-expression pattern of sensitive and resistant cells. Human myeloid malignant cell lines (RPMI-8226, IM-9, K562, THP-1) and lymphoid cancer cell lines (MOLT4, CCRF-CEM, Ramos, U937) were treated with Pexa-Vec. Pexa-Vec was cytotoxic on myeloid cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, and fluorescent imaging and qPCR revealed that Pexa-Vec expression was low in RAMOS than IM-9 after 24 hrs and 48 hrs of infection. Gene expression profiles between two groups were analyzed by microarray. Genes with at least 2-fold increase or decrease in their expression were identified. A total of 660 genes were up-regulated and 776 genes were down-regulated in lymphoid cancer cell lines. The up- and down-regulated genes were categorized into 319 functional gene clusters. We identified the top 10 up-regulated genes in lymphoid cells. Among them three human genes (LEF1, STAMBPL1, and SLFN11) strongly correlated with viral replication. Up-regulation of PVRIG, LPP, CECR1, Arhgef6, IRX3, IGFBP2, CD1d were related to resistant to Pexa-Vec. In conclusion, lymphoid malignant cells are resistant to Pexa-Vec and displayed up-regulated genes associated with resistance to oncolytic viral therapy. These data provide potential targets to overcome resistance, and suggest that molecular assays may be useful in selecting patients for further clinical trials with Pexa-Vec. PMID:27901484

  11. Role of cysteine-rich 61 protein (CCN1) in macrophage-mediated oncolytic herpes simplex virus clearance.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Amy Haseley; Meisen, Walter H; Russell, Luke; Yoo, Ji Young; Bolyard, Chelsea M; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy; Puduvalli, Vinay K; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Tridandapani, Susheela; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma is a devastating disease, and there is an urgent need to develop novel therapies, such as oncolytic HSV1 (OV) to effectively target tumor cells. OV therapy depends on tumor-specific replication leading to destruction of neoplastic tissues. Host responses that curtail virus replication limit its efficacy in vivo. We have previously shown that cysteine-rich 61 protein (CCN1) activates a type 1 IFN antiviral defense response in glioblastoma cells. Incorporating TCGA data, we found CCN1 expression to be a negative prognostic factor for glioblastoma patients. Based on this, we used neutralizing antibodies against CCN1 to investigate its effect on OV therapy. Use of an anti-CCN1 antibody in mice bearing glioblastomas treated with OV led to enhanced virus expression along with reduced immune cell infiltration. OV-induced CCN1 increases macrophage migration toward infected glioblastoma cells by directly binding macrophages and also by enhancing the proinflammatory activation of macrophages inducing MCP-1 expression in glioblastoma cells. Activation of macrophages by CCN1 also increases viral clearance. Neutralization of integrin αMβ2 reversed CCN1-induced macrophage activation and migration, and reduced MCP-1 expression by glioblastoma cells. Our findings reveal that CCN1 plays a novel role in pathogen clearance; increasing macrophage infiltration and activation resulting in increased virus clearance in tumors.

  12. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy of canine and feline cancer.

    PubMed

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Patil, Sandeep S; Petrov, Ivan; Cappello, Joseph; Adelfinger, Marion; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-05-16

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in companion animals such as dogs and cats. Despite recent progress in the diagnosis and treatment of advanced canine and feline cancer, overall patient treatment outcome has not been substantially improved. Virotherapy using oncolytic viruses is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and lyse cancer cells, without causing excessive damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and initiate tumor-specific immunity. The current review describes the use of different oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy and their application to canine and feline cancer.

  14. Oncolytic Virotherapy of Canine and Feline Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Patil, Sandeep S.; Petrov, Ivan; Cappello, Joseph; Adelfinger, Marion; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in companion animals such as dogs and cats. Despite recent progress in the diagnosis and treatment of advanced canine and feline cancer, overall patient treatment outcome has not been substantially improved. Virotherapy using oncolytic viruses is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and lyse cancer cells, without causing excessive damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and initiate tumor-specific immunity. The current review describes the use of different oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy and their application to canine and feline cancer. PMID:24841386

  15. Oncolytic virotherapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartkopf, Andreas D; Fehm, Tanja; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2011-10-01

    The use of replication competent viruses that selectively target and destroy cancer cells has rapidly evolved over the past decade and numerous innovative oncolytic viruses have been created. Many of these promising anti-cancer agents have recently entered into clinical trials (including those on breast cancer) and demonstrated encouraging safety and efficacy. Virotherapeutic strategies are thus of considerable interest to combat breast cancer in both (i) the primary disease situation in which relapse should be avoided as good as possible and (ii) in the metastatic situation which remains incurable to date. Here, we summarize data from preclinical and clinical trials using oncolytic virotherapy to treat breast cancer. This includes strategies to specifically target breast cancer cells, to arm oncolytic viruses with additional therapeutic transgenes and an outlining of future challenges when translating these promising therapeutics "from bench to bedside".

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy reaches adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Adrienne M; Conner, Joseph; Cripe, Timothy P

    2010-12-15

    Lytic viruses kill cells as a consequence of their normal replication life cycle. The idea of harnessing viruses to kill cancer cells arose over a century ago, before viruses were even discovered, from medical case reports of infections associated with cancer remissions. Since then, there has been no shortage of hype, hope, or fear regarding the prospect of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer. Early developments in the field included encouraging antitumor efficacy both in animal studies in the 1920s-1940s and in human clinical trials in the 1950s-1970s. Despite its long-standing history, oncolytic virotherapy was an idea ahead of its time. Without needed advances in molecular biology, virology, immunology, and clinical research ethics, early clinical trials resulted in infectious complications and were fraught with controversial research conduct, so that enthusiasm in the medical community waned. Oncolytic virotherapy is now experiencing a major growth spurt, having sustained numerous laboratory advances and undergone multiple encouraging adult clinical trials, and is now witnessing the emergence of pediatric trials. Here we review the history and salient biology of the field, including preclinical and clinical data, with a special emphasis on those agents now being tested in pediatric cancer patients.

  17. Myristoylation increases the CD8+T-cell response to a GFP prototype antigen delivered by modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Marr, Lisa; Lülf, Anna-Theresa; Freudenstein, Astrid; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2016-04-01

    Activation of CD8(+)T-cells is an essential part of immune responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Strategies to enhance T-cell responses to antigens may be particularly necessary for broadly protective immunization against influenza A virus infections or for candidate vaccines targeting chronic infections and cancer. Here, we tested recombinant MVAs that targeted a model antigen, GFP, to different localizations in infected cells. In vitro characterization demonstrated that GFP accumulated in the nucleus (MVA-nls-GFP), associated with cellular membranes (MVA-myr-GFP) or was equally distributed throughout the cell (MVA-GFP). On vaccination, we found significantly higher levels of GFP-specific CD8(+)T-cells in MVA-myr-GFP-vaccinated BALB/c mice than in those immunized with MVA-GFP or MVA-nls-GFP. Thus, myristoyl modification may be a useful strategy to enhance CD8(+)T-cell responses to MVA-delivered target antigens.

  18. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  19. Targeting gallbladder cancer: oncolytic virotherapy with myxoma virus is enhanced by rapamycin in vitro and further improved by hyaluronan in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is highly lethal, and effective treatment will require synergistic anti-tumor management. The study is aimed at investigating the oncolytic value of myxoma virus (MYXV) infection against GBC and optimizing MYXV oncolytic efficiency. Methods We examined the permissiveness of GBC cell lines to MYXV infection and compared the effects of MYXV on cell viability among GBC and control permissive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo after MYXV + rapamycin (Rap) treatment, which is known to enhance cell permissiveness to MYXV by upregulating p-Akt levels. We also assessed MYXV + hyaluronan (HA) therapy efficiency by examinating Akt activation status, MMP-9 expression, cell viability, and collagen distribution. We further compared hydraulic conductivity, tumor area, and survival of tumor-bearing mice between the MYXV + Rap and MYXV + HA therapeutic regimens. Results MYXV + Rap treatment could considerably increase the oncolytic ability of MYXV against GBC cell lines in vitro but not against GBC xenografts in vivo. We found higher levels of collagen IV in GBC tumors than in glioma tumors. Diffusion analysis demonstrated that collagen IV could physically hinder MYXV intratumoral distribution. HA–CD44 interplay was found to activate the Akt signaling pathway, which increases oncolytic rates. HA was also found to enhance the MMP-9 secretion, which contributes to collagen IV degradation. Conclusions Unlike MYXV + Rap, MYXV + HA therapy significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effects of MYXV in vivo and prolonged survival of GBC tumor-bearing mice. HA may optimize the oncolytic effects of MYXV on GBC via the HA–CD44 interaction which can promote viral infection and diffusion. PMID:24725816

  20. Vaccinia virus A12L protein and its AG/A proteolysis play an important role in viral morphogenic transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su Jung; Hruby, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Like the major vaccinia virus (VV) core protein precursors, p4b and p25K, the 25 kDa VV A12L late gene product (p17K) is proteolytically maturated at the conserved Ala-Gly-Ala motif. However, the association of the precursor and its cleavage product with the core of mature virion suggests that both of the A12L proteins may be required for virus assembly. Here, in order to test the requirement of the A12L protein and its proteolysis in viral replication, a conditional lethal mutant virus (vvtetOA12L) was constructed to regulate A12L expression by the presence or absence of an inducer, tetracycline. In the absence of tetracycline, replication of vvtetOA12L was inhibited by 80% and this inhibition could be overcome by transient expression of the wild-type copy of the A12L gene. In contrast, mutation of the AG/A site abrogated the ability of the transfected A12L gene to rescue, indicating that A12L proteolysis plays an important role in viral replication. Electron microscopy analysis of the A12L deficient virus demonstrated the aberrant virus particles, which were displayed by the AG/A site mutation. Thus, we concluded that the not only A12L protein but also its cleavage processing plays an essential role in virus morphogenic transition. PMID:17625005

  1. Isolation of more potent oncolytic paramyxovirus by bioselection.

    PubMed

    Beier, R; Hermiston, T; Mumberg, D

    2013-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an oncolytic paramyxovirus with a nonsegmented single-stranded RNA genome. In this report, a recombinant oncolytic NDV was passaged in human tumor xenografts and reisolated and characterized after two rounds of bioselection. Several isolates could be recovered that differed from the parental virus with respect to virus spread in tumor cells and the ability to form syncytia in human tumor cells. Three isolates were identified that demonstrated superior oncolytic potency compared with the parental virus as measured by increased oncolytic potency in confluent tumor cell monolayers, in tumor cell spheroids and in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The surface proteins F and HN were sequence analyzed and characterized for fusogenicity. The present study demonstrates that in vivo NDV bioselection can enable the isolation of novel, oncolytic NDV and thus represents a powerful methodology for the development of highly potent oncolytic viruses.

  2. Oncolytic virus carrying shRNA targeting SATB1 inhibits prostate cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li-jun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ning; Fan, Li; Yang, Dong-rong; Xue, Bo-xin; Shan, Yu-xi; Zheng, Jun-nian

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that SATB1 is a promising therapeutic target for prostate cancer. To develop novel SATB1-based therapeutic agents for prostate cancer, in this study, we aimed to construct ZD55-SATB1, an oncolytic adenovirus ZD55 carrying shRNA targeting SATB1, and investigate its effects on the inhibition of prostate cancer growth and metastasis. ZD55-SATB1 was constructed and used to infect human prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP. The inhibitory effect of ZD55-SATB1 on SATB1 expression was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The cytotoxicity of ZD55-SATB1 was detected by MTT assay. Cell invasion was detected by Matrigel invasion assay. The in vivo antitumor activities of ZD55-SATB1 were evaluated in xenograft mouse model. We found that ZD55-SATB1 selectively replicated and significantly reduced SATB1 expression in DU145 and LNCaP cells. ZD55-SATB1 effectively inhibited the viability and invasion of DU145 and LNCaP cells in vitro and inhibited prostate cancer growth and metastasis in xenograft nude mice. In conclusion, replicative oncolytic adenovirus armed with SATB1 shRNA exhibits effective antitumor effect in human prostate cancer. Our study provides the basis for the development of ZD55-SATB1 for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. A capripoxvirus detection PCR and antibody ELISA based on the major antigen P32, the homolog of the vaccinia virus H3L gene.

