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Sample records for oncorhynchus nerka 1993-1994

  1. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : Life History and Genetic Analysis of Redfish Lake Oncorhynchus Nerka, 1993-1994 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Cummings, S.A.

    1994-10-01

    The study has shown through life history examination and DNA analysis that three forms of O. nerka are present in Redfish Lake. The three forms are closely related, but may be sufficiently different to be considered three separate stocks. Fishhook Creek kokanee are temporally isolated from the beach spawners, and may represent the gene pool most similar to the historic sockeye population that once spawned there. Fishhook Creek offers the best spawning area available in the lake system, and should be considered for use in reestablishing an anadromous Fishhook Creek sockeye swain. The resident beach spawning strain of O. nerka is likewise the most similar genetic form of the companion anadromous beach spawning O. nerka, and needs to be considered the most appropriate genetic source to help minimize reduced fitness of the sockeye from inbreeding.

  2. Sexual maturation in kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, S.D.; Scarnecchia, D.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used observational and experimental approaches to obtain information on factors affecting the timing of maturation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka, a semelparous, landlocked salmon. Gonadal staging criteria were developed and applied to three kokanee populations in Idaho lakes and reservoirs. Testes were classified into three stages: immature (stage one, S1), maturing (S2), and mature (S3). Ovaries were classified into eight stages: immature (S1-S3), transitional (stage S4), maturing (S5-S7), and mature (S8). Males entered the maturing stage (S2) in February through April of the spawning year. Females entered maturing stage (S5) as early as July of the year before the spawning year, and as late as March of the spawning year. Three hatchery experiments demonstrated that attainment of a larger body size 10 to 16 months before spawning increased the likelihood of initiation of maturation in both sexes. No gonads in a state of regression were observed. A gonadosomatic index above 0.1 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing male, and a gonadosomatic index above 1.0 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing female. Instantaneous growth rates were not good predictors of maturation, but attaining a size threshold of 18 to 19 cm in the fall was a good predictor of maturation the following year. This improved knowledge of kokanee maturation will permit more effectively management of the species for age, growth and size at maturity as well as for contributions to fisheries. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Setter, A.L.; Welsh, T.L.; Rocklage, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 project to develop DNA assessment techniques for the purpose of determining relationships among populations of Oncorhynchus nerka demonstrated differences that had potential for such application. The work was continued in 1991 with specific application of the techniques to develop DNA probes that could be used in separating populations of 0. nerka associated with the lakes in the upper Salmon River, principally those in Redfish Lake. Research included sockeye-kokanee life history studies that might add supporting evidence for assessing the degree of difference or similarity among populations in the lake systems. This report summarizes the annual activities under the work plan.

  4. Recent ecological divergence despite migration in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavey, Scott A.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Hamon, Troy R.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological divergence may result when populations experience different selection regimes, but there is considerable discussion about the role of migration at the beginning stages of divergence before reproductive isolating mechanisms have evolved. However, detection of past migration is difficult in current populations and tools to differentiate genetic similarities due to migration versus recent common ancestry are only recently available. Using past volcanic eruption times as a framework, we combine morphological analyses of traits important to reproduction with a coalescent-based genetic analysis of two proximate sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations. We find that this is the most recent (~500 years, 100 generations) natural ecological divergence recorded in a fish species, and report that this divergence is occurring despite migration. Although studies of fish divergence following the retreat of glaciers (10,000–15,000 years ago) have contributed extensively to our understanding of speciation, the Aniakchak system of sockeye salmon provides a rare example of the initial stages of ecological divergence following natural colonization. Our results show that even in the face of continued migration, populations may diverge in the absence of a physical barrier.

  5. Heritability of tolerance for infectious hematopoietic necrosis in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntyre, John D.; Amend, Donald F.

    1978-01-01

    A hierarchical breeding design was used to demonstrate the heritability of tolerance for infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in sockeye salmon. Oncorhynchus nerka. Heritability was about 30%, indicating that artificial selection may increase the number of fish that can tolerate the disease.

  6. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring in the Sawtooth Valley Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Teuscher, D.M.; Taki, D.; Ariwite, K.

    1996-05-01

    Critical habitat for endangered Snake River sockeye salmon includes five rearing lakes located in the Sawtooth Valley of central Idaho. Most of the lakes contain either introduced or endemic kokanee populations. Snake River sockeye occur naturally in Redfish Lake, and are being stocked in Redfish and Pettit Lakes. Because kokanee compete with sockeye for limited food resources, understanding population characteristics of both species such as spawn timing, egg-to-fry survival, distribution and abundance are important components of sockeye recovery. This chapter describes some of those characteristics. In 1995, hydroacoustic estimates of O. nerka densities in the Sawtooth Valley Lakes ranged from 57 to 465 fish/ha. Densities were greatest in Pettit followed by Redfish (167), Alturas (95), and Stanley Lakes. O. nerka numbers increased from 1994 values in Pettit and Alturas Lakes, but declined in Redfish and Stanley. Despite a decline in total lake abundance, O. nerka biomass estimates in Redfish Lake increased. Approximately 144,000 kokanee fry recruited to Redfish Lake from Fishhook Creek. O. nerka fry recruitment to Stanley and Alturas lake was 5,000 and 30,000 fry, respectively. Egg-to-fry survival was 14% in Fishhook and 7% in Stanley Lake Creek. In Fishhook Creek, kokanee spawning escapement was estimated using stream surveys and a weir. Escapement estimates were 4,860 from weir counts, and 7,000 from stream surveys. As part of the kokanee reduction program, 385 of the spawning female kokanee were culled. Escapement for Stanley Lake Creek was only 60 fish, a ten fold decrease from 1994. In Alturas Lake, kokanee spawners dropped by 50% to 1,600.

  7. The utilization of a Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus nerka subsidy by three populations of charr Salvelinus spp.

    PubMed

    Denton, K P; Rich, H B; Moore, J W; Quinn, T P

    2010-09-01

    The L(F) -at-age trajectories differentiated two populations of Dolly Varden charr Salvelinus malma and a population of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus from the eastern end of Iliamna Lake, Alaska. Salvelinus malma from the Pedro Bay ponds were the smallest for a given age, followed by Salvelinus alpinus from the lake, and S. malma from the Iliamna River were much larger. The utilization of a large sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka subsidy by the three Salvelinus spp. populations was then investigated by comparing diet data and mixing model (MixSIR) outputs based on carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Stomach contents indicated that both S. malma populations fed on O. nerka products, especially eggs and larval Diptera that had scavenged O. nerka carcasses, whereas S. alpinus fed on a variety of prey items such as three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus and snails. Stable-isotope analysis corroborated the diet data; the two S. malma populations incorporated more O. nerka-derived nutrients into their tissues than did S. alpinus from the lake, although all populations showed substantial utilization of O. nerka-derived resources. Salvelinus alpinus also seemed to be much more omnivorous, as shown by stable-isotope mixing models, than the S. malma populations. The dramatic differences in growth rate between the two S. malma populations, despite similar trophic patterns, indicate that other important genetic or environmental factors affect their life history, including proximate temperature controls and ultimate predation pressures.

  8. Thermal regime, predation danger and the early marine exit of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Katinic, P J; Patterson, D A; Ydenberg, R C

    2015-01-01

    Marine exit timing of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations on the Haida Gwaii Archipelago, British Columbia, Canada, is described, with specific focus on Copper Creek. Marine exit in Copper Creek occurs > 130 days prior to spawning, one of the longest adult freshwater residence periods recorded for any O. nerka population. Copper Creek presents an easy upstream migration, with mild water temperatures (7 to 14°  C), short distance (13·1 km) and low elevation gain (41 m) to the lake where fish hold prior to spawning. An energetic model estimates that <1% of the initial energy reserve is required for upstream migration, compared with 62% for lake holding and 38% for reproductive development. Historical records suggest that it is unlikely that water temperature in any of the O.nerka streams in Haida Gwaii has ever exceeded the presumed temperature threshold (19° C) for early marine exit. Although it is not impossible that the thermal tolerance of Copper Creek O.nerka is very low, the data presented here appear inconsistent with thermal avoidance as an explanation for the early marine exit timing in Copper Creek and in three other populations on the archipelago with early marine exit.

  9. Histopathology of yearling sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) infected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1979-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is generally believed to be a virus disease of very young salmonids. In recent years there have been increasing numbers of unpublished reports that this disease has been occurring uncharacteristically in fish as old as 7-14 months. Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) of this age the histological changes were not severe. Intestinal tract granular cells thought to be pathognomic in young fish were conspicuously absent. Kidney imprints showed necrobiotic bodies however, and subtle changes were observed in the spleen and kidney hematopoietic tissue.

  10. Genetic Analysis of Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka), 2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Joyce; Powell, Madison

    2003-12-01

    A total of 1720 Oncorhynchus nerka tissue samples from 40 populations were characterized using mitochondrial DNA RFLPs (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms). Analysis of anadromous sockeye populations indicated the historical presence of four major maternal lineages. Thirty-five composite mitochondrial haplotypes were observed from the 40 populations of O. nerka sampled throughout the Pacific Northwest. Six of these composite haplotypes ranged in frequency from 7-26% overall and were commonly observed in most populations. The six haplotypes together comprised 90% of the sampled O. nerka. An average of 4.6 composite haplotypes were observed per population. Genetic markers used were satisfactory in separating Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye, residual sockeye and outmigrants from the sympatric kokanee population that spawns in the Fishhook Creek tributary. Outmigrants appear to be primarily composed of progeny from resident residual sockeye, and captively-reared progeny of the captive broodstock program. Thus, residual sockeye may be considered a suitable source of genetic variation to maintain genetic diversity among captive broodstocks of anadromous sockeye. Fishhook Creek kokanee are genetically diverse and during spawning, are temporally and spatially isolated from the residual sockeye population. Eleven composite haplotypes were observed in the kokanee population. The unusually high number of haplotypes is most likely a consequence of periodic stocking of Redfish Lake with kokanee from other sources. Genetic data from Redfish Lake creel samples taken during 1996-1999 putatively indicate the incidental take of a listed resident sockeye.

  11. Immunization of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) against vibriosis using the hyperosmotic infiltration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croy, Thomas R.; Amend, Donald F.

    1977-01-01

    Various procedures of hyperosmotic infiltration (HI) and intraperitoneal injection were used to vaccinate sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) with killed Vibrio anguillarum. Excellent protection was evident against experimentally induced vibriosis in the groups immunized by HI with 10 × Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), 1 × HBSS with 8.0% NaCl and 5.3% NaCl, as well as in the injected groups. Comparisons were made among the various immunization methods by vaccinating fish with ten-fold serial dilutions of bacterin, then challenging them by the water contact method after 6 or 9 weeks. Protection was somewhat better with 10 × HBSS than with 5.3% NaCl, and 1 × HBSS containing 8.0% NaCl was markedly superior to the vaccination of fish without hyperosmotic treatment. Agglutinin titers did not exceed 1 : 8 in any group.

  12. Isolation and structural characterization of glycosaminoglycans from heads of red salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fuming; Xie, Jin; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear, highly negatively charged polysaccharides. They are ubiquitous molecules exhibiting a wide range of biological functions with numerous applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and nutraceutical industrials. The commercial fish-processing industry generates large quantities of solid waste, which can represent a potential resource for GAG production. In this study, we used a three-step recovery and purification scheme for isolation of GAGs from the heads of red salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The GAGs recovery yield was 6 to 7 mg from 1 gram of salmon head powder. The recovered GAGs were structurally analyzed with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by disaccharide composition analysis with reversed-phase ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography. The analyses showed the major composition of the GAGs in red salmon head were chondroitin sulfate C and E. PMID:26918243

  13. Composition and location of simulated lake-shore redds influence incubation success in kokanee, Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fincel, M.J.; Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for improving spawning habitat for lakeshore spawning kokanee, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), were explored by quantifying incubation success of embryos exposed to three substrate treatments in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, USA. Substrate treatments included no modification that used existing gravels in the lake (EXISTING), a cleaned substrate treatment where existing gravels were sifted in the water column to remove silt (CLEANED) and the addition of new, silt-free gravel (ADDED). Incubation success was evaluated using Whitlock-Vibert incubation boxes buried within each substrate treatment that contained recently fertilised embryos. Upon retrieval, live and dead sac fry and eyed eggs were enumerated to determine incubation success (sac fry and eyed eggs ?? 100/number of fertilised embryos). Incubation success varied significantly among locations and redd treatments. In general, incubation success among ADDED redds (0.0-13.0%) was significantly lower than that for EXISTING (1.4-61.0%) and CLEANED (0.4-62.5%) redds. Adding new gravel to spawning areas changed the morphometry of the gravel-water interface and probably exposed embryos to disturbance from wave action and reduced embryo survival. Moreover, efforts to improve spawning habitat for lakeshore spawning kokanee should consider water depth and location (e.g. protected shorelines) as important variables. Adding clean gravel to existing spawning areas may provide little benefit if water depth or lake-bottom morphometry are altered. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Incubation temperature, developmental biology, and the divergence of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) within Lake Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hendry, A.P.; Hensleigh, J.E.; Reisenbichler, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) introduced into Lake Washington in the 1930s and 1940s now spawn at several different sites and over a period of more than 3 months. To test for evolutionary divergence within this derived lineage, embryos that would have incubated in different habitats (Cedar River or Pleasure Point Beach) or at different times (October, November, or December in the Cedar River) were reared in the laboratory at 5, 9, and 12.5??C. Some developmental variation mirrored predictions of adaptive divergence: (i) survival at 12.5??C was highest for embryos most likely to experience such temperatures in the wild (Early Cedar), (ii) development rate was fastest for progeny of late spawners (Late Cedar), and (iii) yolk conversion efficiency was matched to natural incubation temperatures. These patterns likely had a genetic basis because they were observed in a common environment and could not be attributed to differences in egg size. The absolute magnitude of divergence in development rates was moderate (Late Cedar embryos emerged only 6 days earlier at 9??C) and some predictions regarding development rates were not supported. Nonetheless our results provide evidence of adaptive divergence in only 9-14 generations.

  15. Immersion vaccination of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) with two pathogenic strains of Vibrio anguillarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, R.W.; Antipa, R.; Amend, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were immersion-vaccinated in suspensions containing 5 × 107, 5 × 106, 5 × 105, or 5 × 104 bacteria/mL of bivalent or monovalent, formalin-killedVibrio anguillarum, Types I and II. The fish were split into two lots and held for 54 d. At that time one lot was challenged with living, virulent V. anguillarum, Type I, and one with living, virulent V.anguillarum, Type II. Immunization with bivalent bacterin effectively protected the fish from vibriosis, but monovalent vaccine was effective only against the homologous challenge. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type I monovalent bacterin resulted in 0% Type I and 58% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type II monovalent bacterin resulted in 41% Type I and 0% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of bivalent Type I/Type II bacterin resulted in 2% mortality in both challenges. Protective bacterins were effective at concentrations down to 5 × 105 bacteria/mL.Key words: immersion vaccination, bivalent vaccines, Vibrio anguillarum, vibriosis.

  16. Revisiting evolutionary dead ends in sockeye salmon ( Oncorhynchus nerka) life history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavey, S.A.; Hamon, T.R.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    This study challenges recent hypotheses about sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) colonization based on life history and broadens the pathways that investigators should consider when studying sockeye colonization of novel habitats. Most sockeye populations exhibit lake-type life histories. Riverine populations are thought to be more likely to stray from their natal stream to spawn and therefore colonize new habitat. We examined genetic relationships among five geographically proximate sockeye populations from the Aniakchak region of the Alaska Peninsula, Alaska. Specifically, we sought to determine if the genetic population structure was consistent with the hypothesis that a riverine population colonized a recently available upriver volcanic caldera lake, and whether recent volcanism led to genetic bottlenecks in these sockeye populations. Heterozygosity and allelic richness were not higher in the riverine population. Patterns of genetic divergence suggested that the geographically proximate riverine sockeye population did not colonize the lake; the caldera populations were more genetically divergent from the downstream riverine population (FST  =  0.047) than a lake-type population in a different drainage (FST  =  0.018). Our results did not suggest the presence of genetic bottlenecks in the caldera populations.

  17. Ionoregulatory changes in different populations of maturing sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka during ocean and river migration.

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, J M; Patterson, D A; Richards, J G; Cooke, S J; Schulte, P M; Hinch, S G; Farrell, A P

    2005-11-01

    We present the first data on changes in ionoregulatory physiology of maturing, migratory adult sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. Fraser River sockeye were intercepted in the ocean as far away as the Queen Charlotte Islands (approximately 850 km from the Fraser River) and during freshwater migration to the spawning grounds; for some populations this was a distance of over 700 km. Sockeye migrating in seawater toward the mouth of the Fraser River and upriver to spawning grounds showed a decline in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. As a result, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity of fish arriving at the spawning grounds was significantly lower than values obtained from fish captured before entry into freshwater. Plasma osmolality and chloride levels also showed significant decreases from seawater values during the freshwater migration to spawning areas. Movement from seawater to freshwater increased mRNA expression of a freshwater-specific Na+,K+-ATPase isoform (alpha1a) while having no effect on the seawater-specific isoform (alpha1b). In addition, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity generally increased in active spawners compared with unspawned fish on the spawning grounds and this was associated with a marked increase in Na+,K+-ATPase alpha1b mRNA. Increases in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activities observed in spawners suggests that the fish may be attempting to compensate for the osmotic perturbation associated with the decline in plasma chloride concentration and osmolality.

  18. Pathogenesis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Burke, J.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was determined in eight organs and two body fluids from each of 60 adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Included in the sample were 4 males and 56 prespawning, spawning, or spent female fish. All fish were infected, and virus was present in nearly all organs. There was an overall tendency for the mean concentration to increase in many of the organs over time as the fish progressed in ripeness. In prespawning females, IHN virus could be detected in all organs and in ovarian fluid but not in serum; the incidences were highest in the gills, spleen, and pyloric ceca, and the titers were highest in the pyloric ceca and liver. Incidences of infection in the organs were higher in spawning than in prespawning females and higher still in spent females in which the incidence of virus was 100% in all organs except brains (78%) and sera (67%). Virus concentrations in organs or fluids ranged from 5 to 4.0 × 109 plaque-forming units per millilitre. In males, the highest incidences of virus were found in gills, pyloric ceca, and liver. The gills were the only organ in which the virus concentration in males exceeded that of females.Key words: infectious hematopoietic necrosis, IHN, fish virus, viral pathogenesis, sockeye salmon

  19. Directional selection by fisheries and the timing of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) migrations.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas P; Hodgson, Sayre; Flynn, Lucy; Hilborn, Ray; Rogers, Donald E

    2007-04-01

    The timing of migration from feeding to breeding areas is a critical link between the growth and survival of adult animals, their reproduction, and the fitness of their progeny. Commercial fisheries often catch a large fraction of the migrants (e.g., salmon), and exploitation rates can vary systematically over the fishing season. We examined daily records of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in the Egegik and Ugashik management districts in Bristol Bay, Alaska (USA), for evidence of such temporally selective fishing. In recent years, the early migrants have experienced lower fishing rates than later migrants, especially in the Egegik district, and the median migration date of the fish escaping the fisheries has been getting progressively earlier in both districts. Moreover, the overall runs (catch and escapement) in the Egegik district and, to a lesser extent the Ugashik district, have been getting earlier, as predicted in response to the selection on timing. The trends in timing were not correlated with sea surface temperature in the region of the North Pacific Ocean where the salmon tend to concentrate, but the trends in the two districts were correlated with each other, indicating that there may be some common environmental influence in addition to the effect of selection. Despite the selection, both groups of salmon have remained productive. We hypothesize that this resilience may result from representation of all component populations among the early and late migrants, so that the fisheries have not eliminated entire populations, and from density-dependent processes that may have helped maintain the productivity of these salmon populations.

  20. Behavioral tactics of male sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) under varying operating sex ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, Thomas P; Adkison, Milo D.; Ward, Michael B.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated several reproductive-behavior patterns in male salmon, including competitive and sneaking tactics, the formation of hierarchies, and non-hierarchical aggregations around ripe females. Through behavioral observations at varying spatial and temporal scales, we examined the hypothesis that operational sex ratio (OSR) determines male sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) distribution and breeding tactics. Patterns of male distribution and behavior varied over both coarse and fine scales, associated with apparent shifts in reproductive opportunities, the physical characteristics of the breeding sites, and the deterioration of the fish as they approached death. Females spawned completely within a few days of arriving on the spawning grounds, whereas males courted the available ripe females from the date of their arrival on the spawning ground until their death. This difference in reproductive lifespans tended to elevate late-season OSRs but was partially counterbalanced by male departures and the arrival of other ripe females. The proportion of males able to dominate access to ripe females decreased and the number of large courting groups increased over the course of the season, apparently related to both increasing OSR and the deteriorating physical condition of males. However, great variation in OSR was observed within the spawning sites on a given day. OSRs were generally higher in shallow than in deep water, perhaps because larger females or more desirable breeding sites were concentrated in shallow water. The aggregations of males courting females were not stable (i.e. many arrivals and departures took place) and male aggression varied with group size. Aggression was most frequent at low OSRs and in groups of intermediate size (2–4 males per female), and much less frequent in larger groups, consistent with the needs of maximizing reproductive opportunities while minimizing unproductive energy expenditure. These results indicate

  1. Global Assessment of Extinction Risk to Populations of Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Peter S.; Goslin, Matthew; Gross, Mart R.; Irvine, James R.; Augerot, Xanthippe; McHugh, Peter A.; Bugaev, Victor F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Concern about the decline of wild salmon has attracted the attention of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The IUCN applies quantitative criteria to assess risk of extinction and publishes its results on the Red List of Threatened Species. However, the focus is on the species level and thus may fail to show the risk to populations. The IUCN has adapted their criteria to apply to populations but there exist few examples of this type of assessment. We assessed the status of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as a model for application of the IUCN population-level assessments and to provide the first global assessment of the status of an anadromous Pacific salmon. Methods/Principal Findings We found from demographic data that the sockeye salmon species is not presently at risk of extinction. We identified 98 independent populations with varying levels of risk within the species' range. Of these, 5 (5%) are already extinct. We analyzed the risk for 62 out of 93 extant populations (67%) and found that 17 of these (27%) are at risk of extinction. The greatest number and concentration of extinct and threatened populations is in the southern part of the North American range, primarily due to overfishing, freshwater habitat loss, dams, hatcheries, and changing ocean conditions. Conclusions/Significance Although sockeye salmon are not at risk at the species-level, about one-third of the populations that we analyzed are at risk or already extinct. Without an understanding of risk to biodiversity at the level of populations, the biodiversity loss in salmon would be greatly underrepresented on the Red List. We urge government, conservation organizations, scientists and the public to recognize this limitation of the Red List. We also urge recognition that about one-third of sockeye salmon global population diversity is at risk of extinction or already extinct. PMID:22511930

  2. Effects of rearing temperature on immune functions in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alcorn, S.W.; Murray, A.L.; Pascho, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    To determine if the defences of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) raised in captivity are affected by the rearing temperature or their life-cycle stage, various indices of the humoral and cellular immune functions were measured in fish reared at either 8 or 12??C for their entire life-cycle. Measures of humoral immunity included the commonly used haematological parameters, as well as measurements of complement, and lysozyme activity. Cellular assays quantified the ability of macrophages from the anterior kidney to phagocytise Staphylococcus aureus cells, or the activities of certain bactericidal systems of those cells. The T-dependent antibody response to a recombinant 57 kDa protein of Renibacterium salmoninarum was used to quantify the specific immune response. Fish were sampled during the spring and fall of their second, third and fourth years, corresponding to a period that began just before smolting and ended at sexual maturation. Fish reared at 8??C tended to have a greater percentage of phagocytic kidney macrophages during the first 2 years of sampling than the fish reared at 12??C. During the last half of the study the complement activity of the fish reared at 8??C was greater than that of the 12??C fish. Conversely, a greater proportion of the blood leucocytes were lymphocytes in fish reared at 12??C compared to the fish reared at 8??C. Fish reared at 12??C also produced a greater antibody response than those reared at 8??C. Results suggested that the immune apparatus of sockeye salmon reared at 8??C relied more heavily on the non-specific immune response, while the specific immune response was used to a greater extent when the fish were reared at 12??C. Although a seasonal effect was not detected in any of the indices measured, varying effects were observed in some measurements during sexual maturation of fish in both temperature groups. At that time there were dramatic decreases in complement activity and lymphocyte numbers. This study was unique in

  3. Effects of rearing temperature on immune functions in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka).

    PubMed

    Alcorn, Stewart W; Murra, Anthony L; Pascho, Ronald J

    2002-04-01

    To determine if the defences of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) raised in captivity are affected by the rearing temperature or their life-cycle stage, various indices of the humoral and cellular immune functions were measured in fish reared at either 8 or 12 degrees C for their entire life-cycle. Measures of humoral immunity included the commonly used haematological parameters, as well as measurements of complement, and lysozyme activity. Cellular assays quantified the ability of macrophages from the anterior kidney to phagocytise Staphylococcus aureus cells, or the activities of certain bactericidal systems of those cells. The T-dependent antibody response to a recombinant 57 kDa protein of Renibacterium salmoninarum was used to quantify the specific immune response. Fish were sampled during the spring and fall of their second, third and fourth years, corresponding to a period that began just before smolting and ended at sexual maturation. Fish reared at 8 degrees C tended to have a greater percentage of phagocytic kidney macrophages during the first 2 years of sampling than the fish reared at 12 degrees C. During the last half of the study the complement activity of the fish reared at 8 degrees C was greater than that of the 12 degrees C fish. Conversely, a greater proportion of the blood leucocytes were lymphocytes in fish reared at 12 degrees C compared to the fish reared at 8 degrees C. Fish reared at 12 degrees C also produced a greater antibody response than those reared at 8 degrees C. Results suggested that the immune apparatus of sockeye salmon reared at 8 degrees C relied more heavily on the non-specific immune response, while the specific immune response was used to a greater extent when the fish were reared at 12 degrees C. Although a seasonal effect was not detected in any of the indices measured, varying effects were observed in some measurements during sexual maturation of fish in both temperature groups. At that time there were dramatic

  4. Antigen-binding cells in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum, induced by immersion or intraperitoneal injection of Vibrio languilarum bacterin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1981-01-01

    We used an immunocytoadherence assay to monitor the response of antigen-binding cells (ABC) in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, after immersion in, or intraperitoneal injection of, Vibrio anguillarum LS 1–74 bacterin. Both methods initiated an elevated ABC response in less than one day; this response persisted one week longer in the injected than in the immersed fish.

  5. Ecological relationship between freshwater sculpins (Genus cottus) and beach-spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Iliamna Lake, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, C.J.; Brown, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between two sculpin species, Cottus cognatus and Cottus aleuticus, and island beach spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) was examined in Iliamna Lake, Alaska. We conclude that sculpins actively move to specific spawning beaches and that the initiation of their movements precedes the start of spawning. Sculpin predation on sockeye eggs is positively dependent on sculpin size and on the state of the eggs (fresh versus water hardened), with the largest sculpins able to consume nearly 50 fresh eggs at a single feeding and 130 over a 7-day period. The number of sculpins in sockeye nests is greatest at the beginning of the spawning run, lowest in the middle, and high again at the end, with peak numbers of over 100 sculpins per nest (1 m2). We discuss the results in terms of energy flow of marine-derived nutrients into an oligotrophic system and in terms of the coevolution of sockeye spawning behavior and the predatory behavior of sculpins.

  6. Appearance and quantification of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in female sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during their spawning migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Jenes, C.K.; Pascho, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence and amount of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was determined in 10 organs and body fluids from each of 100 female sockeye salmon(Oncorhynchus nerka) before, during, and after their spawning migration into freshwater. Virus was found in high concentrations only in fish sampled during and after spawning. Infection rates increased from nil to 100 percent within 2 weeks. In spawning fish, incidences of IHN virus were high in all organs and fluids except brain and serum, and the highest concentrations were in the pyloric caeca and lower gut. Immediately before spawning, IHN virus was found most frequently in the gills, less frequently in the pyloric caeca and spleen, and rarely in other organs.

  7. Mortality due to infectious hematopoietic necrosis of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) fry in streamside egg incubation boxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus caused mortality of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in streamside egg incubation boxes. Virus was not detectable in eggs or alevins; its first isolation coincided with the appearance of dead fish in a trap on the outflow from the box. Mortality due to the virus did not occur in every egg box studied. However, when fry from the boxes were held in the laboratory, epizootics began as much as 3 wk later, with total mortality exceeding 90%. More than 96% of the dead fry had titers exceeding 105 plaque-forming units per gram. The peak incidence of virus in fry migrating in the river coincided with the arrival of hatchery-produced fry, although some fry believed to have been produced by natural spawning were also infected.Englis

  8. Extensive feeding on sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts by bull trout Salvelinus confluentus during initial outmigration into a small, unregulated and inland British Columbia river.

    PubMed

    Furey, N B; Hinch, S G; Lotto, A G; Beauchamp, D A

    2015-01-01

    Stomach contents were collected and analysed from 22 bull trout Salvelinus confluentus at the edge of the Chilko Lake and Chilko River in British Columbia, Canada, during spring outmigration of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts. Twenty of the 22 (>90%) stomachs contained prey items, virtually all identifiable prey items were outmigrant O. nerka smolts and stomach contents represented a large portion (0·0-12·6%) of estimated S. confluentus mass. The results demonstrate nearly exclusive and intense feeding by S. confluentus on outmigrant smolts, and support recent telemetry observations of high disappearance rates of O. nerka smolts leaving large natural lake systems prior to entering high-order unregulated river systems.

  9. Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) Habitat/Limnologic Research : Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Spaulding, Scott

    1993-05-01

    This report outlines long-term planning and monitoring activities that occurred in 1991 and 1992 in the Stanley Basin Lakes of the upper Salmon River, Idaho for the purpose of sockeye salmon nerka) recovery. Limnological monitoring and experimental sampling protocol, designed to establish a limnological baseline and to evaluate sockeye salmon production capability of the lakes, are presented. Also presented are recommended passage improvements for current fish passage barriers/impediments on migratory routes to the lakes. We initiated O. nerka population evaluations for Redfish and Alturas lakes; this included population estimates of emerging kokanee fry entering each lake in the spring and adult kokanee spawning surveys in tributary streams during the fall. Gill net evaluations of Alturas, Pettit, and Stanley lakes were done in September, 1992 to assess the relative abundance of fish species among the Stanley Basin lakes. Fish population data will be used to predict sockeye salmon production potential within a lake, as well as a baseline to monitor long-term fish community changes as a result of sockeye salmon recovery activities. Also included is a paper that reviews sockeye salmon enhancement activities in British Columbia and Alaska and recommends strategies for the release of age-0 sockeye salmon that will be produced from the current captive broodstock.

  10. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 ??g doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  11. Early marine growth in relation to marine-stage survival rates for Alaska sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, Edward V.; Murphy, J.M.; Adkison, Milo D.; Eisner, L.B.; Helle, J.H.; Moss, J.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that larger juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, have higher marine-stage survival rates than smaller juvenile salmon. We used scales from returning adults (33 years of data) and trawl samples of juveniles (n = 3572) collected along the eastern Bering Sea shelf during August through September 2000-02. The size of juvenile sockeye salmon mirrored indices of their marine-stage survival rate (e.g., smaller fish had lower indices of marine-stage survival rate). However, there was no relationship between the size of sockeye salmon after their first year at sea, as estimated from archived scales, and brood-year survival size was relatively uniform over the time series, possibly indicating size-selective mortality on smaller individuals during their marine residence. Variation in size, relative abundance, and marine-stage survival rate of juvenile sockeye salmon is likely related to ocean conditions affecting their early marine migratory pathways along the eastern Bering Sea shelf.

  12. Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) return after an absence of nearly 90 years: A case of reversion to anadromy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godbout, L.; Wood, C.C.; Withler, R.E.; Latham, S.; Nelson, R.J.; Wetzel, L.; Barnett-Johnson, R.; Grove, M.J.; Schmitt, A.K.; McKeegan, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    We document the recent reappearance of anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) that were thought to have been extirpated by the construction of hydroelectric dams on the Coquitlam and Alouette rivers in British Columbia, Canada, in 1914 and 1927, respectively. Unexpected downstream migrations of juveniles during experimental water releases into both rivers in 2005 and 2006 preceded upstream return migrations of adults in 2007 and 2008. Genetic (microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA) markers and stable isotope (??34S and 87Sr/86Sr) patterns in otoliths confirm that both the juvenile downstream migrants and adult upstream migrants were progeny of nonanadromous sockeye salmon (kokanee) that inhabit Coquitlam and Alouette reservoirs. Low genetic diversity and evidence of genetic bottlenecks suggest that the kokanee populations in both reservoirs originated from relatively few anadromous individuals that residualized after downstream migration was largely prevented by the construction of dams. Once given an opportunity for upstream and downstream migration, both populations appear capable of reverting to a successful anadromous form, even after 25 generations.

  13. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon.

    PubMed

    Garver, Kyle A; LaPatra, Scott E; Kurath, Gael

    2005-04-06

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 pg doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish.

  14. Zooplanktivory and nutrient regeneration by invertebrate (Mysis relicta) and vertebrate (Oncorhynchus nerka) planktivores: Implications for trophic interactions in oligotrophic lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated zooplanktivory and nutrient regeneration by the opossum shrimp Mysis relicta and kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to assess the relative roles of these planktivores in oligotrophic food webs. Using bioenergetic models and clearance rate estimates, we quantified phosphorus (P) excretion rates and consumption of cladoceran prey by Mysis and kokanees in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, from 1995 to 1996. Consumption of cladoceran prey by Mysis was 186 kg ?? ha-1 ?? year-1, whereas consumption by kokanees was less than one quarter as much, at 45 kg ?? ha-1 ?? year-1. Similarly, Mysis excreted approximately 0.250 kg P ?? ha-1 ?? year-1 during nighttime migrations into the upper water column, whereas P excretion by kokanees was less than one third as much, at approximately 0.070 kg P ?? ha-1 ?? year-1. On a volumetric basis, nocturnal excretion by Mysis ranged from 0.002 to 0.007 ??g P ?? L-1 ?? d-1 and accounted for less than 1% of the soluble reactive P typically measured in the upper water column of the lake. Hence, nutrient recycling by Mysis may be limited in the upper water column because of the nocturnal feeding habitats that constrain Mysis to deeper strata for much of the day. In spring and autumn months, low abundance of cladoceran prey coincided with high seasonal energy requirements of the Mysis population that were linked to timing of annual Mysis brood release and abundance of age-0 Mysis. Predation by Mysis accounted for 5-70% of daily cladoceran standing stock, supporting the notion that seasonal availability of cladocerans may be regulated by Mysis predation. In lakes where Mysis experience little predation mortality, they likely play a dominant role in food web interactions (e.g., trophic cascades) relative to planktivorous fishes. Biotic mechanisms, such as successful predator-avoidance behavior, omnivorous feeding habits, and seasonal variation in Mysisbiomass, enhance the ability of Mysis to influence food web interactions from an intermediate

  15. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus genogroup-specific virulence mechanisms in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), from Redfish Lake, Idaho.

    PubMed

    Purcell, M K; Garver, K A; Conway, C; Elliott, D G; Kurath, G

    2009-07-01

    Characterization of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) field isolates from North America has established three main genogroups (U, M and L) that differ in host-specific virulence. In sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, the U genogroup is highly virulent, whereas the M genogroup is nearly non-pathogenic. In this study, we sought to characterize the virus-host dynamics that contribute to genogroup-specific virulence in a captive stock of sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake in Idaho. Juvenile sockeye salmon were challenged by immersion and injection with either a representative U or M viral strain and sampled periodically until 14 days post-infection (p.i.). Fish challenged with each strain had positive viral titre by day 3, regardless of challenge route, but the fish exposed to the M genogroup virus had significantly lower virus titres than fish exposed to the U genogroup virus. Gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR was used to simultaneously assess viral load and host interferon (IFN) response in the anterior kidney. Viral load was significantly higher in the U-challenged fish relative to M-challenged fish. Both viruses induced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but expression was usually significantly lower in the M-challenged group, particularly at later time points (7 and 14 days p.i.). However, ISG expression was comparable with 3 days post-immersion challenge despite a significant difference in viral load. Our data indicated that the M genogroup virus entered the host, replicated and spread in the sockeye salmon tissues, but to a lesser extent than the U genogroup. Both virus types induced a host IFN response, but the high virulence strain (U) continued to replicate in the presence of this response, whereas the low virulence strain (M) was cleared below detectable levels. We hypothesize that high virulence is associated with early in vivo replication allowing the virus to achieve a threshold level, which the

  16. Population Genetic Structure and Life History Variability in Oncorhynchus Nerka from the Snake River Basin, 1991-1993 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Robin S.; Aebersold, Paul B.; Winans, Gary A.

    1997-05-01

    A detailed examination of O. nerka from lakes in the Sawtooth Valley of Idaho was undertaken to help guide recovery planning for the endangered Redfish Lake population and to help resolve relationships between resident and anadromous forms.

  17. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus genogroup-specific virulence mechanisms in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), from Redfish Lake, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) field isolates from North America has established three main genogroups (U, M and L) that differ in host-specific virulence. In sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, the U genogroup is highly virulent, whereas the M genogroup is nearly non-pathogenic. In this study, we sought to characterize the virus-host dynamics that contribute to genogroup-specific virulence in a captive stock of sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake in Idaho. Juvenile sockeye salmon were challenged by immersion and injection with either a representative U or M viral strain and sampled periodically until 14 days post-infection (p.i.). Fish challenged with each strain had positive viral titre by day 3, regardless of challenge route, but the fish exposed to the M genogroup virus had significantly lower virus titres than fish exposed to the U genogroup virus. Gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR was used to simultaneously assess viral load and host interferon (IFN) response in the anterior kidney. Viral load was significantly higher in the U-challenged fish relative to M-challenged fish. Both viruses induced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but expression was usually significantly lower in the M-challenged group, particularly at later time points (7 and 14 days p.i.). However, ISG expression was comparable with 3 days post-immersion challenge despite a significant difference in viral load. Our data indicated that the M genogroup virus entered the host, replicated and spread in the sockeye salmon tissues, but to a lesser extent than the U genogroup. Both virus types induced a host IFN response, but the high virulence strain (U) continued to replicate in the presence of this response, whereas the low virulence strain (M) was cleared below detectable levels. We hypothesize that high virulence is associated with early in vivo replication allowing the virus to achieve a threshold level, which the

  18. Alternative models of climatic effects on sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, M.; Peterman, R.; Lapointe, M.; Gillis, D.; Korman, J.

    1996-01-01

    We compare alternative models of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity (returns per spawner) using more than 30 years of catch and escapement data for Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia. The models examined include several alternative forms of models that incorporate climatic influences as well as models not based on climate. For most stocks, a stationary stock-recruitment relationship explains very little of the interannual variation in productivity. In Bristol Bay, productivity co-varies among stocks and appears to be strongly related to fluctuations in climate. The best model for Bristol Bay sockeye involved a change in the 1970s in the parameters of the Ricker stock-recruitment curve; the stocks generally became more productive. In contrast, none of the models of Fraser River stocks that we examined explained much of the variability in their productivity.

  19. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  20. Infection of gill and kidney of Fraser River sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), by Parvicapsula minibicornis and its effect on host physiology.

    PubMed

    Bradford, M J; Lovy, J; Patterson, D A

    2010-09-01

    Adult sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), migrating upstream in the Fraser River, British Columbia, are exposed to the myxozoan parasite Parvicapsula minibicornis when they enter the river from the ocean. Infections are initially localized in the kidney but have recently been associated with branchitis in one population. Adult fish from five locations in the watershed were sampled to determine whether branchitis was widespread. P. minibicornis infections in kidney glomeruli were prevalent in all samples except for a sample of fish that had just entered the Fraser River from the ocean. For fish captured in spawning streams, parasites were observed in the renal tubules and gill, and branchitis was observed in 70% of fish. Plasma osmolality was negatively correlated with the number of parasites in the kidney tubules, which we hypothesize to be caused by the breach of glomerular membranes as the parasite leaves the fish. Plasma lactate values increased with increasing levels of pathology in gills. These findings support the hypothesis that P. minibicornis impacts the physiology of migrating fish, which may in turn affect the likelihood that adults will be able to migrate and spawn successfully.

  1. Deposition Form and Bioaccessibility of Keto-carotenoids from Mamey Sapote (Pouteria sapota), Red Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum), and Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) Filet.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Ordóñez, Tania; Esquivel, Patricia; Jiménez, Víctor M; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2016-03-09

    The ultrastructure and carotenoid-bearing structures of mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota) chromoplasts were elucidated using light and transmission electron microscopy and compared to carotenoid deposition forms in red bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Globular-tubular chromoplasts of sapote contained numerous lipid globules and tubules embodying unique provitamin A keto-carotenoids in a lipid-dissolved and presumably liquid-crystalline form, respectively. Bioaccessibility of sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin was compared to that of structurally related keto-carotenoids from red bell pepper and salmon. Capsanthin from bell pepper was the most bioaccessible pigment, followed by sapotexanthin and cryptocapsin esters from mamey sapote. In contrast, astaxanthin from salmon was the least bioaccessible keto-carotenoid. Thermal treatment and fat addition consistently enhanced bioaccessibility, except for astaxanthin from naturally lipid-rich salmon, which remained unaffected. Although the provitamin A keto-carotenoids from sapote were highly bioaccessible, their qualitative and quantitative in vivo bioavailability and their conversion to vitamin A remains to be confirmed.

  2. Isolation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from a leech (Piscicola salmositica) and a copepod (Salmincola sp.), ectoparasites of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Klaybor, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    ectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was isolated from freshwater leeches Piscicola salmositica and copepods Salmincola sp. removed from the gills of spawning sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. This is the first report of the isolation of IHN virus from an animal other than salmonid fishes. High levels of IHN virus were also found in leeches taken from the bottom gravel of the spawning area. The prevalence of IHN virus in samples of individual leeches was as high as 100 "/o and the virus was isolated from 95 % of pooled samples of copepods. The highest level of virus was 8.7 X lo5 pfu (plaque forming units) g-' in the copepod and 1.5 X 10"fu g-' in the leech. The level of virus in leeches removed from fish gills was sometimes higher than the level of virus in the gill tissue itself. Virus persisted for at least 16 d in leeches held in the laboratory without feeding. Transmission of IHN virus by leeches probably increases the infection rate of spawning sockeye salmon.

  3. A perspective on physiological studies supporting the provision of scientific advice for the management of Fraser River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, David A.; Cooke, Steven J.; Hinch, Scott G.; Robinson, Kendra A.; Young, Nathan; Farrell, Anthony P.; Miller, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    The inability of physiologists to effect change in fisheries management has been the source of frustration for many decades. Close collaboration between fisheries managers and researchers has afforded our interdisciplinary team an unusual opportunity to evaluate the emerging impact that physiology can have in providing relevant and credible scientific advice to assist in management decisions. We categorize the quality of scientific advice given to management into five levels based on the type of scientific activity and resulting advice (notions, observations, descriptions, predictions and prescriptions). We argue that, ideally, both managers and researchers have concomitant but separate responsibilities for increasing the level of scientific advice provided. The responsibility of managers involves clear communication of management objectives to researchers, including exact descriptions of knowledge needs and researchable problems. The role of the researcher is to provide scientific advice based on the current state of scientific information and the level of integration with management. The examples of scientific advice discussed herein relate to physiological research on the impact of high discharge and water temperature, pathogens, sex and fisheries interactions on in-river migration success of adult Fraser River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and the increased understanding and quality of scientific advice that emerges. We submit that success in increasing the quality of scientific advice is a function of political motivation linked to funding, legal clarity in management objectives, collaborative structures in government and academia, personal relationships, access to interdisciplinary experts and scientific peer acceptance. The major challenges with advancing scientific advice include uncertainty in results, lack of integration with management needs and institutional caution in adopting new research. We hope that conservation physiologists can learn from

  4. Seasonal marine growth of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in relation to competition with Asian pink salmon (O. gorbuscho) and the 1977 ocean regime shift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggerone, Gregory T.; Farley, Ed; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Hagen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recent research demonstrated significantly lower growth and survival of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during odd-numbered years of their second or third years at sea (1975, 1977, etc.), a trend that was opposite that of Asian pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) abundance. Here we evaluated seasonal growth trends of Kvichak and Egegik river sockeye salmon (Bristol Bay stocks) during even- and odd-numbered years at sea by measuring scale circuli increments within each growth zone of each major salmon age group between 1955 and 2000. First year scale growth was not significantly different between odd- and even-numbered years, but peak growth of age-2. smolts was significantly higher than age-1 smolts. Total second and third year scale growth of salmon was significantly lower during odd- than during even-numbered years. However, reduced scale growth in odd-numbered years began after peak growth in spring and continued through summer and fall even though most pink salmon had left the high seas by late July (10-18% growth reduction in odd vs. even years). The alternating odd and even year growth pattern was consistent before and after the 1977 ocean regime shift. During 1977-2000, when salmon abundance was relatively great, sockeye salmon growth was high during specific seasons compared with that during 1955-1976, that is to say, immediately after entry to Bristol Bay, after peak growth in the first year, during the middle of the second growing season, and during spring of the third season. Growth after the spring peak in the third year at sea was relatively low during 1977-2000. We hypothesize that high consumption rates of prey by pink salmon during spring through mid-July of odd-numbered years, coupled with declining zooplankton biomass during summer and potentially cyclic abundances of squid and other prey, contributed to reduced prey availability and therefore reduced growth of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon during late spring through fall of odd-numbered years.

  5. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1993-1994. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Alternatives for ground water cleanup; Managing wastewater in coastal urban areas; and, Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  6. The Chomsky-Place correspondence 1993-1994.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, N; Place, U T

    2000-01-01

    Edited correspondence between Ullin T. Place and Noam Chomsky, which occurred in 1993-1994, is presented. The principal topics are (a) deep versus surface structure; (b) computer modeling of the brain; (c) the evolutionary origins of language; (d) behaviorism; and (e) a dispositional account of language. This correspondence includes Chomsky's denial that he ever characterized deep structure as innate; Chomsky's critique of computer modeling (both traditional and connectionist) of the brain; Place's critique of Chomsky's alleged failure to provide an adequate account of the evolutionary origins of language, and Chomsky's response that such accounts are "pop-Darwinian fairy tales"; and Place's arguments for, and Chomsky's against, the relevance of behaviorism to linguistic theory, especially the relevance of a behavioral approach to language that is buttressed by a dispositional account of sentence construction.

  7. The 1993-1994 Activity of EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.; Aspin, C.; Gilmore, Alan C.; Imhoff, Catherine L.; Jones, Albert F.

    2001-12-01

    EX Lupi is a classical T Tauri star (and the EXor prototype) subject to sporadic outbursts. The historic record shows that it remains at about V=13.2 (or mpg=14.7:) for extended periods, from which it has been observed to brighten to as much as V=8.4 (on one occasion in 1955-1956). During 1993-1994 the star remained slightly above normal minimum, at about V=12.8, and from that level rose to three maxima at V=11.4 and on other occasions to about V=12.0. At minimum light an M0 V absorption spectrum is present. At outburst this spectrum is veiled by a hot continuum (well shown by an IUE exposure), the equivalent widths of the optical-region emission lines decrease, and reverse P Cygni absorption components appear at the higher Balmer lines. The outbursts are believed to be due to episodic infall onto the M0 star.

  8. Recovery of stratospheric ozone over the United States in the winter of 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J.; Harris, J.M.; Lathrop, J.A.; Koenig, G.L.; Komhyr, W.D.; Evans, R.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Deshler, T.; Johnson, B.J.

    1994-08-15

    Total ozone levels, which were 10-15% below normal over the US during the winter of 1992-1993, returned to levels slightly above normal during the winter of 1993-1994. Investigation of ozone vertical profiles indicates that in the region where severe depletion occurred in 1992-1993 (25% reductions at 12-22 km), ozone had returned to normal, while above this region, ozone was abnormally high. Thus total ozone was also high. Low ozone values in 1992-1993 were believed to be related to heterogeneous chemistry on the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol. This interpretation is strengthened by these observations since the particle surface area available for heterogeneous processes in the stratosphere diminished substantially at midlatitudes during 1993 and was not replenished by transport from the equatorial reservoir during the winter as had occurred during the previous winter. However, the observation of continued unusually high ozone above 24 km in winter suggests that this phenomenon, thought to also have been at least partially due to heterogeneous chemistry, is mainly related to dynamics. Unusually high total ozone levels in high northerly latitudes during the winter of 1993-1994 and especially in early February, associated with warm stratospheric temperatures during December and January, are probably the source of high ozone above 24 km in midlatitudes at this time. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  9. FAA/NASA Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research: 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the research conducted during the academic year 1993-1994 under the NASA/FAA sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research. The year end review was held at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, July 14-15, 1994. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of three grants sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration, one each with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (NGL-22-009-640), Ohio University (NGR-36-009-017), and Princeton University (NGL-31-001-252). Completed works, status reports, and annotated bibliographies are presented for research topics which include navigation, guidance and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, human factors, and expert systems concepts applied to aircraft and airport operations. An overview of the year's activities for each university is also presented.

  10. Smolt Migration Characteristics and Mainstem Snake and Columbia River Detection Rates of PIT-Tagged Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon, Annual Reports 1993, 1994, 1995 : Fish Research Project, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Timothy R.; Carmichael, Richard W.; Keefe, MaryLouise

    1996-04-01

    This reports on the second, third, and fourth years of a multi-year study to assess smolt migration characteristics and cumulative detection rates of naturally produced spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Northeast Oregon streams. The goal of this project is to develop an understanding of interpopulational and interannual variation in several early life history parameters of naturally produced spring and summer chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River subbasins. This project will provide information to assist chinook salmon population recovery efforts. Specific populations included in the study are: (1) Catherine Creek; (2) Upper Grande Ronde River; (3) Lostine River; (4) Imnaha River; (5) Wenaha River; and (6) Minam River. In this document, the authors present findings and activities from research completed in 1993, 1994, and 1995.

  11. Investigation of air transportation technology at Ohio University: 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, Robert W.

    1995-01-01

    The Joint University Program (JUP) offers students, faculty, and staff of the Avionics Engineering Center the opportunity to conduct basic research relating to the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System. During the 1993-1994 year research was continued in a variety of GPS-related technologies and also in a hybrid data uplink system. (1) Processing techniques developed for the GPS attitude determination have been applied to centimeter-level kinematic GPS aircraft positioning for flight reference systems and aircraft autoland and taxiing operations. This resulted in the first real-time kinematic GPS autoland. (2) The fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm developed under the Joint University Program has been fully adopted by RTCA Special Committee 159 as the baseline algorithm for sole-means navigation of GPS integrated with GLONASS, LORAN-C, or baro-altimeter. (3) A Satellite Coverage Research Analysis Model (SCRAM) has been developed which provides outage areas, outage dynamics, and availability information for satellite-based navigation systems. RTCA Special Committee 159 has adopted this model for use in their work. (4) A basic receiver structure has been simulated and tested for use with the hybrid data uplink. This uplink utilizes the phase of an existing AM carrier to transmit digital data, thus both amplitude and phase modulation are applied, resulting in a hybrid carrier. The receiver simulation is directly applicable to real-time implementation as a result of the development platform.

  12. Comparative financial analysis of laparoscopic pelvic lymph node dissection performed in 1990-1992 v 1993-1994.

    PubMed

    Troxel, S A; Winfield, H N

    1996-08-01

    In 1994, it was reported that laparoscopic pelvic lymph node dissection (L-PLND) was US $1350 more expensive than open pelvic lymph node dissection (O-PLND) for the staging of prostate cancer. Despite the lower postoperative expenses associated with L-PLND, the intraoperative expenditures were 52% higher, primarily because of the prolonged operating time and the cost of disposable instrumentation. The objective of the present study was to determine if, with increasing laparoscopic experience and a more competitive surgical supply market, the intraoperative as well as the overall hospital expenses would diminish. The study population consisted of 105 men who underwent staging L-PLND for cancer of the prostate. Group I was composed of 50 patients who underwent surgery between 1990 and 1992, and Group II consisted of 55 patients operated on in 1993 and 1994. All hospital-related expenses were reorganized into preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative and subsequently corrected for inflationary changes to a base year of 1993-1994. The total overall expenses of the two groups were similar, differing by only $65. Despite a lowering of preoperative and postoperative expenses in the 1993-1994 group by 112% and 31%, respectively, the intraoperative expenses were still $571 higher. The operative time decreased by 19 minutes in the contemporary group, but the expense of surgical supplies continued to increase up to $910 (104%) more than the 1990-1992 group. It is hoped that the use of "laparoscopic kits" as well hospital equipment consortiums will help slow the escalating costs of surgical care. However, it is the responsibility of the laparoscopic surgeon to demonstrate that these procedures are as safe, efficient, and cost-effective as their open counterpart.

  13. Preliminary assessment of the occurrence and possible sources of MTBE in groundwater in the United States, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.J.; Zogorski, J.S.; Wilber, W.G.; Price, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require fuel oxygenates to be added to gasoline used in some metropolitan areas to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon monoxide or ozone. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is the most commonly used fuel oxygenate and is a relatively new gasoline additive. Nevertheless, out of 60 volatile organic chemicals analyzed, MTBE was the second most frequently detected chemical in samples of shallow ambient groundwater from urban areas that were collected during 1993-1994 aspart of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. Samples were collected from five drinking water wells, 12 springs, and 193 monitoring wells in urban areas. No MTBE was detected in drinking water wells. At a reporting level of 0.2 ??g/L, MTBE was detected most frequently in shallow groundwater from urban areas (27% of 210 wells and springs sampled in eight areas) as compared to shallow groundwater from agricultural areas (1.3% of 549 wells sampled in 21 areas) or deeper groundwater from major aquifers (1.0% of 412 wells sampled in nine areas). Only 3% of the shallow wells sampled in urban areas had concentrations of MTBE that exceed 20 ??g/L, which is the estimated lower limit of the United States Environmental Protection Agency draft drinking water health advisory. Because MTBE is persistent and mobile in groundwater, it can move from shallow to deeper aquifers with time. In shallow urban groundwater, MTBE generally was not found with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, or xylene (BTEX) compounds, which commonly are associated with gasoline spills. This disassociation causes uncertainty as to the source of MTBE. Possible sources of MTBE in groundwater include point sources, such as leaking storage tanks, and non-point sources, such as recharge of precipitation and stormwater runoff.

  14. State of Maine Annual Performance Report on Applied Technology Programs Funded under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act (P.L. 101-392). Program Year 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Education, Augusta. Div. of Applied Technology.

    This report summarizes 1993-1994 program year developments in Maine's applied technology programs funded under the 1990 Carl D. Perkins Act. The first section highlights the following program activities: continued development of Maine's integrated school-to-work transition system, which will allow secondary students to choose one of six career…

  15. Concurrent natural and sexual selection in wild male sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Troy R; Foote, Chris J

    2005-05-01

    Concurrent natural and sexual selection have been inferred from laboratory and comparative studies in a number of taxa, but are rarely measured in natural populations. Because the interaction of these two general categories of selection may be complex when they occur simultaneously, empirical evidence from natural populations would help us to understand this interaction and probably give us greater insight into each separate episode as well. In male sockeye salmon, sexual selection for larger body size has been indicated in both deep and shallow water habitats. However, in shallow habitats male sockeye are generally smaller and less deep-bodied than in deep habitats, a difference that has been ascribed to natural selection. We measured concurrent natural and sexual selection in two years on breeding male sockeye salmon with respect to body size, body shape, and time of arrival to the breeding grounds. Natural selection was variable in effect and sexual selection was variable in intensity in these two years. The patterns of selection also appear to be interdependent; areas where predation on spawning adults is not intense have yielded different patterns of sexual selection than those measured here. It appears that some of the body shape differences in sockeye salmon associated with different spawning habitats, which were previously attributed to selective mortality, may be a result of different patterns of sexual selection in the different habitats. Total selection resulting from the combination of both natural and sexual selection was less intense than either natural or sexual selection in most cases. Measurement of concurrent selection episodes in nature may help us to understand whether the pattern of differential sexual selection is common, and whether observed patterns of habitat-related differentiation may be due to differences in sexual selection.

  16. Over-winter ecology of Oncorhynchus nerka in the Sawtooth Valley Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhart, G.B.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this section of the report on limnology of Lakes in the Snake River Plain are descriptions of winter limnological conditions and kokanee growth characteristics from 1993 to 1995. The winter is usually a very harsh period for animals, and little is know about the over-winter ecology os sockeye salmon. They are active a temperatures below 4 F. The chapter discusses methods and results. 14 figs, 4 tabs.

  17. Founding events influence genetic population structure of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Lake Clark, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramstad, K.M.; Woody, C.A.; Sage, G.K.; Allendorf, F.W.

    2004-01-01

    Bottlenecks can have lasting effects on genetic population structure that obscure patterns of contemporary gene flow and drift. Sockeye salmon are vulnerable to bottleneck effects because they are a highly structured species with excellent colonizing abilities and often occupy geologically young habitats. We describe genetic divergence among and genetic variation within spawning populations of sockeye salmon throughout the Lake Clark area of Alaska. Fin tissue was collected from sockeye salmon representing 15 spawning populations of Lake Clark, Six-mile Lake, and Lake Iliamna. Allele frequencies differed significantly at 11 microsatellite loci in 96 of 105 pairwise population comparisons. Pairwise estimates of FST ranged from zero to 0.089. Six-mile Lake and Lake Clark populations have historically been grouped together for management purposes and are geographically proximate. However, Six-mile Lake populations are genetically similar to Lake Iliamna populations and are divergent from Lake Clark populations. The reduced allelic diversity and strong divergence of Lake Clark populations relative to Six-mile Lake and Lake Iliamna populations suggest a bottleneck associated with the colonization of Lake Clark by sockeye salmon. Geographic distance and spawning habitat differences apparently do not contribute to isolation and divergence among populations. However, temporal isolation based on spawning time and founder effects associated with ongoing glacial retreat and colonization of new spawning habitats contribute to the genetic population structure of Lake Clark sock-eye salmon. Nonequilibrium conditions and the strong influence of genetic drift caution against using estimates of divergence to estimate gene flow among populations of Lake Clark sockeye salmon.

  18. Virginia Resolves, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, S. Rex, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These two issues of "Virginia Resolves" provide articles of interest to the social studies reader and provides ideas for social studies instruction and curriculum. The fall issue features seven articles: (1) "Death and the Young Child" (Rosanne J. Marek); (2) "Simulations: Bibliography for the Middle and Elementary…

  19. Field research, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This article summarizes field research during the 1993-94 field season in the Antarctic. Among other studies were descriptions of the following: Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the antarctic marginal ice zone; Long-term ecological research (LTER) on the Antarctic marine ecosystem: microbiology and carbon flux; Geologic record of late Wisconsinan/Holocene ice sheet advance and retreat from the Ross Sea; Late Quarernary paleoclimatic history of southern Chile: evidence from the marine record; Integrated biostratigraphy and high resolution seismic stratigraphy of the Ross Sea: Implications for Cenozoic eustatic and climate change; Oxygen-isotope record from McMurdo dome and its relation to the geological climate record of the McMurdo Dry Valleys; Evaluation of processes at polar glacier grounding lines to constrain glaciological and oceanographic models; Reconstruction of paleotemperatures from precision borehole temperature logging; Cenozoic glacial and climatic history of the antarctic region; Observation and modeling studies of episodic events in the south polar atmospheric boundary layer; biogeochemistry of carbon and silica on the antarctic shelf; Chlorine and bromine containing trace gases in Antarctica; South Pole monitoring for climatic change; Aerosol Sampling at Palmer Station; several Ozone depletion studies.

  20. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  1. Vertical transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka): Isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisheries and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of IHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973; Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe1977; Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IHN epizootic in an effort to eliminate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingfield & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  2. Competition between Asian pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and Alaskan sockeye salmon (O. nerka) in the North Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Zimmermann, M.; Myers, K.W.; Nielsen, J.L.; Rogers, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of interspecific competition as a mechanism regulating population abundance in offshore marine communities is largely unknown. We evaluated offshore competition between Asian pink salmon and Bristol Bay (Alaska) sockeye salmon, which intermingle in the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, using the unique biennial abundance cycle of Asian pink salmon from 1955 to 2000. Sockeye salmon growth during the second and third growing seasons at sea, as determined by scale measurements, declined significantly in odd-numbered years, corresponding to years when Asian pink salmon are most abundant. Bristol Bay sockeye salmon do not interact with Asian pink salmon during their first summer and fall seasons and no difference in first year scale growth was detected. The interaction with odd-year pink salmon led to significantly smaller size at age of adult sockeye salmon, especially among younger female salmon. Examination of sockeye salmon smolt to adult survival rates during 1977-97 indicated that smolts entering the ocean during even-numbered years and interacting with abundant odd-year pink salmon during the following year experienced 26% (age-2 smolt) to 45% (age-1 smolt) lower survival compared with smolts migrating during odd-numbered years. Adult sockeye salmon returning to Bristol Bay from even-year smolt migrations were 22% less abundant (reduced by 5.9 million fish per year) compared with returns from odd-year migrations. The greatest reduction in adult returns occurred among adults spending 2 compared with 3 years at sea. Our new evidence for interspecific competition highlights the need for multispecies, international management of salmon production, including salmon released from hatcheries into the ocean.

  3. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM OF PLASMA PROLACTIN, GROWTH HORMONE, GLUCOSE AND FREE FATTY ACIDS IN JUVENIOE KOKANEE SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS NERKA. (R823881)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Piscine reovirus, but not Jaundice Syndrome, was transmissible to Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), Sockeye Salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), and Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar L.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, Kyle A.; Marty, Gary D.; Cockburn, Sarah N.; Richard, Jon; Hawley, Laura M.; Müller, Anita; Thompson, Rachel L.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    A Jaundice Syndrome occurs sporadically among sea-pen-farmed Chinook Salmon in British Columbia, the westernmost province of Canada. Affected salmon are easily identified by a distinctive yellow discolouration of the abdominal and periorbital regions. Through traditional diagnostics, no bacterial or viral agents were cultured from tissues of jaundiced Chinook Salmon; however, piscine reovirus (PRV) was identified via RT-rPCR in all 10 affected fish sampled. By histopathology, Jaundice Syndrome is an acute to peracute systemic disease, and the time from first clinical signs to death is likely <48 h; renal tubular epithelial cell necrosis is the most consistent lesion. In an infectivity trial, Chinook Salmon, Sockeye Salmon and Atlantic Salmon, intraperitoneally inoculated with a PRV-positive organ homogenate from jaundiced Chinook Salmon, developed no gross or microscopic evidence of jaundice despite persistence of PRV for the 5-month holding period. The results from this study demonstrate that the Jaundice Syndrome was not transmissible by injection of material from infected fish and that PRV was not the sole aetiological factor for the condition. Additionally, these findings showed the Pacific coast strain of PRV, while transmissible, was of low pathogenicity for Atlantic Salmon, Chinook Salmon and Sockeye Salmon.

  5. ASPOD modifications of 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jennifer J. (Editor); Fogarty, Paul W.; Muller, Matthew; Martucci, Thomas A., III; Williams, Daniel; Rowney, David A.

    1994-01-01

    ASPOD, Autonomous Space Processors for Orbital Debris, provides a unique way of collecting the space debris that has built up over the past 37 years. For the past several years, ASPOD has gone through several different modifications. This year's concentrations were on the solar cutting array, the solar tracker, the earth based main frame/tilt table, the controls for the two robotic arms, and accurate autocad drawings of ASPOD. This final report contains the reports written by the students who worked on the ASPOD project this year.

  6. Selected Reference Books of 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    1994-01-01

    Offers brief, critical reviews of recent scholarly and general works of interest to reference workers in university libraries. Titles covered include dictionaries, databases, religion, literature, music, dance, art and architecture, business, political science, social issues, and history. Brief descriptions of new editions and supplements for…

  7. The influence of life history trade-offs and the size of the incubation gravels on egg size variation in sockeye salmon Onchorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, Thomas P; Hendry , Andrew P.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    1995-01-01

    Egg size is a critical life history trait, reflecting female investment and affecting off- spring fitness. We investigated several factors which may influence variation in egg weight for sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Comparisons were based on col- lections from 18 Alaskan populations, among which adult migration distance and ju- venile rearing habitat were similar but the size composition of incubation gravels was different. Among populations, most of the variation in egg weight could be explained by a positive correlation with different measures of the size composition of incubation gravels (Pearson's r = 0.45-0.91). In contrast, egg weight was poorly correlated with female body length and with female snout length, a morphological feature used during intra-sexual competition. Within each of the Alaskan populations, however, egg weight and snout length were positively correlated with female body length and hence with each other. A positive association between snout length and egg weight was still evident even after the effects of covariance with body size were removed using resid- uals analysis: for all of the fish pooled and within 6 of the 16 populations. A signifi- cant relationship was not detected in the other populations but the trend was neverthe- less positive in 8 of the other 10. Examination of reproductive traits (gonad weight, egg weight, egg number, snout length and hump size) within another population iden- tified a trade-off between egg weight and egg number for females of a given body length. In contrast, positive correlations between reproductive traits were more com- mon, suggesting that energy-rich individuals produce large eggs and large secondary sexual characteristics rather than sacrificing one for the other.

  8. Self-sustaining populations, population sinks or aggregates of strays: chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Wood River system, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jocelyn E; Hilborn, Ray; Quinn, Thomas P; Hauser, Lorenz

    2011-12-01

    Small populations can provide insights into ecological and evolutionary aspects of species distributions over space and time. In the Wood River system in Alaska, USA, small aggregates of Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) spawn in an area dominated by sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Our objective was to determine whether these Chinook and chum salmon are reproductively isolated, self-sustaining populations, population sinks that produce returning adults but receive immigration, or strays from other systems that do not produce returning adults. DNA samples collected from adult chum salmon from 16 streams and Chinook salmon from four streams in the Wood River system over 3 years were compared to samples from large populations in the nearby Nushagak River system, a likely source of strays. For both species, microsatellite markers indicated no significant genetic differentiation between the two systems. Simulations of microsatellite data in a large source and a smaller sink population suggested that considerable immigration would be required to counteract the diverging effects of genetic drift and produce genetic distances as small as those observed, considering the small census sizes of the two species in the Wood River system. Thus, the Wood River system likely receives substantial immigration from neighbouring watersheds, such as the Nushagak River system, which supports highly productive runs. Although no data on population productivity in the Wood River system exist, our results suggest source-sink dynamics for the two species, a finding relevant to other systems where salmonid population sizes are limited by habitat factors.

  9. Immersion vaccination of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) with two pathogenic strains of Vibrio anguillarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, R.W.; Antipa, R.; Amend, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were immersion-vaccinated in suspensions containing 5 × 107, 5 × 106, 5 × 105, or 5 × 104 bacteria/mL of bivalent or monovalent, formalin-killed Vibrio anguillarum, Types I and II. The fish were split into two lots and held for 54 d. At that time one lot was challenged with living, virulent V. anguillarum, Type I, and one with living, virulent V. anguillarum, Type II. Immunization with bivalent bacterin effectively protected the fish from vibriosis, but monovalent vaccine was effective only against the homologous challenge. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type I monovalent bacterin resulted in 0% Type I and 58% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type II monovalent bacterin resulted in 41% Type I and 0% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of bivalent Type I/Type II bacterin resulted in 2% mortality in both challenges. Protective bacterins were effective at concentrations down to 5 × 105 bacteria/mL. Key words: immersion vaccination, bivalent vaccines, Vibrio anguillarum, vibriosis.

  10. Vertical transmission of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum): isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IIHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisherics and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of lHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973, Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe 1977. Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IEEN epizootic in an cffort to climinate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingficid & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  11. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Lake Whatcom Kokanee Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) : Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.; McLellan, Jason G.; Tilson, Mary Beth

    2001-07-01

    Lake Whatcom stock kokanee have been planted in Lake Roosevelt since 1988 with the primary goal of establishing a self-sustaining fishery. Returns of hatchery kokanee to egg collection facilities and recruitment to the creel have been minimal. Therefore, four experiments were conducted to determine the most appropriate release strategy that would increase kokanee returns. The first experiment compared morpholine and non-morpholine imprinted kokanee return rates, the second experiment compared early and middle run Whatcom kokanee, the third experiment compared early and late release dates, and the fourth experiment compared three net pen release strategies: Sherman Creek hatchery vs. Sherman Creek net pens, Colville River net pens vs. Sherman Creek net pens, and upper vs. lower reservoir net pen releases. Each experiment was tested in three ways: (1) returns to Sherman Creek, (2) returns to other tributaries throughout the reservoir, and (3) returns to the creel. Chi-square analysis of hatchery and tributary returns indicated no significant difference between morpholine imprinted and non-imprinted fish, early run fish outperformed middle run fish, early release date outperformed late release fish, and the hatchery outperformed all net pen releases. Hatchery kokanee harvest was estimated at 3,323 fish, which was 33% of the total harvest. Return rates (1998 = 0.52%) of Whatcom kokanee were low indicating an overall low performance that could be caused by high entrainment, predation, and precocity. A kokanee stock native to the upper Columbia, as opposed to the coastal Whatcom stock, may perform better in Lake Roosevelt.