    PubMed

    Heine, H G; Stevens, M P; Foord, A J; Boyle, D B

    1999-07-30

    Sheeppoxvirus (SPV), goatpoxvirus (GPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) of cattle belong to the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family and can cause significant economic losses in countries where they are endemic. Capripox diagnosis by classical virological methods dependent on live capripox virus is not suitable in countries such as Australia where the virus is exotic and live virus is not available. To develop diagnostic tests based on recombinant material, we cloned and sequenced a 3.7 kb viral DNA fragment of SPV that contained open reading frames homologous to the vaccinia virus J6R, H1L, H2R, H3L and H4L genes. A capripoxvirus specific PCR assay was developed that differentiated between SPV and LSDV on the basis of unique restriction sites in the corresponding PCR fragments. The vaccinia virus H3L homolog was identified as the capripoxvirus P32 antigen. The P32 proteins of SPV and LSDV were expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with a poly-histidine tag and affinity purified on metal binding resin. The full-length P32 protein contained a transmembrane region close to the carboxy terminus and was membrane associated but could be solubilised in detergent and used as trapping antigen in an antibody detection ELISA. The ELISA was specific for capripoxvirus as only sera from sheep infected with capripoxvirus but not orf or vaccinia virus reacted with the capripoxvirus P32 antigen.

  4. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus.

  5. A Herpes Oncolytic Virus Can Be Delivered Via the Vasculature to Produce Biologic Changes in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yuman; Kim, Teresa; Bhargava, Amit; Schwartz, Larry; Brown, Karen; Brody, Lynn; Covey, Anne; Karrasch, Matthias; Getrajdman, George; Mescheder, Axel; Jarnagin, William; Kemeny, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) can selectively infect and replicate in cancer cells, and are candidates for use as oncolytic therapy. This long-term report of a phase I trial examines vascular administration of HSV as therapy for cancer. Twelve subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer within the liver failing first-line chemotherapy were treated in four cohorts with a single dose (3 × 106 to 1 × 108 particles) of NV1020, a multimutated, replication-competent HSV. After hepatic arterial administration, subjects were observed for 4 weeks before starting intra-arterial chemotherapy. All patients exhibited progression of disease before HSV injection. During observation, levels of the tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) decreased (median % drop = 24%; range 13–74%; P < 0.02). One of three individuals at the 108 level showed a 39% radiologic decrease in tumor size by cross-section and 75% by volume. HSV infection was documented from liver tumor biopsies. After beginning regional chemotherapy, all patients demonstrated a further decrease in CEA (median 96%; range 50–98%; P < 0.008) and a radiologic partial response. Median survival for this group was 25 months. During follow-up, no signs of virus reactivation were found. Multimutated HSV can be delivered safely into the human bloodstream to produce selective infection of tumor tissues and biologic effects. PMID:19018254

  6. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Satheshkumar, P.S.; Chavre, James; Moss, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopox-viruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. PMID:23816434

  7. Establishing elements of a synthetic biology platform for Vaccinia virus production: BioBrick™ design, serum-free virus production and microcarrier-based cultivation of CV-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuchang; Ruban, Ludmila; Wang, Yaohe; Zhou, Yuhong; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2017-02-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is an established vector for vaccination and is beginning to prove effective as an oncolytic agent. Industrial production of VACV stands to benefit in future from advances made by synthetic biology in genome engineering and standardisation. The CV-1 cell line can be used for VACV propagation and has been used extensively with the CRISPR/Cas9 system for making precise edits of the VACV genome. Here we take first steps toward establishing a scalable synthetic biology platform for VACV production with CV-1 cells featuring standardised biological tools and serum free cell cultivation. We propose a new BioBrick™ plasmid backbone format for inserting transgenes into VACV. We then test the performance of CV-1 cells in propagation of a conventional recombinant Lister strain VACV, VACVL-15 RFP, in a serum-free process. CV-1 cells grown in 5% foetal bovine serum (FBS) Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) were adapted to growth in OptiPRO and VP-SFM brands of serum-free media. Specific growth rates of 0.047 h(-1) and 0.044 h(-1) were observed for cells adapted to OptiPRO and VP-SFM respectively, compared to 0.035 h(-1) in 5% FBS DMEM. Cells adapted to OptiPRO and to 5% FBS DMEM achieved recovery ratios of over 96%, an indication of their robustness to cryopreservation. Cells adapted to VP-SFM showed a recovery ratio of 82%. Virus productivity in static culture, measured as plaque forming units (PFU) per propagator cell, was 75 PFU/cell for cells in 5% FBS DMEM. VP-SFM and OptiPRO adaptation increased VACV production to 150 PFU/cell and 350 PFU/cell respectively. Boosted PFU/cell from OptiPRO-adapted cells persisted when 5% FBS DMEM or OptiPRO medium was observed during the infection step and when titre was measured using cells adapted to 5% FBS DMEM or OptiPRO medium. Finally, OptiPRO-adapted CV-1 cells were successfully cultivated using Cytodex-1 microcarriers to inform future scale up studies.

  8. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is essential and plays a role in promoting virus genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Don B; Evans, David H

    2009-05-01

    Poxviruses are subjected to extraordinarily high levels of genetic recombination during infection, although the enzymes catalyzing these reactions have never been identified. However, it is clear that virus-encoded DNA polymerases play some unknown yet critical role in virus recombination. Using a novel, antiviral-drug-based strategy to dissect recombination and replication reactions, we now show that the 3'-to-5' proofreading exonuclease activity of the viral DNA polymerase plays a key role in promoting recombination reactions. Linear DNA substrates were prepared containing the dCMP analog cidofovir (CDV) incorporated into the 3' ends of the molecules. The drug blocked the formation of concatemeric recombinant molecules in vitro in a process that was catalyzed by the proofreading activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase. Recombinant formation was also blocked when CDV-containing recombination substrates were transfected into cells infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. These inhibitory effects could be overcome if CDV-containing substrates were transfected into cells infected with CDV-resistant (CDV(r)) viruses, but only when resistance was linked to an A314T substitution mutation mapping within the 3'-to-5' exonuclease domain of the viral polymerase. Viruses encoding a CDV(r) mutation in the polymerase domain still exhibited a CDV-induced recombination deficiency. The A314T substitution also enhanced the enzyme's capacity to excise CDV molecules from the 3' ends of duplex DNA and to recombine these DNAs in vitro, as judged from experiments using purified mutant DNA polymerase. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity appears to be an essential virus function, and our results suggest that this might be because poxviruses use it to promote genetic exchange.

  9. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β)-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The essential role of IFN in

  10. Safe and Effective Treatment of Experimental Neuroblastoma and Glioblastoma Using Systemically Delivered Triple MicroRNA-Detargeted Oncolytic Semliki Forest Virus.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Yu, Di; Dyczynski, Matheus; Baskaran, Sathishkumar; Zhang, Lei; Lulla, Aleksei; Lulla, Valeria; Saul, Sirle; Nelander, Sven; Dimberg, Anna; Merits, Andres; Leja-Jarblad, Justyna; Essand, Magnus

    2017-03-15

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme and high-risk neuroblastoma are cancers with poor outcome. Immunotherapy in the form of neurotropic oncolytic viruses is a promising therapeutic approach for these malignancies. Here we evaluate the oncolytic capacity of the neurovirulent and partly IFNβ-resistant Semliki Forest virus (SFV)-4 in glioblastoma multiformes and neuroblastomas. To reduce neurovirulence we constructed SFV4miRT, which is attenuated in normal central nervous system (CNS) cells through insertion of microRNA target sequences for miR124, miR125, miR134.Methods: Oncolytic activity of SFV4miRT was examined in mouse neuroblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme cell lines and in patient-derived human glioblastoma cell cultures (HGCC). In vivo neurovirulence and therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in two syngeneic orthotopic glioma models (CT-2A, GL261) and a syngeneic subcutaneous neuroblastoma model (NXS2). The role of IFNβ in inhibiting therapeutic efficacy was investigated.Results: The introduction of miRNA target sequences reduced neurovirulence of SFV4 in terms of attenuated replication in mouse CNS cells and ability to cause encephalitis when administered intravenously. A single intravenous injection of SFV4miRT prolonged survival and cured four of eight mice (50%) with NXS2 and three of 11 mice (27%) with CT-2A, but not for GL261 tumor-bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic efficacy in different tumor models inversely correlated to secretion of IFNβ by respective cells upon SFV4 infection in vitro Similarly, killing efficacy of HGCC lines inversely correlated to IFNβ response and interferon-α/β receptor-1 expression.Conclusions: SFV4miRT has reduced neurovirulence, while retaining its oncolytic capacity. SFV4miRT is an excellent candidate for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and neuroblastoma with low IFN-β secretion. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1519-30. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Immunization with influenza A NP-expressing vaccinia virus recombinant protects mice against experimental infection with human and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Altstein, A D; Gitelman, A K; Smirnov, Y A; Piskareva, L M; Zakharova, L G; Pashvykina, G V; Shmarov, M M; Zhirnov, O P; Varich, N P; Ilyinskii, P O; Shneider, A M

    2006-05-01

    Two-fold immunization of Balb/c mice with a vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the NP protein of influenza A/PR8/34 (H1N1) virus under the control of a strong synthetic promoter induced specific antibodies and protected animals against low-dose challenge by mouse-adapted heterosubtypic variants of human A/Aichi2/68 (H3N2) and avian A/Mallard/Pennsylvania/10218/84 (H5N2) influenza virus strains. The surviving immunized animals had lower anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers compared to non-immunized mice. There was no difference in viral titers in lungs of immunized and non-immunized animals that succumbed to the infection. In order to try to increase immune system presentation of NP-protein-derived peptides, and thereby increase their immunogenicity, we constructed another vaccinia-based NP-expressing recombinant containing a rapid proteolysis signal covalently bound to the NP protein. This sequence, derived from the mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene has been shown to increase degradation of various proteins. However, we found that when used as part of a recombinant NP, this signal neither increased its proteolytic degradation, nor was it more efficient in the induction of a protective response against influenza infection.

  12. The attenuated NYCBH vaccinia virus deleted for the immune evasion gene, E3L, completely protects mice against heterologous challenge with ectromelia virus.

    PubMed

    Denzler, Karen L; Schriewer, Jill; Parker, Scott; Werner, Chas; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Huynh, Trung; Holechek, Susan; Buller, R M; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2011-12-06

    The New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) vaccinia virus (VACV) vaccine strain was deleted for the immune evasion gene, E3L, and tested for its pathogenicity and ability to protect mice from heterologous challenge with ectromelia virus (ECTV). NYCBHΔE3L was found to be highly attenuated for pathogenicity in a newborn mouse model and showed a similar attenuated phenotype as the NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus. Scarification with one or two doses of the attenuated NYCBHΔE3L was able to protect mice equally as well as NYCBH from death, weight loss, and viral spread to visceral organs. A single dose of NYCBHΔE3L resulted in low poxvirus-specific antibodies, and a second dose increased levels of poxvirus-specific antibodies to a level similar to that seen in animals vaccinated with a single dose of NYCBH. However, similar neutralizing antibody titers were observed following one or two doses of NYCBHΔE3L or NYCBH. Thus, NYCBHΔE3L shows potential as a candidate for a safer human smallpox vaccine since it protects mice from challenge with a heterologous poxvirus.

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy for urological cancers.

    PubMed

    Delwar, Zahid; Zhang, Kaixin; Rennie, Paul S; Jia, William

    2016-06-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a cancer treatment in which replication-competent viruses are used that specifically infect, replicate in and lyse malignant tumour cells, while minimizing harm to normal cells. Anecdotal evidence of the effectiveness of this strategy has existed since the late nineteenth century, but advances and innovations in biotechnological methods in the 1980s and 1990s led to a renewed interest in this type of therapy. Multiple clinical trials investigating the use of agents constructed from a wide range of viruses have since been performed, and several of these enrolled patients with urological malignancies. Data from these clinical trials and from preclinical studies revealed a number of challenges to the effectiveness of oncolytic virotherapy that have prompted the development of further sophisticated strategies. Urological cancers have a range of distinctive features, such as specific genetic mutations and cell surface markers, which enable improving both effectiveness and safety of oncolytic virus treatments. The strategies employed in creating advanced oncolytic agents include alteration of the virus tropism, regulating transcription and translation of viral genes, combination with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or gene therapy, arming viruses with factors that stimulate the immune response against tumour cells and delivery technologies to ensure that the viral agent reaches its target tissue.