  12. Beyond Correlation in the Detection of Climate Change Impacts: Testing a Mechanistic Hypothesis for Climatic Influence on Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Tillotson, Michael D.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the biological impacts of climate change is a current focus of ecological research and has important applications in conservation and resource management. Owing to a lack of suitable control systems, measuring correlations between time series of biological attributes and hypothesized environmental covariates is a common method for detecting such impacts. These correlative approaches are particularly common in studies of exploited fish species because rich biological time-series data are often available. However, the utility of species-environment relationships for identifying or predicting biological responses to climate change has been questioned because strong correlations often deteriorate as new data are collected. Specifically stating and critically evaluating the mechanistic relationship(s) linking an environmental driver to a biological response may help to address this problem. Using nearly 60 years of data on sockeye salmon from the Kvichak River, Alaska we tested a mechanistic hypothesis linking water temperatures experienced during freshwater rearing to population productivity by modeling a series of intermediate, deterministic relationships and evaluating temporal trends in biological and environmental time-series. We found that warming waters during freshwater rearing have profoundly altered patterns of growth and life history in this population complex yet there has been no significant correlation between water temperature and metrics of productivity commonly used in fisheries management. These findings demonstrate that pairing correlative approaches with careful consideration of the mechanistic links between populations and their environments can help to both avoid spurious correlations and identify biologically important, but not statistically significant relationships, and ultimately producing more robust conclusions about the biological impacts of climate change. PMID:27123845

  13. Beyond Correlation in the Detection of Climate Change Impacts: Testing a Mechanistic Hypothesis for Climatic Influence on Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) Productivity.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Michael D; Quinn, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the biological impacts of climate change is a current focus of ecological research and has important applications in conservation and resource management. Owing to a lack of suitable control systems, measuring correlations between time series of biological attributes and hypothesized environmental covariates is a common method for detecting such impacts. These correlative approaches are particularly common in studies of exploited fish species because rich biological time-series data are often available. However, the utility of species-environment relationships for identifying or predicting biological responses to climate change has been questioned because strong correlations often deteriorate as new data are collected. Specifically stating and critically evaluating the mechanistic relationship(s) linking an environmental driver to a biological response may help to address this problem. Using nearly 60 years of data on sockeye salmon from the Kvichak River, Alaska we tested a mechanistic hypothesis linking water temperatures experienced during freshwater rearing to population productivity by modeling a series of intermediate, deterministic relationships and evaluating temporal trends in biological and environmental time-series. We found that warming waters during freshwater rearing have profoundly altered patterns of growth and life history in this population complex yet there has been no significant correlation between water temperature and metrics of productivity commonly used in fisheries management. These findings demonstrate that pairing correlative approaches with careful consideration of the mechanistic links between populations and their environments can help to both avoid spurious correlations and identify biologically important, but not statistically significant relationships, and ultimately producing more robust conclusions about the biological impacts of climate change.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the Pacific cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki ssp.: Salmonidae) based on partial mtDNA ND4 sequences: a closer look at the highly fragmented inland species.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wade D; Turner, Thomas F

    2009-08-01

    The genus Oncorhynchus includes Pacific salmon and trout (anadromous and land-locked) species of the western United States and Mexico. All species and subspecies in this group are threatened, endangered, sensitive, or species of conservation concern in portions of their native ranges. To examine the relationships of the species within Oncorhynchus we sequenced a 768 bp fragment of the protein-encoding ND4 mtDNA region. We included all six recognized subspecies of O. clarki (cutthroat trout), O. gilaegilae (Gila trout) and O. g. apache (Apache trout). Gene trees from likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses revealed that Salvelinus was the sister group to Oncorhynchus, and as expected based on previous studies, O. clarki was sister to a clade that consisted of O. mykiss plus O. g. gilae and O. g. apache. Within the cutthroat clade (O. clarki), the coastal form O. c. clarki was basal with the Rio Grande cutthroat (O. c. virginalis) most derived. Divergence dating based on a fossil calibration molecular clock showed the oldest clade (mean node age) was O. masou ssp., which diverged roughly 7.6 MYA. Highest probability density intervals for divergence of O. masou overlapped with divergence (6.3 MYA) of Pacific salmon clades ((O. gorbuscha + O. nerka) and (O. tshawytscha + O. kisutch)). The Pacific trout clade ((O. mykiss + O. gilae ssp.) + (O. clarki ssp.)) diverged from the Pacific salmon around 6.3 MYA, with most of the diversification within the O. clarki clade occurring in the last 1 MY.

  15. Evaluation of the protective immunogencity of the N, P, M, NV and G proteins of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using DNA vaccines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Jones, J.; Vincent, B.; Hsu, Y.-L; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    The protective immunogenicity of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), non-virion protein (NV) and glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was assessed in rainbow trout using DNA vaccine technology. DNA vaccines were produced by amplifying and cloning the viral genes in the plasmid pCDNA 3.1. The protective immunity elicited by each vaccine was evaluated through survival of immunized fry after challenge with live virus. Neutralizing antibody titers were also determined in vaccinated rainbow troutOncorhynchus mykiss fry (mean weight 2 g) and 150 g sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. The serum from the 150 g fish was also used in passive immunization studies with naïve fry. Our results showed that neither the internal structural proteins (N, P and M) nor the NV protein of IHNV induced protective immunity in fry or neutralizing antibodies in fry and 150 g fish when expressed by a DNA vaccine construct. The G protein, however, did confer significant protection in fry up to 80 d post-immunization and induced protective neutralizing antibodies. We are currently investigating the role of different arms of the fish immune system that contribute to the high level of protection against IHNV seen in vaccinated fish.

  16. 50 CFR 600.1400 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Alosa alabamae Striped bass: Morone saxatilis Rainbow smelt: Osmerus mordax Atlantic salmon: Salmo salar Chinook, or king, salmon: Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Coho, or silver, salmon: Oncorhynchus kisutch Pink salmon: Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Sockeye salmon: Oncorhynchus nerka Chum salmon: Oncorhynchus...

  17. 50 CFR 600.1400 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Alosa alabamae Striped bass: Morone saxatilis Rainbow smelt: Osmerus mordax Atlantic salmon: Salmo salar Chinook, or king, salmon: Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Coho, or silver, salmon: Oncorhynchus kisutch Pink salmon: Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Sockeye salmon: Oncorhynchus nerka Chum salmon: Oncorhynchus...

  18. 50 CFR 600.1400 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Alosa alabamae Striped bass: Morone saxatilis Rainbow smelt: Osmerus mordax Atlantic salmon: Salmo salar Chinook, or king, salmon: Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Coho, or silver, salmon: Oncorhynchus kisutch Pink salmon: Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Sockeye salmon: Oncorhynchus nerka Chum salmon: Oncorhynchus...

  19. Identification of the sex chromosome pair in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Phillips, R B; DeKoning, J; Morasch, M R; Park, L K; Devlin, R H

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a probe to the male-specific GH-Y (growth hormone pseudogene) was used to identify the Y chromosome in the karyotypes of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). The sex chromosome pair is a small acrocentric chromosome pair in chum salmon and the smallest metacentric chromosome pair in pink salmon. Both of these chromosome pairs are morphologically different from the sex chromosome pairs in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The 5S rRNA genes are on multiple chromosome pairs including the sex chromosome pair in chum salmon, but at the centromeres of two autosomal metacentric pairs in pink salmon. The sex chromosome pairs and the chromosomal locations of the 5S rDNA appear to be different in all five of the North American Pacific salmon species and rainbow trout. The implications of these results for evolution of sex chromosomes in salmonids are discussed.

  20. South Carolina State Library Annual Report. 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    This report provides a summary of the activities of the South Carolina State Library. The highlight of the year was development and adoption of the "Agenda for Change," a program which makes the Library more responsive to the needs of public libraries. As a result, the Library evaluated its personnel needs and transferred vacant…

  1. School-to-Work Apprenticeship. Project Manual 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee Coll., Baytown, TX.

    With Perkins tech prep funds, Lee College (Baytown, Texas), working with the Gulf Coast Tech Prep Consortium and the Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District, developed a school-to-work apprenticeship model for tech prep programs. An advisory committe provided guidance in identifying targeted apprenticeable jobs, program content, and…

  2. Annual Performance Report for Vocational Education. Guam 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guam Community Coll., Agana. Office of the State Agency for Vocational and Adult Education.

    In 1992, the Guam System of Performance Measures and Standards for vocational education was adopted. In 1993-94, results of the performance measures and standards indicated the following: 68 percent of secondary students achieved the 0.5 grade growth in reading; about 90 percent of postsecondary students scored a mean gain of 1.2, well over the…

  3. What's Happening in the Mathematical Sciences, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipra, Barry

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of the first two volumes of a new annual serial devoted to surveying some of the important developments in the mathematical sciences in the previous year or so. Mathematics is constantly growing and changing, reaching out to other areas of science and helping to solve some of the major problems facing society. Volumes 1 and…

  4. Patterns of homicide--Cali, Colombia, 1993-1994.

    PubMed

    1995-10-06

    In Colombia, as in the United States, homicide occurs disproportionately among urban residents (1,2). Homicide rates in the city of Cali, Colombia (1994 population: 1,776,436), increased fivefold from 1985 through 1992, reaching levels of 100 per 100,000 persons. Because of this increase, in 1992 the city of Cali established the Development, Security, and Peace Program (DESEPAZ) to implement a series of strategies to prevent violence and improve security among the residents of Cali. An important element of this program was the establishment of a surveillance system to enable characterization of patterns and determinants of homicide to provide information to decision makers for formulating policies and programs. This report summarizes findings from this system for January 1993-May 1994.

  5. Biomass Power: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    The Biomass Power Program and industry are developing technologies to expand the use of biomass that include methods of feedstock production and the equipment to convert feedstocks into electric power or process heat. With the help of advanced biomass power technologies and new feedstock supply systems, as much as 50,000 megawatts (MW) of biomass power capacity will be in place by the year 2010. The Biomass Power Program supports the development of three technologies -- gasification, pyrolysis, and direct combustion -- from the laboratory bench scale to the prototype commercial scale. Gasification equipment produces biogas that is burned in high-efficiency turbine-generators developed for the electric power industry. Pyrolysis processes produce oils from renewable biomass that burn like petroleum to generate electricity. In direct combustion technology, power plants today burn bulk biomass directly to generate electricity. Improving the direct combustion technology of these plants increases efficiency and reduces emissions. In addition to developing these three technologies, the Biomass Power Program supports joint ventures to plan and construct facilities that demonstrate the benefits of biomass power. The program is supporting joint ventures to conduct 10 case studies of dedicated feedstock supply systems.

  6. Europe and Asia in Space, 1993-1994.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    For Privatization", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 27 June 1994, pp. 22-23. 96. "RKK Energia Issues Stock Due to Privatization Order", Space News...multi-year renovation project was undertaken in Kourou to support not only the forthcoming Ariane 5 but also the con- tinuing Ariane 4 missions. By...via the newly formed Lockheed- Khrunichev- Energia joint venture. By the end of 1994 no commercial Proton launches had been undertaken, and the first

  7. [Djibouti, history of 2 epidemics of cholera: 1993-1994].

    PubMed

    Morillon, M; De Pina, J J; Husser, J A; Baudet, J M; Bertherat, E; Martet, G

    1998-01-01

    When two cholera epidemics broke out in Djibouti, respectively in 1993 and 1994, Bioforce was obliged to intervene. The first time, three goals were pursued: setting up a rehydration centre in a tent, organizing epidemiological surveillance and training local personnel in treatment and diagnosis techniques. The next year, the epidemic followed serious flooding. The epidemiological analysis showed that cholera had become endemic in the poor neighbourhoods of the town and that epidemic break-outs were favoured by contaminated surface water and disturbances in the distribution of drinking water. The epidemic of 1997, likewise following flooding, only confirmed this point of view.

  8. Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

  9. Geothermal Program Overview: Fiscal Years 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-11-01

    Geothermal energy represents the largest U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. This overview looks at the basic science behind the various geothermal technologies and provides information on DOE Geothermal Energy Program activities and accomplishments.

  10. The 1993/1994 NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP) attempts to reach a culturally diverse group of promising U.S. graduate students whose research interests are compatible with NASA's programs in space science and aerospace technology. Each year we select approximately 100 new awardees based on competitive evaluation of their academic qualifications, their proposed research plan and/or plan of study, and their planned utilization of NASA research facilities. Fellowships of up to $22,000 are awarded for one year and are renewable, based on satisfactory progress, for a total of three years. Approximately 300 graduate students are, thus, supported by this program at any one time. Students may apply any time during their graduate career or prior to receiving their baccalaureate degree. An applicant must be sponsored by his/her graduate department chair or faculty advisor; this book discusses the GSRP in great detail.

  11. Status Report on Institutional Effectiveness, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losak, John

    This annual report provides evaluation of specific academic centers at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, reflecting specific goals, associated outcome measures, and attainment status relative to the goals. Twelve sections focus on the: (1) Abraham S. Fischler Center for the Advancement of Education; (2) Center for Computer…

  12. AGS experiments: 1992, 1993, 1994. Revision December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    This document contains listings and two page summaries for experiments run at the GAS for 1992--1994. Listings are also given for publications and experimenters. A working copy of the 1995--1996 experiment schedule is also included.

  13. Ionization in liquids [annual] progress report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bakale, G.

    1994-12-31

    Progress in 1993--94 was focused on delineating how ions of the model nonpolar spherical solute Buckminsterfullerene interact differently with various nonpolar solvents than does the ellipsoidal fullerene analog C-70, and exposing a variety of new audiences to the electrophilicity-carcinogenicity relationship in order to obtain fresh insight into this relationship that may lead to elucidation of the role of electrons in carcinogenesis and thereby a better understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation. To achieve these goals a new collaboration was established with scientists at Oak Ridge National Lab who have unique facilities to characterize fullerene and its radiolytic products.

  14. Real-time PCR for quantification of viable Renibacterium salmoninarum in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunio; Sakai, D K

    2007-03-13

    Quantification of msa gene mRNA of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was investigated using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR assay on R. salmoninarum in culture, and in experimentally challenged chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta fry kidney tissues (total of 70 samples) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and bath infection. Correlations of msa gene mRNA concentrations with culturable cell concentrations (as colony forming units [CFU]), determined by drop-plate culture method on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM) agar through a 12 wk incubation time, and msa gene DNA concentrations by real-time PCR assay were examined. Furthermore, ovarian fluid samples from wild chum salmon adults with no clinical signs of disease were collected from 8 rivers and from clinically infected kokanee 0. nerka and masu salmon O. masou that were reared in 1 and 2 hatcheries, respectively (total of 414 samples). All samples were examined by nested PCR assay. Then, positive samples were examined by real-time PCR assays for mRNA and DNA; mRNA was detectable at 8 log units (5.0 x 101 to 5.0 x 10(9) copies p11(-1)) with high correlation (R2 = 0.999). The mRNA concentration correlated with CFU in kidney tissue from fish infected by i.p. injection (R2 = 0.924), by bath infection (R2 = 0.502) and in culture (R2 = 0.888). R. salmoninarum was detected and quantified by real-time PCR assay for mRNA in ovarian fluid samples in both subclinically infected chum salmon adults and clinically infected kokanee and masu salmon adults; detection rates ranged from 0 to 44.4% and concentrations ranged from 9.7 x 10(2) to 5.6 x 10(5) copies pl(-1). These results indicate that real-time PCR assay for the mRNA is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method to detect and quantify the viability of R. salmoninarum in kidney and ovarian fluid samples of salmonid fishes with both clinical and subclinical infection of the pathogen.

  15. [Genetic Differentiation of Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka from Kamchatka River Basin and the Lake-River Systems of the West Coast of the Bering Sea as Inferred from Data on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Khrustaleva, A M; Klovach, N V; Vedischeva, E V; Seeb, J E

    2015-10-01

    The variability of 45 single nucleotide polymorphism loci (SNP) was studied in sockeye salmon from the Kamchatka River basin and four lake-river systems of the west coast of the Bering Sea. Based on the genetic differentiation estimates for the largest sockeye salmon populations of Eastern Kamchatka and Chukotka, the examined samples were combined into two regional groups represented by the population of the Kamchatka River drainage, which included numerous local subpopulations and seasonal races, and the northern population grouping from the rivers of Olutorsko-Navarinsky raion, wherein the sockeye salmon from Maynypilginskaya Lake-River system was relatively isolated. Considerable divergence was observed between the island (Sarannoe Lake, Bering Island) and continental populations. Genetic heterogeneity was revealed and groups of early- and late-maturing individuals were isolated in the sample of late-run sockeye salmon from Kamchatka River. In Apuka River, subdivision of the spawning run into two genetically distinct spatial and temporal groupings was also observed. The results suggest that the differentiation of sockeye salmon samples by single nucleotide substitution frequencies was largely due to differences in the direction and strength of local selection at some loci in the population complexes and intrapopulation groupings from the examined river basins of Eastern Kamchatka, Chukotka, and Commander Islands.

  16. Specificity of DNA vaccines against the U and M genogroups of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a fish rhabdovirus that causes significant mortality in salmonid species. In North America IHNV has three major genogroups designated U, M, and L. Host-specificity of the M and U genogroups of IHNV has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges, with M isolates being more prevalent and more virulent in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and U isolates being more prevalent and highly virulent in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). In this study, efficacy of DNA vaccines containing either M (pM) or U (pU) virus glycoprotein genes was investigated during intra- and cross-genogroup challenges in rainbow trout. In virus challenges at 7 days post-vaccination (early antiviral response), both pM and pU were highly protective against either M or U IHNV. In challenges at 28 days post-vaccination (specific antiviral response), both pM and pU were protective against M IHNV but the homologous pM vaccine was significantly more protective than pU in one of two experiments. At this stage both pM and pU induced comparably high protection against U IHNV challenge. Correlates of protection were also investigated by assessing the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene Mx-1 and the production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) following pM or pU DNA vaccination. Mx-1 gene expression, measured at 4 and 7 days post-vaccination as an indicator of the host innate immune response, was found to be significantly higher after pM than pU vaccination in some cases. Neutralizing antibody was produced in response to the two vaccines, but antibody titers did not show consistent correlation with protection. The results show that the rainbow trout innate and adaptive immune responses have some ability to distinguish between the U and M genogroup IHNV, but overall the pM and pU vaccines were protective against both homologous and cross-genogroup challenges.

  17. Specificity of DNA vaccines against the U and M genogroups of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Lapatra, Scott E; Kurath, Gael

    2011-07-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a fish rhabdovirus that causes significant mortality in salmonid species. In North America IHNV has three major genogroups designated U, M, and L. Host-specificity of the M and U genogroups of IHNV has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges, with M isolates being more prevalent and more virulent in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and U isolates being more prevalent and highly virulent in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). In this study, efficacy of DNA vaccines containing either M (pM) or U (pU) virus glycoprotein genes was investigated during intra- and cross-genogroup challenges in rainbow trout. In virus challenges at 7 days post-vaccination (early antiviral response), both pM and pU were highly protective against either M or U IHNV. In challenges at 28 days post-vaccination (specific antiviral response), both pM and pU were protective against M IHNV but the homologous pM vaccine was significantly more protective than pU in one of two experiments. At this stage both pM and pU induced comparably high protection against U IHNV challenge. Correlates of protection were also investigated by assessing the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene Mx-1 and the production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) following pM or pU DNA vaccination. Mx-1 gene expression, measured at 4 and 7 days post-vaccination as an indicator of the host innate immune response, was found to be significantly higher after pM than pU vaccination in some cases. Neutralizing antibody was produced in response to the two vaccines, but antibody titers did not show consistent correlation with protection. The results show that the rainbow trout innate and adaptive immune responses have some ability to distinguish between the U and M genogroup IHNV, but overall the pM and pU vaccines were protective against both homologous and cross-genogroup challenges.

  18. Evidence for competitive dominance of Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) over other Salmonids in the North Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Relatively little is known about fish species interactions in offshore areas of the world's oceans because adequate experimental controls are typically unavailable in such vast areas. However, pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) are numerous and have an alternating-year pattern of abundance that provides a natural experimental control to test for interspecific competition in the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. Since a number of studies have recently examined pink salmon interactions with other salmon, we reviewed them in an effort to describe patterns of interaction over broad regions of the ocean. Research consistently indicated that pink salmon significantly altered prey abundance of other salmon species (e.g., zooplankton, squid), leading to altered diet, reduced total prey consumption and growth, delayed maturation, and reduced survival, depending on species and locale. Reduced survival was observed in chum salmon (O. keta) and Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) originating from Puget Sound and in Bristol Bay sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Growth of pink salmon was not measurably affected by other salmon species, but their growth was sometimes inversely related to their own abundance. In all marine studies, pink salmon affected other species through exploitation of prey resources rather than interference. Interspecific competition was observed in nearshore and offshore waters of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, and one study documented competition between species originating from different continents. Climate change had variable effects on competition. In the North Pacific Ocean, competition was observed before and after the ocean regime shift in 1977 that significantly altered abundances of many marine species, whereas a study in the Pacific Northwest reported a shift from predation- to competition-based mortality in response to the 1982/1983 El Nino. Key traits of pink salmon that influenced competition with other salmonids included great abundance, high

  19. Stabilizing Oils from Smoked Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smoking of meats and fish is one of the earliest preservation technologies developed by humans. In this study, the smoking process was evaluated as a method for reducing oxidation of Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) oils and also maintaining the quality of oil in aged fish prior to oil extractio...

  20. Cryopreservation of sperm of the endangered gila trout, Oncorhynchus gilae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gila trout, Oncorhynchus gilae, are native to the headwaters of the Gila River drainage in New Mexico and Arizona and the headwaters of the Verde River drainage in Arizona. The species is currently protected as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Cryopreservation of sperm is now a widely us...

  1. Nomenclature of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graziano, Sara L.; Brown, K.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Congruence of genetic data is critical for comparative and collaborative studies on natural fish populations. A comprehensive list of reported mitochrondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss generated using the S-Phe/P2 primer set is presented as a resource for future investigations of this species.

  2. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, and either urine or expired water. The data were then an...

  3. Diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms for identifying westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, S T; Novak, B J; Drinan, D P; Jennings, R deM; Vu, N V

    2011-03-01

    We describe 12 diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays for use in species identification among rainbow and cutthroat trout: five of these loci have alleles unique to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), three unique to westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarkii lewisi) and four unique to Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri). These diagnostic assays were identified using a total of 489 individuals from 26 populations and five fish hatchery strains.

  4. Hybrids between chum Oncorhynchus keta and pink Oncorhynchus gorbuscha salmon: age, growth and morphology and effects on salmon production.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, L A; Tochilina, T G; Shaikhaev, E G; Pogodin, V P; Malinina, T V; Gharrett, A J

    2016-10-01

    Mature hybrids between chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, which were identified by an intermediate colour pattern, were caught at the Kurilsky Hatchery, Iturup Island, Russia. Most of them were female and 3 years old (a partial freshwater year and 2 marine years), which is intermediate between the ages of maturity of the parental species. The hybrids exceed both parental species in the rate of growth, are large in size and robust and might successfully compete for mating in the wild or be chosen for artificial reproduction. The ratio of the scale length over width, R, is oblate (R < 1), whereas scales of the parental species are prolate (R > 1). From scale analyses, the c.v. in body size of hybrid females at the second marine year is twice that of O. keta, which suggests developmental instability in the hybrid. A dynamic model predicted that continuing hybridization at a low rate does not produce a substantial hybrid load due to selection against advanced-generation hybrids and backcrosses. A high hybridization rate, however, may be an additional risk for genetic management and should be taken into account in programmes of artificial reproduction of Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp., although such hybrids might have commercial use in confined production systems.

  5. 50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226.210... Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho...

  6. 50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226.210... Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho...

  7. 50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226.210... Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho...

  8. Teratological hermaphroditism in the chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uzmann, J.R.; Hesselholt, M.N.

    1957-01-01

    The anomalous condition of hermaphroditism appears to be no less rare in fish than in other normally dioecious animals. Previous records of bisexuality' in the Pacific salmons, Oncorhynchus spp., are few in number despite the intensive study accorded this group. Rutter (1902) reported the condition in two king salmon (O. tshawytscha); Crawford (1927) reported the condition in a silver salmon (O. kisutch); and Gibbs (1956) described a bisexual steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and briefly noted another instance of hermaphroditism in the king salmon. We wish to record an example of this anomaly in the chum salmon (O. keta).

  9. Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta respond to moonlight during homeward migrations.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, E I

    2012-07-01

    The swimming depth of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta equipped with archival tags was investigated off the Pacific Ocean coast of Hokkaido and North Honshu, Japan. As shown from movements of the fish with disc tags, O. keta swam at shallower depths during the full-moon phase than in the other phases and their swimming speed during this phase was faster compared to other phases. In addition, the circadian rhythm suggests a biological clock. These observations are all consistent with the view that O. keta make use of moonlight in order to navigate at night-time during homeward migration.

  10. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) invasion and the spread of hybridization with native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, M.C.; Muhlfeld, C.C.; Allendorf, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed 13 microsatellite loci to estimate gene flow among westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi, populations and determine the invasion pattern of hybrids between native O. c. lewisi and introduced rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, in streams of the upper Flathead River system, Montana (USA) and British Columbia (Canada). Fourteen of 31 sites lacked evidence of O. mykiss introgression, and gene flow among these nonhybridized O. c. lewisi populations was low, as indicated by significant allele frequency divergence among populations (?ST = 0.076, ?ST = 0.094, P < 0.001). Among hybridized sites, O. mykiss admixture declined with upstream distance from a site containing a hybrid swarm with a predominant (92%) O. mykiss genetic contribution. The spatial distribution of hybrid genotypes at seven diagnostic microsatellite loci revealed that O. mykiss invasion is facilitated by both long distance dispersal from this hybrid swarm and stepping-stone dispersal between hybridized populations. This study provides an example of how increased straying rates in the invasive taxon can contribute to the spread of extinction by hybridization and suggests that eradicating sources of introgression may be a useful conservation strategy for protecting species threatened with genomic extinction. ?? 2008 NRC.

  11. Quantitative interlake comparison of thyroid pathology in Great Lakes coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Moccia, R.D.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Lakes Ontario, Michigan, Erie, or Huron were found to suffer epizootics of thyroid hyperplasia and goiters which appeared to have an environmental etiology. There were 13-fold differences in goiter prevalence within the Great Lakes, and the differences in goiter frequency were correlated with the degree of thyroid hyperplasia. A means of assessing the degree of thyroid hyperplasia (thyroid index) is described, and the derived index was used to facilitate statistical interlake and interspecies comparisons. Despite the hyperplastic (or goitered) condition in all prespawning or spawning Great Lakes salmon, serum thyroid hormone levels were generally higher than in prespawning coho salmon from the Fraser River, British Columbia, indicating that the Great Lakes fish were not necessarily hypothyroid. The hyperplastic lesions appear to undergo progressive changes: (a) large follicles, partly colloid depleted, surrounded by cuboidal epithelial cells; (b) small follicles, largely colloid depleted, surrounded by columnar epithelial cells (in this form, the follicles commonly assume a trabeculate arrangement); (c) ''microfollicles'' with greatly enlarged columnar epithelial cells encompassing very small follicles; (d) apparently afollicular lesions with little or no colloid in evidence. There was some evidence of benign invasiveness, although the lesions generally resembled simple hyperplastic parenchymatous goiters seen in humans.

  12. Estrogenic Activity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential estrogenic activity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) was determined using separate screening and dose response studies with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results of this study indicate that some PFAAs may act as estrogens in fish.

  13. Magnetic Discrimination Learning in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, Cordula V.; Walker, Michael M.

    Although conditioning techniques are the most powerful way to study behavioural responses by animals to external stimuli, the magnetic sense has proved surprisingly resistant to conditioning approaches. This study demonstrated learned discrimination of magnetic field intensity stimuli by a new species, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In a unitary conditioned discrimination technique, four juvenile rainbow trout were trained to strike a target at the end of a response bar in anticipation of food. In successive experiments, the trout failed to discriminate the presence and absence of a vibration stimulus, but subsequently learned to discriminate the presence and absence of a magnetic field intensity anomaly (peak intensity of 75 μTesla). The authors conclude that the necessary conditions for training animals to magnetic intensity are the use of spatially distinctive stimuli and of a conditioned response that requires movement.

  14. Hematological, biochemical, and behavioral responses of Oncorhynchus mykiss to dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Demet; Can, Canan

    2011-12-01

    The effects of dimethoate on hematological, biochemical parameters, and behavior were investigated in Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to sublethal concentrations of 0.0735, 0.3675, and 0.7350 mg/l for 5, 15, and 30 days. Significant decrease was determined in erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, and MCH, which was pronounced after prolonged exposure indicating the appearance of microcytic hypochromic anemia. There were no prominent changes in thrombocyte and MCHC. The glucose concentration showed an ascending pattern that proved to be positively correlated with duration. The protein concentration declined in higher dimethoate concentrations following 15 and 30 days. Negative and significant correlation was detected between glucose and protein concentrations. The fish showed remarkable behavioral abnormality such as loss of balance, erratic swimming, and convulsion. Present findings revealed that dimethoate exerts its toxic action even in sublethal concentrations and hematological parameters and abnormal behavior may be sensitive indicators to evaluate pesticide intoxication.

  15. School of Advanced Military Studies Research Catalog, AY 1983 - 1984 Through AY 1993 - 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    the Situation in a Time-Compressed Environ- ment, ADA 161 624 Flora, Dale B., Major, IN, Battlefield Stress: Causes, Cures and Countermeasures, ADA... Kerry K., Major, EN, E-Force: How Idiart, Philip L., Major, FA, Time-On-Target: Agile Is It?, ADA 179 415 Tactical Organization and the Massing of Di... Nature of the Informa- tion Required?, ADA 184 905 Tosch, David F., Major, QM, Sustaining Tacti- cal Maneuver on the AirLand Battlefield: Caldwell

  16. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel Biennial Report, Fiscal Years 1993--1994. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    In Fiscal Year 1993, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 30 proceedings. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Panel handled 36 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlight, and analyzes how the wide- ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

  17. A pilot marine monitoring program in Cook Inlet, Alaska 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.S.; Boehm, P.D.; Hyland, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Under the mandate of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA`90) the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (CIRCAC) sponsored the initiation of a pilot monitoring program in Cook Inlet, Alaska, The objectives of the pilot monitoring program were to provide baseline data on petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and biota of Cook Inlet, and to evaluate the effectiveness of selected monitoring techniques in detecting petroleum hydrocarbon inputs from industry based sources. A sampling program was initiated in 1993 that included petroleum industry, specific sites and reference sites. Sample measurements included polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in sediments, caged mussels, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), sediment toxicity using the amphipod, Ampelisca abdita, and estimates of population size and physiological condition of indigenous bivalves. Results of the 1993 sampling program indicated that (1) background levels of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and diagenetic hydrocarbons were present in sediments and indigenous bivalves, and (2) that limited amphipod toxicity and variations in bivalve measurements did not correlate with the hydrocarbons in the sediments. Modifications to the 1993 program were instituted for the 1994 sampling and included, the selection of new industry specific sites, discontinued use of caged bivalves, and design changes to SPMDs to enhance sensitivity. The results of the 1994 sampling program, and comparisons with the 1993 data are presented.

  18. Semi-autonomous robots for reactor containments. Annual summary report, [1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    During 1993, the activity at the University was split into two primary groups. One group provided direct support for the development and testing of the RVIR vehicle. This effort culminated in a demonstration of the vehicle at ORNL during December. The second group of researchers focused attention on pushing the technology forward in the areas of radiation imaging, navigation, and sensing modalities. A major effort in technology transfer took place during this year. All of these efforts reflected in the periodic progress reports which are attached. During 1994, our attention will change from the Nuclear Energy program to the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management office. The immediate needs of the Robotics Technology Development Program within the Office of Technology Development of EM drove this change in target applications. The University will be working closely with the national laboratories to further develop and transfer existing technologies to mobile platforms which are currently being designed and employed in seriously hazardous environments.

  19. The Western Pond Turtle; Habitat and History, 1993-1994 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Dan C.

    1994-08-01

    The western pond turtle is known from many areas of Oregon. The majority of sightings and other records occur in the major drainages of the Klamath, Rogue, Umpqua, Willamette and Columbia River systems. A brief overview is presented of the evolution of the Willamette-Puget Sound hydrographic basin. A synopsis is also presented of the natural history of the western pond turtle, as well as, the status of this turtle in the Willamette drainage basin. The reproductive ecology and molecular genetics of the western pond turtle are discussed. Aquatic movements and overwintering of the western pond turtle are evaluated. The effect of introduced turtle species on the status of the western pond turtle was investigated in a central California Pond. Experiments were performed to determine if this turtle could be translocated as a mitigation strategy.

  20. Evaluation of Wildlife Mitigation Sites at the Chief Joseph Dam Project (1993/1994 Season)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-22

    HYDRANGEACEAE R, BS, BB, Iff. Site PEPU Picta pungens Colorado blue spruce PINACEAE 1ff. Site PIPO Pimsrponderosa ponderosa. pine PINACEAE BS, BB, R, Irr...aspen SM.ZCACE I. it PRVI Prwius virgniana chokecherry ROSACEAE Inf. Site PSMB Pseudbtsuga menziesii Douglas fir PINACEAE R PUTR Purshia iridentata

  1. Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring, Flathead Lake, 1993-1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Deleray, Mark; Fredenberg, Wade; Hansen, Barry

    1995-07-01

    One mitigation goal of the Hungry Horse Dam fisheries mitigation program, funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, is to replace lost production of 100,000 adult kokanee in Flathead Lake. The mitigation program calls for a five-year test to determine if kokanee can be reestablished in Flathead Lake. The test consists. of annual stocking of one million hatchery-raised yearling kokanee. There are three benchmarks for judging the success of the kokanee reintroduction effort: (1) Post-stocking survival of 30 percent of planted kokanee one year after stocking; (2) Yearling to adult survival of 10 percent (100,000 adult salmon); (3) Annual kokanee harvest of 50,000 or more fish per year by 1998, with an average length of 11 inches or longer for harvested fish, and fishing pressure of 100,000 angler hours or more. Kokanee were the primary sport fish species in the Flathead Lake fishery in the early 1900s, and up until the late 1980s when the population rapidly declined in numbers and then disappeared. Factors identified which influenced the decline of kokanee are the introduction of opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta), hydroelectric operations, overharvest through angling, and competition and/or predation by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and lake whitefish (Coregonur clupeaformis). The purpose of this report was to summarize the stocking program and present monitoring results from the 1993 and 1994 field seasons. In June 1993, roughly 210,000 yearling kokanee were stocked into two bays on the east shore of Flathead Lake. Following stocking, we observed a high incidence of stocked kokanee in stomach samples from lake trout captured in areas adjacent to the stocking sites and a high percentage of captured lake trout containing kokanee. Subsequent monitoring concluded that excessive lake trout predation precluded significant survival of kokanee stocked in 1993. In June 1994, over 802,000 kokanee were stocked into Big Arm Bay. The combination of near optimum water temperatures, an upsurge in the abundance of Duphniu rhorum, and saturation planting in an area believed to have lower lake trout densities was expected to maximize short-term survival of stocked kokanee. A net-pen experiment demonstrated that yearling hatchery kokanee, in the absence of predation, adjusted to conditions in Flathead Lake and utilized available zooplankton during June and July without substantial poststocking mortality. Kokanee captured after several months in the lake exhibited good growth and condition. We concluded that the food supply in Big Arm Bay was not limiting survival of stocked kokanee. The 1994 monitoring objective was to quantify lake trout predation of kokanee in Big Arm Bay in the first eight weeks following stocking. There were three components needed to quantify predation; estimated number of lake trout in Big Arm Bay, average number of kokanee consumed by lake trout, and estimated time required for lake trout to digest kokanee. As in the previous year, the monitoring results from the 1994 kokanee plant demonstrated that lake trout predation is the primary factor reducing survival of stocked kokanee. We estimated that lake trout consumed a minimum of 232,000 kokanee in Big Arm Bay during the first eight weeks following stocking. This represents 29 percent of kokanee planted. The consumption estimate was based on a hydroacoustic estimate for lake trout abundance (7,850 fish over 300 mm in total length), an incidence of kokanee per lake trout stomach sample which ranged from 2.99 to 0.22 fish, and a gastric evacuation rate of 47 hours for lake trout to digest consumed kokanee. Due to hydroacoustic limitations in identifying bottom-oriented lake trout, we underestimated the true abundance of lake trout, which led to an underestimate of kokanee mortality. By fall of 1994, we estimated that an additional 12.7 percent of surviving kokanee matured, based on observations of similar-sized fish in the hatchery. Thus, up to 72,000 additional fish were removed from the population due to early maturation. Adding the loss due to predation in the first eight weeks (232,000) to the loss due to early maturation (72,000), we accounted for mortality of at least 304,000 (38 percent) of the original 802,000 fish planted. These estimates did not account for additional losses, including predation outside Big Arm Bay, predation in the months following July, and predation from species other than lake trout, such as bull trout and northern squawfish. We documented lake trout predation of kokanee from June through October, and predation by fish species other than lake trout. One of the program goals is to achieve post-stocking survival of 30 percent one year after planting. Based on observations of the 1994 program, it is unlikely we will achieve this level of survival from the 1994 plant.

  2. Accountability as Measured by Employer Satisfaction in Hawaii's Tourist/Hospitality Industry: 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William A.

    During 1993 and 94, the University of Hawaii performed a study of local organizations in the tourist/hospitality industry, assessing employer satisfaction with the graduates and products of the public school system and community colleges. Specifically, the study aimed to determine if participants of training programs were making a successful…

  3. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. [Annual report], 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-03-01

    In this report, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, we have (1) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (2) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (3) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are presented.

  4. Advanced Light Source First-Phase Scientific Program, 1993/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This composite document outlines ten different experiments planned for the beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Researchers from various parts of the country have detailed their methods and equipment to be used in experiments in biology and physics. X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy are the common topics to these experiments. (GHH)

  5. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes. Progress report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1993 to September 1994, which includes the second year of the three year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of our existing research contract. The budget proposal for the third year, December 1, 1994 to November 30, 1995 as originally approved, is also presented. As anticipated in our 1992--1995 proposal, Fermilab E760/E835 on high precision charmonium spectroscopy has remained a major part of our preoccupation and commitment during the last year, and it will remain so in the forthcoming year. In early 1994 we joined the collaboration of the Brookhaven experiment E852 on the spectroscopy of states with exotic quantum numbers. The first successful three month run of E852 was completed on July 31 and preliminary data analysis has been started. Some new commitments have resulted from this collaboration and a separate proposal for supplemental financial support is being prepared for them. At Los Alamos our experiment {number_sign}1274 on search of extremely neutron rich exotic nuclei by pion absorption began making initial measurements a month ago and is expected to take data during the period October 15--November 30, 1994. In addition to the above on-going programs, our Bates proposal (94-01) for a definitive measurement of the quenching of the longitudinal response in quasi-free scattering of electrons from nuclei has been approved with high priority for 600 hours of beam time, and we expect to start the experiment in late 1995.

  6. Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1993-1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Michael C.; Onjukka, Sam T.; Focher, Shannon M.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the first three years of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. Because the hatchery and the evaluation study and the fish health monitoring investigations are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The majority of the data that is crucial for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

  7. The Journal of the Imagination in Language Learning, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coreil, Clyde, Ed.; Napoliello, Mihri

    1994-01-01

    Articles in these two issues are as follows: "Imagination and Memory: Friends or Enemies" (Earl W. Stevick); "Imagination in Second Language Acquisition" (James J. Asher); "Where the Magic Lies" (Interview with Carolyn Graham); "Drawing on Experience: The Interview" (with John Dumicich); "What Color is…

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Willow Creek, Technical Report 1993-1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Beilke, Susan

    1994-09-01

    The Willow Creek site is one of the most significant remaining areas of typical native Willamette Valley habitats, with a variety of wetlands, grasslands, and woodlands. A diverse array of native flora and fauna, with significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Wildlife diversity is high, and includes species of mammals, songbirds, raptors, reptiles, amphibians, and one rare invertebrate. Over 200 species of native plants have been identified (including populations of six rare, threatened, or endangered species), along with significant remnants of native plant communities. Willow Creek is located in Lane County, Oregon, on the western edge of the City of Eugene (see Figure 1). The city limit of Eugene passes through the site, and the site is entirely within the Eugene Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). At present, only lands to the east and northeast of the site are developed to full urban densities. Low density rural residential and agricultural land uses predominate on lands to the northwest and south. A partially completed light industrial/research office park is located to the northwest. Several informal trails lead south from West 18th at various points into the site. The area encompasses a total of approximately 349 acres under several ownerships, in sections 3 and 4 of Township 18 South, Range 4 West. wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. The BPA is considering exercising their option to purchase the Bailey Hill property, acquiring additional properties now owned by The Nature Conservancy, and/or funding enhancement activities for the entire site in order to receive credit under the Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin.

  9. Literacy across the Curriculum: Connecting Literacy in the Schools, Community and Workplace, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy across the Curriculum, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This packet contains four sets of newsletters. Some of the topics covered in the Spring 1993 edition include the following: the rhetoric of crisis discredited, ethics in business-education partnerships, teaching about editorials, the politics of workplace literacy, women and literacy programs in Canada, and a list of resources on native literacy.…

  10. Venus Data Analysis Program: Directory of Research Projects (1993-1994)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This directory provides information about the scientific investigations funded by the NASA Venus Data Analysis Program (VDAP) during fiscal year 1993. The VDAP Directory consists of summary sheets from the proposals that were selected by NASA for funding in FY 93. Each summary sheet indicates the title, principal investigator, institution of the investigation, and information related to the objectives of the research activities proposed for FY 93. The objective of the VDAP Program is to advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of Venus. VDAP supports scientific investigation using data obtained from the Magellan, Pioneer Venus, and other Venus missions, as well as earth-based observations that contribute to understanding the physical and evolutionary properties of Venus. The program intends to enhance the scientific return from these missions by broadening the participation in the analysis of Venus data. Categories of research funded by VDAP are atmosphere, ionosphere, geology, geophysics, and mapping. The directory is intended to provide the science community with an overview of the research projects supported by this program. Research activities identified in this directory were selected for funding in FY 93 on the basis of scientific peer review conducted by the VDAP Review Panel.

  11. Venus Data Analysis Program: Directory of Research Projects (1993-1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This directory provides information about the scientific investigations funded by the NASA Venus Data Analysis Program (VDAP) during fiscal year 1993. The VDAP Directory consists of summary sheets from the proposals that were selected by NASA for funding in FY 93. Each summary sheet indicates the title, principal investigator, institution of the investigation, and information related to the objectives of the research activities proposed for FY 93. The objective of the VDAP Program is to advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of Venus. VDAP supports scientific investigation using data obtained from the Magellan, Pioneer Venus, and other Venus missions, as well as earth-based observations that contribute to understanding the physical and evolutionary properties of Venus. The program intends to enhance the scientific return from these missions by broadening the participation in the analysis of Venus data. Categories of research funded by VDAP are atmosphere, ionosphere, geology, geophysics, and mapping. The directory is intended to provide the science community with an overview of the research projects supported by this program. Research activities identified in this directory were selected for funding in FY 93 on the basis of scientific peer review conducted by the VDAP Review Panel.

  12. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1993--1994 interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Deverman, G.S.; Werpy, T.A.; Phelps, M.R.; Baker, E.G.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Process development research is continuing on a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system that has been demonstrated to convert organics in water (dilute or concentrated) to useful and environmentally safe gases. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEESO), treats a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from hazardous organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of continuous-feed, tubular reactors systems for testing catalysts and feedstocks in the process. A range of catalysts have been tested, including nickel and other base metals, as well as ruthenium and other precious metals. Results of extensive testing show that feedstocks, ranging from 2% para-cresol in water to potato waste and spent grain, can be processed to > 99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The product fuel gas contains from 40% up to 75% methane, depending on the feedstock. The balance of the gas is mostly carbon dioxide with < 5% hydrogen and usually < 1% ethane and higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics from 10 to 1,000 mg/l COD, depending on the feedstock. The level of development of TEES has progressed to the initial phases of industrial process demonstration. Testing of industrial waste streams is under way at both the bench scale and engineering scale of development.

  13. Accurate modeling of F-region electron densities. Annual progress report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In the past year, the authors have made considerable progress in a number of areas including algorithm development, completion of two major case studies, and the development of a new EUV flux model. As a result, there has been a major improvement in the ability to model global emissions in support of NASA's imaging plans. Activity highlights include the following: developed a new algorithm to allow physical models to reproduce observed NmF2; investigated the relationship between NmF2 and F10.7 at Millstone Hill during 1990; developed a new solar EUV flux model; statistical survey of anomalously high nighttime electron T(sub e) at Millstone Hill; conducted a case study of the March 1990 magnetic storm; and conducted a comparison between theory and data of magnetically quiet behavior of the winter ionosphere at Millstone Hill.

  14. Proceedings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickel, George W., Ed.; Owen, David B., Ed.

    These proceedings are composed of papers presented at the 1993 and 1994 Annual Meetings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society. The collection is divided into four parts. Part 1 includes: "Failure, Philosophy of Education, and the Music of the Spheres" (David B. Owen); "What Has Philosophy of Education Come To?"…

  15. Contents of lead and cadmium in selected fish species consumed in Finland in 1993-1994.

    PubMed

    Tahvonen, R; Kumpulainen, J

    1996-01-01

    The lead and cadmium contents of the main fish species consumed in Finland were determined by ETAAS after wet digestion with HNO3. Analytical quality was controlled with blanks, reference materials and blind replicates. Mean and median lead contents of domestic fish species were < LOD (1 microgram/kg)-9.4 micrograms/kg and < LOD-4.7 micrograms/kg. The lead contents of imported fish and imported canned or salted fish ranged from < LOD to 8, and 4 to 177 micrograms/kg. Mean and median cadmium contents of domestic fish species were < LOD (0.4 microgram/kg)-5.8 micrograms/kg and < LOD-4.4 micrograms/kg Fresh imported fish contained < LOD-11 micrograms Cd per kg and canned or salted fish 9-42 micrograms Cd per kg. Higher fish consumption would not increase lead or cadmium intake significantly in Finland. At present fish contributes about 4% of the average lead intake and 3% of cadmium intake.

  16. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1993-1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, Robin M; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P

    1999-02-01

    The assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis (ASCTTA) project provided information on the level of smoltification in Columbia River hatchery and wild salmonid stocks to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), for the primary purpose of in-river management of flows.

  17. Talking with TV: A Guide to Starting Dialogue with Youth, 1993-1994 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    This booklet shows parents and other adults how to use entertainment television to spark discussions with children and adolescents about sexuality, values, responsibility, communication, and other sensitive subjects (personal relationships, race and culture, drug use). First published in 1989, this booklet has been updated annually. Discussion…

  18. Office Occupations Certificate Program for Students with Developmental Disabilities. Final Report 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Community Coll. System, TX. Central Coll.

    A project was conducted at Central College of the Houston Community College System to provide office skills training to students with developmental disabilities so they can obtain employment as office assistants in the community. The Office Occupations Certificate Program was designed for this purpose. Students involved included those with mental…

  19. 1993-1994 Final technical report for establishing the SECME Model in the District of Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, R.G.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report for a program to establish the SECME Model in the District of Columbia. This program has seen the development of a partnership between the District of Columbia Public Schools, the University of the District of Columbia, the Department of Energy, and SECME. This partnership has demonstrated positive achievement in mathematics and science education and learning in students within the District of Columbia.

  20. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  1. Sexual difference in PCB concentrations of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Schrank, Candy S.; Begnoche, Linda J.; Elliott, Robert F.; Quintal, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    We determined polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in 35 female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and 60 male coho salmon caught in Lake Michigan (Michigan and Wisconsin, United States) during the fall of 1994 and 1995. In addition, we determined PCB concentrations in the skin-on fillets of 26 female and 19 male Lake Michigan coho salmon caught during the fall of 2004 and 2006. All coho salmon were age-2 fish. These fish were caught prior to spawning, and therefore release of eggs could not account for sexual differences in PCB concentrations because female coho salmon spawn only once during their lifetime. To investigate whether gross growth efficiency (GGE) differed between the sexes, we applied bioenergetics modeling. Results showed that, on average, males were 19% higher in PCB concentration than females, based on the 1994–1995 dataset. Similarly, males averaged a 20% higher PCB concentration in their skin-on fillets compared with females. According to the bioenergetics modeling results, GGE of adult females was less than 1% higher than adult male GGE. Thus, bioenergetics modeling could not explain the 20% higher PCB concentration exhibited by the males. Nonetheless, a sexual difference in GGE remained a plausible explanation for the sexual difference in PCB concentrations.

  2. Virulence of Flavobacterium columnare genomovars in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Jason P; LaFrentz, Benjamin R

    2016-08-09

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease and is responsible for significant economic losses in aquaculture. F. columnare is a Gram-negative bacterium, and 5 genetic types or genomovars have been described based on restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S rRNA gene. Previous research has suggested that genomovar II isolates are more virulent than genomovar I isolates to multiple species of fish, including rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, improved genotyping methods have shown that some isolates previously classified as genomovar I, and used in challenge experiments, were in fact genomovar III. Our objective was to confirm previous results with respect to genomovar II virulence, and to determine the susceptibility of rainbow trout to other genomovars. The virulence of 8 genomovar I, 4 genomovar II, 3 genomovar II-B, and 5 genomovar III isolates originating from various sources was determined through 3 independent challenges in rainbow trout using an immersion challenge model. Mean cumulative percent mortality (CPM) of ~49% for genomovar I isolates, ~1% for genomovar II, ~5% for the II-B isolates, and ~7% for the III isolates was observed. The inability of genomovar II isolates to produce mortalities in rainbow trout was unanticipated based on previous studies, but may be due to a number of factors including rainbow trout source and water chemistry. The source of fish and/or the presence of sub-optimal environment may influence the susceptibility of rainbow trout to different F. columnare genomovars.

  3. Density-dependence at sea for coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emlen, J.M.; Reisenbichler, R.R.; McGie, A.M.; Nickelson, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    The success of expanded salmon hatchery programs will depend strongly on the degree of density-induced diminishing returns per smolt released. Several authors have addressed the question of density-dependent mortality at sea in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), but have come to conflicting conclusions. We believe there are compelling reasons to reinvestigate the data, and have done so for public hatchery fish, using a variety of approaches. The results provide evidence that survival of these public hatchery fish is negatively affected, directly by the number of public hatchery smolts and indirectly by the number of private hatchery smolts. These results are weak, statistically, and should be considered primarily as a caution to those who, on the basis of other published work, believe that density-dependence does not exist. The results reported here also re-emphasize the often overlooked point that inferences drawn from data are strongly biased by investigators' views of how the systems of interest work and by the statistical assumptions they make preparatory to the analysis of those data.

  4. Population viability of the Snake River chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emlen, John M.

    1995-01-01

    In the presence of historical data, population viability models of intermediate complexity can be parameterized and utilized to project the consequences of various management actions for endangered species. A general stochastic population dynamics model with density feedback, age structure, and autocorrelated environmental fluctuations was constructed and parameterized for best fit over 36 years of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) redd count data in five Idaho index streams. Simulations indicate that persistence of the Snake River spring chinook salmon population depends primarily on density-independent mortality. Improvement of rearing habitat, predator control, reduced fishing pressure, and improved dam passage all would alleviate density-independent mortality. The current value of the Ricker α should provide for a continuation of the status quo. A recovery of the population to 1957–1961 levels within 100 years would require an approximately 75% increase in survival and (or) fecundity. Manipulations of the Ricker β are likely to have little or no effect on persistence versus extinction, but considerable influence on population size.

  5. Evaluation of a chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in both the laboratory and the field. Chinook salmon in laboratory tanks were fed alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), the predominant food of chinook salmon in Lake Michigan. Food consumption and growth by chinook salmon during the experiment were measured. To estimate the efficiency with which chinook salmon retain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from their food in the laboratory, PCB concentrations of the alewife and of the chinook salmon at both the beginning and end of the experiment were determined. Based on our laboratory evaluation, the bioenergetics model was furnishing unbiased estimates of food consumption by chinook salmon. Additionally, from the laboratory experiment, we calculated that chinook salmon retained 75% of the PCBs contained within their food. In an earlier study, assimilation rate of PCBs to chinook salmon from their food in Lake Michigan was estimated at 53%, thereby suggesting that the model was substantially overestimating food consumption by chinook salmon in Lake Michigan. However, we concluded that field performance of the model could not be accurately assessed because PCB assimilation efficiency is dependent on feeding rate, and feeding rate of chinook salmon was likely much lower in our laboratory tanks than in Lake Michigan.

  6. Proteomic analysis of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Villarroel, Marsha; Rosengrave, Patrice; Carne, Alan; Kleffmann, Torsten; Lokman, P Mark; Gemmell, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian, or coelomic, fluid that is released with the egg mass of many fishes is increasingly found to play an important role in several biological processes crucial for reproductive success. These include maintenance of oocyte fertility and developmental competence, prolonging of sperm motility, and enhancing sperm swimming speed. Here we examined if and how the proteome of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid varied among females and then sought to examine the composition of this fluid. Ovarian fluid in chinook salmon was analyzed using 1D SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS tryptic digest screened against Mascot and Sequest databases. We found marked differences in the number and concentrations of proteins in salmon ovarian fluid across different females. A total of 174 proteins were identified in ovarian fluid, 47 of which were represented by six or more peptides, belonging to one of six Gene Ontology pathways. The response to chemical stimulus and response to hypoxia pathways were best represented, accounting for 26 of the 174 proteins. The current data set provides a resource that furthers our understanding of those factors that influence successful egg production and fertilisation in salmonids and other species.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Ovarian Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Villarroel, Marsha; Rosengrave, Patrice; Carne, Alan; Kleffmann, Torsten; Lokman, P. Mark; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian, or coelomic, fluid that is released with the egg mass of many fishes is increasingly found to play an important role in several biological processes crucial for reproductive success. These include maintenance of oocyte fertility and developmental competence, prolonging of sperm motility, and enhancing sperm swimming speed. Here we examined if and how the proteome of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid varied among females and then sought to examine the composition of this fluid. Ovarian fluid in chinook salmon was analyzed using 1D SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS tryptic digest screened against Mascot and Sequest databases. We found marked differences in the number and concentrations of proteins in salmon ovarian fluid across different females. A total of 174 proteins were identified in ovarian fluid, 47 of which were represented by six or more peptides, belonging to one of six Gene Ontology pathways. The response to chemical stimulus and response to hypoxia pathways were best represented, accounting for 26 of the 174 proteins. The current data set provides a resource that furthers our understanding of those factors that influence successful egg production and fertilisation in salmonids and other species. PMID:25089903

  8. Effects of sex steroids on indices of protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of 17-estradiol (E2), testosterone, and 5a-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on protein turnover and proteolytic gene expression were determined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocytes and white muscle tissue. E2 reduced rates of protein synthesis and increased rates of protein degr...

  9. Renal excretion in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) after acute exposure to 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Allen, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    COHO SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS KISUTCH) EXPOSED TO AN ACUTE, SUBLETHAL CONCENTRATION OF 3-TRIFLUOROMETHLY 1-4 NITROPHENOL (TFM) EXHIBITED AN INCREASED OUTPUT OF URINE WHEN COMPARED WITH CONTROLS, BUT THE URINARY EXCRETION OF NA, K, CA, MG AND C1 WAS NOT AFFECTED. ABOUT 35 TIMES MORE CONJUGATED TFM THAN FREE TFM WAS EXCRETED DURING THE 24-HOUR STUDY PERIOD.

  10. Growth enhancement of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by passive immunisation against somatostatin-14

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were passively immunised against somatostatin-14 (SS-14) using an antibody originating from egg laying chicken (Gallus domesticus). Fish were immunised weekly (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 d) with chicken egg yolk derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against SS-14 (1:25 ...

  11. Fatty acid partitioning varies across fillet regions during sexual maturation in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are commonly reared as diploids (2N, two sets of chromosomes) or triploids (3N, three sets of chromosomes). Sexual maturation in 2N has negative effects on production efficiency, nutrient retention, and fillet quality. On the other hand, 3N female rainbow trout ...

  12. Sensory analysis of rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, fed enriched black soldier fly prepupae, hermetia illucens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growth trial and fillet sensory analysis were conducted to examine the effects of replacing dietary fish meal with black soldier fly (BSF) prepupae, Hermetia illucens, in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. A practical-type trout diet was formulated to contain 45% protein; four test diets were dev...

  13. Observations on side-swimming rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a controlled 6-month study using six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS), it was observed that rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in all WRAS exhibited a higher-than-normal prevalence of side-swimming (i.e. controlled, forward swimming, but with misaligned orientation suc...

  14. Effects of incubation temperatures on embryonic and larval survival in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incubation temperature is commonly used by hatcheries to manipulate hatch date in salmonids including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Target dates for hatching often change during the incubation period and require a sudden adjustment in temperature. Although there are many studies charac...

  15. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  16. Shedding of Renibacterium salmoninarum by infected chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKibben, C.L.; Pascho, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the transmission and pathogenesis of Renibacterium salmoninarum may describe more accurately what is occurring in the natural environment if test fish are infected by waterborne R. salmoninarum shed from infected fish. To quantify bacterial shedding by chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha at 13??C in freshwater, groups of fish were injected intraperitoneally with R. salmoninarum at either 1.3 x 106 colony forming units (CFU) fish-1 (high-dose injection group) or 1.5 x 103 CFU fish-1 (low-dose injection group). R. salmoninarum infection levels were measured in the exposed fish by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BKD-ELISA). At regular intervals for 30 d, the numbers of R. salmoninarum shed by the injected fish were calculated on the basis of testing water samples by the membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT) and bacteriological culture. Mean BKD-ELISA optical densities (ODs) for fish in the low-dose injection group were not different from those of control fish [p > 0.05), and no R. salmoninarum were detected in water samples taken up to 30 d after injection of fish in the low-dose group. By 12 d after injection a proportion of the fish from the high-dose infection group had high (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 1.000) to severe (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 2.000) R. salmoninarum infection levels, and bacteria were detected in the water by both tests. However, measurable levels of R. salmoninarum were not consistently detected in the water until a proportion of the fish maintained high to severe infection levels for an additional 8 d. The concentrations of R salmoninarum in the water samples ranged from undetectable up to 994 cells ml-1 on the basis of the MF-FAT, and up to 1850 CFU ml-1 on the basis of bacteriological culture. The results suggest that chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum by injection of approximately 1 x 106 CFU fish-1 can be used as the source of infection in cohabitation challenges beginning 20 darter injection.

  17. Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 3 of 3; Addendum to the Assessment of Juvenile Oncorhynchus nerka (Sockeye and Kokane) Rearing Conditions of Skaha and Osoyoos Lakes 2002 Section of the 2002 Technical Report, 2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Howie; Lawrence, Shayla; Rebellato, Betty

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this addendum is, first, to provide and discuss disease agent survey results that were not available for inclusion in the Disease Risk Assessment portion of the YEAR 3 report at the time of its writing, and second, to make recommendations stemming from these results. The first set of results deals with live box exposure tests conducted using juvenile sentinel rainbow trout in the spring of 2002 to detect Myxosoma cerebralis and Ceratomyxa shasta. The second set of results deals with similar exposure tests conducted in the spring of 2003. The latter tests were initially intended to occur in the fall of 2002 but had to be re-scheduled to the spring of 2003 because suitably aged sentinel rainbow trout for the exposures were not available in the fall of 2002. The methods used for the live box exposure tests were essentially the same as those described in the YEAR 3 report. Fish were again exposed at the same four sites above McIntyre Dam and at the same four sites below the dam. As mentioned in the YEAR 3 report, the spring 2002 exposure lasted for 21 days (May 6 to 27). The spring 2003 exposure also lasted for 21 days (April 22 to May 13). The number of fish in the spring 2003 tests was, however, reduced to approximately half the number used in previous tests in order to reduce the chances of dissolved oxygen problems, suspected to have occurred in earlier tests in some of the live boxes. As before, fish that survived the live box exposures were transferred to Skaha Hatchery where they were held for sufficient time to permit any infections with M. cerebralis and C. shasta to develop and to permit for spore development in these pathogens. Assays for the pathogens were carried out as previously described. Detection of M. cerebralis was based on detecting its spores following the trypsin/pepsin digestion method. Detection of C. shasta was based on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, but smears of fresh intestinal tissues (one fish per smear) were also prepared so that positive PCR findings could be confirmed by the microscopic observation of C. shasta spores. Except as just mentioned, appropriate tissues from the fish were in most cases pooled (maximum of five fish per pool) for the assays.

  18. Development of a Method to Produce Freeze-Dried Cubes from 3 Pacific Salmon Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freeze-dried boneless skinless cubes of pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), and chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon were prepared and physical properties evaluated. To minimize freeze-drying time, the kinetics of dehydration and processing yields were investigated. The physical ...

  19. Detection and identification of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense plerocercoids from wild Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, J; Murata, R; Sadamasu, K; Araki, J

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the risk of diphyllobothriasis from ingestion of wild Pacific salmon in Japan by surveying Diphyllobothrium plerocercoids in 182 salmon samples obtained from Japan. The plerocercoids were not detected in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) (0/26), called Akizake in Japan, caught between September and November. However, the detection rate of plerocercoids in chum salmon, called Tokishirazu in Japan, caught between early April and June, was 51.1% (24/47) with an average of two plerocercoid larvae per fish. The detection rates of cherry salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) and pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) were 12.2% (10/82) and 18.5% (5/27), respectively, and the average number of plerocercoids per fish was 0.45 (37 larvae/82 fishes) and 0.22 larvae (6 larvae/27 fishes), respectively. Plerocercoids isolated from O. keta and O. masou were identified as Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense on the basis of molecular analysis of the cox1 and nad3 genes. Moreover, four tapeworms (three from O. keta and one from O. masou) were obtained by infecting golden hamsters with plerocercoids. The morphological features of these tapeworms were similar to those of D. nihonkaiense isolated from humans. Therefore, we think that O. keta and not O. masou is the most important source of plerocercoid infections in Japan.

  20. Linking marine and freshwater growth in western Alaska Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Nielsen, J.L.; Agler, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothesis that growth in Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. is dependent on previous growth was tested using annual scale growth measurements of wild Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha returning to the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers, Alaska, from 1964 to 2004. First-year marine growth in individual O. tshawytscha was significantly correlated with growth in fresh water. Furthermore, growth during each of 3 or 4 years at sea was related to growth during the previous year. The magnitude of the growth response to the previous year's growth was greater when mean year-class growth during the previous year was relatively low. Length (eye to tail fork, LETF) of adult O. tshawytscha was correlated with cumulative scale growth after the first year at sea. Adult LETF was also weakly correlated with scale growth that occurred during freshwater residence 4 to 5 years earlier, indicating the importance of growth in fresh water. Positive growth response to previous growth in O. tshawytscha was probably related to piscivorous diet and foraging benefits of large body size. Faster growth among O. tshawytscha year classes that initially grew slowly may reflect high mortality in slow growing fish and subsequent compensatory growth in survivors. Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in this study exhibited complex growth patterns showing a positive relationship with previous growth and a possible compensatory response to environmental factors affecting growth of the age class.

  1. Using broad landscape level features to predict redd densities of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Methow River watershed, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romine, Jason G.; Perry, Russell W.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    We used broad-scale landscape feature variables to model redd densities of spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Methow River watershed. Redd densities were estimated from redd counts conducted from 2005 to 2007 and 2009 for steelhead trout and 2005 to 2009 for spring Chinook salmon. These densities were modeled using generalized linear mixed models. Variables examined included primary and secondary geology type, habitat type, flow type, sinuosity, and slope of stream channel. In addition, we included spring effect and hatchery effect variables to account for high densities of redds near known springs and hatchery outflows. Variables were associated with National Hydrography Database reach designations for modeling redd densities within each reach. Reaches were assigned a dominant habitat type, geology, mean slope, and sinuosity. The best fit model for spring Chinook salmon included sinuosity, critical slope, habitat type, flow type, and hatchery effect. Flow type, slope, and habitat type variables accounted for most of the variation in the data. The best fit model for steelhead trout included year, habitat type, flow type, hatchery effect, and spring effect. The spring effect, flow type, and hatchery effect variables explained most of the variation in the data. Our models illustrate how broad-scale landscape features may be used to predict spawning habitat over large areas where fine-scale data may be lacking.

  2. Spatial and temporal spawning dynamics of native westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi, introduced rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and their hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, C.C.; McMahon, T.E.; Belcer, D.; Kershner, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to assess spatial and temporal spawning distributions of native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi; WCT), introduced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT), and their hybrids in the upper Flathead River system, Montana (USA) and British Columbia (Canada), from 2000 to 2007. Radio-tagged trout (N = 125) moved upriver towards spawning sites as flows increased during spring runoff and spawned in 29 tributaries. WCT migrated greater distances and spawned in headwater streams during peak flows and as flows declined, whereas RBT and RBT hybrids (backcrosses to RBT) spawned earlier during increasing flows and lower in the system. WCT hybrids (backcrosses to WCT) spawned intermediately in time and space to WCT and RBT and RBT hybrids. Both hybrid groups and RBT, however, spawned over time periods that produced temporal overlap with spawning WCT in most years. Our data indicate that hybridization is spreading via long-distance movements of individuals with high amounts of RBT admixture into WCT streams and stepping-stone invasion at small scales by later generation backcrosses. This study provides evidence that hybridization increases the likelihood of reproductive overlap in time and space, promoting extinction by introgression, and that the spread of hybridization is likely to continue if hybrid source populations are not reduced or eliminated.

  3. Characterization of 13 microsatellites for Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi) and cross-amplification in six other salmonids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M L; Kirchoff, V S; Peacock, M M

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen newly developed tri- and tetranucleotide repeat microsatellite markers were developed for Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi), a threatened subspecies endemic to the Lahontan hydrographic basin in the western USA. These loci are highly polymorphic with five to 30 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Cross-species amplification of these markers was most successful in the closely related rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, with only three loci amplifying in brown trout, Salmo trutta. Nonoverlapping allelic distributions for many of these loci among the six salmonid species screened suggest these markers may be useful for hybrid determination.

  4. Histopathological findings in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with 3 different Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; Vega-Sánchez, Vicente; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the macroscopic and microscopic lesions in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with genetically identified Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, and A. veronii species. The genus Aeromonas includes bacteria that naturally inhabit both waterways and organisms. At least 27 Aeromonas species have been identified to date, some of which can cause significant economic losses in aquaculture. As up to 68.8% of Aeromonas isolates may be misidentified in routine biochemical and phenotypic tests, however, reported cases of Aeromonas infection in fish may be wrongly identified. Our findings confirmed that the 3 Aeromonas species studied are associated with septicemia and dermal lesions in rainbow trout.

  5. Ibuprofen metabolism in the liver and gill of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gomez, C F; Constantine, L; Moen, M; Vaz, A; Wang, W; Huggett, Duane B

    2011-03-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment has become an important topic of discussion with respect to pharmaceutical absorption, metabolism and elimination in fish. This study investigates the metabolism of ibuprofen by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In vitro metabolic loss of parent compound was measured in gill and liver S9 and microsomal fractions. Metabolite analysis found 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen as the major metabolite in uninduced S9 fractions. Supplementing S9 fractions with UDPGA did not significantly enhance metabolism. Additionally, assays involving the induction and inhibition of specific CYP isozymes support CYP1A2 as a possible metabolic pathway in fish.

  6. Histopathological findings in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with 3 different Aeromonas species

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; Vega-Sánchez, Vicente; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the macroscopic and microscopic lesions in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with genetically identified Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, and A. veronii species. The genus Aeromonas includes bacteria that naturally inhabit both waterways and organisms. At least 27 Aeromonas species have been identified to date, some of which can cause significant economic losses in aquaculture. As up to 68.8% of Aeromonas isolates may be misidentified in routine biochemical and phenotypic tests, however, reported cases of Aeromonas infection in fish may be wrongly identified. Our findings confirmed that the 3 Aeromonas species studied are associated with septicemia and dermal lesions in rainbow trout. PMID:26130859

  7. Viral erythrocytic necrosis: Some physiological consequences of infection in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacMillan, John R.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Landolt, Marsha L.

    1980-01-01

    Erythroid cells in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) susceptible to infection with erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) were examined by light and electron microscopy. Cells of stages II, III, IV, V, and VI contained complete eyrthrocytic necrosis virions in the cytoplasm. Viruses closely resembling ENV were also detected in the nuclei of some erythroblasts. Some secondary consequences of ENV infection were a threefold greater mortality rate from vibriosis, a significantly decreased tolerance to oxygen depletion, and a decreased ability to regulate serum sodium and potassium in saltwater.