  14. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  15. In vitro screen of a small molecule inhibitor drug library identifies multiple compounds that synergize with oncolytic myxoma virus against human brain tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zemp, Franz J.; Pisklakova, Alexandra; Narendran, Aru; McFadden, Grant; Lun, Xueqing; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Kurz, Ebba U.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to form a disease reservoir that mediates tumor recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Oncolytic virotherapy uses replication-competent viruses to target and kill malignant cells and has been evaluated in clinic for glioma therapy with limited results. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a safe and highly effective oncolytic virus (OV) in conventional glioma models but, as seen with other OVs, is only modestly effective for patient-derived BTICs. The objective of this study was to determine whether MyxV treatment against human BTICs could be improved by combining chemotherapeutics and virotherapy. Methods A 73-compound library of drug candidates in clinical use or preclinical development was screened to identify compounds that sensitize human BTICs to MyxV treatment in vitro, and synergy was evaluated mathematically in lead compounds using Chou-Talalay analyses. The effects of combination therapy on viral gene expression and viral replication were also assessed. Results Eleven compounds that enhance MyxV efficacy were identified, and 6 were shown to synergize with the virus using Chou-Talalay analyses. Four of the synergistic compounds were shown to significantly increase viral gene expression, indicating a potential mechanism for synergy. Three highly synergistic compounds (axitinib, a VEGFR inhibitor; rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor; and pemetrexed, a folate anti-metabolite) belong to classes of compounds that have not been previously shown to synergize with oncolytic viruses in vitro. Conclusions This study has identified multiple novel drug candidates that synergistically improve MyxV efficacy in a preclinical BTIC glioma model. PMID:25605818

  16. Transduction of human dendritic cells with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus encoding MUC1 and IL-2.

    PubMed

    Trevor, K T; Hersh, E M; Brailey, J; Balloul, J M; Acres, B

    2001-10-01

    The epithelial mucin MUC1 is considered an opportune target antigen for cancer immunotherapy, as it is over-expressed and exhibits aberrant glycosylation in malignant cells. Because dendritic cells (DC) are powerful initiators of immune responses, efforts have focused on tumor antigen-bearing DC as potent cancer vaccines. In this study we have characterized the transduction of monocyte-derived DC with a highly attenuated vaccinia virus vector [modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA)] encoding human MUC1 and the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-2. Analysis of transduced DC cultures generated from a number of donors revealed MUC1 expression in the range of 27-54% of the cells and a co-regulated secretion of bioactive IL-2. As shown by FACS analysis with MUCI-specific antibodies, the MVA-MUC1/IL-2-transduced DC predominantly expressed the fully processed glycoform of MUC1, typical of that displayed by normal epithelia. Over a 3-day period after transduction, transgene expression declined concurrent with an increase in MVA-induced cytopathic effects. The transduced DC stimulated allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation, indicating that DC immunostimulatory function is not impaired by vector transduction. In the presence of IL-2, MVA-transduced DC were able to enhance autologous lymphocyte proliferation. Also, vector expression was analyzed in DC cultures treated with TNF-alpha, a known DC maturation factor. As indicated by the up-regulation of several DC maturation markers, neither virus infection nor transgene expression influenced the maturation capacity of the cells. The MVA-MUC1/IL-2 vector effectively transduced both immature and TNF-alpha-matured DC. Overall, our results are encouraging for the clinical application of MVA-MUC1/IL-2-transduced DC.

  17. Detection of Vaccinia Virus in Milk: Evidence of a Systemic and Persistent Infection in Experimentally Infected Cows.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Tércia Moreira Ludolfo; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Rivetti, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Alves, Pedro Augusto; Galinari, Grazielle Cossenzo Florentino; Cerqueira, Mônica Maria Oliveira Pinho; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-11-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects lactating cows and milkers. VACV DNA and infectious particles have been detected in milk of naturally infected cows. However, the period and pattern of VACV shedding in milk is unknown, as is whether the presence of VACV in milk is due to a localized or a systemic infection. To address those questions, eight lactating cows were inoculated with VACV in previously scarified teats. The experiment was divided in two phases. In Phase 1, milk samples were collected daily for 33 days, and in Phase 2, four animals from the first phase were immunosuppressed. In both phases, milk was collected with a sterile catheter on even days and by hand milking on odd days. All animals showed typical BV lesions in the inoculated teats. All milk samples were subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR to detect VACV DNA. PCR-positive samples were subjected to virus isolation. VACV DNA was intermittently detected in milk in both phases and infectious viral particles could be detected only in phase 2, on the 69th, 73rd, 74th, 77th, 79th, and 81st days postinfection. Despite the possibility of propagation of VACV through milk, it is known that milk continues to be drawn and marketed normally during outbreaks of the disease. The detection of both VACV DNA and infectious particles in milk samples draws attention to the potential public health risk associated with the consumption of milk from BV outbreaks. Detection of VACV in the milk from noninfected teats demonstrated that VACV shedding in milk might be related to a systemic infection. Moreover, it was shown that VACV DNA and viral infectious particles could be detected in milk even after healing of the lesions, demonstrating that VACV may cause a persistent infection in cattle.

  18. Identification from diverse mammalian poxviruses of host-range regulatory genes functioning equivalently to vaccinia virus C7L.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-03-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L-C7L-), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L(-)C7L(-), supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L(-)C7L(-) at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts.

  19. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation.

  20. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  1. The heterogeneity of human antibody responses to vaccinia virus revealed through use of focused protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S.; Wollenick, Kristin; Witten, Elizabeth A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Dolin, Raphael; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interest in strategies to combat infectious agents with epidemic potential has led to a re-examination of vaccination protocols against smallpox. To help define which antigens elucidate a human antibody response, we have targeted proteins known or predicted to be presented on the surface of the intracellular mature virion (IMV) or the extracellular enveloped virion (EEV). The predicted ectodomains were expressed in a mammalian in vitro coupled transcription/translation reaction using tRNAlys precharged with lysine-ε-biotin followed by solid phase immobilization on 384 well neutravidin-coated plates. The generated array is highly specific and sensitive in a microELISA format. By comparison of binding of vaccinia-immune sera to the reticulocyte lysate-produced proteins and to secreted post-translationally-modified proteins, we demonstrate that for several proteins including the EEV proteins B5 and A33, proper recognition is dependent upon appropriate folding, with little dependence upon glycosylation per se. We further demonstrate that the humoral immune response to vaccinia among different individuals is not uniform in specificity or strength, as different IMV and EEV targets predominate within the group of immunogenic proteins. This heterogeneity likely results from the diversity of HLA Class II alleles and CD4 T helper cell epitopes stimulating B cell antibody production. Our findings have important implications both for design of new recombinant subunit vaccines as well as for methods of assaying the human antibody response utilizing recombinant proteins produced in vitro. PMID:19146908

  2. Characterization of ectromelia virus deficient in EVM036, the homolog of vaccinia virus F13L, and its application for rapid generation of recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Felicia; Xu, Ren-Huan; Sigal, Luis J

    2012-12-01

    The orthopoxvirus (OPV) vaccinia virus (VACV) requires an intact F13L gene to produce enveloped virions (EV) and to form plaques in cell monolayers. Simultaneous introduction of an exogenous gene and F13L into F13L-deficient VACV results in expression of the foreign gene and restoration of plaque size. This is used as a method to rapidly generate VACV recombinants without the need for drug selection. However, whether other OPVs require the orthologs of F13L to generate EV and form plaques, whether F13L orthologs and EV are important for OPV pathogenesis in natural hosts, and whether a system based on F13L ortholog deficiency can be used to generate recombinant OPVs other than VACV have not been reported. The F13L ortholog in ectromelia virus (ECTV), the agent of mousepox, is EVM036. We show that ECTV lacking EVM036 formed small plaques and was highly attenuated in vivo but still induced strong antibody responses. Reintroduction of EVM036 in tandem with the DsRed gene resulted in a virus that expressed DsRed in infected cells but was indistinguishable from wild-type ECTV in terms of plaque size and in vivo virulence. Thus, our data show that, like F13L in VACV, EVM036 is required for ECTV plaque formation and that EVM036 and EV are important for ECTV virulence. Our experiments also suggest that OPVs deficient in F13L orthologs could serve as safer anti-OPV vaccines. Further, our results demonstrate that ECTV deficient in EVM036 can be exploited for the rapid generation of fully virulent ECTV expressing foreign genes of interest.

  3. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques.

  4. Vaccinia virus F16 protein, a predicted catalytically inactive member of the prokaryotic serine recombinase superfamily, is targeted to nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Senkevich, Tatiana G.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The F16L gene of vaccinia virus (VACV) is conserved in all chordopoxviruses except avipoxviruses. The crocodile poxvirus F16 protein ortholog has highly significant similarity to prokaryotic serine recombinases and contains all amino acids that comprise the catalytic site. In contrast, F16 orthologs encoded by other poxviruses show only marginally significant similarity to serine recombinases, lack essential amino acids of the active site and are most likely inactive derivatives of serine recombinases. Nevertheless, the conservation of F16L in non-avian poxviruses suggested an important function. However, a VACV mutant with the F16L gene knocked out replicated normally in dividing and quiescent cells. The F16 protein was synthesized early after infection and detected in virus cores. When expressed in infected or uninfected cells, F16 accumulated in nucleoli depending on the level of expression and confluency of cells. Evidence was obtained that F16 forms multimers, which might regulate concentration-dependent intracellular localization. PMID:21752417

  5. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Graciela; Alonso-Lobo, Juan Manuel; Rastrojo, Alberto; Fischer, Cornelius; Sauer, Sascha; Aguado, Begoña

    2017-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN) binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection. PMID:28280747

  6. Daily ingestion of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ST11 decreases Vaccinia virus dissemination and lethality in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Pereira Andrade, A C; Lima, M Teixeira; Oliveira, G Pereira; Calixto, R Silva; de Sales E Souza, É Lorenna; da Glória de Souza, D; de Almeida Leite, C M; Ferreira, J M Siqueira; Kroon, E G; de Oliveira, D Bretas; Dos Santos Martins, F; Abrahão, J S

    2017-02-07

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is an important pathogen. Although studies have shown relationships between probiotics and viruses, the effect of probiotics on VACV infection is unknown. Therefore, this work aims to investigate the probiotics effects on VACV infection. Mice were divided into four groups, two non-infected groups, one receiving the probiotic, the other one not receiving it, and two groups infected intranasally with VACV Western Reserve (VACV-WR) receiving or not receiving the probiotic. Viral titres in organs and cytokine production in the lungs were analysed. Lung samples were also subjected to histological analysis. The intake of probiotic results in reduction in viral spread with a significant decrease of VACV titer on lung, liver and brain of treated group. In addition,treatment with the probiotic results in attenuated mice lung inflammation showing fewer lesions on histological findings and decreased lethality in mice infected with VACV. The ingestion of Lactobacillus paracasei ST11 (LPST11) after VACV infection resulted in 2/9 animal lethality compared with 4/9 in the VACV group. This is the first study on probiotics and VACV interactions, providing not only information about this interaction, but also proposing a model for future studies involving probiotics and other poxvirus.

  7. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  8. Both CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells Contribute to Corneal Clouding and Viral Clearance following Vaccinia Virus Infection in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, I. V.; Clausius, H.; Kolb, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus (VACV) keratitis is a serious complication following smallpox vaccination and can lead to blindness. The pathological mechanisms involved in ocular VACV infection are poorly understood. Previous studies have used rabbits, but the lack of immune reagents and transgenic or knockout animals makes them less suitable for mechanistic studies. We report that infection of C57BL/6 mice with 1 × 107 PFU of vaccinia virus strain WR results in blepharitis, corneal neovascularization, and stromal keratitis. The DryVax strain of VACV was completely attenuated. Infection required corneal scarification and replication-competent virus, and the severity of ocular disease was similar in 4- to 6-week-old and 1-year-old mice. Viral titers peaked at approximately 1 × 106 PFU on day 5 postinfection, and virus had not cleared by day 13 postinfection. Neutrophils were found in the peripheral cornea on day 1 after infection and then declined, followed by infiltration of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which remained peripheral throughout the infection. Blood vessel growth extended 2 to 5 mm into the cornea from the limbus. Infection of CD4−/−, CD8−/−, or antibody-depleted mice resulted in similar disease severity and corneal clouding, indicating that both T-cell subsets were involved in the immunopathological response. Depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells resulted in significantly more severe disease and failure to clear the virus. On the basis of our results, the pathology of VACV keratitis is significantly different from that of herpes simplex virus keratitis. Further studies are likely to reveal novel information regarding virulence and immune responses to viral ocular infection. IMPORTANCE Potentially blinding eye infections can occur after vaccination for smallpox. Very little is known about the pathological mechanisms that are involved, and the information that is available was generated using rabbit models. The lack of immunological reagents for

  9. Vaccination of horses with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) expressing African horse sickness (AHS) virus major capsid protein VP2 provides complete clinical protection against challenge.

    PubMed

    Alberca, Berta; Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Cabana, Marta; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Viaplana, Elisenda; Frost, Lorraine; Gubbins, Simon; Urniza, Alicia; Mertens, Peter; Castillo-Olivares, Javier

    2014-06-17

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that infects all species of equidae and causes high mortality in horses. Previously, a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the protein VP2 of AHSV serotype 4 was shown to induce virus neutralising antibodies in horses and protected interferon alpha receptor gene knock-out mice (IFNAR -/-) against virulent AHSV challenge. This study builds on the previous work, examining the protective efficacy of MVA-VP2 vaccination in the natural host of AHSV infection. A study group of 4 horses was vaccinated twice with a recombinant MVA virus expressing the major capsid protein (VP2) of AHSV serotype 9. Vaccinated animals and a control group of unvaccinated horses were then challenged with a virulent strain of AHSV-9. The vaccinated animals were completely protected against clinical disease and also against viraemia as measured by standard end-point dilution assays. In contrast, all control horses presented viraemia after challenge and succumbed to the infection. These results demonstrate the potential of recombinant MVA viruses expressing the outer capsid VP2 of AHSV as a protective vaccine against AHSV infection in the field.

  10. Broad and potent cellular and humoral immune responses after a second late HIV-modified vaccinia virus ankara vaccination in HIV-DNA-primed and HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boosted Swedish vaccinees.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Hejdeman, Bo; Bråve, Andreas; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Hallengärd, David; Currier, Jeffrey R; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Hasselrot, Klara; Earl, Patricia L; Polonis, Victoria R; Marovich, Mary A; Robb, Merlin L; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that an HIV vaccine regimen including three HIV-DNA immunizations and a single HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost was safe and highly immunogenic in Swedish volunteers. A median 38 months after the first HIV-MVA vaccination, 24 volunteers received 10(8) plaque-forming units of HIV-MVA. The vaccine was well tolerated. Two weeks after this HIV-MVA vaccination, 18 (82%) of 22 evaluable vaccinees were interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) reactive: 18 to Gag and 10 (45%) to Env. A median minimal epitope count of 4 to Gag or Env was found in a subset of 10 vaccinees. Intracellular cytokine staining revealed CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cell responses in 23 (95%) of 24 vaccinees, 19 to Gag and 19 to Env. The frequency of HIV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses was equally high (75%). A high proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to Gag was polyfunctional with production of three or more cytokines (40% and 60%, respectively). Of the Env-specific CD4(+) T cells 40% were polyfunctional. Strong lymphoproliferative responses to Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-treated subtype A, B, C, and A_E virus were demonstrable in 21 (95%) of 22 vaccinees. All vaccinees developed binding antibodies to Env and Gag. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assay against subtype B and CRF01_AE viruses. The neutralizing antibody response rates were influenced by the vaccine dose and/or mode of delivery used at the previous HIV-MVA vaccination. Thus, a second late HIV-MVA boost induced strong and broad cellular immune responses and improved antibody responses. The data support further exploration of this vaccine concept.

  11. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  12. The oncolytic herpes simplex virus vector, G47Δ, effectively targets tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingjing; Jiang, Hua; Cheng, Lin; Liu, Renbin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a tamoxifen-resistant cell line (MCF-7/TAM-R) and to investigate the therapeutic effect of G47Δ on this cell line both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the MCF-7/TAM-R monoclonal subline was established after exposing MCF-7 cells to tamoxifen for 21 days. Then, it was compared with a wild-type MCF-7 subline (MCF-7W), which was not treated with tamoxifen. Cell proliferation, viability, cell cycle and apoptosis analyses were carried out to examine the characteristics of the MCF-7/TAM-R cells. Both in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies were conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect of G47Δ on the MCF-7/TAM-R cells. Compared to the MCF-7W cells, we found that the MCF-7/TAM-R cells exhibited a higher proliferation ability (P<0.05) and a stronger resistance to the cytotoxic effects induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) (P<0.05). G47Δ demonstrated a high cytotoxic effect on both the MCF-7/TAM-R and MCF-7W cell lines. After being infected with G47Δ at an MOI of 0.01, >90% of the MCF-7/TAM-R and MCF-7W cells died on day 5. G47Δ induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, G47Δ inhibited tumor growth in subcutaneous tumor models of both MCF-7/TAM-R and MCF-7W. Thus, we conclude that G47Δ, a third generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus, is highly sensitive and safe in targeting tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Linear Epitopes in Vaccinia Virus A27 Are Targets of Protective Antibodies Induced by Vaccination against Smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Kaever, Thomas; Matho, Michael H.; Meng, Xiangzhi; Crickard, Lindsay; Schlossman, Andrew; Xiang, Yan; Crotty, Shane; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus (VACV) A27 is a target for viral neutralization and part of the Dryvax smallpox vaccine. A27 is one of the three glycosaminoglycan (GAG) adhesion molecules and binds to heparan sulfate. To understand the function of anti-A27 antibodies, especially their protective capacity and their interaction with A27, we generated and subsequently characterized 7 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), which fell into 4 distinct epitope groups (groups I to IV). The MAbs in three groups (groups I, III, and IV) bound to linear peptides, while the MAbs in group II bound only to VACV lysate and recombinant A27, suggesting that they recognized a conformational and discontinuous epitope. Only group I antibodies neutralized the mature virion in a complement-dependent manner and protected against VACV challenge, while a group II MAb partially protected against VACV challenge but did not neutralize the mature virion. The epitope for group I MAbs was mapped to a region adjacent to the GAG binding site, a finding which suggests that group I MAbs could potentially interfere with the cellular adhesion of A27. We further determined the crystal structure of the neutralizing group I MAb 1G6, as well as the nonneutralizing group IV MAb 8E3, bound to the corresponding linear epitope-containing peptides. Both the light and the heavy chains of the antibodies are important in binding to their antigens. For both antibodies, the L1 loop seems to dominate the overall polar interactions with the antigen, while for MAb 8E3, the light chain generally appears to make more contacts with the antigen. IMPORTANCE Vaccinia virus is a powerful model to study antibody responses upon vaccination, since its use as the smallpox vaccine led to the eradication of one of the world's greatest killers. The immunodominant antigens that elicit the protective antibodies are known, yet for many of these antigens, little information about their precise interaction with antibodies is available. In an

  14. A Chimeric HIV-1 gp120 Fused with Vaccinia Virus 14K (A27) Protein as an HIV Immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Aneesh; García-Arriaza, Juan; C. Raman, Suresh; Conesa, José Javier; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Santiago, César; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Carrascosa, José L.; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    In the HIV vaccine field, there is a need to produce highly immunogenic forms of the Env protein with the capacity to trigger broad B and T-cell responses. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a chimeric HIV-1 gp120 protein (termed gp120-14K) by fusing gp120 from clade B with the vaccinia virus (VACV) 14K oligomeric protein (derived from A27L gene). Stable CHO cell lines expressing HIV-1 gp120-14K protein were generated and the protein purified was characterized by size exclusion chromatography, electron microscopy and binding to anti-Env antibodies. These approaches indicate that gp120-14K protein is oligomeric and reacts with a wide spectrum of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), gp120-14K protein upregulates the levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with Th1 innate immune responses (IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, RANTES). Moreover, we showed in a murine model, that a heterologous prime/boost immunization protocol consisting of a DNA prime with a plasmid expressing gp120-14K protein followed by a boost with MVA-B [a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 gp120, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B], generates stronger, more polyfunctional, and greater effector memory HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immune responses, than immunization with DNA-gp120/MVA-B. The DNA/MVA protocol was superior to immunization with the combination of protein/MVA and the latter was superior to a prime/boost of MVA/MVA or protein/protein. In addition, these immunization protocols enhanced antibody responses against gp120 of the class IgG2a and IgG3, together favoring a Th1 humoral immune response. These results demonstrate that fusing HIV-1 gp120 with VACV 14K forms an oligomeric protein which is highly antigenic as it activates a Th1 innate immune response in human moDCs, and in vaccinated mice triggers polyfunctional HIV-1-specific adaptive

  15. A rapid, high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay for testing smallpox vaccine efficacy based on detection of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew C; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L

    2008-06-01

    Virus neutralization remains a vital tool in assessment of vaccine efficacy for smallpox in the absence of animal smallpox models. In this regard, development of a rapid, sensitive, and high-throughput vaccinia neutralization assay has been sought for evaluating alternative smallpox vaccines, use in bridging studies, as well as understanding the effects of anti-viral immunotherapeutic regimes. The most frequently used method of measuring vaccinia virus neutralization by plaque reduction is time, labor, and material intensive, and therefore limiting in its utility for large scale, high-throughput analysis. Recent advances provide alternative methods that are less labor intensive and higher throughput but with limitations in reagents needed and ease of use. An innovative neutralization assay is described based on a modified Western Reserve vaccinia vector expressing green fluorescent protein (WR-GFP) and an adherent cell monolayer in multi-well plate format. The assay is quick, accurate, provides a large dynamic range and is well suited for large-scale vaccination studies using standard adherent cell lines.

  16. Eczema vaccinatum resulting from the transmission of vaccinia virus from a smallpox vaccinee: an investigation of potential fomites in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Edith; Miramontes, Roque; Openshaw, John; Olson, Victoria A; Karem, Kevin L; Marcinak, John; Panares, Rodrigo; Staggs, Wayne; Allen, Donna; Weber, Stephen G; Vora, Surabhi; Gerber, Susan I; Hughes, Christine M; Regnery, Russell; Collins, Limone; Diaz, Pamela S; Reynolds, Mary G; Damon, Inger

    2009-01-14

    On March 3, 2007, a 2-year-old boy was hospitalized with eczema vaccinatum. His two siblings, one with eczema, were subsequently removed from the home. Swabs of household items obtained on March 13th were analyzed for orthopoxvirus DNA signatures with real-time PCR. Virus culture was attempted on positive specimens. Eight of 25 household samples were positive by PCR for orthopoxvirus; of these, three yielded viable vaccinia virus in culture. Both siblings were found to have serologic evidence of orthopoxvirus exposure. These findings have implications for smallpox preparedness, especially in situations where some household members are not candidates for vaccination.

  17. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shoudong; Tong, Jessica; Rahman, Masmudur M; Shepherd, Trevor G; McFadden, Grant

    2012-08-01

    In the past two decades, more than 20 viruses with selective tropism for tumor cells have been developed as oncolytic viruses (OVs) for treatments of a variety of malignancies. Of these viruses, eleven have been tested in human ovarian cancer models in preclinical studies. So far, nine phase I or II clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using four different types of OVs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancers. In this article, we summarize the different OVs that are being assessed as therapeutics for ovarian cancer. We also present an overview of recent advances in identification of key genetic or immune-response pathways involved in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, which provides a better understanding of the tumor specificities and oncolytic properties of OVs. In addition, we discuss how next-generation OVs could be genetically modified or integrated into multimodality regimens to improve clinical outcomes based on recent advances in ovarian cancer biology.

  18. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shoudong; Tong, Jessica; Rahman, Masmudur M; Shepherd, Trevor G; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, more than 20 viruses with selective tropism for tumor cells have been developed as oncolytic viruses (OVs) for treatments of a variety of malignancies. Of these viruses, eleven have been tested in human ovarian cancer models in preclinical studies. So far, nine phase I or II clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using four different types of OVs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancers. In this article, we summarize the different OVs that are being assessed as therapeutics for ovarian cancer. We also present an overview of recent advances in identification of key genetic or immune-response pathways involved in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, which provides a better understanding of the tumor specificities and oncolytic properties of OVs. In addition, we discuss how next-generation OVs could be genetically modified or integrated into multimodality regimens to improve clinical outcomes based on recent advances in ovarian cancer biology. PMID:25977900

  19. Protective Efficacy of the Conserved NP, PB1, and M1 Proteins as Immunogens in DNA- and Vaccinia Virus-Based Universal Influenza A Virus Vaccines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenling; Li, Renqing; Deng, Yao; Lu, Ning; Chen, Hong; Meng, Xin; Wang, Wen; Wang, Xiuping; Yan, Kexia; Qi, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xiangmin; Xin, Wei; Lu, Zhenhua; Li, Xueren; Bian, Tao; Gao, Yingying; Tan, Wenjie; Ruan, Li

    2015-06-01

    The conventional hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-based influenza vaccines need to be updated most years and are ineffective if the glycoprotein HA of the vaccine strains is a mismatch with that of the epidemic strain. Universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components might provide cross-protection and thus complement and improve conventional vaccines. In this study, we generated DNA plasmids and recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the conserved proteins nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase basic 1 (PB1), and matrix 1 (M1) from influenza virus strain A/Beijing/30/95 (H3N2). BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a single vaccine based on NP, PB1, or M1 alone or a combination vaccine based on all three antigens and were then challenged with lethal doses of the heterologous influenza virus strain A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Vaccines based on NP, PB1, and M1 provided complete or partial protection against challenge with 1.7 50% lethal dose (LD50) of PR8 in mice. Of the three antigens, NP-based vaccines induced protection against 5 LD50 and 10 LD50 and thus exhibited the greatest protective effect. Universal influenza vaccines based on the combination of NP, PB1, and M1 induced a strong immune response and thus might be an alternative approach to addressing future influenza virus pandemics.