  8. The behavioural homing response of adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta to amino-acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, E Y; Leonard, J B K; Ueda, H

    2016-11-21

    Adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta homing behaviour in a two-choice test tank (Y-maze) was monitored using a passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tag system in response to river-specific dissolved free amino-acid (DFAA) profiles and revealed that the majority of O. keta showed a preference for artificial natal-stream water and tended to stay in this maze arm for a longer period; natal-stream water was chosen over a nearby tributary's water, but not when the O. keta were presented with a non-tributary water. The results demonstrate the ability of O. keta to discriminate artificial stream waters containing natural levels of DFAA.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) mitochondrial DNA derived from restriction site haplotype information.

    PubMed

    Garvin, M R; Saitoh, K; Churikov, D Y; Brykov, V A; Gharrett, A J

    2010-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are useful genetic markers for the management and conservation of commercially important species such as salmon. Informative markers can be derived from data obtained for other purposes. We used restriction endonuclease data from earlier work to identify potentially useful restriction sites in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). With the aid of a newly generated complete mitochondrial DNA sequence (accession number AP010773), we identified the SNP responsible for each restriction site variant, designed rapid genotyping assays, and surveyed the SNPs in more than 400 individuals. The restriction site analysis and the SNP genotyping assays were almost perfectly concordant. Some reasons for the non-concordance were identified and discussed.

  10. Open-jaw syndrome in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) at a hatchery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crouch, Dennis E.; Yasutake, William T.; Rucker, Robert R.

    1973-01-01

    Nearly 0.5% of the yearling spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) at a national fish hatchery were observed with mouth agape, the condition occurring in two of 16 ponds. X-radiographs and histological preparations indicated that the articular bone of the lower jaw was malformed and dislocated dorsal and posterior to its normal point of attachment. The bone appeared to be embedded in the mandibular muscle and surrounded by an extensive fibrous tissue network. Genetic aberration, environmental interaction, and teratogenic substances are discussed as possible causes of the anomaly.

  11. First isolation of Pseudocohnilembus persalinus (Ciliophora: Scuticociliatida) from freshwater-reared rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon R M; Prosperi-Porta, Gina; LaPatra, Scott E

    2010-10-01

    Ciliated protists were isolated from the ovarian fluid of apparently healthy adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) maintained in freshwater. The organism was identified as Pseudocohnilembus persalinus based on morphometric and morphological analysis of silver-stained specimens obtained from culture and on analysis of ribosomal RNA gene sequences. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene sequence of this organism also was characterized. This ciliate has been reported previously as free living only in saline environments and as an endosymbiont in a marine teleost, the olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). A cyst-like stage may have facilitated the novel occurrence of this organism as an endosymbiont in rainbow trout.

  12. Professional Development: International and National Perspectives. Four Presentations from AAHE's National Conference on School/College Collaboration, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Sato, Nancy; Paine, Lynn; Snowball, Diane

    The four papers presented here address teacher development from an international viewpoint. In "Professional Development and Standards" (Linda Darling-Hammond) it is suggested that U.S. educators engage in new kinds of collaborations with universities, and it proposes a shift from information transmittal to "co-construction" of…

  13. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1993, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo; Peters, Ronald L.

    1996-09-01

    Bull trout and cutthroat trout are two salmonid species native to the Lake Coeur d`Alene drainage. Historically these species were a critical component of the Coeur d`Alene Tribe`s annual subsistence requirements. Since 1932, the cutthroat trout population has declined significantly in the Coeur d`Alene system. The present ecosystem bears little resemblance to habitat composition, diversity and structure of the historic ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to conduct baseline stream and biological surveys of four drainages located within the Coeur d`alene Reservation and make recommendations on ways to increase the westslope cutthroat and bull trout populations on the Reservation. Data indicated that habitat degradation, specifically, water quantity and lack of habitat complexity, was limiting westslope cutthroat and bull trout populations on the Reservation. Population data indicated that cutthroat trout populations were low when compared to other similar drainages. Surveys revealed a conspicuous absence of bull trout. Recommendations included: conducting extensive habitat restoration in the study drainages; developing alternate harvest opportunities to reduce pressure on wild stocks; purchasing critical watershed areas for fisheries habitat protection; constructing and operating a trout production facility; and, implementing a five-year monitoring program to evaluate the program effectiveness.

  14. Advanced turbine technology applications project (ATTAP): Hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support (HVTE-TS): Annual report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This is the sixth of a series of reports documenting work performed on the ATTAP/HVTETS. This is a combined report to cover work performed in both 1993 and 1994. Progress is reported on ceramic component design and characterization, powertrain development, component rig testing and performance and durability testing.

  15. Effect of Flap Deflection on Section Characteristics of S813 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of small deflections of a 30% chord, simple flap on the section characteristics of a tip airfoil, the S813, designed for 20- to 30-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been evaluated theoretically. The decrease in maximum lift coefficient due to leading-edge roughness increases in magnitude with increasing, positive flap deflection and with decreasing Reynolds number.

  16. Results of the basewide monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Cunningham, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio, as part of Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) that began in 1992. The BMP was designed as a long-term project to character ground-water and surface-water quality (including streambed sediments), describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits the Base, and investigate the effects of activities at WPAFB on regional water quality. Ground water, surface ware, and streambed sediment were sampled in four rounds between August 1993 and September 1994 to provide the analytical data needed to address the objectives of the BMP. Surface-water-sampling rounds were designed to include most of the seasonal hydrologic conditions encountered in southwestern Ohio, including baseflow conditions and spring runoff. Ground-water-sampling rounds were scheduled for times of recession and recharfe. Ground-water data were used to construct water-table, potentiometric, and vertical gradient maps of the WPAFB area. Water levels have not changed significantly since 1987, but the effects of pumping on and near the Base can have a marked effect on water levels in localized areas. Ground-ware gradients generally were downward throughout Area B (the southwestern third of the Base) and in the eastern third of Areas A and C (the northeastern two-thirds of the Base), and were upward in the vicinity of Mad River. Stream-discharge measurements verified these gradients. Many of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) exceedances of inorganic constituents in ground water were associated with water from the bedrock. Exceedances of concentrations of chromium and nickel were found consistently in five wells completed in the glacial aquifer beneath the Base. Five organic compounds [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] were detected at concentrations that exceeded MCLs; all of the TCE, PCE, and vinyl chloride exceedances were in water from glacial aquifer, whereas the benzene exceedance and most of the bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exceedances were in water from the bedrock. TCE (16 exceedances) and PCE (11 exceedances) most frequently exceeded the MCLs and were detected in the most samples. A decrease in concentrations of inorganic and organic compounds with depth suggest that many constituents detected in ground-water samples are associated partly with human activities, in addition to their natural occurrence. Included in the list of these constituents are nickel, chromium, copper, lead vanadium, zinc, bromide, and nitrate. Many constituents are not found at depths greater than 60 to 80 feet, possibly indicating that human effects on ground-water quality are limited to shallow flow systems. Organic compounds detected in shallow or intermediate-depth wells were aligned mostly with flowpaths that pass through or near identified hazardous-waste sites. Few organic contaminants were detected in surface water. The only organic compound to exceed MCLs for drinking water was bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, but it was detected at concentrations just above the MCL. Inorganic constituents detected at concentration exceeding MCLs include beryllium (twice), lead (once), thallium (once), and gross alpha radiation (once). No polycyclic aromatic (PAHs) were detected in surface-water samples. The highest concentrations of contaminants detected during a storm event were in samples from upgradient locations, indicating that off-Base sources may contribute to surface-water contamination. Inorganic and organic contaminants were found in streambed sediments at WPAFB, primarily in Areas A and C. Trace metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium were detected at 16 locations at concentrations considered 'elevated' according to a ranking scheme for sediments. PAHS were the organic compounds detected most frequently and in highest concentrations organo

  17. Preliminary assessment of the occurrence and possible sources of MTBE in groundwater in the United States, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.T.; Zogorski, J.S.; Wilber, W.G.; Price, C.V.

    1997-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require fuel oxygenates to be added to gasoline used in some metropolitan areas to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon monoxide or ozone. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), is the most commonly used fuel oxygenate and is a relatively new gasoline additive. Nevertheless, out of 60 volatile organic chemicals analyzed, MTBE was the second most frequently detected chemical in samples of shallow ambient groundwater from urban areas that were collected during 1993-94 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Samples were collected from 5 drinking-water wells, 12 springs, and 1g3 monitoring wells in urban areas. No MTBE was detected in drinking-water wells. At a reporting level of 0.2 ??g/L, MTBE was detected most frequently in shallow groundwater from urban areas (27% of 210 wells and springs sampled in 8 areas) as compared to shallow groundwater from agricultural areas (1.3% of 549 wells sampled in 21 areas) or deeper groundwater from major aquifers (1.0% of 412 wells sampled in 9 areas). Only 3% of the shallow wells sampled in urban areas had concentrations of MTBE that exceed 20 ??g/L, which is the estimated lower limit of the United States Environmental Protection Agency draft lifetime drinking water health advisory. Because MTBE is persistent and mobile in groundwater) it can move from shallow to deeper aquifers with time. In shallow urban groundwater, MTBE generally was not found with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, or xylenes (BTEX) compounds which commonly are associated with gasoline spills. This disassociation causes uncertainty as to the source of MTBE. Possible sources of MTBE in groundwater include point sources, such as leaking storage tanks, and nonpoint sources, such as recharge of precipitation and storm-water runoff.

  18. [Induced abortion after the 12th week of pregnancy in the county of Arhus 1993-1994. Psychological consequences].

    PubMed

    Meyer, L; Petersson, B H

    1996-07-29

    The records of all women applying for permission to have an abortion performed after the 12th week of pregnancy during a one-year period in the County of Aarhus were continuously reviewed, and the women who had the abortion performed due to psychosocial reasons were interviewed with a questionnaire at the time of the abortion and again four months later. Of the 76 women who applied for permission for a late abortion the following were excluded from the study: 31 who had the abortion because a malformed child was suspected, six women who did not have the abortion although permission had been given, five women who did not receive permission, four who were under 18 years of age, one who had a miscarriage, 10 who were from another country of origin and did not understand Danish and finally four women who were allowed an abortion on a medical indication and who were either in hospital or in jail. Fifteen women were questioned concerning their age, length of pregnancy and psychological and social histories and were asked to fill out a depression scale. The data showed that none of them had planned their pregnancy and they had had no symptoms of pregnancy until the time at which they applied for the abortion. None of them regretted the abortion afterwards; half of the women were under psychological strain at the time of application, and a few of them had even more psychological symptoms four months after the abortion. Although they had many social problems, physical complications and psychological problems only a few of the women had seen a doctor in the four month period between the abortion and the follow-up.

  19. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  20. Diversity of movements by individual anadromous coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii.

    PubMed

    Goetz, F A; Baker, B; Buehrens, T; Quinn, T P

    2013-11-01

    Wild, downstream-migrating cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii, smolts and adults were captured at a weir in Big Beef Creek, Hood Canal, Washington, surgically implanted with acoustic tags and tracked to identify spring and summer movements using stationary receivers in order to test the assumption that the species moves little while in marine waters. Overall, 93-96% migrated from the stream into the east side of the long narrow fjord, where they dispersed north and south along the shoreline. Most O. c. clarkii were detected nearshore within 10 km of the release site, with declining detection rates to 77 km. Over one-third (36%) crossed c. 2-4 km of deep water to the other side but only one O. c. clarkii left the Hood Canal basin. Movements and behaviour patterns did not differ between smolts and adults but cluster analysis revealed two modes of distribution, here categorized as residents and migrants. Within these categories of overall distribution, a range of finer-scale behaviour patterns was observed, including sedentary individuals, daily moving between proximate sites and more continuous long-distance travel. Diel movement patterns varied markedly among individuals but overall activity increased near dawn, peaked around mid-day and declined but continued at night. These patterns contrast with sympatric and closely related steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, providing new insights into the diversity of salmonid behaviour.

  1. Life-history organization of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) in Yellowstone Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gresswell, Robert E.; Liss, W.J.; Larson, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Life-history organization of the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) may be viewed at various levels, including species, subspecies, metapopulation, population, or individual. Each level varies in spatial scale and temporal persistence, and components at each level continually change with changes in environment. Cutthroat trout are widely distributed throughout the western United States, occurring in such diverse environments as coastal rivers of the Pacific Northwest and interior streams of the Great Basin. During its evolution the species has organized into 14 subspecies with many different life-history characteristics and habitat requirements. Within subspecies, organization is equally complex. For example, life-history traits, such as average size and age, migration strategy, and migration timing, vary among individual spawning populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) in tributary streams of Yellowstone Lake. Understanding the effects of human perturbations on life-history organization is critical for management of the cutthroat trout and other polytypic salmonid species. Loss of diversity at any hierarchical level jeopardizes the long-term ability of the species to adapt to changing environments, and it may also lead to increased fluctuations in abundance and yield and increase the risk of extinction.

  2. [Sex identification of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Rud, Yu P; Maistrenko, M I; Buchatskii, L P

    2015-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based test for rapid sex identification of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss has been elaborated. Using the data deposited with the NCBI genome bank, nucleotide sequences of the specific sex-linked locus of salmonid species have been analyzed and the oligonucleotide primers have been selected. The length of the amplification products is 800 nucleotide pairs. Amplification specificity has been tested by nucleotide analysis of the amplicon sequences. All PCR products match the Y chromosome region housing the corresponding specific locus. A comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the fragments carrying the rainbow trout (and other salmonid species) sex-linked marker demonstrates a high degree of identity, amounting to 95-99%. The maximal identity between the sequences (99%) is observed when analyzing representatives of the same genus, for example, Oncorhynchus. Thus, the sex is detectable by a simple PCR test, thereby allowing the male revertants emerging via hormonal sex reversion to be identified. This test is a rapid diagnostic method, since it requires only 1 day for testing and informing the fish farm on its results. Results of abdomen opening of rainbow trout revertants and examination of their hormonal status are also described.

  3. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, Cristian; Díaz, Nelson F.; Gomez, Gilda; López, María Eugenia; Iturra, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), various quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners) produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC) that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002) were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10) with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035) mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map. PMID:22888302

  4. Enhancing highly unsaturated omega-3 fatty acids in phase-fed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using Alaskan fish oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to investigate differences in the kinetics of fatty acids (FA) deposition in fillets of market-sized (approximately 450g) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets containing commercial Alaskan fish oils versus menhaden oil. Comparisons were made with FA leve...

  5. Effects of frying in various cooking oils on fatty acid content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to describe the effects of frying with various oils on the fatty acid content of rainbow trout. Four different oils were evaluated (peanut oil, high oleic sunflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil). Farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets were sliced into three portions and eac...

  6. Acute handling disturbance modulates plasma insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of acute stressor exposure on proximal (growth hormone; GH) and distal (insulin-like growth factor-I; IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins) components of the somatotropic axis are poorly understood in finfish. We exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to a 5-minute handling disturbance to...

  7. Preliminary examination of oxidative stress in juvenile spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) of wild origin sampled from transport barges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migrating juvenile wild Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), collected and loaded onto transport barges at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, were sampled from barges at John Day Dam, 348 km downstream, at five-day intervals beginning late April and ending late May. An increase in lipid per...

  8. Abnormal swimming behavior and increased deformities in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss cultured in low exchange water recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to determine if accumulating water quality parameters would negatively impact rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss health and welfare within water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS) that were operated at low and near-zero water exchange, with and without ozonation, and ...

  9. Effects of triploidy on growth and protein degradation during the recovery from feed deprivation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying physiological differences between diploid and triploid rainbow trout will help define how ploidy affects mechanisms that impact growth and nutrient utilization. In this study juvenile diploid and triploid female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were either continually fed or fasted f...

  10. Continuous exposure to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus during early life stages of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss(Walbaum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) were exposed continuously to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) at 0, 10, 1,000, or 100,000 pfu/L of water to estimate the effects of chronic IPNV exposure on early life stages. Fish density averaged 35 fish/L or 140 fish/L, with a tank flow rat...

  11. Continuous Exposure to Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV) During Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) were exposed continuously to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) at 0, 10, 1,000, or 10,000 pfu/L of water to estimate the effects of chronic IPNV exposure on early life stages. Fish density averaged 35 fish/L (low) or 140 fish/L (high), and wate...

  12. Effect of anthocyanidins on myogenic differentiation in induced and non-induced primary myoblasts from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to test whether an anthocyanidin mixture (peonidin, cyanidin and pelargonidin chloride) modulates myogenesis in both induced and non-induced myogenic cells from juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We evaluated three different anthocyanidin concentrations (1X, 2.5X and...

  13. Identification of Estrogen-responsive Vitelline Envelope Protein Fragments from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Plasma Using Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma protein biomarkers associated with exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol were isolated and identified using novel sample preparation techniques and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and bioinformatics approaches. Juvenile male and female trout ...

  14. A second generation integrated map of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome: analysis of synteny with model fish genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we generated DNA fingerprints and end sequences from bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from two new libraries to improve the first generation integrated physical and genetic map of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome. The current version of the physical map is compose...

  15. Virus diseases of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Stanley W.

    1954-01-01

    The degenerative or non-neoplastic diseases of possible virus origin give the fish-culturist the most concern because of the severe mortalities resulting from infection. Epizootics of this nature have been reported in carp (Cyprinus carpio) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Europe, in acara (Geophagus brasiliensis) in South America, in kokanee, (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka nerka) in the State of Washington. It has been demonstrated that each epizootic was caused by an infectious filterable agent, probably a virus.

  16. Differences in neurobehavioral responses of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper and cobalt: Behavioral avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Marr, J.C.A.; Lipton, J.; Cacela, D.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Behavioral avoidance of copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), and a Cu and Co mixture in soft water differed greatly between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha). Chinook salmon avoided at least 0.7 {micro}g Cu/L, 24 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 1.0 {micro}g Cu/L and 0.9 {micro}g Co/L, whereas rainbow trout avoided at least 1.6 {micro}g Cu/L, 180 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 2.6 {micro}g Cu/L and 2.4 {micro}g Co/L. Chinook salmon were also more sensitive to the toxic effects of Cu in that they failed to avoid {ge}44 {micro}g Cu/L, whereas rainbow trout failed to avoid {ge}180 {micro}g Cu/L. Furthermore, following acclimation to 2 {micro}g Cu/L, rainbow trout avoided 4 {micro}g Cu/L and preferred clean water, but chinook salmon failed to avoid any Cu concentrations and did not prefer clean water. The failure to avoid high concentrations of metals by both species suggests that the sensory mechanism responsible for avoidance responses was impaired. Exposure to Cu concentrations that were not avoided could result in lethality from prolonged Cu exposure or in impairment of sensory-dependent behaviors that are essential for survival and reproduction.

  17. Recent physical connections may explain weak genetic structure in western Alaskan chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R; Kondzela, Christine M; Martin, Patrick C; Finney, Bruce; Guyon, Jeffrey; Templin, William D; DeCovich, Nick; Gilk-Baumer, Sara; Gharrett, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Low genetic divergence at neutral loci among populations is often the result of high levels of contemporary gene flow. Western Alaskan summer-run chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations demonstrate weak genetic structure, but invoking contemporary gene flow as the basis for the low divergence is problematic because salmon home to their natal streams and some of the populations are thousands of kilometers apart. We used genotypes from microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism loci to investigate alternative explanations for the current genetic structure of chum salmon populations from western Alaska. We also estimated current levels of gene flow among Kuskokwim River populations. Our results suggest that weak genetic structure is best explained by physical connections that occurred after the Holocene Thermal Maximum among the Yukon, Kuskokwim, and Nushagak drainages that allowed gene flow to occur among now distant populations. PMID:23919176

  18. Using scale characteristics and water temperature to reconstruct growth rates of juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Beakes, M P; Sharron, S; Charish, R; Moore, J W; Satterthwaite, W H; Sturm, E; Wells, B K; Sogard, S M; Mangel, M

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from a northern California Central Valley population were reared in a controlled laboratory experiment. Significantly different rates of growth were observed among fish reared under two ration treatments and three temperature treatments (8, 14 and 20°C). Wider circulus spacing and faster deposition was associated with faster growth. For the same growth rate, however, circulus spacing was two-fold wider and deposited 36% less frequently in the cold compared to the hot temperature treatment. In a multiple linear regression, median circulus spacing and water temperature accounted for 68% of the variation in observed O. mykiss growth. These results corroborate previous research on scale characteristics and growth, while providing novel evidence that highlights the importance of water temperature in these relationships. Thus, this study establishes the utility of using scale analysis as a relatively non-invasive method for inferring growth in salmonids.

  19. Stress of formalin treatment in juvenile spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Yasutake, W.T.

    1973-01-01

    The physiological stress of 200 ppm formalin treatments at 10 C is more severe in the juvenile steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) than in the spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). In the steelhead, a marked hypochloremia follows a 1-hr treatment and recovery requires about 24 hr. During longer treatments, hypercholesterolemia together with reduced regulatory precision, hypercortisolemia, alkaline reserve depletion, and hypocapnia unaccompanied by a fall in blood pH occur — suggestive of compensated respiratory alkalosis. In the spring chinook, hypochloremia and reduced plasma cholesterol regulatory precision are the significant treatment side effects but recovery requires only a few hours.Formalin treatments also cause epithelial separation, hypertrophy, and necrosis in the gills of both fishes but again, consistent with the physiological dysfunctions, these are more severe in the steelhead.

  20. Dietary effects of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Sakineh; Teimouri, Mahdi; Amirkolaie, Abdolsamad Keramat

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of diets containing 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish (n=180; 101±8 g) were randomly divided into fifteen 300 L fiberglass tanks in triplicates for a period of ten weeks. The RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, total protein and albumin levels increased significantly in the groups supplemented with S. platensis. Dietary inclusion of S. platensis had no significant effects on hematocrit, cholesterol, triglyceride and lactate of the blood. HDL-cholesterol was larger in rainbow trout fed 10% S. platensis in comparison with the other diets, whereas LDL-cholesterol significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. Cortisol and glucose significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. The present results demonstrate that inclusion of 10% S. platensis can be introduced as an immunostimulant in rainbow trout diets.

  1. Cholinergic and behavioral neurotoxicity of carbaryl and cadmium to larval rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauvais, S.L.; Jones, S.B.; Parris, J.T.; Brewer, S.K.; Little, E.E.

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals are common environmental contaminants that can cause neurotoxicity to aquatic organisms, impairing reproduction and survival. Neurotoxic effects of cadmium and carbaryl exposures were estimated in larval rainbow trout (RBT; Oncorhynchus mykiss) using changes in physiological endpoints and correlations with behavioral responses. Following exposures, RBT were videotaped to assess swimming speed. Brain tissue was used to measure cholinesterase (ChE) activity, muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR) number, and MChR affinity. ChE activity decreased with increasing concentrations of carbaryl but not of cadmium. MChR were not affected by exposure to either carbaryl or cadmium. Swimming speed correlated with ChE activity in carbaryl-exposed RBT, but no correlation occurred in cadmium-exposed fish. Thus, carbaryl exposure resulted in neurotoxicity reflected by changes in physiological and behavioral parameters measured, while cadmium exposure did not. Correlations between behavior and physiology provide a useful assessment of neurotoxicity.

  2. Avoidance response of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hexavalent chromium solutions.

    PubMed

    Svecevicius, Gintaras

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on one-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to evaluate their ability to detect and avoid hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Test fish were given a choice to discriminate between clean water and Cr(6+) solutions of six sublethal concentrations ranging from 0.0015 to 0.3 mg Cr/L in a counter-current flow, steep gradient chamber. The intensity of avoidance response reached a significant level at test concentrations of 0.003 mg Cr/L and higher, and was directly proportional to the Cr(6+) concentration logarithm. Avoidance threshold was estimated through regression analysis and to be 0.0017 mg Cr/L. This result is approximately sixfold lower than maximum-permitted concentration of 0.01 mg Cr/L accepted as the Lithuanian water-quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life.

  3. Use of behavioral responses of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in identifying sublethal exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Svecevicius, Gintaras

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted in a flow-through apparatus on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to evaluate the sensitivity of a number of their behavioral responses to hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Test fish were exposed to Cr(6+) concentrations corresponding to 0.001-1 parts of the rainbow trout 96-h LC50 (0.029-28.5 mg Cr/L, respectively) in short-term (15 min) tests. Sensitivity parameter responses could be arranged into the following sequence: latent period of detection response = locomotor activity > gill ventilation frequency > coughing rate. All the rainbow trout responses were sensitive behavioral indicators of sublethal exposure. Behavioral responses meet the criteria as rapid tools for bioassay testing and could be easily standardized using Cr(6+) as a reference toxicant.

  4. Avoidance of copper and zinc by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss pre-exposed to copper.

    PubMed

    Svecevičius, Gintaras

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in a counter-current flow, steep-gradient chamber to evaluate their ability to detect and avoid copper and zinc at concentrations of 0.1 mg Cu/L and 1 mg Zn/L, respectively, after 10-day pre-exposure to five copper sublethal concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mg Cu/L and after 10-day re-acclimation period in clean water. Avoidance response intensity in affected fish significantly decreased with increase in pre-exposure Cu concentration. The strength of avoidance response to Cu and Zn test solutions in pre-exposed fish after re-acclimation gradually increased in a concentration-dependent order.

  5. Fast genomic biomarker responses of retene and pyrene in liver of juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Kati; Arsiola, Tiina; Oikari, Aimo

    2012-10-01

    We studied the transcriptive effects of two PAHs, retene (RET) and pyrene (PYR), in three equimolar sublethal concentrations (0.9-10 μg/L) in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. After 24 h of in vivo exposure, expressions of selected genes (CYP1A, Hsp30, Hsp70, Grp78, Sep15, GP1) were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These PAHs changed the studied gene transcriptions differently, but not significantly, except for CYP1A, which was induced only by RET. RET induced CYP1A gene expression even at low, environmentally realistic concentrations in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout.

  6. Nutritional factors in the biochemical pathology of Corynebacterial kidney disease in the coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Ross, A.J.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of diet ingredient on the morbidity and biochemical pathogenesis of corynebacterial kidney disease was investigated using juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) fed the Abernathy dry ration made up with either corn gluten or cottonseed meal (isoprotein, isocaloric substitution). Evaluation of incidence of infection, pituitary activation and aspects of carbohydrate metabolism, acid-base balance, renal function, and hematopoietic activity showed that the actual disease incidence was about the same for both diets but the nonspecific stress of infection was more severe in fish fed the corn gluten.Discriminant function calculations combining four physiological parameters gave a probability of 0.86 for successfully diagnosing infected fish on the basis of these blood chemistry tests.

  7. Assessing smoltification of juvenile spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha using changes in body morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Rondorf, D.W.; Tilson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A morphometric measure of smoltification of juvenile spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was developed and evaluated. Fish were collected from hatcheries in Washington and Idaho prior to release and at McNary Dam on the Columbia River during their downstream migration. Distances between 15 anatomical landmarks were digitized from photographs of each fish resulting in 34 morphometric characters for analysis. The canonical variate calculated from a discriminant function based on several principal components was evaluated as a measure of smoltification. The canonical variate was significantly correlated with gill Na+–K+ ATPase activity, a commonly used measure of smoltification. Measuring the morphometric characters and calculating the canonical variate is a relatively simple procedure and can be performed with little harm to the fish. This method of smoltification assessment may be ideally suited to studies in which sacrificing fish is not possible, such as those involving threatened or endangered species, or when access to a laboratory for sample analysis is not available.

  8. Family size and effective population size in a hatchery stock of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, R.C.; McIntyre, J.D.; Hemmingsen, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Means and variances of family size measured in five year-classes of wire-tagged coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were linearly related. Population effective size was calculated by using estimated means and variances of family size in a 25-yr data set. Although numbers of age 3 adults returning to the hatchery appeared to be large enough to avoid inbreeding problems (the 25-yr mean exceeded 4500), the numbers actually contributing to the hatchery production may be too low. Several strategies are proposed to correct the problem perceived. Argument is given to support the contention that the problem of effective size is fairly general and is not confined to the present study population.

  9. Functional characterization of a BCL10 isoform in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Pellegrino; Scudiero, Ivan; Coccia, Elena; Ferravante, Angela; Paolucci, Marina; D’Andrea, Egildo Luca; Varricchio, Ettore; Pizzulo, Maddalena; Reale, Carla; Zotti, Tiziana; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2015-01-01

    The complexes formed by BCL10, MALT1 and members of the family of CARMA proteins have recently been the focus of much attention because they represent a key mechanism for regulating activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we report the functional characterization of a novel isoform of BCL10 in the trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, which we named tBCL10. tBCL10 dimerizes, binds to components of the CBM complex and forms cytoplasmic filaments. Functionally, tBCL10 activates NF-κB transcription factor and is inhibited by the deubiquitinating enzyme A20. Finally, depletion experiments indicate that tBCL10 can functionally replace the human protein. This work demonstrates the evolutionary conservation of the mechanism of NF-κB activation through the CBM complex, and indicates that the rainbow trout O.mykiss can serve as a model organism to study this pathway. PMID:25834783

  10. Functional characterization of a BCL10 isoform in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Pellegrino; Scudiero, Ivan; Coccia, Elena; Ferravante, Angela; Paolucci, Marina; D'Andrea, Egildo Luca; Varricchio, Ettore; Pizzulo, Maddalena; Reale, Carla; Zotti, Tiziana; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2015-01-01

    The complexes formed by BCL10, MALT1 and members of the family of CARMA proteins have recently been the focus of much attention because they represent a key mechanism for regulating activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we report the functional characterization of a novel isoform of BCL10 in the trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, which we named tBCL10. tBCL10 dimerizes, binds to components of the CBM complex and forms cytoplasmic filaments. Functionally, tBCL10 activates NF-κB transcription factor and is inhibited by the deubiquitinating enzyme A20. Finally, depletion experiments indicate that tBCL10 can functionally replace the human protein. This work demonstrates the evolutionary conservation of the mechanism of NF-κB activation through the CBM complex, and indicates that the rainbow trout O . mykiss can serve as a model organism to study this pathway.

  11. Geographic distribution of chromosome and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms in Oncorhynchus mykiss native to western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome studies of native populations of Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead and rainbow trout) in western Washington and southern British Columbia revealed the presence of two evolutionarily distinct chromosome lineages. Populations between, and including, the Elwha River, Washington, and Chilliwack River, British Columbia, contained 2n = 60 chromosomes. Populations on the central Washington coast contained 2n = 58 chromosomes. The north Washington coast and western Strait of Juan de Fuca contained individuals with 58, 59, or 60 chromosomes, suggesting this is a transition zone between 58 and 60 chromosome groups. The differences in chromosomal structure between 2n = 58 and 2n = 60 groups are presumably a Robertsonian rearrangement and an inversion. Allelic variation at three microsatellite loci (One ??6, One ??11 and Omy 77) also was examined, and no significant variation was detected among the 58 and 60 chromosome races. A hypothesis is presented concerning the origin of the 60 chromosome lineage.

  12. Whole body and tissue blood volumes of two strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Estimates of apparent packed cell, plasma and total blood volumes for the whole body and for 13 selected tissues were compared between Kamloops and Wytheville strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by the simultaneous injection of two vascular tracers, radiolabeled trout erythrocytes (51Cr-RBC) and radioiodated bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA). 2. Whole body total blood volume, plasma volume and packed cell volume were slightly, but not significantly greater in the Wytheville trout, whereas, the apparent plasma volumes and total blood volumes in 4 of 13 tissues were significantly greater in the Kamloops strain. 3. Differences were most pronounced in highly perfused organs, such as the liver and kidney and in organs of digestion such as the stomach and intestines. 4. Differences in blood volumes between the two strains may be related to the greater permeability of the vascular membranes in the Kamloops strain fish.

  13. Effects of some pesticides on the vital organs of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Terzi, Ertugrul; Boran, Halis; Yandi, Ilhan; Altinok, Ilhan

    2010-12-01

    Gill, trunk kidney, spleen, and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were examined after exposure to different sublethal concentrations of carbosulfan (25, 50 and 200 μgL(-1)), propineb (3, 6 and 24 mgL(-1)), and benomyl (2, 5 and 20 mgL(-1)) for 14 days. Lesions were observed in gill, trunk kidney, spleen, and liver of rainbow trout exposed to either concentration of pesticides. The most important lesions were determined in the highest concentrations of pesticides. Lamellar fusion, lamellar hyperplasia, epithelial lifting, vacuolization of epithelial tissue, epithelial necrosis, hypertrophy and sloughing of epithelium were observed on fish exposed to carbosulfan, propineb and benomyl. Fish had cell necrosis, degeneration and oedemas in liver, trunk kidney and spleen. None of these lesions were seen in control fish.

  14. Experimental hexamitiasis in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdner)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1965-01-01

    An exogenous strain of cultured Hexamita salmonis (Moore) was employed to induce trophic hexamitiasis in otherwise disease-free juveniles of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Mortality and growth were the parameters used to detect the effects of hexamitiasis on the two species. Two levels of each of the three experimental factors under study, Hexamita infection, species of fish, and density of fish, were arranged in a three-way factorial design. Replicate lots involved a total of 1,440 fish held under controlled laboratory conditions.Comparisons of growth and mortality indicate that infection with H. salmonis over a period of 8 weeks is innocuous to coho salmon. Steelhead trout suffered a low, but statistically significant mortality which subsided after the sixth week; growth rate was not affected.

  15. Atmospheric depression-mediated water temperature changes affect the vertical movement of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Takashi; Hyodo, Susumu; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-01

    The Sanriku coastal area, Japan, is one of the southern-most natural spawning regions of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta. Here, we report their behavioral response to changes in ambient temperature after the passage of an atmospheric depression during the early spawning season. Before the passage, all electrically tagged fish moved vertically for several hours to depths below the shallow thermocline at >100 m. However, during the atmospheric depression, the salmon shortened the duration of their vertical movements and spent most time at the surface. The water column was homogenous at <150 m deep except for the surface. The descending behavior may have been discontinued because the cooler water below the thermocline was no longer in a thermally defined layer, due to strong vertical mixing by high wave action. Instead, they likely spent time within the cooler water temperatures at the surface of bays to minimize metabolic energy cost during migration.

  16. Recent physical connections may explain weak genetic structure in western Alaskan chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Kondzela, Christine M; Martin, Patrick C; Finney, Bruce; Guyon, Jeffrey; Templin, William D; Decovich, Nick; Gilk-Baumer, Sara; Gharrett, Anthony J

    2013-07-01

    Low genetic divergence at neutral loci among populations is often the result of high levels of contemporary gene flow. Western Alaskan summer-run chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) populations demonstrate weak genetic structure, but invoking contemporary gene flow as the basis for the low divergence is problematic because salmon home to their natal streams and some of the populations are thousands of kilometers apart. We used genotypes from microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism loci to investigate alternative explanations for the current genetic structure of chum salmon populations from western Alaska. We also estimated current levels of gene flow among Kuskokwim River populations. Our results suggest that weak genetic structure is best explained by physical connections that occurred after the Holocene Thermal Maximum among the Yukon, Kuskokwim, and Nushagak drainages that allowed gene flow to occur among now distant populations.