  20. Complete genome sequence analysis of Seneca Valley virus-001, a novel oncolytic picornavirus.

    PubMed

    Hales, Laura M; Knowles, Nick J; Reddy, P Seshidar; Xu, Ling; Hay, Carl; Hallenbeck, Paul L

    2008-05-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus-001 (SVV-001), a small RNA virus, was determined and was shown to have typical picornavirus features. The 7280 nt long genome was predicted to contain a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 666 nt, followed by a single long open reading frame consisting of 6543 nt, which encodes a 2181 aa polyprotein. This polyprotein could potentially be cleaved into 12 polypeptides in the standard picornavirus L-4-3-4 layout. A 3' UTR of 71 nt was followed by a poly(A) tail of unknown length. Comparisons with other picornaviruses showed that the P1, 2C, 3C and 3D polypeptides of SVV-001 were related most closely to those of the cardioviruses, although they were not related as closely to those of encephalomyocarditis virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus as the latter were to each other. Most other regions of the polyprotein differed considerably from those of all other known picornaviruses. SVV-001 contains elements of an internal ribosome entry site reminiscent of that found in hepatitis C virus and a number of genetically diverse picornaviruses. SVV-001 is a novel picornavirus and it is proposed that it be classified as the prototype species in a novel genus named 'Senecavirus'.

  1. Three-Year Durability of Immune Responses Induced by HIV-DNA and HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara and Effect of a Late HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost in Tanzanian Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Agricola; Munseri, Patricia J; Nilsson, Charlotta; Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Tecleab, Teghesti; Liakina, Valentina; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Robb, Merlin L; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Ferrari, Guido; Sandstrom, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2017-01-27

    We explored the duration of immune responses and the effect of a late third HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost in HIV-DNA primed and HIV-MVA boosted Tanzanian volunteers. Twenty volunteers who had previously received three HIV-DNA and two HIV-MVA immunizations were given a third HIV-MVA immunization 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. At the time of the third HIV-MVA, 90% of the vaccinees had antibodies to HIV-1 subtype C gp140 (median titer 200) and 85% to subtype B gp160 (median titer 100). The majority of vaccinees had detectable antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies, 70% against CRF01_AE virus-infected cells (median titer 239) and 84% against CRF01_AE gp120-coated cells (median titer 499). A high proportion (74%) of vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 63% to Gag and 42% to Env, 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. After the third HIV-MVA, there was an increase in Env-binding antibodies and ADCC-mediating antibodies relative to the response seen at the time of the third HIV-MVA vaccination, p < .0001 and p < .05, respectively. The frequency of IFN-γ ELISpot responses increased to 95% against Gag or Env and 90% to both Gag and Env, p = .064 and p = .002, respectively. In conclusion, the HIV-DNA prime/HIV-MVA boost regimen elicited potent antibody and cellular immune responses with remarkable durability, and a third HIV-MVA immunization significantly boosted both antibody and cellular immune responses relative to the levels detected at the time of the third HIV-MVA, but not to higher levels than after the second HIV-MVA.

  2. Interaction between the G3 and L5 proteins of the vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Cindy L.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-04-10

    The vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex (EFC) consists of 10 to 12 proteins that are embedded in the viral membrane and individually required for fusion with the cell and entry of the core into the cytoplasm. The architecture of the EFC is unknown except for information regarding two pair-wise interactions: A28 with H2 and A16 with G9. Here we used a technique to destabilize the EFC by repressing the expression of individual components and identified a third pair-wise interaction: G3 with L5. These two proteins remained associated under several different EFC destabilization conditions and in each case were immunopurified together as demonstrated by Western blotting. Further evidence for the specific interaction of G3 and L5 was obtained by mass spectrometry. This interaction also occurred when G3 and L5 were expressed in uninfected cells, indicating that no other viral proteins were required. Thus, the present study extends our knowledge of the protein interactions important for EFC assembly and stability.

  3. The Vaccinia Virus O1 Protein Is Required for Sustained Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 and Promotes Viral Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lukassen, Susanne; Späth, Michaela; Wolferstätter, Michael; Babel, Eveline; Brinkmann, Kay; Wielert, Ursula; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in infected cells has been shown to be crucial for full replication efficiency of orthopoxviruses in cell culture. In infected cells, this pathway is mainly activated by the vaccinia virus growth factor (VGF), an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like protein. We show here that chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA), but not modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), induced sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in infected human 293 cells, although both viruses direct secretion of functional VGF. A CVA mutant lacking the O1L gene (CVA-ΔO1L) demonstrated that the O1 protein was required for sustained upregulation of the ERK1/2 pathway in 293 cells as well as in other mammalian cell lines. The highly conserved orthopoxvirus O1L gene encodes a predicted 78-kDa protein with a hitherto-unknown function. CVA-ΔO1L showed reduced plaque size and an attenuated cytopathic effect (CPE) in infected cell cultures and reduced virulence and spread from lungs to ovaries in intranasally infected BALB/c mice. Reinsertion of an intact O1L gene into MVA, which in its original form harbors a fragmented O1L open reading frame (ORF), restored ERK1/2 activation in 293 cells but did not increase replication and spread of MVA in human or other mammalian cell lines. Thus, the O1 protein was crucial for sustained ERK1/2 activation in CVA- and MVA-infected human cells, complementing the autocrine function of VGF, and enhanced virulence in vivo. PMID:22171261

  4. Measurements of vaccinia virus dissemination using whole body imaging: approaches for predicting of lethality in challenge models and testing of vaccines and antiviral treatments.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Marina; Kapnick, Senta; Golding, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of novel anti-smallpox vaccines and antiviral treatments often rely on mouse -challenge models using pathogenic vaccinia virus, such as Western Reserve (WR) strain or other orthopoxviruses. Traditionally, efficacy of treatment is evaluated using various readouts, such as lethality (rare), measurements of body weight loss, pox lesion scoring, and determination of viral loads in internal organs by enumerating plaques in sensitive cell lines. These methodologies provide valuable information about the contribution of the treatment to protection from infection, yet all have similar limitations: they do not evaluate dissemination of the virus within the same animal and require large numbers of animals. These two problems prompted us to turn to a recently developed whole body imaging technology, where replication of recombinant vaccinia virus expressing luciferase enzyme (WRvFire) is sensed by detecting light emitted by the enzyme in the presence of D: -luciferin substrate administered to infected animal. Bioluminescence signals from infected organs in live animals are registered by the charge-coupled device camera in IVIS instrument developed by Caliper, and are converted into numerical values. This chapter describes whole body bioimaging methodology used to determine viral loads in normal live BALB/c mice infected with recombinant WRvFire vaccinia virus. Using Dryvax vaccination as a model, we show how bioluminescence data can be used to determine efficacy of treatment. In addition, we illustrate how bioluminescence and survival outcome can be combined in Receiver Operating Characteristic curve -analysis to develop predictive models of lethality that can be applied for testing of new therapeutics and second-generation vaccines.

  5. The combined effects of oncolytic reovirus plus Newcastle disease virus and reovirus plus parvovirus on U87 and U373 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alkassar, Muhannad; Gärtner, Barbara; Roemer, Klaus; Graesser, Friedrich; Rommelaere, Jean; Kaestner, Lars; Haeckel, Isabelle; Graf, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Previous results had documented oncolytic capacity of reovirus, parvovirus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on several tumor cell types. To test whether combinations of these viruses may increase this capacity, human U87- and U373-glioblastoma cells, in vitro or xenografted into immuno-compromised mice, were subjected to simultaneous double infections and analyzed. Our results show that reovirus (serotype-3) plus NDV (Hitcher-B1) and reovirus plus parvovirus-H1 lead to a significant increase in tumor cell killing in vitro in both cell lines (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01) and in vivo. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated the simultaneous replication of the viruses in nearly all cells (>95%) after combined infection. These data thus indicate that a synergistic anti-tumor effect can be achieved by the combined infection with oncolytic viruses.

  6. Vaccinia and other viruses with available vaccines show marked homology with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein: the prospect of using existing vaccines to stem the AIDS pandemic.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J Chris

    2012-04-01

    Cross-reactive immunity occurs when infection with or vaccination against one virus protects against another related family member. A search for homologues of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein revealed that it is composed of thousands of intercalating and overlapping viral matches of pentapeptide or longer gapped consensi, belonging to over 70% of the currently sequenced virome, infecting all kingdoms from bacteria to man. It was also highly homologous to proteins from the Visna/Maedi and other ovine viruses, while other proteins (nef/tat/gag/pol) were homologous to proteins from the equine infectious anaemia virus and HTLV-2/HTLV-3 viruses. This phenomenon suggests that horizontal gene transfer from coinfecting RNA and DNA viruses to retroviruses is extensive, providing a route for the subsequent insertion of non-retroviral genes into human and other genomes via retroviral integration. This homology includes all viruses for which vaccines already exist. Cross-reactive immunity may be operative in AIDS, as Vaccinia vaccination decreases viral replication in HIV-1 infected patients' cells, for the CCR5 tropic form. Measles, Dengue virus, or GB virus C infections also decrease the HIV-1 viral load. A resumption of Vaccinia/smallpox vaccination might be expected to have a significant effect on the AIDS pandemic, and a careful study of the potential uses of other existing viral and bacterial vaccines merits close attention. This phenomenon may also be relevant to other recalcitrant viruses, bacteria, and parasites for which no vaccine exists and the armory of existing vaccines may have a role to play in diseases other than those for which they were designed.

  7. Extent of systemic spread determines CD8+ T cell immunodominance for laboratory strains, smallpox vaccines and zoonotic isolates of vaccinia virus1

    PubMed Central

    Flesch, Inge E.A.; Hollett, Natasha A.; Wong, Yik Chun; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Howard, Debbie; da Fonseca, Flávio G.; Tscharke, David C.

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells that recognize virus-derived peptides presented on MHC class I (pMHC) are vital anti-viral effectors. The pMHC presented by any given virus vary greatly in immunogenicity allowing them to be ranked in an immunodominance hierarchy. However, the full range of parameters that determine immunodominance and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show across a range of vaccinia virus (VACV) strains, including the current clonal smallpox vaccine, that the ability of a strain to spread systemically correlated with reduced immunodominance. Reduction in immunodominance was observed both in the lymphoid system and at the primary site of infection. Mechanistically, reduced immunodominance was associated with more robust priming and especially priming in the spleen. Finally, we show this is not just a property of vaccine and laboratory strains of virus, because an association between virulence and immunodominance was also observed in isolates from an outbreak of zoonotic VACV that occurred in Brazil. PMID:26195812

  8. Comparable polyfunctionality of ectromelia virus- and vaccinia virus-specific murine T cells despite markedly different in vivo replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hersperger, Adam R; Siciliano, Nicholas A; Eisenlohr, Laurence C

    2012-07-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) stimulates long-term immunity against highly pathogenic orthopoxvirus infection of humans (smallpox) and mice (mousepox [ectromelia virus {ECTV}]) despite the lack of a natural host-pathogen relationship with either of these species. Previous research revealed that VACV is able to induce polyfunctional CD8(+) T-cell responses after immunization of humans. However, the degree to which the functional profile of T cells induced by VACV is similar to that generated during natural poxvirus infection remains unknown. In this study, we monitored virus-specific T-cell responses following the dermal infection of C57BL/6 mice with ECTV or VACV. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we measured levels of degranulation, cytokine expression (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]), and the cytolytic mediator granzyme B. We observed that the functional capacities of T cells induced by VACV and ECTV were of a similar quality in spite of the markedly different replication abilities and pathogenic outcomes of these viruses. In general, a significant fraction (≥50%) of all T-cell responses were positive for at least three functions both during acute infection and into the memory phase. In vivo killing assays revealed that CD8(+) T cells specific for both viruses were equally cytolytic (∼80% target cell lysis after 4 h), consistent with the similar levels of granzyme B and degranulation detected among these cells. Collectively, these data provide a mechanism to explain the ability of VACV to induce protective T-cell responses against pathogenic poxviruses in their natural hosts and provide further support for the use of VACV as a vaccine platform able to induce polyfunctional T cells.

  9. Novel therapeutic strategies in human malignancy: combining immunotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Padma; Thorne, Steve H

    2015-01-01

    Results from randomized clinical trials over the last several years have finally begun to demonstrate the potential of oncolytic viral therapies to treat a variety of cancers. One reason for these successes has been the realization that this platform is most effective when considered primarily as an immunotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy has also made dramatic strides recently with antibodies capable of blocking immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T-cell therapies, notably CAR T-cells, leading a panel of novel and highly clinically effective therapies. It is clear therefore that an understanding of how and when these complementary approaches can most effectively be combined offers the real hope of moving beyond simply treating the disease and toward starting to talk about curative therapies. In this review we discuss approaches to combining these therapeutic platforms, both through engineering the viral vectors to more beneficially interact with the host immune response during therapy, as well as through the direct combinations of different therapeutics. This primarily, but not exclusively focuses on strains of oncolytic vaccinia virus. Some of the results reported to date, primarily in pre-clinical models but also in early clinical trials, are dramatic and hold great promise for the future development of similar therapies and their translation into cancer therapies.

  10. Phase 1 Study of Intravenous Oncolytic Poxvirus (vvDD) in Patients With Advanced Solid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Guo, Zong Sheng; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Breitbach, Caroline J; O'Malley, Mark E; Jones, Heather L; Moon, Anne; McCart, Judith Andrea; Shuai, Yongli; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a phase 1 study of intravenous vvDD, a Western Reserve strain oncolytic vaccinia virus, on 11 patients with standard treatment-refractory advanced colorectal or other solid cancers. The primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose and associated toxicity while secondary endpoints were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immune responses, and antitumor activity. No dose-limiting toxicities and treatment related severe adverse events were observed. The most common adverse events were grades 1/2 flu-like symptoms. Virus genomes were detectable in the blood 15–30 minutes after virus administration in a dose-dependent manner. There was evidence of a prolonged virus replication in tumor tissues in two patients, but no evidence of virus replication in non-tumor tissues, except a healed injury site and an oral thrush. Over 100-fold of anti-viral antibodies were induced in patients' sera. A strong induction of inflammatory and Th1, but not Th2 cytokines, suggested a potent Th1-mediated immunity against the virus and possibly the cancer. One patient showed a mixed response on PET-CT with resolution of some liver metastases, and another patient with cutaneous melanoma demonstrated clinical regression of some lesions. Given the confirmed safety, further trials evaluating intravenous vvDD in combination with therapeutic transgenes, immune checkpoint blockade or complement inhibitors, are warranted. PMID:27203445

  11. Immune Suppression during Oncolytic Virotherapy for High-Grade Glioma; Yes or No?

    PubMed

    Koks, Carolien A E; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Graf, Norbert; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been seriously considered for glioma therapy over the last 20 years. The oncolytic activity of several oncolytic strains has been demonstrated against human glioma cell lines and in in vivo xenotransplant models. So far, four of these stains have additionally completed the first phase I/II trials in relapsed glioma patients. Though safety and feasibility have been demonstrated, therapeutic efficacy in these initial trials, when described, was only minor. The role of the immune system in oncolytic virotherapy for glioma remained much less studied until recent years. When investigated, the immune system, adept at controlling viral infections, is often hypothesized to be a strong hurdle to successful oncolytic virotherapy. Several preclinical studies have therefore aimed to improve oncolytic virotherapy efficacy by combining it with immune suppression or evasion strategies. More recently however, a new paradigm has developed in the oncolytic virotherapy field stating that oncolytic virus-mediated tumor cell death can be accompanied by elicitation of potent activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity that greatly improves the efficacy of certain oncolytic strains. Therefore, it seems the three-way interaction between oncolytic virus, tumor and immune system is critical to the outcome of antitumor therapy. In this review we discuss the studies which have investigated how the immune system and oncolytic viruses interact in models of glioma. The novel insights generated here hold important implications for future research and should be incorporated into the design of novel clinical trials.

  12. Vaccinia Virus Uses Retromer-Independent Cellular Retrograde Transport Pathways To Facilitate the Wrapping of Intracellular Mature Virions during Virus Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses, such as vaccinia virus (VACV), undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms and includes a crucial wrapping step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways are required for this wrapping step, we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor known as the GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multistep replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting the GARP complex and in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition, foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multistep growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with the morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. IMPORTANCE Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals that the prototypic poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus

  13. Structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001: an oncolytic picornavirus representing a new genus.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2008-10-08

    The crystal structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001), the representative member of a new genus, Senecavirus, is reported at 2.3A resolution. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus shown to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+) ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity with the genomes of the members of Cardiovirus. The overall tertiary structure of VP1-VP4 subunits is conserved with the exception of loops, especially those of VP1 that show large deviations relative to the members of the cardioviruses. The surface loops of VP1 and VP2 are predicted to mediate cell tropism of SVV-001. In addition, the organization of the packaged nucleic acid density indicates that certain regions of VP2 and VP4 interact closely with the packaged nucleic acid.

  14. Structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001: An Oncolytic Picornavirus Representing a New Genus

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P.; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2008-10-17

    The crystal structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001), the representative member of a new genus, Senecavirus, is reported at 2.3{angstrom} resolution. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus shown to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+) ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity with the genomes of the members of Cardiovirus. The overall tertiary structure of VP1-VP4 subunits is conserved with the exception of loops, especially those of VP1 that show large deviations relative to the members of the cardioviruses. The surface loops of VP1 and VP2 are predicted to mediate cell tropism of SVV-001. In addition, the organization of the packaged nucleic acid density indicates that certain regions of VP2 and VP4 interact closely with the packaged nucleic acid.

  15. Targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 eradicates experimental pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Gayral, Marion; Lulka, Hubert; Hanoun, Naima; Biollay, Coline; Sèlves, Janick; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Berthommé, Hervé; Trempat, Pascal; Epstein, Alberto L; Buscail, Louis; Béjot, Jean-Luc; Cordelier, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As many other cancers, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression is associated with a series of hallmark changes for cancer cells to secure their own growth success. Yet, these very changes render cancer cells highly sensitive to viral infection. A promising strategy may rely on and exploit viral replication for tumor destruction, whereby infection of tumor cells by a replication-conditional virus may lead to cell destruction and simultaneous release of progeny particles that can spread and infect adjacent tumor cells, while sparing healthy tissues. In the present study, we used Myb34.5, a second-generation replication-conditional herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mutant in which ICP6 gene expression is defective and expression of the HSV-1 γ134.5 gene is regulated by the cellular B-myb promoter. We found that B-myb is present in experimental PDAC and tumors, and is overexpressed in patients' tumors, as compared with normal adjacent pancreas. Myb34.5 replicates to high level in human PDAC cell lines and is associated with cell death by apoptosis. In experimental models of PDAC, mice receiving intratumoral Myb34.5 injections appeared healthy and tumor progression was inhibited, with evidence of tumor necrosis, hemorrhage, viral replication, and cancer cell death by apoptosis. Combining standard-of-care chemotherapy with Myb34.5 successfully led to a very impressive antitumoral effect that is rarely achieved in this experimental model, and resulted in a greater reduction in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone. These promising results warrant further evaluation in early phase clinical trial for patients diagnosed with PDAC for whom no effective treatment is available.

  16. The detection of Vaccinia virus confirms the high circulation of Orthopoxvirus in buffaloes living in geographical isolation, Marajó Island, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Franco-Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira; Fagundes Pereira, Alexandre; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; de Souza Trindade, Giliane; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2016-06-01

    In Brazil, serologic evidence of Orthopoxvirus (OPV) circulation showed positivity around 20% in cattle, humans, monkeys and rodents. Although OPV seropositivity has been described in buffalo herds in southeastern Brazil, no Vaccinia virus (VACV) (member of genus OPV) outbreaks in buffalo herds have been described in this country. This study aimed to investigate the detection of anti-OPV antibodies and to study the OPV genome in Brazilian buffalo herds. Our results demonstrated a high OPV seropositivity in buffalo herds on Marajó Island and molecular data confirmed the circulation of VACV. The geographical isolation conditionmight be a sine qua non condition to explain our results.

  17. Vaccinia Virus B1 Kinase Is Required for Postreplicative Stages of the Viral Life Cycle in a BAF-Independent Manner in U2OS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, Augusta; Ibrahim, Nouhou; Wicklund, April; Weskamp, Kaitlin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The vaccinia virus B1R gene encodes a highly conserved protein kinase that is essential for the poxviral life cycle. As demonstrated in many cell types, B1 plays a critical role during viral DNA replication when it inactivates the cellular host defense effector barrier to autointegration factor (BAF or BANF1). To better understand the role of B1 during infection, we have characterized the growth of a B1-deficient temperature-sensitive mutant virus (Cts2 virus) in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. In contrast to all other cell lines tested to date, we found that in U2OS cells, Cts2 viral DNA replication is unimpaired at the nonpermissive temperature. However, the Cts2 viral yield in these cells was reduced more than 10-fold, thus indicating that B1 is required at another stage of the vaccinia virus life cycle. Our results further suggest that the host defense function of endogenous BAF may be absent in U2OS cells but can be recovered through either overexpression of BAF or fusion of U2OS cells with mouse cells in which the antiviral function of BAF is active. Interestingly, examination of late viral proteins during Cts2 virus infection demonstrated that B1 is required for optimal processing of the L4 protein. Finally, execution point analyses as well as electron microscopy studies uncovered a role for B1 during maturation of poxviral virions. Overall, this work demonstrates that U2OS cells are a novel model system for studying the cell type-specific regulation of BAF and reveals a role for B1 beyond DNA replication during the late stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE The most well characterized role for the vaccinia virus B1 kinase is to facilitate viral DNA replication by phosphorylating and inactivating BAF, a cellular host defense responsive to foreign DNA. Additional roles for B1 later in the viral life cycle have been postulated for decades but are difficult to examine directly due to the importance of B1 during DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that

  18. Vaccinia virus K1L protein mediates host-range function in RK-13 cells via ankyrin repeat and may interact with a cellular GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ritu R; Terajima, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    The K1L protein of vaccinia virus is required for its growth in certain cell lines (RK-13 and human). The cowpox host-range protein CP77 has been shown to complement K1L function in RK-13 cells, despite a lack of homology between the two proteins except for ankyrin repeats. We investigated the role of ankyrin repeats of K1L protein in RK-13 cells. The growth of a recombinant vaccinia virus, with K1L gene mutated in the most conserved ankyrin repeat, was severely impaired. Infection with the mutant virus caused shutdown of cellular and viral protein synthesis early in infection. We also investigated the interaction of K1L protein with cellular proteins and found that K1L interacts with the rabbit homologue of human ACAP2, a GTPase-activating protein with ankyrin repeats. Our result suggests the importance of ankyrin repeat for host-range function of K1L in RK-13 cells and identifies ACAP2 as a cellular protein, which may be interacting with K1L.

  19. Five of 12 forms of vaccinia virus-expressed human hepatic cytochrome P450 metabolically activate aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Toshifumi; Yamano, Shigeru; Gelboin, H.V.; Gonzalez, F.J. ); Guzelian, P.S. )

    1990-06-01

    Twelve forms of human hepatic cytochrome P450 were expressed in hepatoma cells by means of recombinant vaccinia viruses. The expressed P450s were analyzed for their abilities to activate the potent hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B{sub 1} to metabolites having mutagenic or DNA-binding properties. Five forms, P450s IA2, IIA3, IIB7, IIIA3, and IIIA4, activated aflatoxin B{sub 1} to mutagenic metabolites as assessed by the production of His revertants of Salmonella typhimurium in the Ames test. The same P450s catalyzed conversion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} to DNA-bound derivatives as judged by an in situ assay in which the radiolabeled carcinogen was incubated with cells expressing the individual P450 forms. Seven other human P450s, IIC8, IIC9, IID6, IIE1, IIF1, and IIIA5, and IVB1, did not significantly activate aflatoxin B{sub 1} as measured by both the Ames test and the DNA-binding assay. Moreover, polyclonal anti-rat liver P450 antibodies that crossreact with individual human P450s IA2, IIA3, IIIA3, and IIIA4 each inhibited aflatoxin B{sub 1} activation catalyzed by human liver S-9 extracts. Inhibition ranged from as low as 10% with antibody against IIA3 to as high as 65% with antibody against IIIA3 and IIIA4. These results establish that metabolic activation of aflatoxin B{sub 1} in human liver involves the contribution of multiple forms of P450.