  17. [CATALITICAL PROPERTIES OF LIVER MONOAMINE OXIDASE IN THE CHUM SALMON ONCORHYNCHUS KETA].

    PubMed

    Basova, I N; Basova, N E; Yagodina, O V

    2015-01-01

    The substrate and inhibitory specificity of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) in the liver of males of the summer form of the chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta was studied. As to the spectrum of deaminated substrates, the hepatic MAO of the chum salmon is similar to MAO of most terrestrial mammals, for eight classical MAO substrates similarity in their substrate characteristics were found. Analysis of the antimonoamine oxidase activity of two derivaties of 2-propinilamine, five derivatives of acridine as well as of pyronine G revealed significant qualitative and quantitative differences as compared to the hepatic enzyme of tuna and whitefish. The compounds tested manifested themselves as irreversible inhibitors of chum salmon's hepatic MAO possessing various efficacy, but lacking the selectivity of action as dependent on the deaminated substrate. The obtained data on the substrate and inhibitory analysis provide an indirect evidence for the presence of a single molecular form of MAO in the chum salmon liver.

  18. Comparative cardiovascular effects of four fishery anesthetics in spinally transected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredricks, K.T.; Gingerich, W.H.; Fater, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    1. We compared the effects of four anesthetics on heart rate, dorsal and ventral aortic blood pressure, and electrocardiograms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). 1. Exposure to the local anesthetics tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) and benzocaine hydrochloride (BZH) produced minimal cardiovascular alterations. Mean dorsal aortic pressure (DAP) decreased during exposure to MS-222, and mean DAP and mean ventral aortic pressure (VAP) increased 15% during recovery from BZH. 3. Exposure to the general anesthetic 2-phenoxyethanol (2-PE) or the hypnotic agent etomidate (ET) dramatically decreased heart rate and blood pressures and altered EKG patterns. 4. During recovery, VAP and DAP increased above baseline for an extended period. Heart rate and EKG patterns rapidly returned to normal.

  19. Application of laser ablation ICPMS to trace the environmental history of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takaomi; Hirata, Takafumi; Takagi, Yasuaki

    2007-02-01

    Trace element levels in otoliths of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta were examined by means of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). A close linear relationship in the Sr:Ca ratios between EPMA (X-ray analysis with an electron microprobe) and LA-ICPMS analyses was found (p<0.0001), suggesting that the latter technique could be used to separate the marine and freshwater life phases. Mg:Ca, Cr:Ca, Zn:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios in either the core region or the oceanic growth zone of the otoliths varied among sites. These differences suggest that elemental compositions may reflect environmental variability among spawning (breeding) or habitat sites. Thus, those element ratios demonstrate the potential to be used to distinguish between fish spawning (breeding) sites and habitats for this species of salmon.

  20. Detection of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea by RT-LAMP assay.

    PubMed

    Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Seok Ryel; Park, Myung-Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2011-10-01

    The viral diseases have been the serious problem in salmonid farming, and rainbow trout is not an exception. In this study, routine surveys were conducted for detecting of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea during 2009-2010. Head kidneys from individual fish were employed for virus detection by using a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were the target viruses in this study. 53.5% (46/86) were found to be IPNV-positive, while IHNV and VHSV showed RT-LAMP negative during examination for 2 years. Ten IPNV-positive samples were randomly selected for viral isolation and the cells showing CPEs were subjected to RT-LAMP, RT-PCR, and direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the rainbow trout isolate has high similarity homologies with the VR-299 strain, as previously described.

  1. The stress of Formalin treatments in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1971-01-01

    Changes in gill function, acid–base balance and pituitary activation occurring during standard 200 ppm formalin treatments of juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were compared. Plasma Cl−, Ca++, total CO2, and interrenal vitamin C in the trout declined continuously and in proportion to the exposure time, but the salmon were able to maintain these metabolic parameters at approximately initial levels. Blood pH and alkaline reserve regulation of the salmon was also less affected by formalin treatments, especially during prolonged exposures. The oxygen consumption of both species was depressed, but substantially more so in the trout than could be accounted for by decreased ventilation rates. Little frank hemolysis occurred in either species, but there was a significant bilirubinemia in the trout.

  2. Five cases of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense infection with discovery of plerocercoids from an infective source, Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae.

    PubMed

    Ando, K; Ishikura, K; Nakakugi, T; Shimono, Y; Tamai, T; Sugawa, M; Limviroj, W; Chinzei, Y

    2001-02-01

    Five persons from 2 families residing at Miyama Town, Mie Prefecture, Japan, ingested fresh raw fish Oncorhynchus sp. on 9 May 1999 that was caught at Owase district in Mie. They all expelled diphyllobothriid cestodes 11-37 days after ingesting the fish. The parasites were morphologically identical to Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense Yamane et al., 1986. Five plerocercoids were detected from a portion of the fish. Nucleotide sequence of a region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene of mitochondrial DNA from an adult worm was identical with that from the plerocercoid. The fish was identified as Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae according to the nucleotide sequence of the nuclear ribosomal second internal transcribed spacer region II gene. This is the first record of D. nihonkaiense plerocercoids from O. m. ishikawae.

  3. The effect of adrenaline on the temperature dependency of cardiac action potentials in pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, S; Hanson, L M; Farrell, A P

    2012-04-01

    Using sharp electrode impalement, action potentials recorded from atrial and ventricular tissue of pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha generally decreased in duration with increasing test temperature (6, 10, 16 and 20° C). Stimulation of the tissue using 500 nM adrenaline had no significant effect on the duration of the atrial action potential at any test temperature but lengthened the ventricular action potential by ~17%.

  4. Sperm metabolism of the telost fishes Chalcalburnus chalcoides and Oncorhynchus mykiss and its relation to motility and viability.

    PubMed

    Lahnsteiner, F; Berger, B; Weismann, T

    1999-09-01

    In the teleost fish Chalcalburnus chalcoides (Cyprinidae) the influence of metabolic inhibitors, substrates, coenzymes, and oxygen concentrations on spermatozoal parameters during motility and during immotile incubation was studied, the respiration rate was characterized, representative metabolite levels were measured, and the results were compared with Oncorhynchus mykiss (Salmonidae). In Chalcalburnus chalcoides the sperm motility rate, the average path swimming velocity, the motility duration, and the viability of immotile semen were significantly reduced in the presence of inhibitors of respiration (potassium cyanide, 2.4-dinitrophenol, atractyloside). Anaerobic conditions (<1 mg O(2)/liter) and inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle by malonate and >7.5 mmol/liter succinate had similar effects on the sperm motility parameters and on the viability of immotile spermatozoa. Pyruvate and coenzyme A (an acyl-group carrier during oxidative carboxylation of pyruvate) prolonged the duration of sperm motility and the viability of immotile incubated spermatozoa, and also increased the spermatozoal respiration rate. Glucose levels significantly decreased during motility and during immotile storage and, under anaerobic conditions, the levels of lactate increased indicating that pyruvate derived from glycolysis. The respiration rate and the glycolytic rate significantly increased during motility. Therefore oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and aerobic glycolysis are central energy-supplying pathways for spermatozoa of Chalcalburnus chalcoides. The stimulatory effect of pyruvate and coenzyme A indicated that glycolysis is a rate-controlling pathway. Similar results were obtained for Oncorhynchus mykiss with the only exception that the stimulatory effect of coenzyme A was more significant than the stimulatory effect of pyruvate. When the sperm motility-activating saline solutions were optimized in aspects of energy supply, ionic composition, and

  5. Some physiological aspects of sublethal heat stress in the juvenile steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1973-01-01

    A rapid (3 min) but sublethal temperature increase from 10 to 20 imposed a greater stress on juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) than on juvenile steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Both species suffered hyperglycemia, hypocholesterolemia, increased blood hemoglobin, and decreased blood sugar regulatory precision, but the steelhead recovered more quickly. Acid–base equilibrium was essentially unaffected, and only the coho suffered any significant interrenal vitamin C depletion. Vitamin C normalization required about 24 hr.

  6. Evaluation of angler effort and harvest of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Lake Scanewa, Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kock, Tobias J.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    A creel evaluation was conducted in Lake Scanewa, a reservoir on the Cowlitz River, to monitor catch rates of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and determine if the trout fishery was having negative impacts on juvenile anadromous salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the system. The trout fishery, which is supported by releases of 20,000 fish (2 fish per pound) per year from June to August, was developed to mitigate for the construction of the Cowlitz Falls Dam in 1994. The trout fishery has a target catch rate of at least 0.50 fish per hour. Interviews with 1,214 anglers during the creel evaluation found that most anglers targeted rainbow trout (52 percent) or Chinook and coho salmon (48 percent). The interviewed anglers caught a total of 1,866 fish, most of which were rainbow trout (1,213 fish; 78 percent) or coho salmon (311 fish; 20 percent). We estimated that anglers spent 17,365 hours fishing in Lake Scanewa from June to November 2010. Catch rates for boat anglers (1.39 fish per hour) exceeded the 0.50 fish per hour target, whereas catch rates for shore anglers (0.35 fish per hour) fell short of the goal. The combined catch rates for all trout anglers in the reservoir were 0.96 fish per hour. We estimated that anglers harvested 7,584 (95 percent confidence interval = 2,795-12,372 fish) rainbow trout during the study period and boat anglers caught more fish than shore anglers (5,975 and 1,609 fish, respectively). This estimate suggests that more than 12,000 of the 20,000 rainbow trout released into Lake Scanewa during 2010 were not harvested, and could negatively impact juvenile salmon in the reservoir through predation or competition. We examined 1,236 stomach samples from rainbow trout and found that 2.1 percent (26 fish) of these samples contained juvenile fish. Large trout (greater than 300 millimeters) had a higher incidence of predation than small trout (less than 300 millimeters; 8.50 and 0.06 percent, respectively). A total of 39 fish were found in rainbow

  7. Cytotoxicity of atorvastatin and simvastatin on primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ellesat, Kathrin Sabine; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Asberg, Anders; Thomas, Kevin V; Hylland, Ketil

    2010-09-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering pharmaceuticals and commonly prescribed drugs in European countries. Their discharge into the aquatic environment has increased in the last few years and they are present at detectable levels in most sewage effluents. The aim of the present study was to quantify the cytotoxic effects of acid and lactone forms of two statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, as well as selected metabolites (ortho- and para-hydroxy atorvastatin acid, ortho-hydroxy atorvastatin lactone, simvastatin hydroxyl carboxylic acid, and 3''hydroxy simvastatin lactone) to hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Hepatocytes were exposed for 24, 48, and 72 h to different concentrations of each test substance (0.4-400 microM). Cytotoxicity was measured as metabolic inhibition and loss of membrane integrity with the fluorescent probes alamar blue (AB) and 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate, acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM), respectively. Atorvastatin, simvastatin, and ortho-hydroxy atorvastatin lactone had dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on hepatocytes. Simvastatin was more toxic than atorvastatin and the lactone form more toxic than the acid form. Exposure time affected atorvastatin and ortho-hydroxy atorvastatin lactone but not simvastatin toxicity.

  8. An experimental vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila can induce protection in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Plant, K.P.; Alcorn, S.; Ostland, V.; Winton, J.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, was developed using a bacterial lysate. To test the strength of protection, A. hydrophila challenge models were compared using injection into both the intraperitoneal (IP) cavity and the dorsal sinus (DS) with selected doses of live bacteria washed in saline or left untreated. Unlike the IP route, injection into the DS with either saline washed or unwashed cells resulted in consistent cumulative mortality and a dose response that could be used to establish a standard challenge having an LD50 of approximately 3 × 107 colony forming units per fish. Survivors of the challenge suffered significantly lower mortality upon re-challenge than naïve fish, suggesting a high level of acquired resistance was elicited by infection. Passive immunization using serum from hyper-immunized fish also resulted in significantly reduced mortality indicating protection can be transferred and that some portion of resistance may be antibody mediated. Vaccination of groups of rainbow trout with A. hydrophila lysate resulted in significant protection against a high challenge dose but only when injected along with Freund’s complete adjuvant. At a low challenge dose, mortality in all groups was low, but the bacterial lysate alone appeared to offer some protection.

  9. Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Knabe, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Catch-and-release angling is popular in many parts of the world and plays an increasingly important role in fish conservation efforts. Although survival rates associated with catch-and-release angling are well documented for many species, sublethal effects have been less studied. An experiment was conducted to directly assess the effects of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were simulated in laboratory tanks maintained at 15-16 ??C with hooks manually placed in pre-designated locations in the mouths of the fish. There were no differences in standard length (P = 0.59) or wet weight (P = 0.81) gained between caught and uncaught fish over a 1-month angling and recovery period. Survival was 96.99 ?? 0.06% for rainbow trout caught and released, and did not vary with number (one, two or four) of captures. Thus, catch-and-release angling appears to have little effect on growth and mortality of rainbow trout hooked in the mouth. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Metabolism and elimination of benzocaine by rainbow-trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Gingerich, W.H.; Allen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    1. Branchial and urinary elimination of benzocaine residues was evaluated in adult rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, given a single dorsal aortic dose of c-14-benzocaine hydrochloride.^2. Branchial elimination of benzocaine residues was rapid and accounted for 59.2% Of the dose during the first 3 h after dosing. Renal elimination of radioactivity was considerably slower; the kidney excreted 2.7% Dose within 3 h and 9.0% Within 24 h. Gallbladder bile contained 2.0% Dose 24 h after injection.^3. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from water taken 3 min after injection, 87.3% Was benzocaine and 12.7% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. After 60 min, 32.7% Was benzocaine and 67.3% Was n-acetylated benzocaine.^4. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from urine taken 1 h after dosing, 7.6% Was para-aminobenzoic acid, 59.7% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid, 19.5% Was benzocaine, and 8.0% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. The proportion of the radioactivity in urine changed with time so that by 20 h, 1.0% Was para-aminobenzoic acid and 96.6% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid.^5. Benzocaine and a more hydrophobic metabolite, n-acetylated benzocaine, were eliminated primarily through the gills; renal and biliary pathways were less significant elimination routes for benzocaine residues.

  11. Histopathological changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after exposure to sublethal composite nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Birincioglu, Serap; Altinok, Ilhan

    2009-10-01

    Subchronic toxicity of composite inorganic fertilizers such as ammonium sulfate [fertilizer A; (NH(4))(2)SO(4); 21% NH(4)-N)], composite fertilizer 15-15-15 (fertilizer B; commercial formulation: 15% NH(4)-N, 15% phosphorus, and 15% potassium oxide), and composite fertilizer 25-5-10 (fertilizer C; commercial formulation: 25% NH(4)-N, 5% phosphorus, and 10% potassium oxide) on the skin, liver, kidney, pancreas, and gills of the juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in two-week toxicity tests under static-renewal test conditions. Fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of fertilizers did not show any behavioral abnormality compared to control groups. Histological lesions were observed in skin, gills, liver, pancreas, and trunk kidney of the fish. In the epidermis, degenerated/vacuolated epithelial cells, microcystic dilatations, and intracellular edema of mucus cell were observed. Liver had swollen and degenerated hepatocytes without losing adenoid structure. Hematopoietic tissues had necrosis and vacuolar degeneration on proximal tubules of the kidney. In order, the most affected organs were skin, liver, and kidney.

  12. Effects of Watercress (Nasturtium nasturtium) extract on selected immunological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Asadi, M S; Mirvaghefei, A R; Nematollahi, M A; Banaee, M; Ahmadi, K

    2012-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium nasturtium) is a medical plant containing diverse chemically-active substances with biological properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of watercress extract on immunological and hematological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were fed for 21 days with diet supplemented with 0.1% and 1% of watercress extract per 1 kg food and with a normal diet as control. Hematological parameters such as red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), RBC index like mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) as well as immunological parameters such as peroxidase, lysozyme and complement activities, total protein, albumin and globulin levels were measured after 21 days of watercress extract treatment. The results indicated that oral administration of 1 % watercress extract in fish may enhance some hematological and immunological parameters including Hb and MCHC, lysozyme and complement activities, total protein and globulin levels, compared to the controls after 21 days of experimental period. In conclusion, on the basis of these results, oral administration of watercress extract may be useful to improve fish's immune system.

  13. Some blood chemistry values for the juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Chatterton, K.

    1971-01-01

    Overlapping Gaussian distribution curves were resolved into normal ranges for 1800 clinical test values obtained from caudal arterial blood or plasma of more than 1000 juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) held under defined conditions of diet and temperature. Estimated normal blood chemistry ranges were bicarbonate, 9.5–12.6 mEq/liter; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 0.9–3.4 mg/100 ml; chloride, 122–136 mEq/liter; cholesterol, 88–262 mg/100 ml;pCO2, 2.6–6.1 mm Hg (10 C); glucose, 41–135 mg/100 ml; hematocrit, 32.5–52.5%; hemoglobin, 6.5–9.9 g/100 ml; total protein, 1.4–4.3 g/100 ml; blood pH (10 C), 7.51–7.83. The calculated range of normal acid–base balance vs. water temperature is also presented.

  14. The effect of creosote on vitellogenin production in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherry, J.P.; Whyte, J.J.; Karrow, N.A.; Gamble, A.; Boerman, H.J.; Bol, N.C.; Dixon, D.G.; Solomon, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a broader investigation into the effects of creosote treatments on the aquatic biota in pond microcosms, we examined the possible implications for vitellogenin (Vtg) production in Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout (RT)]. Vtg is the precursor of egg yolk protein and has emerged as a useful biomarker of exposure to estrogenic substances. Our a priori intent was to assess the ability of the creosote treatments (nominal cresoste concentrations were 0, 3, and 10 ??l/L immediately after the last subsurface addition) to induce estrogenic responses in RT. The data showed no evidence of an estrogenic response in the treated fish. During the course of the experiment, however, the fish matured and began to produce Vtg, probably in response to endogenous estrogen. A posteriori analysis of the Vtg data from the maturing fish showed that after 28 days, the plasma Vtg concentrations were about 15-fold lower in fish from the creosote-treated microcosms compared with fish from the reference microcosm. Although the experiment design does not permit mechanistic insights, our observation suggests that exposure of female fish to PAH mixtures such as creosote can impair the production of Vtg with possible health implications for embryos and larvae. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  15. Comparison of biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in two different trout farms'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Tayfun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biochemical parameters of cultured rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum, 1972) reared in two different trout farms' (Agri and Erzurum). The average weights of fish were 150±10gr for first station (Agri), 230±10gr for second station (Erzurum). Fishes used in research were randomly caught from pools, and fifteen pieces were used for each group. Fishes were fed with commercial trout feed with 45-50% crude protein twice a day. The levels of AST, ALT, LDL, total cholesterol and triglyceride in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be higher (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Whereas, the levels of HDL in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be lower (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Differences in the levels of total cholesterol and AST, ALT, HDL, LDL, triglyceride may be associated with size, sex, sexual maturity and environmental conditions (temperature, pH, hardness and dissolved oxygen).

  16. Inhibition of fish pathogens by the microbiota from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Nahuelquín, Yanina; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the isolation and taxonomic identification of the cultivable total microbiota (TM) and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment from selected stages of the life-cycle, and the evaluation of the LAB antimicrobial activity against the main fish pathogens. TM and LAB isolates were randomly selected and identified by 16S rRNA and/or superoxide dismutase gene sequencing. Although a great diversity in the TM was observed, Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae were clearly prevalent, while the genus Lactococcus was the predominant LAB. From a total of 1620 randomly selected LAB, 1159 isolates (71.5%) showed antimicrobial activity. From these, 248 isolates (21.4%) selected for their activity against, at least, four fish pathogens, were taxonomically identified, being Lactococcus lactis the most common species (164 isolates, 66.1%). Interestingly, 88 isolates (35.5%), including 55 L. lactis isolates, exerted activity against four strains of the rainbow trout pathogen Lactococcus garvieae. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout and rearing environment are potential sources for the isolation of LAB, mainly lactococci, active against L. garvieae and other fish pathogens. Moreover, this is the first study describing the cultivable TM and LAB from rainbow trout intestine and rearing environment along the fish life-cycle. The host-derived LAB active against fish pathogens comprise potential candidates as probiotics in rainbow trout farming as an alternative or complementary strategy to antibiotics and vaccines for disease prevention.

  17. Biogenic Amines and Predictive Models of Quality of Rainbow Trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) Fillets during Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzheng; Lv, Jian; Zhang, Longteng; Dong, Zehong; Feng, Ligeng; Luo, Yongkang

    2017-02-01

    To estimate biogenic amines and changes in quality of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) fillets at different temperatures, we determined the sensory attributes, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), total viable counts (TVC), and biogenic amines (BAs) of samples that were untreated (CK) or dry cured with 1.8% salt (T). There was no significant difference between CK and T samples in terms of TVB-N, TVC, and BAs. TVB-N and TVC increased significantly (P < 0.05) with storage time at 3, 9, and 15°C. Putrescine (PUT) and cadaverine (CAD) increased significantly (P < 0.05) at -3, 3, 9, and 15°C during storage. Histamine formed more easily when storage temperatures were higher. The kinetic models of sensory scores for TVB-N, TVC, PUT, CAD, and the sum of PUT and CAD (PUT+CAD) in T samples versus storage time and temperature were developed based on the Arrhenius equation. High regression coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) indicated the acceptability of the kinetic model for predicting changes in the quality of the rainbow trout fillets. Relative errors between predicted and experimental values of TVB-N, TVC, and PUT+CAD were all within 10% except for TVB-N on day 6. The prediction model based on TVB-N, TVC, and PUT+CAD can be applied to evaluate changes in quality of rainbow trout fillets from -3 to 15°C (270 to 288 K).

  18. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lavado, Ramon Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation.

  19. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics.

    PubMed

    Musharrafieh, Rami; Tacchi, Luca; Trujeque, Joshua; LaPatra, Scott; Salinas, Irene

    2014-02-21

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-∝) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout.

  20. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) detection, avoidance, and chemosensory effects of oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Lari, Ebrahim; Pyle, Greg G

    2017-03-24

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) - a byproduct of the oil sands industry in Northern Alberta, Canada - is currently stored in on-site tailings ponds. The goal of the present study was to investigate the interaction of OSPW with the olfactory system and olfactory-mediated behaviours of fish upon the first encounter with OSPW. The response of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to different concentrations (0.1, 1, and 10%) of OSPW was studied using a choice maze and electro-olfactography (EOG), respectively. The results of the present study showed that rainbow trout are capable of detecting and avoiding OSPW at a concentration as low as 0.1%. Exposure to 1% OSPW impaired (i.e. reduced sensitivity) the olfactory response of rainbow trout to alarm and food cues within 5 min or less. The results of the present study demonstrated that fish could detect and avoid minute concentrations of OSPW. However, if fish were exposed to OSPW-contaminated water and unable to escape, their olfaction would be impaired.

  1. Nutrient content in the muscle and skin of fillets from farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rebolé, A; Velasco, S; Rodríguez, M L; Treviño, J; Alzueta, C; Tejedor, J L; Ortiz, L T

    2015-05-01

    The nutrient content in the muscle and edible skin parts of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets, sampled at two growth stages, was evaluated. The average concentrations of protein and essential amino acids were higher in the muscle than in the skin. The chemical scores reached a value of 1.0 for the amino acids in the muscle and ranged from 0.40 (tryptophan) to 0.94 (threonine) in the skin. The average lipid content and the saturated fatty acids/polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-6/n-3 ratios were higher in the skin than in the muscle, whereas the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3) was higher in the muscle. Significant differences were found for the essential minerals analysed, except for Cu. The concentrations of Na, K and Mg were higher and those of Ca, P, Fe, Mn and Zn were lower in the muscle than in the skin. Significant effects of the fish growth on the composition were detected.

  2. Altered burst swimming in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to natural and synthetic oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Osachoff, H L; Osachoff, K N; Wickramaratne, A E; Gunawardane, E K; Venturini, F P; Kennedy, C J

    2014-08-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed to two concentrations each of 17β-oestradiol (E2; natural oestrogen hormone) or 17α-ethinyl oestradiol (EE2; a potent synthetic oestrogen hormone) to evaluate their potential effects on burst-swimming performance. In each of six successive burst-swimming assays, burst-swimming speed (Uburst ) was lower in fish exposed to 0.5 and 1 µg l(-1) E2 and EE2 for four days compared with control fish. A practice swim (2 days prior to exposure initiation) in control fish elevated initial Uburst values, but this training effect was not evident in the 1 µg l(-1) EE2-exposed fish. Several potential oestrogen-mediated mechanisms for Uburst reductions were investigated, including effects on metabolic products, osmoregulation and blood oxygen-carrying capacity. Prior to burst-swimming trials, fish exposed to E2 and EE2 for 4 days had significantly reduced erythrocyte numbers and lower plasma glucose concentrations. After six repeated burst-swimming trials, plasma glucose, lactate and creatinine concentrations were not significantly different among treatment groups; however, plasma Cl(-) concentrations were significantly reduced in E2- and EE2-treated fish. In summary, E2 and EE2 exposure altered oxygen-carrying capacity ([erythrocytes]) and an osmoregulatory-related variable ([Cl(-) ]), effects that may underlie reductions in burst-swimming speed, which will have implications for fish performance in the wild.

  3. Parasites and hepatic lesions among pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha (Walbaum), during early seawater residence.

    PubMed

    Saksida, S M; Marty, G D; Jones, S R M; Manchester, H A; Diamond, C L; Bidulka, J; St-Hilaire, S

    2012-02-01

    Juvenile pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha (Walbaum), in the Broughton Archipelago region of western Canada were surveyed over 2 years for sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus clemensi), gross and microscopic lesions and evidence of infections with viruses and bacteria. The 1071 fish examined had an approximate ocean residence time no longer than 3 months. A high prevalence of degenerative liver lesions, renal myxosporean parasites and a low prevalence of skin lesions and sea lice were observed. No indications of viral or bacterial diseases were detected in either year. The monthly prevalence of sea lice in 2007 (18-51%) was higher than in 2008 (1-26%), and the infestation density exceeded the lethal threshold in only two fish. Degenerative hepatic lesions and renal myxosporean parasites occurred in approximately 40% of the pink salmon examined in June of both years, and the peak monthly prevalence of hepatocellular hydropic degeneration was greater in 2007 (32%, in May) than in 2008 (12%, in June). Logistic regression analysis found skin lesions and hepatocellular hydropic degeneration significantly associated with sea lice. Most parasites and lesions occurred during both years, but the prevalence was often higher in 2007. Fish weight was 35% less in June 2007 than in June 2008, but condition factor was not different. Further research is required to monitor inter-annual variations and aetiology of the liver lesions and to assess their potential role on pink salmon survival.

  4. Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Wesley A; Seeb, Lisa W; Everett, Meredith V; Waples, Ryan K; Templin, William D; Seeb, James E

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. Here, we identified 10 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to explore population structure, demography, and adaptive divergence in five populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from western Alaska. Patterns of population structure were similar to those of past studies, but our ability to assign individuals back to their region of origin was greatly improved (>90% accuracy for all populations). We also calculated effective size with and without removing physically linked loci identified from a linkage map, a novel method for nonmodel organisms. Estimates of effective size were generally above 1000 and were biased downward when physically linked loci were not removed. Outlier tests based on genetic differentiation identified 733 loci and three genomic regions under putative selection. These markers and genomic regions are excellent candidates for future research and can be used to create high-resolution panels for genetic monitoring and population assignment. This work demonstrates the utility of genomic data to inform conservation in highly exploited species with shallow population structure. PMID:24665338

  5. Over the falls? Rapid evolution of ecotypic differentiation in steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pearse, Devon E; Hayes, Sean A; Bond, Morgan H; Hanson, Chad V; Anderson, Eric C; Macfarlane, R Bruce; Garza, John Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to novel habitats and phenotypic plasticity can be counteracting forces in evolution, but both are key characteristics of the life history of steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Anadromous steelhead reproduce in freshwater river systems and small coastal streams but grow and mature in the ocean. Resident rainbow trout, either sympatric with steelhead or isolated above barrier dams or waterfalls, represent an alternative life-history form that lives entirely in freshwater. We analyzed population genetic data from 1486 anadromous and resident O. mykiss from a small stream in coastal California with multiple barrier waterfalls. Based on data from 18 highly variable microsatellite loci (He = 0.68), we conclude that the resident population above one barrier, Big Creek Falls, is the result of a recent anthropogenic introduction from the anadromous population of O. mykiss below the falls. Furthermore, fish from this above-barrier population occasionally descend over the falls and have established a genetically differentiated below-barrier subpopulation at the base of the falls, which appears to remain reproductively isolated from their now-sympatric anadromous ancestors. These results support a hypothesis of rapid evolution of a purely resident life history in the above-barrier population in response to strong selection against downstream movement.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Edwardsiella tarda from fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed Central

    Amandi, A; Hiu, S F; Rohovec, J S; Fryer, J L

    1982-01-01

    A new bacterial pathogen of chinook salmon (oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was isolated from fish in Oregon's Rogue River. The bacteria are biochemically and serologically related to strains of Edwardsiella tarda. Initially isolated from chinook salmon, the bacteria were also pathogenic for steelhead and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The 50% lethal doses for chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and channel catfish injected intraperitoneally and maintained in 18 degrees C water were 4.1 x 10(6), 5.6 x 10(6), and 4.0 x 10(5) respectively. When chinook salmon and rainbow trout were injected intraperitoneally and held in 12 degrees C water, the mean lethal doses were 6.4 x 10(7) and 1.7 x 10(6), respectively. The invasiveness of the organism was low in steelhead trout exposed to the bacteria by the waterborne route. The optimum growth temperature of the bacteria in brain heart infusion broth was approximately 35 degrees C. The guanine plus cytosine content of DNA obtained from E. tarda isolated from salmon was 59 mol%. PMID:7103490

  7. Subunit vaccine candidates against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Skov, Jakob; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holm Mattsson, Andreas; Dalsgaard, Inger; Kania, Per Walter; Buchmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis and a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Injection vaccination with commercial mineral oil-adjuvanted bacterin vaccines has been partly successful in preventing the disease but in Danish rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) aquaculture furunculosis outbreaks still occur. In this study we tested the efficacy of experimental subunit vaccines against A. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout. We utilized in silico screening of the proteome of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain A449 and identified potential protective protein antigens that were tested by in vivo challenge trial. A total of 14 proteins were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and prepared in 3 different subunit vaccine combinations to immunize 3 groups of rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The fish were exposed to virulent A. salmonicida 7 weeks after immunization. To assess the efficacy of the subunit vaccines we evaluated the immune response in fish after immunization and challenge infection by measuring the antibody levels and monitoring the survival of fish in different groups. The survival of fish at 3 weeks after challenge infection showed that all 3 groups of fish immunized with 3 different protein combinations exhibited significantly lower mortalities (17–30%) compared to the control groups (48% and 56%). The ELISA results revealed significantly elevated antibody levels in fish against several protein antigens, which in some cases were positively correlated to the survival. PMID:28182704

  8. Identification of a novel cathelicidin gene in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-I; Pleguezuelos, Olga; Zhang, Yong-An; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2005-08-01

    We report the cloning of a novel antimicrobial peptide gene, termed rtCATH_1, found in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The predicted 216-residue rtCATH_1 prepropeptide consists of three domains: a 22-residue signal peptide, a 128-residue cathelin-like region containing two identifiable cathelicidin family signatures, and a predicted 66-residue C-terminal cationic antimicrobial peptide. This predicted mature peptide was unique in possessing features of different known (mammalian) cathelicidin subgroups, such as the cysteine-bridged family and the specific amino-acid-rich family. The rtCATH_1 gene comprises four exons, as seen in all known mammalian cathelicidin genes, and several transcription factor binding sites known to be of relevance to host defenses were identified in the 5' flanking region. By Northern blot analysis, the expression of rtCATH_1 was detected in gill, head kidney, and spleen of bacterially challenged fish. Primary cultures of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or poly(I x C) also expressed rtCATH_1. A 36-residue peptide corresponding to the core part of the fish cathelicidin was chemically synthesized and shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity and a low hemolytic effect. Thus, rtCATH_1 represents a novel antimicrobial peptide gene belonging to the cathelicidin family and may play an important role in the innate immunity of rainbow trout.

  9. Relative sensitivity of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to acute copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Lipton, Josh; Welsh, Paul G

    2002-03-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were recently listed as threatened in the United States under the federal Endangered Species Act. Past and present habitat for this species includes waterways contaminated with heavy metals released from mining activities. Because the sensitivity of this species to copper was previously unknown, we conducted acute copper toxicity tests with bull and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in side-by-side comparison tests. Bioassays were conducted using water at two temperatures (8 degrees C and 16 degrees C) and two hardness levels (100 and 220 mg/L as CaCO3). At a water hardness of 100 mg/L, both species were less sensitive to copper when tested at 16 degrees C compared to 8 degrees C. The two species had similar sensitivity to copper in 100-mg/ L hardness water, but bull trout were 2.5 to 4 times less sensitive than rainbow trout in 220-mg/L hardness water. However, when our results were viewed in the context of the broader literature on rainbow trout sensitivity to copper, the sensitivities of the two species appeared similar. This suggests that adoption of toxicity thresholds that are protective of rainbow trout would be protective of bull trout; however, an additional safety factor may be warranted because of the additional level of protection necessary for this federally threatened species.

  10. Evidence of Olfactory Imprinting at an Early Life Stage in Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Bett, Nolan N; Hinch, Scott G; Dittman, Andrew H; Yun, Sang-Seon

    2016-11-09

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) navigate towards spawning grounds using olfactory cues they imprinted on as juveniles. The timing at which imprinting occurs has been studied extensively, and there is strong evidence that salmon imprint on their natal water during the parr-smolt transformation (PST). Researchers have noted, however, that the life histories of some species of Pacific salmon could necessitate imprinting prior to the PST. Juvenile pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) spend less time in fresh water than any other species of Pacific salmon, and presumably must imprint on their natal water at a very young age. The time at which imprinting occurs in this species, however, has not been experimentally tested. We exposed juvenile pink salmon as alevins to phenethyl alcohol (PEA) or control water, reared these fish to adulthood, and then tested their behavioural responses to PEA to determine whether the fish successfully imprinted. We found that pink salmon exposed to PEA as alevins were attracted to the chemical as adults, suggesting that imprinting can occur during this stage. Our finding provides some of the first evidence to support the long-standing belief that imprinting can occur in pink salmon prior to the PST.