  20. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  1. The Myristate Moiety and Amino Terminus of Vaccinia Virus L1 Constitute a Bipartite Functional Region Needed for Entry

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce-de-León, Manuel; Saw, Wan Ting; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) L1 is a myristoylated envelope protein which is required for cell entry and the fusion of infected cells. L1 associates with members of the entry-fusion complex (EFC), but its specific role in entry has not been delineated. We recently demonstrated (Foo CH, et al., Virology 385:368–382, 2009) that soluble L1 binds to cells and blocks entry, suggesting that L1 serves as the receptor-binding protein for entry. Our goal is to identify the structural domains of L1 which are essential for its functions in VACV entry. We hypothesized that the myristate and the conserved residues at the N terminus of L1 are critical for entry. To test our hypothesis, we generated mutants in the N terminus of L1 and used a complementation assay to evaluate their ability to rescue infectivity. We also assessed the myristoylation efficiency of the mutants and their ability to interact with the EFC. We found that the N terminus of L1 constitutes a region that is critical for the infectivity of VACV and for myristoylation. At the same time, the nonmyristoylated mutants were incorporated into mature virions, suggesting that the myristate is not required for the association of L1 with the viral membrane. Although some of the mutants exhibited altered structural conformations, two mutants with impaired infectivity were similar in conformation to wild-type L1. Importantly, these two mutants, with changes at A4 and A5, undergo myristoylation. Overall, our results imply dual differential roles for myristate and the amino acids at the N terminus of L1. We propose a myristoyl switch model to describe how L1 functions. PMID:22398293

  2. Vaccinia Virus Protein A49 Is an Unexpected Member of the B-cell Lymphoma (Bcl)-2 Protein Family*

    PubMed Central

    Neidel, Sarah; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Mansur, Daniel S.; Strnadova, Pavla; Smith, Geoffrey L.; Graham, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes several proteins that inhibit activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). VACV protein A49 prevents translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus by sequestering cellular β-TrCP, a protein required for the degradation of the inhibitor of κB. A49 does not share overall sequence similarity with any protein of known structure or function. We solved the crystal structure of A49 from VACV Western Reserve to 1.8 Å resolution and showed, surprisingly, that A49 has the same three-dimensional fold as Bcl-2 family proteins despite lacking identifiable sequence similarity. Whereas Bcl-2 family members characteristically modulate cellular apoptosis, A49 lacks a surface groove suitable for binding BH3 peptides and does not bind proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax or Bak. The N-terminal 17 residues of A49 do not adopt a single well ordered conformation, consistent with their proposed role in binding β-TrCP. Whereas pairs of A49 molecules interact symmetrically via a large hydrophobic surface in crystallo, A49 does not dimerize in solution or in cells, and we propose that this hydrophobic interaction surface may mediate binding to a yet undefined cellular partner. A49 represents the eleventh VACV Bcl-2 family protein and, despite these proteins sharing very low sequence identity, structure-based phylogenetic analysis shows that all poxvirus Bcl-2 proteins are structurally more similar to each other than they are to any cellular or herpesvirus Bcl-2 proteins. This is consistent with duplication and diversification of a single BCL2 family gene acquired by an ancestral poxvirus. PMID:25605733

  3. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Vaccinia Virus Envelope Protein D8 and Its Recognition by the Antibody LA5

    PubMed Central

    Matho, Michael H.; Maybeno, Matt; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Becker, Danielle; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Crotty, Shane; Peters, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Smallpox vaccine is considered a gold standard of vaccines, as it is the only one that has led to the complete eradication of an infectious disease from the human population. B cell responses are critical for the protective immunity induced by the vaccine, yet their targeted epitopes recognized in humans remain poorly described. Here we describe the biochemical and structural characterization of one of the immunodominant vaccinia virus (VACV) antigens, D8, and its binding to the monoclonal antibody LA5, which is capable of neutralizing VACV in the presence of complement. The full-length D8 ectodomain was found to form a tetramer. We determined the crystal structure of the LA5 Fab-monomeric D8 complex at a resolution of 2.1 Å, as well as the unliganded structures of D8 and LA5-Fab at resolutions of 1.42 Å and 1.6 Å, respectively. D8 features a carbonic anhydrase (CAH) fold that has evolved to bind to the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chondroitin sulfate (CS) on host cells. The central positively charged crevice of D8 was predicted to be the CS binding site by automated docking experiments. Furthermore, sequence alignment of various poxvirus D8 orthologs revealed that this crevice is structurally conserved. The D8 epitope is formed by 23 discontinuous residues that are spread across 80% of the D8 protein sequence. Interestingly, LA5 binds with a high-affinity lock-and-key mechanism above this crevice with an unusually large antibody-antigen interface, burying 2,434 Å2 of protein surface. PMID:22623786

  4. Intrarectal vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing carcinoembronic antigen induces mucosal and systemic immunity and prevents progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kim, Hong Sung; Wainstein, Alberto; Kim, Dae Won; Yang, Wein Cui; Moroziewicz, Dorota; Mong, Phyllus Y; Bereta, Michal; Taback, Bret; Wang, Qin; Kaufman, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa contains an intact immune system that protects the host from pathogens and communicates with the systemic immune system. Absorptive epithelial cells in the mucosa give rise to malignant tumors although the interaction between tumor cells and the mucosal immune system is not well defined. The pathophysiology of colorectal cancer has been elucidated through studies of hereditary syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene. Patients with FAP develop adenomas and inevitably progress to invasive carcinomas by the age of 40. To better delineate the role of mucosal immunity in colorectal cancer, we evaluated the efficacy of intrarectal recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) in a murine FAP model in which mice are predisposed to colorectal cancer and also express human CEA in the gut. Mucosal vaccination reduced the incidence of spontaneous adenomas and completely prevented progression to invasive carcinoma. The therapeutic effects were associated with induction of mucosal CEA-specific IgA Ab titers and CD8(+) CTLs. Mucosal vaccination was also associated with an increase in systemic CEA-specific IgG Ab titers, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and resulted in growth inhibition of s.c. implanted CEA-expressing tumors suggesting communication between mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Thus, intrarectal vaccination induces mucosal and systemic antitumor immunity and prevents progression of spontaneous colorectal cancer. These results have implications for the prevention of colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

  5. Variola virus F1L is a Bcl-2-like protein that unlike its vaccinia virus counterpart inhibits apoptosis independent of Bim.

    PubMed

    Marshall, B; Puthalakath, H; Caria, S; Chugh, S; Doerflinger, M; Colman, P M; Kvansakul, M

    2015-03-12

    Subversion of host cell apoptosis is an important survival strategy for viruses to ensure their own proliferation and survival. Certain viruses express proteins homologous in sequence, structure and function to mammalian pro-survival B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) proteins, which prevent rapid clearance of infected host cells. In vaccinia virus (VV), the virulence factor F1L was shown to be a potent inhibitor of apoptosis that functions primarily be engaging pro-apoptotic Bim. Variola virus (VAR), the causative agent of smallpox, harbors a homolog of F1L of unknown function. We show that VAR F1L is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis, and unlike all other characterized anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members lacks affinity for the Bim Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain. Instead, VAR F1L engages Bid BH3 as well as Bak and Bax BH3 domains. Unlike its VV homolog, variola F1L only protects against Bax-mediated apoptosis in cellular assays. Crystal structures of variola F1L bound to Bid and Bak BH3 domains reveal that variola F1L forms a domain-swapped Bcl-2 fold, which accommodates Bid and Bak BH3 in the canonical Bcl-2-binding groove, in a manner similar to VV F1L. Despite the observed conservation of structure and sequence, variola F1L inhibits apoptosis using a startlingly different mechanism compared with its VV counterpart. Our results suggest that unlike during VV infection, Bim neutralization may not be required during VAR infection. As molecular determinants for the human-specific tropism of VAR remain essentially unknown, identification of a different mechanism of action and utilization of host factors used by a VAR virulence factor compared with its VV homolog suggest that studying VAR directly may be essential to understand its unique tropism.

  6. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Rivera, Armando; Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-20

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone.

  7. Structural analysis and immunogenicity of recombinant major envelope protein (rA27L) of buffalopox virus, a zoonotic Indian vaccinia-like virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2015-10-05

    Buffalopox virus (BPXV), an Indian variant of vaccinia virus (VACV), is a zoonotic agent and affects buffaloes, cattle and humans. A27L is one of the conserved major immuno-dominant envelope proteins of orthopox viruses (OPVs) involved in viral entry/maturation and elicits neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the A27L gene of BPXV-Vij/96 strain encoding recombinant mature A27L (21S to E110) and C-terminal truncated A27L-LZD (21S to N84aa) proteins were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. Structurally, A27L of BPXV was similar to that of VACV and found to contain four regions including a potential coiled-coil motif (CCM) in the centre (43 to 84aa). Oligomerization of recombinant A27L fusion protein (∼30 kDa) leads to the formation of dimer/trimers/tetramers under non-reducing conditions. Further, the purified rA27L protein was used for active immunization of rabbit (250 μg/rabbit) and adult mice (10 μg and 50 μg/mice) with or without adjuvants (FCA, alum and CpG). Immune response measured by using indirect-ELISA and SNT revealed a gradual increase in antigen specific serum IgG as well as neutralization antibody titers. Upon challenge with virulent BPXV strain, a protection of 60% was observed in suckling mice passively administered with anti-rA27L sera. No cross-reactivity of rA27L protein with hyperimmune sera against ORFV, GTPV, SPPV, PPRV, FMDV and BTV was noticed in indirect-ELISA. The study indicated that the rA27L protein is a safe and potential prophylactic as well as diagnostic antigen for buffalopox.

  8. MyD88-Dependent Immunity to a Natural Model of Vaccinia Virus Infection Does Not Involve Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael L.; Sei, Janet J.; Siciliano, Nicholas A.; Xu, Ren-Huan; Roscoe, Felicia; Sigal, Luis J.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the pattern recognition receptor Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is typically thought to recognize bacterial components, it has been described to alter the induction of both innate and adaptive immunity to a number of viruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV). However, many pathogens that reportedly encode TLR2 agonists may actually be artifactually contaminated during preparation, possibly with cellular debris or merely with molecules that sensitize cells to be activated by authentic TLR2 agonists. In both humans and mice, the most relevant natural route of infection with VACV is through intradermal infection of the skin. Therefore, we examined the requirement for TLR2 and its signaling adaptor MyD88 in protective immunity to VACV after intradermal infection. We find that although TLR2 may recognize virus preparations in vitro and have a minor role in preventing dissemination of VACV following systemic infection with large doses of virus, it is wholly disposable in both control of virus replication and induction of adaptive immunity following intradermal infection. In contrast, MyD88 is required for efficient induction of CD4 T cell and B cell responses and for local control of virus replication following intradermal infection. However, even MyD88 is not required to induce local inflammation, inflammatory cytokine production, or recruitment of cells that restrict virus from spreading systemically after peripheral infection. Thus, an effective antiviral response does require MyD88, but TLR2 is not required for control of a peripheral VACV infection. These findings emphasize the importance of studying relevant routes of infection when examining innate sensing mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Vaccinia virus (VACV) provides the backbone for some of the most widely used and successful viral vaccine vectors and is also related to the human pathogens Cantagalo virus and molluscum contagiosum virus that infect the skin of patients. Therefore, it is vital to understand

  9. Effects of Nasal or Pulmonary Delivered Treatments with an Adenovirus Vectored Interferon (mDEF201) on Respiratory and Systemic Infections in Mice Caused by Cowpox and Vaccinia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Donald F.; Wong, Min-Hui; Hurst, Brett L.; Ennis, Jane; Turner, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    An adenovirus 5 vector encoding for mouse interferon alpha, subtype 5 (mDEF201) was evaluated for efficacy against lethal cowpox (Brighton strain) and vaccinia (WR strain) virus respiratory and systemic infections in mice. Two routes of mDEF201 administration were used, nasal sinus (5-µl) and pulmonary (50-µl), to compare differences in efficacy, since the preferred treatment of humans would be in a relatively small volume delivered intranasally. Lower respiratory infections (LRI), upper respiratory infections (URI), and systemic infections were induced by 50-µl intranasal, 10-µl intranasal, and 100-µl intraperitoneal virus challenges, respectively. mDEF201 treatments were given prophylactically either 24 h (short term) or 56d (long-term) prior to virus challenge. Single nasal sinus treatments of 106 and 107 PFU/mouse of mDEF201 protected all mice from vaccinia-induced LRI mortality (comparable to published studies with pulmonary delivered mDEF201). Systemic vaccinia infections responded significantly better to nasal sinus delivered mDEF201 than to pulmonary treatments. Cowpox LRI infections responded to 107 mDEF201 treatments, but a 106 dose was only weakly protective. Cowpox URI infections were equally treatable by nasal sinus and pulmonary delivered mDEF201 at 107 PFU/mouse. Dose-responsive prophylaxis with mDEF201, given one time only 56 d prior to initiating a vaccinia virus LRI infection, was 100% protective from 105 to 107 PFU/mouse. Improvements in lung hemorrhage score and lung weight were evident, as were decreases in liver, lung, and spleen virus titers. Thus, mDEF201 was able to treat different vaccinia and cowpox virus infections using both nasal sinus and pulmonary treatment regimens, supporting its development for humans. PMID:23874722

  10. Protective effects of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based vaccine candidate against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus require both cellular and humoral responses.

    PubMed

    Dowall, Stuart D; Graham, Victoria A; Rayner, Emma; Hunter, Laura; Watson, Robert; Taylor, Irene; Rule, Antony; Carroll, Miles W; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. There is no approved vaccine currently available against CCHF. The most promising candidate, which has previously been shown to confer protection in the small animal model, is a modified Vaccinia Ankara virus vector expressing the CCHF viral glycoprotein (MVA-GP). It has been shown that MVA-GP induces both humoral and cellular immunogenicity. In the present study, sera and T-lymphocytes were passively and adoptively transferred into recipient mice prior to challenge with CCHF virus. Results demonstrated that mediators from both arms of the immune system were required to demonstrate protective effects against lethal challenge.