  11. Loma salmonae (Protozoa: Microspora) infections in seawater reared coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, M.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Groff, J.M.; Hedrick, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Loma salmonae (Putz et al., 1965) infections were observed in five groups of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, reared in seawater net-pens in Washington State, U.S.A. in 1984–1986. Ultrastructural characteristics, size of spores, tissues and host infected, and geographical location identified the microsporidium as Loma salmonae. Preserved spores measured 4.4×2.3 (4–5.6×2–2.4) μm and exhibited 14–17 turns of the polar filament. Infections were evident in the gills of some fish before seawater entry, but few parasites were observed and they caused little tissue damage. Infections observed in fish after transfer to seawater were associated with significant pathological changes in the gills. A mixed inflammatory infiltrate was associated with ruptured microsporidian xenomas within the vessels and interstitium of the primary lamellae. Microsporidian spores were dispersed throughout the lesions and were often seen inside phagocytes. The parasite was also observed in the heart, spleen, kidney and pseudobranchs; however, the inflammatory lesions were common only in the heart.Monthly examination of fish after transfer to seawater showed peak prevalences (33–65%) of gill infections during the summer. Although moribund fish were often infected with other pathogens, the high prevalence of L. salmonae infections and the severity of the lesions it caused, suggested that this parasite significantly contributed to the recurrent summer mortalities observed at this net-pen site.

  12. p,p'-DDE depresses the immune competence of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) leukocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misumi, Ichiro; Vella, Anthony T.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Schreck, Carl B.

    2005-01-01

    p,p′-DDE, the main metabolite of DDT, is still detected in aquatic environments throughout the world. Here, the effects and mechanisms by which p,p′-DDE exposure might affect the immune system of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was studied. Isolated salmon splenic and pronephric leukocytes were incubated with different concentrations of p,p′-DDE, and cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and mitogenic responses were measured by flow cytometry and Alamar Blue assay. p,p′-DDE significantly reduced cell viability and proliferation and increased apoptosis. The effect of p,p′-DDE on pronephric leukocytes was more severe than on splenic leukocytes, likely because pronephric leukocytes had a higher proportion of granulocytes, cells that appear more sensitive to p,p′-DDE. The effect of p,p′-DDE on leukocytes appeared to vary between developmental stages or seasonal differences. The mitogenic response of leukocytes of chinook salmon exposed to p,p′-DDE in vivo exhibited a biphasic dose–response relationship. Only leukocytes isolated from salmon treated with 59 ppm p,p′-DDE had a significantly lower percentage of Ig+ blasting cells than controls, although the response was biphasic. These results support the theory that exposure to chemical contaminants could lead to an increase in disease susceptibility and mortality of fish due to immune suppression.

  13. Correlated contemporary evolution of life history traits in New Zealand Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, M T; Quinn, T P; Unwin, M J

    2011-03-01

    Size at age and age at maturity are important life history traits, affecting individual fitness and population demography. In salmon and other organisms, size and growth rate are commonly considered cues for maturation and thus age at maturity may or may not evolve independently of these features. Recent concerns surrounding the potential phenotypic and demographic responses of populations facing anthropogenic disturbances, such as climate change and harvest, place a premium on understanding the evolutionary genetic basis for evolution in size at age and age at maturity. In this study, we present the findings from a set of common-garden rearing experiments that empirically assess the heritable basis of phenotypic divergence in size at age and age at maturity in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations introduced to New Zealand. We found consistent evidence of heritable differences among populations in both size at age and age at maturity, often corresponding to patterns observed in the wild. Populations diverged in size and growth profiles, even when accounting for eventual age at maturation. By contrast, most, but not all, cases of divergence in age at maturity were driven by the differences in size or growth rate rather than differences in the threshold relationship linking growth rate and probability of maturation. These findings help us understand how life histories may evolve through trait interactions in populations exposed to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, and how we might best detect such evolution.

  14. An integrated linkage map reveals candidate genes underlying adaptive variation in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    McKinney, G J; Seeb, L W; Larson, W A; Gomez-Uchida, D; Limborg, M T; Brieuc, M S O; Everett, M V; Naish, K A; Waples, R K; Seeb, J E

    2016-05-01

    Salmonids are an important cultural and ecological resource exhibiting near worldwide distribution between their native and introduced range. Previous research has generated linkage maps and genomic resources for several species as well as genome assemblies for two species. We first leveraged improvements in mapping and genotyping methods to create a dense linkage map for Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha by assembling family data from different sources. We successfully mapped 14 620 SNP loci including 2336 paralogs in subtelomeric regions. This improved map was then used as a foundation to integrate genomic resources for gene annotation and population genomic analyses. We anchored a total of 286 scaffolds from the Atlantic salmon genome to the linkage map to provide a framework for the placement 11 728 Chinook salmon ESTs. Previously identified thermotolerance QTL were found to colocalize with several candidate genes including HSP70, a gene known to be involved in thermal response, as well as its inhibitor. Multiple regions of the genome with elevated divergence between populations were also identified, and annotation of ESTs in these regions identified candidate genes for fitness related traits such as stress response, growth and behaviour. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of combining genomic resources with linkage maps to enhance evolutionary inferences.

  15. Costs of living for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in an increasingly warming and invaded world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuehne, Lauren M.; Olden, Julian D.; Duda, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid environmental change in freshwater ecosystems has created a need to understand the interactive effects of multiple stressors, with temperature and invasive predators identified as key threats to imperiled fish species. We tested the separate and interactive effects of water temperature and predation by non-native smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) on the lethal (mortality) and sublethal (behavior, physiology, and growth) effects for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in seminatural stream channel experiments. Over 48 h trials, there was no difference in direct predation with warmer temperatures, but significant interactive effects on sublethal responses of juvenile salmon. Warmer temperatures resulted in significantly stronger and more variable antipredator responses (surface shoaling and swimming activity), while physiological indicators (plasma glucose, plasma cortisol) suggested suppression of physiological mechanisms in response to the combined stressors. These patterns corresponded with additive negative growth in predation, temperature, and combined treatments. Our results suggest that chronic increases in temperature may not increase direct predation over short periods, but can result in significant sublethal costs with negative implications for long-term development, disease resistance, and subsequent size-selective mortality of Pacific salmon.

  16. Genetic variation of resistance to mercury poisoning in steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) alevins.

    PubMed

    Blanc, J M; McIntyre, J D; Simon, R C

    2003-09-01

    Newly hatched steelhead alevins were obtained from the factorial breeding of 24 male and 10 female steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Each set of offspring were in a separate cell. They were tested for resistance to intoxication by methylmercuric chloride (CH3HgCl) in water at a nearly constant mercury concentration of 8 microg l(-1). High mortality (81% of the tested alevins) occurred within 2 weeks. Resistance to intoxication, as measured by the time to death, as well as by the survival rate, shared high paternal and maternal variation with negligible interaction. Heritability of time to death was 0.59 +/- 0.17; heritability of survival (all-or-none trait) was lower (0.26 +/- 0.09). Mercury in dead alevins increased with time to death, exhibiting a large environmental variation and (comparatively) negligible genetic influence. At the end of the bioassay, the mercury content in survivors varied widely (3-21 microg g(-1) wet weight). The content was greater than, but correlated with that of dead alevins from the same cells, and it showed little relation with survival rate. Thus, it seems that resistance to poisoning implies a tolerance to high levels of mercury rather than a limitation of its accumulation.

  17. Characterization and application of a quantitative DNA marker that discriminates sex in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, D.R.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    A qualitative male-specific DNA marker (OT-24) was amplified by spPCR (single-primer polymerase chain reaction) from chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) DNA along with several non-sex-linked products. The termini of the male-specific product were sequenced, and a pair of PeR primers were constructed for marker-specific PCR amplification. Dual primer PCR (dpPCR), with the marker-specific primers, amplified a product from both nudes and females. The amount of dpPCR product amplified from males was at least 100-fold greater than that from females. The quantitative difference between males and females was consistent among geographically distinct populations from western U.S. rivers. In addition, DNA sequence analysis indicated that OT-24 was highly conserved among geographically distinct salmon populations. The qualitative spPCR product segregated through several genetic crosses indicating equal sex ratios among progeny. Identification of the male and female juveniles by dpPCR was consistent with the spPCR analysis. There was no tissue specificity observed by spPCR or dpPCR analysis of this marker. A rapid DNA extraction method and dpPCR analysis were used to nonlethally determine sex ratios in wild spring chinook salmon adults, withheld for genetic and behavioral studies, prior to their development of gross sexual differences in their external morphology.

  18. Characterization and application of a quantitative DNA marker that discriminates sex in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, D.R.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    A qualitative male-specific DNA marker (OT-24) was amplified by spPCR (single-primer polymerase chain reaction) from chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) DNA along with several non-sex-linked products. The termini of the male-specific product were sequenced, and a pair of PeR primers were constructed for marker-specific PCR amplification. Dual primer PCR (dpPCR), with the marker-specific primers, amplified a product from both nudes and females. The amount of dpPCR product amplified from males was at least 100-fold greater than that from females. The quantitative difference between males and females was consistent among geographically distinct populations from western U.S. rivers. In addition, DNA sequence analysis indicated that OT-24 was highly conserved among geographically distinct salmon populations. The qualitative spPCR product segregated through several genetic crosses indicating equal sex ratios among progeny. Identification of the male and female juveniles by dpPCR was consistent with the spPCR analysis. There was no tissue specificity observed by spPCR or dpPCR analysis of this marker. A rapid DNA extraction method and dpPCR analysis were used to nonlethally determine sex ratios in wild spring chinook salmon adults, withheld for genetic and behavioral studies, prior to their development of gross sexual differences in their external morphology.

  19. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) 7-day survival and growth test method.

    PubMed

    Lazorchak, James M; Smith, Mark E

    2007-10-01

    A short-term method was developed in this study for conducting subchronic survival and growth renewal toxicity tests with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Previously published early life-stage methods for various salmonid species involve test durations of 30 to 90 days. This trout method, however, follows a previously published 7-day fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) growth method. The tests performed in this study measured subchronic growth and survival effects using standard reference toxicants (ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, phenol, and zinc sulfate), receiving water, and effluent samples. The test results were compared with performance criteria and results for 7-day survival and growth tests with P. promelas to determine the level of comparability between the two species. The results from tests with both salmonid species indicated that this 7-day survival and growth test method using O. mykiss and S. fontinalis provides reproducible results with various reference toxicant materials and can be used successfully to detect potential toxicity in environmental samples.

  20. Embryotoxicity of extracts from Lake Ontario rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.E.; Metcalfe, T.L.; Metcalfe, C.D. . Environmental and Resources Studies Program); Huestis, S.Y. )

    1994-09-01

    Various preparative techniques were used to extract nonpolar organic compounds from the muscle tissue of Lake Ontario rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In this extract, PCBs and organochlorine compounds were detected in nanogram-per-milliliter quantities, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans were detected in picogram-per-milliliter quantities. The extract and various subfractions of the extract were tested for embryotoxicity in a bioassay with embryos of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). The whole extract was embryotoxic to medaka, as were an extract fraction containing PCBs (fraction A) and extract fractions containing nonpolar organochlorine compounds (fractions B and C). When subfractions prepared from fraction A were tested for embryotoxicity, a subfraction containing non-ortho-substituted PCB congeners was embryo-toxic, whereas subfractions containing mono-ortho- and di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners were relatively nontoxic. Pathological lesions characteristic of exposure to planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons were observed only in embryos exposed to the non-ortho-PCB subfraction. The non-ortho-PCB subfraction of fraction A was more toxic than the original fraction A, which indicates that nontoxic PCBs reduce the toxicity of the non-ortho-PCBs through some unknown mechanism. This study indicates that organochlorine compounds and non-ortho-substituted PCBs have the potential to be embryotoxic to early life stages of Great lakes fish, but nontoxic contaminants can modify this toxic response. These data are relevant to the interpretation of correlations between embryo mortalities and concentrations of persistent organic contaminants in Great Lakes salmonids.

  1. Experiment of Critical Swimming Speed of Fingerling Masu Salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou) Using River Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Mattashi; Kato, Koh

    The authors conducted a field swimming experiment using cultured masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou) fingerlings in order to study their critical swimming speed during their release into the river in the Iwaki River diversion weir. The experimental equipment was a small, rectangular cross-section channel, which was installed in a local riverbed at the fishway. The experiment was conducted using an average cross-sectional water flow velocity of 17 to 92 cm·s-1, and using masu salmon fingerlings from 4.8 to 7.1 cm in the length. River water temperature was between 13.7 and 20.6 °C. The critical swimming speed measured over 60 minutes was between 16 and 41 cm·s-1 and a positive correlation was found between the critical swimming speed and body length. The critical swimming speed measured by body length (BL) was 3.5 to 6.9 times (that is, the distance travelled per second based on body length), and the mean critical swimming speed was 5.5 (with a standard deviation of 1.1). Results showed that water temperature differences in the experiment had no significant effect on the critical swimming speed measured over 60 minutes.

  2. Epizootiology and histopathology of Parvicapsula sp. in coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasutake, William T.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2003-01-01

    The epizootiology and histopathology of the myxosporean Parvicapsula sp. was studied during monthly health surveys of 4 groups of coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch at a commercial farm in Puget Sound, Washington, USA, from 1984 to 1986. No Parvicapsula sp. was detected in histological samples taken from juvenile fish in fresh water, but the parasite was detected in fish from all groups 2 to 8 mo after transfer to seawater net pens. Groups placed in seawater net pens in November and December had a higher prevalence of infection, and a longer period of continuous detected infection, than those introduced into net pens in May. For the groups transferred to seawater in November and December, the highest infection prevalence (45 to 90%) was detected during the following March and April. Among 13 tissues examined histologically, only the pseudobranch and kidney were positive for Parvicapsula sp., with 26 (62%) of 42 positive fish showing infections only in the pseudobranch, 5 (12%) showing infections only in the kidney, and 11 (26%) showing infections in both organs. Both the pseudobranch and kidney were apparent primary infection sites, but pseudobranch infections appeared to persist longer in a population. Pseudobranch infections were frequently heavy and associated with extensive inflammation and necrosis of filament and lamellar tissues. The kidney had been the only infection site reported for Parvicapsula sp. in previous studies of coho salmon.

  3. Epizootiology and histopathology of Parvicapsula sp. in coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasutake, William T.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2003-01-01

    The epizootiology and histopathology of the myxosporean Parvicapsula sp. was studied during monthly health surveys of 4 groups of coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch at a commercial farm in Puget Sound, Washington, USA, from 1984 to 1986. No Parvicapsula sp. was detected in histological samples taken from juvenile fish in fresh water, but the parasite was detected in fish from all groups 2 to 8 mo after transfer to seawater net pens. Groups placed in seawater net pens in November and December had a higher prevalence of infection, and a longer period of continuous detected infection, than those introduced into net pens in May. For the groups transferred to seawater in November and December, the highest infection prevalence (45 to 90%) was detected during the following March and April. Among 13 tissues examined histologically, only the pseudobranch and kidney were positive for Parvicapsula sp., with 26 (62%) of 42 positive fish showing infections only in the pseudobranch, 5 (12%) showing infections only in the kidney, and 11 (26%) showing infections in both organs. Both the pseudobranch and kidney were apparent primary infection sites, but pseudobranch infections appeared to persist longer in a population. Pseudobranch infections were frequently heavy and associated with extensive inflammation and necrosis of filament and lamellar tissues. The kidney had been the only infection site reported for Parvicapsula sp. in previous studies of coho salmon.

  4. Signatures of natural selection among lineages and habitats in Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Limborg, Morten T; Blankenship, Scott M; Young, Sewall F; Utter, Fred M; Seeb, Lisa W; Hansen, Mette H H; Seeb, James E

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular interrogation techniques now allow unprecedented genomic inference about the role of adaptive genetic divergence in wild populations. We used high-throughput genotyping to screen a genome-wide panel of 276 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the economically and culturally important salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss. Samples included 805 individuals from 11 anadromous and resident populations from the northwestern United States and British Columbia, and represented two major lineages including paired populations of each life history within single drainages of each lineage. Overall patterns of variation affirmed clear distinctions between lineages and in most instances, isolation by distance within them. Evidence for divergent selection at eight candidate loci included significant landscape correlations, particularly with temperature. High diversity of two nonsynonymous mutations within the peptide-binding region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (DAB) gene provided signatures of balancing selection. Weak signals for potential selection between sympatric resident and anadromous populations were revealed from genome scans and allele frequency comparisons. Our results suggest an important adaptive role for immune-related functions and present a large genomic resource for future studies.

  5. Effects of copper on immune system parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Dethloff, G.M.; Bailey, H.C.

    1998-09-01

    Agricultural, urban, industrial, and mining sources release metals into waterways. The effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on integrated physiological processes in fish, such as immunocompetency, are not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological effects of a range of sublethal copper concentrations on Shasta-strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed in soft water. Trout were sampled after 3, 7, 14, and 21 d of exposure to copper. The percentage of monocytes was consistently elevated at 26.9 {micro}g Cu/L, and the percentage of lymphocytes was decreased. A consistent increase in the percentage of neutrophils occurred at 26.9 and 6.4 {micro}g Cu/L. Respiratory burst activity was decreased for all concentrations at all sampling days, but a significant reduction occurred only at 14 and 21 d of exposure to copper. B-like cell proliferation was decreased by exposure to the higher copper concentrations. Proliferation results, however, had high variability. T-like cell proliferation and phagocytosis were not altered. Hepatic copper concentration was consistently elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 {micro}g Cu/L; no correlation was found between hepatic copper concentration and the immune system responses investigated. Consistent alterations in immunological parameters suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of chronic metal toxicity in natural systems.

  6. Electronic tags and genetics explore variation in migrating steelhead kelts (oncorhynchus mykiss), Ninilchik river, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, J.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zimmerman, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic and archival tags examined freshwater and marine migrations of postspawn steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Ninilchik River, Alaska, USA. Postspawn steelhead were captured at a weir in 2002-2005. Scale analysis indicated multiple migratory life histories and spawning behaviors. Acoustic tags were implanted in 99 kelts (2002-2003), and an array of acoustic receivers calculated the average speed of outmigration, timing of saltwater entry, and duration of residency in the vicinity of the river mouth. Ocean migration data were recovered from two archival tags implanted in kelts in 2004 (one male and one female). Archival tags documented seasonal differences in maximum depth and behavior with both fish spending 97% of time at sea <6 m depth (day and night). All study fish were double tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags implanted in the body cavity. Less than 4% of PIT tags were retained in postspawn steelhead. Molecular genetics demonstrated no significant differences in genetic population structure across years or among spawning life history types, suggesting a genetically panmictic population with highly diverse life history characteristics in the Ninilchik River.

  7. A novel role for pigment genes in the stress response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Uniza Wahid; Øverli, Øyvind; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Johansen, Ida Beitnes; Berget, Ingunn; Silva, Patricia I. M.; Kittilsen, Silje; Höglund, Erik; Omholt, Stig W.; Våge, Dag Inge

    2016-01-01

    In many vertebrate species visible melanin-based pigmentation patterns correlate with high stress- and disease-resistance, but proximate mechanisms for this trait association remain enigmatic. Here we show that a missense mutation in a classical pigmentation gene, melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor (MC1R), is strongly associated with distinct differences in steroidogenic melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) mRNA expression between high- (HR) and low-responsive (LR) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We also show experimentally that cortisol implants increase the expression of agouti signaling protein (ASIP) mRNA in skin, likely explaining the association between HR-traits and reduced skin melanin patterning. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP), needed for MC2R function, binds differently to the two MC1R variants. Considering that mRNA for MC2R and the MC1R variants are present in head kidney cells, we hypothesized that MC2R activity is modulated in part by different binding affinities of the MC1R variants for MRAP. Experiments in mammalian cells confirmed that trout MRAP interacts with the two trout MC1R variants and MC2R, but failed to detect regulation of MC2R signaling, possibly due to high constitutive MC1R activity. PMID:27373344

  8. Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Prefer and Are Less Aggressive in Darker Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Leigh P.; Franks, Becca; Weary, Daniel M.; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Fish are capable of excellent vision and can be profoundly influenced by the visual properties of their environment. Ambient colours have been found to affect growth, survival, aggression and reproduction, but the effect of background darkness (i.e., the darkness vs. lightness of the background) on preference and aggression has not been evaluated systematically. One-hundred Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), a species that is increasing in popularity in aquaculture, were randomly assigned to 10 tanks. Using a Latin-square design, every tank was bisected to allow fish in each tank to choose between all the following colour choices (8 choices in total): black vs. white, light grey, dark grey, and a mixed dark grey/black pattern, as well as industry-standard blue vs. white, light grey, dark grey, and black. Fish showed a strong preference for black backgrounds over all other options (p < 0.01). Across tests, preference strength increased with background darkness (p < 0.0001). Moreover, having darker backgrounds in the environment resulted in less aggressive behaviour throughout the tank (p < 0.0001). These results provide the first evidence that darker tanks are preferred by and decrease aggression in salmonids, which points to the welfare benefits of housing farmed salmon in enclosures containing dark backgrounds. PMID:27028731

  9. NORs inheritance analysis in crossings including individuals from two stocks of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Oliveira, Claudio; Tabata, Yara Aiko; Rigolino, Marcos Guilherme; Foresti, Fausto

    2002-01-01

    Silver nitrate staining of rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) chromosomes, for the identification of the nucleolar organizing regions (NORs), revealed that in individuals from Núcleo Experimental de Salmonicultura de Campos do Jordão (Brazil) NORs were located in the long arms of submetacentric pair while in specimens from Mount Shasta (USA) NORs were located in the short arms of a submetacentric pair. Cytogenetic analysis of the offspring, obtained through artificial crosses including individuals from both stocks, allowed the identification of NORs in two submetacentric chromosomes, one in the short arms and the other in the long arms, confirming the effectiveness of the hybridization process. Complementary results obtained using the FISH technique with 18S and 5S rDNA probes showed that NOR-bearing chromosomes exhibited a cluster of 5S genes located in tandem with the 18S gene cluster in both stocks. The results allow us to suggest that the difference in NOR-bearing chromosomes found between the two stocks is likely to be due to pericentric inversion involving the chromosome segment where 18S and 5S rDNA genes are located. The presence of ribosomal genes in the long arms of a submetacentric chromosome is apparently a particular characteristic of the rainbow trout stock of Campos do Jordão and might be used as a chromosome marker in studies of controlled crosses in this species.

  10. Recovery of Barotrauma Injuries in Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from Exposure to Pile Driving Sound

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Brandon M.; Popper, Arthur N.; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were exposed to simulated high intensity pile driving signals to evaluate their ability to recover from barotrauma injuries. Fish were exposed to one of two cumulative sound exposure levels for 960 pile strikes (217 or 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum; single strike sound exposure levels of 187 or 180 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss respectively). This was followed by an immediate assessment of injuries, or assessment 2, 5, or 10 days post-exposure. There were no observed mortalities from the pile driving sound exposure. Fish exposed to 217 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum displayed evidence of healing from injuries as post-exposure time increased. Fish exposed to 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum sustained minimal injuries that were not significantly different from control fish at days 0, 2, and 10. The exposure to 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum replicated the findings in a previous study that defined this level as the threshold for onset of injury. Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that one or two Mild injuries resulting from pile driving exposure are unlikely to affect the survival of the exposed animals, at least in a laboratory environment. PMID:22745794

  11. Gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during the stress response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Momoda, T.S.; Schwindt, A.R.; Feist, G.W.; Gerwick, L.; Bayne, C.J.; Schreck, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    To better appreciate the mechanisms underlying the physiology of the stress response, an oligonucleotide microarray and real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) were used to study gene expression in the livers of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). For increased confidence in the discovery of candidate genes responding to stress, we conducted two separate experiments using fish from different year classes. In both experiments, fish exposed to a 3??h stressor were compared to control (unstressed) fish. In the second experiment some additional fish were exposed to only 0.5??h of stress and others were sampled 21??h after experiencing a 3??h stressor. This 21??h post-stress treatment was a means to study gene expression during recovery from stress. The genes we report as differentially expressed are those that responded similarly in both experiments, suggesting that they are robust indicators of stress. Those genes are a major histocompatibility complex class 1 molecule (MHC1), JunB, glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), and nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1). Interestingly, Nupr1 gene expression was still elevated 21??h after stress, which indicates that recovery was incomplete at that time. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute effects of chlorinated resin acid exposure on juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.J.; Sweeting, R.M.; Farrell, A.P.; McKeown, B.A.; Johansen, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    The effects of an acute exposure to either 14-monochlorodehydroabietic acid (MCDHAA) or 12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid (DCDHAA) were examined in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The experimentally determined 96-h LC50 values (and their 95% confidence limits) were 1.03 (0.72, 1.48) and 0.91 (0.70, 1.21) mg/L, for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively. To measure effects on several biochemical parameters, swimming performance, and disease resistance, juvenile trout were exposed for 24 h to sublethal concentrations of one or the other resin acid in an intermittent-flow respirometer. Hematocrit, plasma lactate, and liver protein were significantly affected by exposure to the highest dose (80% of the 96-h LC50 value) of either of the resin acids. Plasma cortisol levels were 14- and 3-fold higher than were controls. Resistance to infection by Aeromonas salmonicida was significantly reduced; the cumulative percent mortalities due to furunculosis in fish exposed to MCDHAA or DCDHAA reached 20 and 26%, respectively. Swimming performance, measured as critical swimming speed (mean values 6.32 {+-} 0.20 and 5.93 {+-} 0.15 body lengths per second for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively), was not significantly affected by resin acid exposure.

  13. Changes in Size and Age of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Returning to Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Bert; Grant, W. Stewart; Brenner, Richard E.; Hamazaki, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    The average sizes of Pacific salmon have declined in some areas in the Northeast Pacific over the past few decades, but the extent and geographic distribution of these declines in Alaska is uncertain. Here, we used regression analyses to quantify decadal trends in length and age at maturity in ten datasets from commercial harvests, weirs, and spawner abundance surveys of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha throughout Alaska. We found that on average these fish have become smaller over the past 30 years (~6 generations), because of a decline in the predominant age at maturity and because of a decrease in age-specific length. The proportion of older and larger 4-ocean age fish in the population declined significantly (P < 0.05) in all stocks examined by return year or brood year. Our analyses also indicated that the age-specific lengths of 4-ocean fish (9 of 10 stocks) and of 3-ocean fish (5 of 10 stocks) have declined significantly (P < 0.05). Size-selective harvest may be driving earlier maturation and declines in size, but the evidence is not conclusive, and additional factors, such as ocean conditions or competitive interactions with other species of salmon, may also be responsible. Regardless of the cause, these wide-spread phenotypic shifts influence fecundity and population abundance, and ultimately may put populations and associated fisheries at risk of decline. PMID:26090990

  14. Genetic stock identification of immature chum salmon ( Oncorhynchus keta) in the western Bering Sea, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minho; Kim, Suam; Low, Loh-Lee

    2016-03-01

    Genetic stock identification studies have been widely applied to Pacific salmon species to estimate stock composition of complex mixed-stock fisheries. In a September-October 2004 survey, 739 chum salmon ( Oncorhynchus keta) specimens were collected from 23 stations in the western Bering Sea. We determined the genetic stock composition of immature chum salmon based on the previous mitochondria DNA baseline. Each regional estimate was computed based on the conditional maximum likelihood method using 1,000 bootstrap resampling and then pooled to the major regional groups: Korea - Japan - Primorie (KJP) / Russia (RU) / Northwest Alaska (NWA) / Alaska Peninsula - Southcentral Alaska - Southeast Alaska - British Columbia - Washington (ONA). The stock composition of immature chum salmon in the western Bering Sea was a mix of 0.424 KJP, 0.421 RU, 0.116 NWA, and 0.039 ONA stocks. During the study period, the contribution of Asian chum salmon stocks gradually changed from RU to KJP stock. In addition, North American populations from NWA and ONA were small but present near the vicinity of the Russian coast and the Commander Islands, suggesting that the study areas in the western Bering Sea were an important migration route for Pacific chum salmon originating both from Asia and North America during the months of September and October. These results make it possible to better understand the chum salmon stock composition of the mixed-stock fisheries in the western Bering Sea and the stock-specific distribution pattern of chum salmon on the high-seas.

  15. Effect of nanosilver on cortisol release and morphometrics in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Murray, Laura; Rennie, Michael D; Enders, Eva C; Pleskach, Kerri; Martin, Jonathan D

    2016-11-17

    Nanosilver (nAg) is a nanoparticle commonly incorporated into consumer products for its antimicrobial properties that has been detected in aquatic environments. Toxic effects of nAg on fish have been observed, and nAg may induce a stress response in fish in the form of increased blood plasma cortisol. Effects of nAg exposure on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were investigated over a 28-d period using blood plasma cortisol concentrations as an indicator of stress. Several morphometric measures (growth, Fulton's condition factor, and hepatosomatic index [HSI]) were also taken during the experiment to investigate potential whole-body effects of exposure, and concentrations of nAg in fish muscle tissue were measured. Fish were exposed to environmentally relevant (average 0.28 μg/L) and higher (average 47.60 μg/L) exposure concentrations of nAg. The results showed a significant increase in blood plasma cortisol for both exposure treatments. A significant effect on HSI by treatment dependent on exposure time was also observed, although no obvious trend was detected, whereas other morphometric measures were not affected by nAg exposure. In addition, Ag was detected in fish muscle tissue. The results indicate that although nAg did engage the stress response in fish, it did not affect growth or condition under the experimental conditions and time frame investigated. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-8. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Fluvial rainbow trout contribute to the colonization of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a small stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, Dana E.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Powell, Madison S.

    2013-01-01

    Life history polymorphisms provide ecological and genetic diversity important to the long term persistence of species responding to stochastic environments. Oncorhynchus mykiss have complex and overlapping life history strategies that are also sympatric with hatchery populations. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and parentage analysis were used to identify the life history, origin (hatchery or wild) and reproductive success of migratory rainbow/steelhead for two brood years after barriers were removed from a small stream. The fluvial rainbow trout provided a source of wild genotypes to the colonizing population boosting the number of successful spawners. Significantly more parr offspring were produced by anadromous parents than expected in brood year 2005, whereas significantly more parr offspring were produced by fluvial parents than expected in brood year 2006. Although hatchery steelhead were prevalent in the Methow Basin, they produced only 2 parr and no returning adults in Beaver Creek. On average, individual wild steelhead produced more parr offspring than the fluvial or hatchery groups. Yet, the offspring that returned as adult steelhead were from parents that produced few parr offspring, indicating that high production of parr offspring may not be related to greater returns of adult offspring. These data in combination with other studies of sympatric life histories of O. mykiss indicate that fluvial rainbow trout are important to the conservation and recovery of steelhead and should be included in the management and recovery efforts.

  17. Ceramides are involved in the regulation of food intake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Velasco, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesize that ceramides are involved in the regulation of food intake in fish. Therefore, we assessed in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) the effects of intracerebroventricular treatment with C6:0 ceramide on food intake. In a second experiment, we assessed the effects in brain areas of ceramide treatment on neuropeptide expression, fatty acid-sensing systems, and cellular signaling pathways. Ceramide treatment induced a decrease in food intake, a response opposed to the orexigenic effect described in mammals, which can be related to enhanced mRNA abundance of cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript and proopiomelanocortin and decreased mRNA abundance of Agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y. Fatty acid-sensing systems appear to be inactivated by ceramide treatment. The mRNA abundance of integrative sensors AMPK and sirtuin 1, and the phosphorylation status of cellular signaling pathways dependent on protein kinase B, AMPK, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) are generally activated by ceramide treatment. However, there are differences between hypothalamus and hindbrain in the phosphorylation status of AMPK (decreased in hypothalamus and increased in hindbrain), mTOR (decreased in hypothalamus and increased in hindbrain), and FoxO1 (increased in hypothalamus and decreased in hindbrain) to ceramide treatment. The results suggest that ceramides are involved in the regulation of food intake in rainbow trout through mechanisms comparable to those characterized previously in mammals in some cases.

  18. Impacts of multispecies parasitism on juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferguson, Jayde A.; Romer, Jeremy; Sifneos, Jean C.; Madsen, Lisa; Schreck, Carl B.; Glynn, Michael; Kent, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    We are studying the impacts of parasites on threatened stocks of Oregon coastal coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In our previous studies, we have found high infections of digeneans and myxozoans in coho salmon parr from the lower main stem of West Fork Smith River (WFSR), Oregon. In contrast parr from tributaries of this river, and outmigrating smolts, harbor considerably less parasites. Thus, we have hypothesized that heavy parasite burdens in parr from this river are associated with poor overwintering survival. The objective of the current study was to ascertain the possible effects these parasites have on smolt fitness. We captured parr from the lower main stem and tributaries of WFSR and held them in the laboratory to evaluate performance endpoints of smolts with varying degrees of infection by three digeneans (Nanophyetus salmincola, Apophallus sp., and neascus) and one myxozoan (Myxobolus insidiosus). The parameters we assessed were weight, fork length, growth, swimming stamina, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. We repeated our study on the subsequent year class and with hatchery reared coho salmon experimentally infected with N. salmincola. The most significant associations between parasites and these performance or fitness endpoints were observed in the heavily infected groups from both years. We found that all parasite species, except neascus, were negatively associated with fish fitness. This was corroborated for N. salmincola causing reduced growth with our experimental infection study. Parasites were most negatively associated with growth and size, and these parameters likely influenced the secondary findings with swimming stamina and ATPase activity levels.

  19. Variability in expression of anadromy by female Oncorhynchus mykiss within a river network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Justin S.; Dunham, Jason B.; Reeves, Gordon H.; McMillan, John R.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Jordan, Chris E.

    2012-01-01

    We described and predicted spatial variation in marine migration (anadromy) of female Oncorhynchus mykiss in the John Day River watershed, Oregon. We collected 149 juvenile O. mykiss across 72 sites and identified locations used by anadromous females by assigning maternal origin (anadromous versus non-anadromous) to each juvenile. These assignments used comparisons of strontium to calcium ratios in otolith primordia and freshwater growth regions to indicate maternal origin. We used logistic regression to predict probability of anadromy in relation to mean annual stream runoff using data from a subset of individuals. This model correctly predicted anadromy in a second sample of individuals with a moderate level of accuracy (e.g., 68% correctly predicted with a 0.5 classification threshold). Residuals from the models were not spatially autocorrelated, suggesting that remaining variability in the expression of anadromy was due to localized influences, as opposed to broad-scale gradients unrelated to mean annual stream runoff. These results are important for the management of O. mykiss because anadromous individuals (steelhead) within the John Day River watershed are listed as a threatened species, and it is difficult to discern juvenile steelhead from non-anadromous individuals (rainbow trout) in the field. Our results provide a broad-scale description and prediction of locations supporting anadromy, and new insight for habitat restoration, monitoring, and research to better manage and understand the expression of anadromy in O. mykiss.