  11. Protective effects of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based vaccine candidate against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus require both cellular and humoral responses

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart D.; Graham, Victoria A.; Rayner, Emma; Hunter, Laura; Watson, Robert; Taylor, Irene; Rule, Antony; Carroll, Miles W.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. There is no approved vaccine currently available against CCHF. The most promising candidate, which has previously been shown to confer protection in the small animal model, is a modified Vaccinia Ankara virus vector expressing the CCHF viral glycoprotein (MVA-GP). It has been shown that MVA-GP induces both humoral and cellular immunogenicity. In the present study, sera and T-lymphocytes were passively and adoptively transferred into recipient mice prior to challenge with CCHF virus. Results demonstrated that mediators from both arms of the immune system were required to demonstrate protective effects against lethal challenge. PMID:27272940

  12. Deletion of C7L and K1L Genes Leads to Significantly Decreased Virulence of Recombinant Vaccinia Virus TianTan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Shuhui; Zhang, Qicheng; Tian, Meijuan; Hou, Jue; Wang, Rongmin; Liu, Chang; Ji, Xu; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    The vaccinia virus TianTan (VTT) has been modified as an HIV vaccine vector in China and has shown excellent performance in immunogenicity and safety. However, its adverse effects in immunosuppressed individuals warrant the search for a safer vector in the following clinic trails. In this study, we deleted the C7L and K1L genes of VTT and constructed six recombinant vaccinia strains VTT△C7L, VTT△K1L, VTT△C7LK1L, VTKgpe△C7L, VTKgpe△K1L and VTT△C7LK1L-gag. The pathogenicity and immunogenicity of these recombinants were evaluated in mouse and rabbit models. Comparing to parental VTT, VTT△C7L and VTT△K1L showed significantly decreased replication capability in CEF, Vero, BHK-21 and HeLa cell lines. In particular, replication of VTT△C7LK1L decreased more than 10-fold in all four cell lines. The virulence of all these mutants were decreased in BALB/c mouse and rabbit models; VTT△C7LK1L once again showed the greatest attenuation, having resulted in no evident damage in mice and erythema of only 0.4 cm diameter in rabbits, compared to 1.48 cm for VTT. VTKgpe△C7L, VTKgpe△K1L and VTT△C7LK1L-gag elicited as strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV genes as did VTKgpe, while humoral immune response against the vaccinia itself was reduced by 4-8-fold. These data show that deletion of C7L and K1L genes leads to significantly decreased virulence without compromising animal host immunogenicity, and may thus be key to creating a more safe and effective HIV vaccine vector. PMID:23840887

  13. Deletion of C7L and K1L genes leads to significantly decreased virulence of recombinant vaccinia virus TianTan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Shuhui; Zhang, Qicheng; Tian, Meijuan; Hou, Jue; Wang, Rongmin; Liu, Chang; Ji, Xu; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    The vaccinia virus TianTan (VTT) has been modified as an HIV vaccine vector in China and has shown excellent performance in immunogenicity and safety. However, its adverse effects in immunosuppressed individuals warrant the search for a safer vector in the following clinic trails. In this study, we deleted the C7L and K1L genes of VTT and constructed six recombinant vaccinia strains VTT△C7L, VTT△K1L, VTT△C7LK1L, VTKgpe△C7L, VTKgpe△K1L and VTT△C7LK1L-gag. The pathogenicity and immunogenicity of these recombinants were evaluated in mouse and rabbit models. Comparing to parental VTT, VTT△C7L and VTT△K1L showed significantly decreased replication capability in CEF, Vero, BHK-21 and HeLa cell lines. In particular, replication of VTT△C7LK1L decreased more than 10-fold in all four cell lines. The virulence of all these mutants were decreased in BALB/c mouse and rabbit models; VTT△C7LK1L once again showed the greatest attenuation, having resulted in no evident damage in mice and erythema of only 0.4 cm diameter in rabbits, compared to 1.48 cm for VTT. VTKgpe△C7L, VTKgpe△K1L and VTT△C7LK1L-gag elicited as strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV genes as did VTKgpe, while humoral immune response against the vaccinia itself was reduced by 4-8-fold. These data show that deletion of C7L and K1L genes leads to significantly decreased virulence without compromising animal host immunogenicity, and may thus be key to creating a more safe and effective HIV vaccine vector.

  14. Vaccinia virus K1 ankyrin repeat protein inhibits NF-κB activation by preventing RelA acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bravo Cruz, Ariana G; Shisler, Joanna L

    2016-10-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein inhibits dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) activation. A consequence of this function is that K1 inhibits PKR-induced NF-κB activation during VACV infection. However, transient expression of K1 also inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced NF-κB activation. This suggests that K1 has a second NF-κB inhibitory mechanism that is PKR-independent. This possibility was explored by expressing K1 independently of infection and stimulating NF-κB under conditions that minimized or excluded PKR activation. K1 inhibited both TNF- and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced NF-κB activation, as detected by transcription of synthetic (e.g. luciferase) and natural (e.g. CXCL8) genes controlled by NF-κB. K1 also inhibited NF-κB activity in PKRkd cells, cells that have greatly decreased amounts of PKR. K1 no longer prevented IκBα degradation or NF-κB nuclear translocation in the absence of PKR, suggesting that K1 acted on a nuclear event. Indeed, K1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of stimulated and unstimulated cells. K1 inhibited acetylation of the RelA (p65) subunit of NF-κB, a nuclear event known to be required for NF-κB activation. Moreover, p65-CBP (CREB-binding protein) interactions were blocked in the presence of K1. However, K1 did not preclude NF-κB binding to oligonucleotides containing κB-binding sites. The current interpretation of these data is that NF-κB-promoter interactions still occur in the presence of K1, but NF-κB cannot properly trigger transcriptional activation because K1 antagonizes acetylation of RelA. Thus, in comparison to all known VACV NF-κB inhibitory proteins, K1 acts at one of the most downstream events of NF-κB activation.

  15. Oncolytic measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated cytotoxicity by human myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Carole; Guillerme, Jean-Baptiste; Bruni, Daniela; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Combredet, Chantal; Tangy, Frédéric; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Attenuated measles virus (MV) is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as an oncolytic therapeutic agent. Originally used for its lytic activity against tumor cells, it is now admitted that the effectiveness of MV also lies in its ability to initiate antitumor immune responses through the activation of dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we investigated the capacity of oncolytic MV to convert human blood myeloid CD1c+ DCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into cytotoxic effectors. We found that MV induces the expression of the cytotoxic protein TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on the surface of DCs. We demonstrate that the secretion of interferon-α (IFN-α) by DCs in response to MV is responsible for this TRAIL expression. Several types of PRRs (pattern recognition receptors) have been implicated in MV genome recognition, including RLRs (RIG-I-like receptors) and TLRs (Toll-like receptors). We showed that CD1c+ DCs secrete modest amounts of IFN-α and express TRAIL in an RLR-dependent manner upon exposure to MV. In pDCs, MV is recognized by RLRs and also by TLR7, leading to the secretion of high amounts of IFN-α and TRAIL expression. Finally, we showed that MV-stimulated DCs induce TRAIL-mediated cell death of Jurkat cells, confirming their acquisition of cytotoxic functions. Our results demonstrate that MV can activate cytotoxic myeloid CD1c+ DCs and pDCs, which may participate to the antitumor immune response. PMID:28197384

  16. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-)/trp53(-/-) syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/-) Trp53 (+/-) mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  17. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Kiminori; Chiyo, Tomoko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Tobita, Yoshimi; Tokunaga, Yuko; Yasui, Fumihiko; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Wakita, Takaji; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Mizuno, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Matsushima, Kouji; Kohara, Michinori

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis), liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25), which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-))/MxCre((+/-)) mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor) TNF-α and (interleukin) IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  18. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities.

  19. Safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) against Dryvax challenge in vaccinia-naïve and vaccinia-immune individuals.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Janie; McCurdy, Lewis H; Larkin, Brenda D; Gordon, Ingelise J; Rucker, Steven E; Enama, Mary E; Koup, Richard A; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T; Moodie, Zoe; Gu, Lin; Yan, Lihan; Graham, Barney S

    2007-02-09

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) was evaluated as an alternative to Dryvax in vaccinia-naïve and vaccinia-immune adult volunteers. Subjects received intramuscular MVA or placebo followed by Dryvax challenge at 3 months. Two or more doses of MVA prior to Dryvax reduced severity of lesion formation, decreased magnitude and duration of viral shedding, and augmented post-Dryvax vaccinia-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and extracellular enveloped virus protein-specific antibody responses. MVA vaccination is safe and immunogenic and improves the safety and immunogenicity of subsequent Dryvax vaccination supporting the potential for using MVA as a vaccine in the general population to improve immunity to orthopoxviruses.

  20. Interferon-mediated Tumor Resistance to Oncolytic Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Safieh; Ghorbani, Elnaz; Khazaei, Majid; Avan, Amir; Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Azadmanesh, Keyhan; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi

    2017-01-30

    Interferons (INFs) elicit antiviral responses in tumor cells upon binding to cell surface receptors. Oncolytic virotherapy (OV) is an effective antitumor therapeutic approach which in combination with standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy regimens potentiates treatment responses in cancer patients. However, oncolytic viruses are susceptible to the IFN-induced antiviral state in the tumor microenvironment. A number of studies have therefore investigated the effects of combined therapy of IFN signaling pharmacological inhibitors with oncolytic viruses, which result in improved virus replication and oncolysis. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the mechanisms of interferon-mediated tumor resistance to oncolytic virotherapy and provides new insights regarding the effectiveness of combinatorial treatment strategies to attenuate INF-induced OV resistance for greater clinical significance in the treatment of cancer patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM.

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  3. Modeling oncolytic virotherapy: is complete tumor-tropism too much of a good thing?

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Amarasekare, Priyanga; Petty, Ian T D

    2014-10-07

    The specific targeting of tumor cells by replication-competent oncolytic viruses is considered indispensable for realizing the potential of oncolytic virotherapy. Yet off-target infections by oncolytic viruses may increase virus production, further reducing tumor load. This ability may be critical when tumor-cell scarcity or the onset of an adaptive immune response constrain viral anti-tumoral efficacy. Here we develop a mathematical framework for assessing whether oncolytic viruses with reduced tumor-specificity can more effectively eliminate tumors while keeping losses to normal cell populations low. We find viruses that infect some normal cells can potentially balance the competing goals of tumor elimination and minimizing the effects on normal cell populations. Particularly when infected tissues can be regenerated, moderating rather than completely eliminating the ability of oncolytic viruses to infect and lyse normal cells could improve cancer treatment, with potentially fewer side-effects than conventional treatments such as chemotherapy.

  4. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  5. The orthopoxvirus 68-kilodalton ankyrin-like protein is essential for DNA replication and complete gene expression of modified vaccinia virus Ankara in nonpermissive human and murine cells.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Karin M; Schwantes, Astrid; Staib, Caroline; Schnierle, Barbara S; Sutter, Gerd

    2009-06-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a highly attenuated and replication-deficient vaccinia virus (VACV) that is being evaluated as replacement smallpox vaccine and candidate viral vector. MVA lacks many genes associated with virulence and/or regulation of virus tropism. The 68-kDa ankyrin-like protein (68k-ank) is the only ankyrin repeat-containing protein that is encoded by the MVA genome and is highly conserved throughout the Orthopoxvirus genus. We showed previously that 68k-ank is composed of ankyrin repeats and an F-box-like domain and forms an SCF ubiquitin ligase complex together with the cellular proteins Skp1a and Cullin-1. We now report that 68k-ank (MVA open reading frame 186R) is an essential factor for completion of the MVA intracellular life cycle in nonpermissive human and murine cells. Infection of mouse NIH 3T3 and human HaCaT cells with MVA with a deletion of the 68k-ank gene (MVA-Delta68k-ank) was characterized by an extensive reduction of viral intermediate RNA and protein, as well as late transcripts and drastically impaired late protein synthesis. Furthermore, infections with MVA-Delta68k-ank failed to induce the host protein shutoff that is characteristic of VACV infections. Although we demonstrated that proteasome function in general is essential for the completion of the MVA molecular life cycle, we found that a mutant 68k-ank protein with a deletion of the F-box-like domain was able to fully complement the deficiency of MVA-Delta68k-ank to express all classes of viral genes. Thus, our data demonstrate that the 68k-ank protein contains another critical domain that may function independently of SCF ubiquitin ligase complex formation, suggesting multiple activities of this interesting regulatory protein.

  6. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 pro