  20. Estimating westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) movements in a river network using strontium isoscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Simon R. Thorrold,; Thomas E. McMahon,; Marotz, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We used natural variation in the strontium concentration (Sr:Ca) and isotope composition (87Sr:86Sr) of stream waters and corresponding values recorded in otoliths of westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) to examine movements during their life history in a large river network. We found significant spatial differences in Sr:Ca and 87Sr:86Sr values (strontium isoscapes) within and among numerous spawning and rearing streams that remained relatively constant seasonally. Both Sr:Ca and 87Sr:86Sr values in the otoliths of juveniles collected from nine natal streams were highly correlated with those values in the ambient water. Strontium isoscapes measured along the axis of otolith growth revealed that almost half of the juveniles had moved at least some distance from their natal streams. Finally, otolith Sr profiles from three spawning adults confirmed homing to natal streams and use of nonoverlapping habitats over their migratory lifetimes. Our study demonstrates that otolith geochemistry records movements of cutthroat trout through Sr isoscapes and therefore provides a method that complements and extends the utility of conventional tagging techniques in understanding life history strategies and conservation needs of freshwater fishes in river networks.

  1. Effects of Haematococcus pluvialis supplementation on antioxidant system and metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, Najmeh; Tayefi-Nasrabadi, Hossein; Oushani, Ali Khani; Enferadi, Mohammad Hamed Najafi

    2012-04-01

    Effects of commercial source for astaxanthin (Haematococcus pluvialis) (H.p) on antioxidant power, specific marker enzymes, and some metabolites were examined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were fed on diets containing 1, 3, and 10 g microalga kg(-1) feed for 30 days. Serum total antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation product, indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA), significantly enhanced with different doses of administration, indicating the elevated antioxidant status in all treatment groups. In group fed with high dose of alga, significantly elevated aspartate aminotransferase activity (AST) was noted, indicating damage of normal liver function in this group. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were not affected in all groups. Although serum total protein remained unaffected, serum glucose level was decreased significantly in lower doses of administration. Furthermore, triglyceride and cholesterol levels showed significant decrease in 3 g kg(-1) microalga group by modulation of lipid metabolism in this group. On the other hand, in highest dose, significant increase in lipids was observed, indicating the slight dysfunction in lipid metabolism in this treatment group. The present study suggests that Haematococcus pluvialis especially in dose of 3 g kg(-1) feed administration may effectively enhance the antioxidant system and some biochemical parameters in rainbow trout.

  2. Evidence of Olfactory Imprinting at an Early Life Stage in Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Nolan N.; Hinch, Scott G.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Yun, Sang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) navigate towards spawning grounds using olfactory cues they imprinted on as juveniles. The timing at which imprinting occurs has been studied extensively, and there is strong evidence that salmon imprint on their natal water during the parr-smolt transformation (PST). Researchers have noted, however, that the life histories of some species of Pacific salmon could necessitate imprinting prior to the PST. Juvenile pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) spend less time in fresh water than any other species of Pacific salmon, and presumably must imprint on their natal water at a very young age. The time at which imprinting occurs in this species, however, has not been experimentally tested. We exposed juvenile pink salmon as alevins to phenethyl alcohol (PEA) or control water, reared these fish to adulthood, and then tested their behavioural responses to PEA to determine whether the fish successfully imprinted. We found that pink salmon exposed to PEA as alevins were attracted to the chemical as adults, suggesting that imprinting can occur during this stage. Our finding provides some of the first evidence to support the long-standing belief that imprinting can occur in pink salmon prior to the PST. PMID:27827382

  3. Effects of anesthesia and surgery on Ucrit performance and MO₂ in chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kazufumi; Nii, Hisaya; Tsuji, Takatoshi; Miyoshi, Koji; Hamamoto, Satoshi; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Telemetry is a useful technique for elucidating salmon behavior, but the recovery periods before fish can be safely released after the attachment of telemetry devices have not yet been established. Reported recovery times vary widely, from 2 h to 13 days. We examined how anesthesia and surgery to attach external electromyogram (EMG) transmitters affected chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) recovery based on three physiological parameters. Fish subjected to anesthesia plus EMG transmitter attachment (EMG group), anesthesia only (AO group), and no handling (control) were placed in a swim tunnel. Critical swimming speed (Ucrit), oxygen consumption (MO₂), and muscle activity (EMG values) were assessed 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 30 h after treatment. The MO₂ in the EMG and AO groups was higher than in the control group 1 h after treatment, but did not differ significantly from the control in all subsequent trials (from 6 to 30 h after treatment). Values for Ucrit and EMG were not significantly different from the control group in any of the trials conducted 1-30 h after treatment. We concluded that chum salmon had regained their normal swimming ability by 6 h after treatment and could be safely released into the natural environment.

  4. Occurrence and identification of Anisakis spp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) isolated from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Lee, Cheul-Ho; Seong, Ki-Baik; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of infection and the identification of anisakid larvae in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) from the Namdae River, the east coast of Korea, were investigated. In total, 8,358 larvae were collected from 120 fish samples (male = 58 fish, female = 62 fish) in 2008. Fish samples were collected during October and November 2008. All the chum salmon samples (120/120, 100%) caught were infected with anisakid larvae with a high intensity (69.65 ± 48.58 larvae/host). They were mostly found in muscles (98.00%). Based on the morphological and the molecular analysis of PCR-RFLP and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA cox2 gene markers, these nematodes were identified as Anisakis simplex (sensu stricto) third-stage larvae. This is the first report on the molecular identification of anisakid worms from salmonid fishes in Korea. The high occurrence of anisakid worms in chum salmon may pose considerable food safety problems if they were consumed as raw or undercooked, although their commercial value is relatively lower than other salmonid species.

  5. [A search for null alleles at the microsatellite locus of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum)].

    PubMed

    Kordicheva, S Iu; Rubtsova, G A; Shitova, M V; Shaĭkhaev, G O; Afanas'ev, K I; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2010-08-01

    Population studies with the use of microsatellite markers face a problem of null alleles, i.e., the absence of a PCR product, caused by the mutations in the microsatellite flanking regions, which serve as the sites of primer hybridization. In this case, the microsatellite primer associated with such mutation is not amplified, leading to false homozygosity in heterozygous individuals. This, in turn, results in biased population genetic estimates, including the excess of homozygotes at microsatellite loci. Analysis of the population structure of a Pacific salmon species, chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum), revealed the presence of null alleles at the Oke3 microsatellite locus in the population samples, in which an excess of homozygotes was observed. The analysis was performed using different combinations of modified primers chosen to match the Oke3 locus. The use of these primers enabled identification of true heterozygotes among those individuals, which were previously diagnosed as homozygotes with the use of standard primers. Removal of null alleles eliminated the excess homozygotes in the chum salmon samples described. In addition to the exclusion of false homozygosity, the use of modified primers makes it possible to introduce polymorphic primer variants associated with certain microsatellite alleles into population studies.

  6. Linkage mapping with paralogs exposes regions of residual tetrasomic inheritance in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    PubMed

    Waples, R K; Seeb, L W; Seeb, J E

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequence similarity due to shared ancestry after a duplication event, that is paralogy, complicates the assessment of genetic variation, as sequences originating from paralogs can be difficult to distinguish. These confounded sequences are often removed prior to further analyses, leaving the underlying loci uncharacterized. Salmonids have only partially rediploidized subsequent to a whole-genome duplication; residual tetrasomic inheritance has been observed in males. We present a maximum-likelihood-based method to resolve confounded paralogous loci by observing the segregation of alleles in gynogenetic haploid offspring and demonstrate its effectiveness by constructing two linkage maps for chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), with and without these newly resolved loci. We find that the resolved paralogous loci are not randomly distributed across the genome. A majority are clustered in expanded subtelomeric regions of 14 linkage groups, suggesting a significant fraction of the chum salmon genome may be missed by the exclusion of paralogous loci. Transposable elements have been proposed as drivers of genome evolution and, in salmonids, may have an important role in the rediploidization process by driving differentiation between homeologous chromosomes. Consistent with that hypothesis, we find a reduced fraction of transposable element annotations among paralogous loci, and these loci predominately occur in the genomic regions that lag in the rediploidization process.

  7. Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Ultra-Low Dose Cancer Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David E.; Orner, Gayle; Willard, Kristin D.; Tilton, Susan; Hendricks, Jerry D.; Pereira, Clifford; Benninghoff, Abby D.; Bailey, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer risk assessment utilizing rodents requires extrapolation across five orders of magnitude to estimate the Virtually Safe Dose (VSD). Regulatory agencies rely upon the Linear Extrapolated Dose (LED) except when sufficient information on mechanism of action justifies alternative models. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has been utilized at Oregon State University as a model for human cancer for forty years. Low cost and high capacity, made possible by our unique facility, along with low spontaneous background and high sensitivity, allow design and conduct of statistically challenging studies not possible in rodents. Utilization of custom microarrays demonstrates similarities in gene expression in trout and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have completed one study employing over 42,000 trout with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and determined the dose resulting in 1 additional cancer in 5,000 animals, a 50-fold enhancement over the mouse ED01 study. Liver tumor incidence at low dose deviated significantly from linearity (concave down), whereas, DBP-DNA adductions deviated slightly (convex up). A second study is underway with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Results to date indicate AFB1 at low dose, in contrast to DBP, elicits a linear dose-response function on the log-log scale which falls below the LED with a slope slightly greater than 1.0. Such studies demonstrate the statistical power of the trout cancer model and strengthen the case for incorporation of these data-sets into risk assessment for these environmental human carcinogens. PMID:19135172

  8. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and ultra-low dose cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Orner, Gayle; Willard, Kristin D; Tilton, Susan; Hendricks, Jerry D; Pereira, Clifford; Benninghoff, Abby D; Bailey, George S

    2009-03-01

    Cancer risk assessment utilizing rodents requires extrapolation across five orders of magnitude to estimate the Virtually Safe Dose (VSD). Regulatory agencies rely upon the Linear Extrapolated Dose (LED) except when sufficient information on mechanism of action justifies alternative models. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has been utilized at Oregon State University as a model for human cancer for forty years. Low cost and high capacity, made possible by our unique facility, along with low spontaneous background and high sensitivity, allow design and conduct of statistically challenging studies not possible in rodents. Utilization of custom microarrays demonstrates similarities in gene expression in trout and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have completed one study employing over 42,000 trout with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and determined the dose resulting in 1 additional cancer in 5000 animals, a 50-fold enhancement over the mouse ED(01) study. Liver tumor incidence at low dose deviated significantly from linearity (concave down), whereas, DBP-DNA adductions deviated slightly (convex up). A second study is underway with aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). Results to date indicate AFB(1) at low dose, in contrast to DBP, elicits a linear dose-response function on the log-log scale which falls below the LED with a slope slightly greater than 1.0. Such studies demonstrate the statistical power of the trout cancer model and strengthen the case for incorporation of these data-sets into risk assessment for these environmental human carcinogens.

  9. Body morphology differs in wild juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Willamette River, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billman, E.J.; Whitman, L.D.; Schroeder, R.K.; Sharpe, C.S.; Noakes, David L. G.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Body morphology of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the upper Willamette River, Oregon, U.S.A., was analysed to determine if variation in body shape is correlated with migratory life-history tactics followed by juveniles. Body shape was compared between migrating juveniles that expressed different life-history tactics, i.e. autumn migrants and yearling smolts, and among parr sampled at three sites along a longitudinal river gradient. In the upper Willamette River, the expression of life-history tactics is associated with where juveniles rear in the basin with fish rearing in downstream locations generally completing ocean ward migrations earlier in life than fish rearing in upstream locations. The morphological differences that were apparent between autumn migrants and yearling smolts were similar to differences between parr rearing in downstream and upstream reaches, indicating that body morphology is correlated with life-history tactics. Autumn migrants and parr from downstream sampling sites had deeper bodies, shorter heads and deeper caudal peduncles compared with yearling smolts and parr from the upstream sampling site. This study did not distinguish between genetic and environmental effects on morphology; however, the results suggest that downstream movement of juveniles soon after emergence is associated with differentiation in morphology and with the expression of life-history variation.

  10. Hormonal control of hepatic glycogen metabolism in food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vijayan, M.M.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.; Moon, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma cortisol concentration and liver cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor activities of continuously swimming, food-deprived coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) did not differ from those of resting, fed fish. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly higher in the exercising, starved fish, but there were no significant differences in either hepatic glycogen concentration or hepatic activities of glycogen phosphorylase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate kinase, or lactate dehydrogenase between the two groups. Total glucose production by hepatocytes did not differ significantly between the two groups; glycogen breakdown accounted for all the glucose produced in the resting, fed fish whereas it explained only 59% of the glucose production in the exercised animals. Epinephrine and glucagon stimulation of glucose production by hepatocytes was decreased in the exercised fish without significantly affecting hepatocyte glycogen breakdown in either group. Insulin prevented glycogen breakdown and enhanced glycogen deposition in exercised fish. The results indicate that food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon conserve glycogen by decreasing the responsiveness of hepatocytes to catabolic hormones and by increasing the responsiveness to insulin (anabolic hormone).

  11. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Brian P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Colvin, Michael E.; Benda, Susan E.; Peterson, James T.; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning.

  12. Identification of a new calcitonin gene in the salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha.

    PubMed Central

    Jansz, H; Martial, K; Zandberg, J; Milhaud, G; Benson, A A; Julienne, A; Moukhtar, M S; Cressent, M

    1996-01-01

    Three isoforms of calcitonin (CT) exist in salmonids. Isohormones I and II are expressed in the pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha. We report here the existence in this species of a CT gene and of its transcripts, which encode for a fourth isohormone, the salmon CT (sCT) IV. This new CT gene was identified by PCR from genomic DNA and by sequencing the amplified DNA. The expression of this CT gene was established in ultimobranchial body and brain, by reverse transcription-PCR, hybridization and sequencing. The sCT IV gene, like the sCT I gene, is a complex transcription unit, containing exons encoding for a CT as a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) molecule. The predicted peptide, sCT IV, has a greater homology with the eel CT and the sCT II than with the sCT I. Alignment of the sCT IV with other fish and chicken CT showed amino acid modifications in similar positions as those found during evolution. The predicted salmon CGRP IV peptide is highly homologous to the known CGRP molecules in other species, confirming the high conservation of the molecule during evolution. This identification of a new salmon CT gene is interesting both for the therapeutic potential represented by the new molecules encoded by this gene and for phylogenetic studies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8901583

  13. Sources of variation in counts of meristic features of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruse, C.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    We determined variability in counts of meristic features (pyloric caceae, vertebrae, pelvic fin rays, gill-rakers, basibranchial teeth, scales above the lateral line, and scales in the lateral series) of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) by 3 independent readers, by the same reader on 3 different occasions, and among fish from 12 sampling sites within a 650-km2 watershed. Genetic purity of the cutthroat trout was determined by electrophoretic analysis. Significant differences in meristic counts were observed among 3 readers and among sampling sites, but not among 3 occasions by a single reader. Scale counts were within the reported range for Yellowstone cutthroat trout, but counts of other structures (pyloric caceae, gillrakers, vertebrae) were as similar to rainbow trout as to Yellowstone cutthroat trout. Meristic counts identified the fish as cutthroat trout; however, variation among readers and sampling sites as well as within the species, limits their use when identifying genetically pure cutthroat trout or assessing possible integration with rainbow trout.

  14. In situ biomonitoring of PAH-contaminated sediments using juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Barbee, Gary C; Barich, John; Duncan, Bruce; Bickham, John W; Matson, Cole W; Hintze, Christopher J; Autenrieth, Robin L; Zhou, Guo-Dong; McDonald, Thomas J; Cizmas, Leslie; Norton, Dale; Donnelly, Kirby C

    2008-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous marine and freshwater sediment contaminants. Extensive data exist to confirm that PAHs are toxic to aquatic receptors. However, limited information is available regarding the bioavailability and genotoxicity of sediment PAHs to aquatic organisms. This study investigated an integrated biomonitoring approach using chemical analyses and biomarkers to characterize the bioavailability and genotoxicity of a complex PAH mixture in freshwater lake sediments associated with a former manufactured gas plant (MGP). Sediment PAH genotoxicity was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM), DNA adduct (32)P-postlabeling, and erythrocyte micronuclei in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) caged in the water column. Significant PAH-induced genotoxicity was observed with FCM and (32)P-postlabeling, but not with erythrocyte micronuclei. Chromosome damage in peripheral blood and hepatic DNA adducts correlated with sediment, but not water column PAH concentrations. Total hepatic DNA adducts in salmon caged nearest the former MGP facility was 39+/-6.5 (RALx10(9)), while salmon caged in a reference lake had 28+/-2.3 total hepatic DNA adducts per 10(9) nucleotides. These results indicate that in situ biomonitoring using biomarkers and caged fish can be a sensitive indicator of genotoxic PAHs in sediments.

  15. Cytokine expression in leucocytes and gut cells of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, induced by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Austin, Brian

    2006-12-15

    Understanding how the various host cells respond to probiotic bacteria in vitro may provide important insight into elaborate immune responses triggered by beneficial bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed pattern of the mRNA expression of cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-8, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta) in head kidney (HK) leucocytes and gut cells isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) after co-culturing with live probiotics. HK leucocytes and gut cells adjusted to 5 x 10(6) and 2 x 10(6) ml(-1), respectively, in L-15 medium containing 25% decomplemented FCS and 300 mg l(-1) L-glutamine were co-cultured with Carnobacterium maltaromaticum B26 and C. divergens B33 at an multiplicity of infection of 25 for 6 and 12 h. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using SYBR Green I was employed to determine the mRNA expression of studied genes. Although neither probiotic strains significantly induced mRNA of the cytokines in gut cells, expression ratios of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha of HK cells were significantly higher, suggesting that these bacteria can stimulate innate immunity in rainbow trout.

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of carbonic anhydrase in the pseudobranch tissue of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, S. M.; Mazlan, A. G.; Simon, K. D.; Delaunoy, J. P.; Laurent, P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudobranch function has long interested scientists, but its role has yet to be elucidated. Several studies have suggested that pseudobranchs serve respiratory, osmoregulatory, and sensory functions. This work investigated the immunolocalization of pseudobranch carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the teleost fish species rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to clarify its physiological function. CA was purified from rainbow trout gills O. mykiss and specific antibodies were raised. Immunoblotting between tissue homogenates of pseudobranch and gill CA antibodies showed specific immunostaining with only one band corresponding to CA in the pseudobranch homogenate. Results of immunohistochemical technique revealed that CA was distributed within pseudobranch cells and more precisely in the apical parts (anti-vascular) of cells. The basal (vascular) parts of cells, tubular system, blood capillaries, and pillar cells were not immunostained. Immunocytochemistry confirmed these results and showed that some CA enzyme was cytoplasmic and the remainder was linked to membranous structures. The results also showed that the lacunar tissue layers did not display immunoperoxidase activity. Our results indicated that pseudobranch CA may have a function related to the extracellular medium wherein CA intervenes with the mechanism of stimulation of afferent nerve fibers. PMID:24510712

  17. Using nitrogen stable isotopes to detect longdistance movement in a threatened cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii utah)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, A.J.; Colyer, W.T.; Lowe, W.H.; Vinson, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Interior cutthroat trout occupy small fractions of their historic ranges and existing populations often are relegated to headwater habitats. Conservation requires balancing protection for isolated genetically pure populations with restoration of migratory life histories by reconnecting corridors between headwater and mainstem habitats. Identification of alternative life history strategies within a population is critical to these efforts. We tested the application of nitrogen stable isotopes to discern fluvial from resident Bonneville cutthroat trout (BCT; Oncorhynchus clarkii utah) in a headwater stream. Fluvial BCT migrate from headwater streams with good water quality to mainstem habitats with impaired water quality. Resident BCT remain in headwater streams. We tested two predictions: (i) fluvial BCT have a higher ??15N than residents, and (ii) fluvial BCT ??15N reflects diet and ??15N enrichment characteristics of mainstem habitats. We found that fluvial ??15N was greater than resident ??15N and that ??15N was a better predictor of life history than fish size. Our data also showed that fluvial and resident BCT had high diet overlap in headwater sites and that ??15N of lower trophic levels was greater in mainstem sites than in headwater sites. We conclude that the high ??15N values of fluvial BCT were acquired in mainstem sites.

  18. Two novel muramidases from skin mucosa of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, J M O; Kemp, G D; Smith, V J

    2004-05-01

    Two novel antibacterial muramidases were purified to homogeneity from skin exudates of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Unusually, one has an acidic isoelectric point and it is the first anionic muramidase to be reported for fish. Its molecular mass is 14,268 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry. The other muramidase is cationic with a mass of 14,252 Da. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing and peptide mapping strongly point to it being a c-type lysozyme, the first to be purified and characterised from skin of a salmonid. Its optimum pH ranges from 4.5 to 5.5 and its optimum temperature, at pH 5.0, is 33-49 degrees C, although it still exhibits activity at 5 degrees C. It is strongly bactericidal to the Gram-(+) bacterium Planococcus citreus, with a minimum bactericidal concentration of 100 U ml(-1), but is neither chitinolytic nor haemolytic. These two muramidases probably contribute to epithelial defence of the fish against microbes, either alone or in synergism with antibacterial peptides.

  19. Accumulation and disposition of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Haukås, Marianne; Mariussen, Espen; Ruus, Anders; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2009-11-08

    The brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has been reported in environmental samples worldwide. The three diastereomers, alpha-, beta- and gamma-HBCD, behave differently in aquatic food webs; likely depending on different factors influencing assimilation efficiency and metabolism. In the present study, two oral exposure experiments with rainbow trout were performed to assess the role of selective uptake on diastereomer-specific accumulation and disposition of HBCD to liver, brain and muscle. In both experiments, juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were administrated a technical HBCD-mixture in commercial feed (10mgkg(-1)), followed by up to 21 days of food deprivation. Already 6h after exposure, the HBCD accumulation was significant, and the concentrations peaked 4-8 days after the exposure. The relative change in HBCD pattern during the accumulation process (0-8 days), suggested that there was a diastereomer-selective uptake of alpha- and beta-HBCD in the rainbow trout. During the initial 48h, considerable amounts of all three diastereomers were distributed to liver, brain and muscle. A 70% reduction in SigmaHBCD levels after 21 days, indicated elimination of HBCD from brain and liver, but no clear elimination from the muscle was observed. Differences in HBCD pattern between organs at the end of the experiment support a proposal of an organ-specific diastereomer accumulation.

  20. Effects of atrazine on hepatic metabolism and endocrine homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Salaberria, Iurgi; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Asensio, Vega; Olsvik, Pål A; Andersen, Rolf A; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world and is now under scrutiny for its alleged capacity to disrupt the endocrine system. Exhibiting negligible interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER), ATZ's mode of action remains to be elucidated. ATZ may act as an inducer of the enzyme aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens, although other mechanisms should also be taken into consideration such as impairment of hepatic metabolism. Therefore we administered juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) a dose of either 2 or 200 microg ATZ/kg, or of carrier control phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and we measured plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (Vtg) 6 days after exposure. Simultaneously we analyzed hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), and catalase (CAT) activity. Although sex steroid levels showed no significant alterations, we found a dose-dependent increase in Vtg and a concomitant decrease in CYP1A. There was no effect of ATZ on GST-P mRNA levels but GST-P was positively correlated with CYP1A. Also, CYP1A was negatively correlated with liver CAT and E2, and varied with T concentrations in a hormetic manner. The results showed that ATZ can alter hepatic metabolism, induce estrogenic effects and oxidative stress in vivo, and that these effects are linked.

  1. Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Demet; Can, Canan; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Dikilitas, Murat; Taskin, Abdullah; Bilinc, Hasan

    2011-06-01

    The present study was conducted in order to investigate pro-oxidant activity of dimethoate in liver and brain tissues following sublethal pesticide exposure for 5, 15 and 30 d by using SOD, GPx, CAT enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation as biomarkers as well as DNA damaging potential via detecting% Tail DNA, Tail moment and Olive tail moment as endpoints in erythrocytes of Oncorhynchus mykiss in an in vitro experiment. Antioxidant enzyme activities were found to elicit two staged response which was an initial induction followed by a sharp inhibition in liver tissue while a sustained increase in GPx activity and slight stimulation in SOD activity were detected in brain tissue. Lipid peroxidation showed an ascending pattern throughout the exposure period in both tissues and a decreasing trend was determined in tissue protein levels which was proved to be positively correlated with duration. Similar findings were obtained from outcomes preferred to quantify DNA damage and TM was decided to reflect the extent of damage more sensitively because of determined positive correlation with concentrations applied. Considering these results, it can be concluded that oxidative stress condition evoked by dimethoate could not be responded effectively and genotoxic nature of pesticide was proven by determined clastogenic effect possibly via being an alkylation agent or stimulating the production of reactive species.

  2. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Musharrafieh; Luca, Tacchi; Joshua, Trujeque; Scott, LaPatra; Irene, Salinas

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β 1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β , IL-6 and TNF-α) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout. PMID:24438987

  3. Hypothermic storage of isolated spermatogonia and oogonia from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Falahatkar, Bahram; Poursaeid, Samaneh; Kitada, Ryota; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2017-03-14

    A growing number of fish species are endangered due to human activities. A short- or long-time preservation of gametes could conserve genetic resources of threatened fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate a hypothermic condition for short-term preservation of spermatogonia and oogonia cells isolated from immature transgenic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and to determine the maximum time point for further transplantation. Viability rate of germ cells was investigated after isolation and during storage at 4 °C up to 24 h. Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium supplemented with Hepes fetal bovine serum and l-glutamine was used as hypothermic storage media. The results showed that while viability decreased following 24 h storage, the remaining viable cells did not vary morphologically as well as GFP intensity retained similar to those observed in freshly isolated cells. The hypothermal storage study indicated that culture medium is suitable for preserving germ cells in the short periods of time. Simplicity, easily available culture media and low cost provide new insight into hypothermic conditions for preserving and transporting of germ cells for next applied and basic studies.

  4. Vulnerability to predation and physiological stress responses of experimentally descaled juvenile Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, Dena M.; Mesa, Matthew G.; Olson, Todd M.

    1994-01-01

    Juvenile salmonids,Oncorhynchus spp., commonly encounter conditions (e.g., during hatchery release and dam passage) that result in damage to the skin, scale, and slime complex. We conducted laboratory experiments to determine if descaling of juvenile chinook salmon,O. tshawytscha, increased their vulnerability to predation, and to assess the physiological stress responses elicited by descaling. Salmon were experimentally descaled on either 10% or 20% of their total body area. When offered equal numbers of control and descaled juvenile chinook salmon, northern squawfish,Ptychocheilus oregonensis, did not consume significantly more of either prey type (48–60% of consumed prey were descaled). Juvenile chinook salmon descaled on 10% of their body area did show significant physiological stress responses, however. Mean concentrations of plasma cortisol peaked 1 h after descaling, and returned to control levels by 12 h. Plasma glucose peaked 3 h post-treatment and remained elevated for 24 h. Plasma lactate increased immediately following treatment and returned to undisturbed control levels by 3 h. The osmoregulatory response of plasma potassium was highly variable, but plasma sodium decreased immediately and remained low for 24 h. The observed physiological responses suggest that descaling of juvenile chinook salmon could result in decreased resistance to disease and other stressors encountered in the field, possibly leading to reduced performance capacity and lowered survival.

  5. Cellular components of probiotics control Yersinia ruckeri infection in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Abbass, A; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Austin, B

    2010-01-01

    Subcellular components of the probiotics Aeromonas sobria GC2 and Bacillus subtilis JB-1, when administered to rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, conferred protection against a new biogroup of Yersinia ruckeri. Thus, intraperitoneal or intramuscular injection of rainbow trout with cell wall proteins (CWPs), outer membrane proteins (OMPs), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), whole cell proteins (WCPs) and live cells followed by challenge on day 8 with Y. ruckeri led to 80-100% survival compared with 10% survival in the controls. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) profiles of WCPs and OMPs from GC2 had 10 and 5 variable protein bands in comparison to 11 and 5 bands in the WCPs and CWPs from JB-1. Proteomic analyses were employed following SDS-PAGE to categorize one dominant protein of 104.7 kDa from the CWPs of JB-1 and equated it with 'Bacillus spp. endoglucanase' with a Mascot score >69. These results point to the potential of using cellular components of probiotics for protection of fish against bacterial diseases.

  6. Effects of atrazine on hepatic metabolism and endocrine homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Salaberria, Iurgi Hansen, Bjorn Henrik; Asensio, Vega; Olsvik, Pal A.; Andersen, Rolf A.; Jenssen, Bjorn Munro

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world and is now under scrutiny for its alleged capacity to disrupt the endocrine system. Exhibiting negligible interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER), ATZ's mode of action remains to be elucidated. ATZ may act as an inducer of the enzyme aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens, although other mechanisms should also be taken into consideration such as impairment of hepatic metabolism. Therefore we administered juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) a dose of either 2 or 200 {mu}g ATZ/kg, or of carrier control phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and we measured plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (Vtg) 6 days after exposure. Simultaneously we analyzed hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), and catalase (CAT) activity. Although sex steroid levels showed no significant alterations, we found a dose-dependent increase in Vtg and a concomitant decrease in CYP1A. There was no effect of ATZ on GST-P mRNA levels but GST-P was positively correlated with CYP1A. Also, CYP1A was negatively correlated with liver CAT and E2, and varied with T concentrations in a hormetic manner. The results showed that ATZ can alter hepatic metabolism, induce estrogenic effects and oxidative stress in vivo, and that these effects are linked.

  7. Post-release behavior and movement patterns of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) after capture using alternative commercial fish gear, lower Columbia River, Washington and Oregon, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kock, Tobias J.; Evans, Scott D.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 and 2012, WDFW conducted post-release mortality studies of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) that were captured using beach or purse seines. These studies were comprised of two groups of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags): (1) treatment fish that were captured by one of the gear types 9–25 river kilometers (rkm) downstream of Bonneville Dam (rkm 234); and (2) control fish that were captured at the Adult Fish Facility near the Washington shore fish ladder at Bonneville Dam, and then transported and released 8 rkm downstream of the Bonneville Dam. Fish were confirmed to have survived if they moved upstream and were detected on PIT-tag antennas at or upstream of Bonneville Dam, were recovered at hatcheries or at the dam, or were captured by commercial or sport fishers. Post-release survival estimates were higher for steelhead (89–98 percent) than for Chinook salmon and coho salmon (50–90 percent; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, unpub. data, 2014). However, some Chinook salmon and coho salmon return to hatcheries, or spawn in the mainstem Columbia River and in tributaries downstream of Bonneville Dam. The proportion of Chinook salmon and coho salmon in the treatment group that were destined for areas downstream of Bonneville Dam likely was higher than in the control group because the control fish were collected as they were attempting to pass the dam. If this assertion was true, mortality would have been overestimated in these studies, so WDFW developed a study plan to determine the post-release movements and intended location of Chinook salmon and coho salmon collected with beach and purse seines in the lower Columbia River.

  8. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Gyrodactylus salmonis (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) isolates collected in Mexico from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel; Paladini, Giuseppe; Freeman, Mark A; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Shinn, Andrew P

    2012-05-25

    Gyrodactylus salmonis (Yin et Sproston, 1948) isolates collected from feral rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in Veracruz, southeastern Mexico are described. Morphological and molecular variation of these isolates to G. salmonis collected in Canada and the U.S.A. is characterised. Morphologically, the marginal hook sickles of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis closely resemble those of Canadian specimens - their shaft and hook regions align closely with one another; only features of the sickle base and a prominent bridge to the toe permit their separation. The 18S sequence determined from the Mexican specimens was identical to two variable regions of SSU rDNA obtained from a Canadian population of G. salmonis. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (spanning ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis are identical to ITS sequences of an American population of G. salmonis and to Gyrodactylus salvelini Kuusela, Ziętara et Lumme, 2008 from Finland. Analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis show 98-99% similarity to those of Gyrodactylus gobiensis Gläser, 1974, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, and Gyrodactylus rutilensis Gläser, 1974. Mexican and American isolates of G. salmonis are 98% identical, as assessed by sequencing the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Oncorhynchus mykiss is one of the most widely-dispersed fish species in the world and has been shown to be an important vector for parasite/disease transmission. Considering that Mexican isolates of G. salmonis were collected well outside the native distribution range of all salmonid fish, we discuss the possibility that the parasites were translocated with their host through the aquacultural trade. In addition, this study includes a morphological review of Gyrodactylus species collected from rainbow trout and from other salmonid fish of the genus Oncorhynchus which occur throughout North America.

  9. Antibody-producing cells correlated to body weight in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) acclimated to optimal and elevated temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrahy, L.N.M.; Schreck, C.B.; Maule, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    The immune response of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ranging in weight from approximately 10 to 55 g was compared when the fish were acclimated to either 13 or 21?? C. A haemolytic plaque assay was conducted to determine differences in the number of antibody-producing cells (APC) among fish of a similar age but different body weights. Regression analyses revealed significant increases in the number of APC with increasing body weight when fish were acclimated to either water temperature. These results emphasise the importance of standardising fish weight in immunological studies of salmonids before exploring the possible effects of acclimation temperatures. ?? 2001 Academic Press.

  10. [Parasitic helminths infection in Coho salmón, Oncorhynchus kisutch, during their return to Simpson river, Chile].

    PubMed

    Torres, P; Aedo, E; Figueroa, L; Siegmund, I; Silva, R; Navarrete, N; Puga, S; Marín, F; Aedo, E

    2000-01-01

    Between may and july 1994, 17 adult returning salmons, Oncorhynchus kisutch, were collected in the River Simpson, Chile. All fishes showed infection by plerocercoids of Diphyllobothrium sp. in different locations: stomach, spleen, liver, mesenteries and gonads. Infection with larval cestodes of an unidentified species of Phillobothriidae was determined in the intestine of seven (41.2%) salmons and its prevalences of infection showed significant differences between female and male salmons. The 94.4% of total plerocercoids of Diphyllobothrium were isolated from the stomach wall. Prevalence and mean intensity of infection by Diphyllobothrium sp. did not show significant differences between fishes of different sex.

  11. Behaviour of growth hormone transgenic coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in marine mesocosms assessed by acoustic tag telemetry.

    PubMed

    Hollo, T; Watson, B M; Johnston, S V; Devlin, R H

    2017-02-05

    Underwater acoustic tag telemetry was used to assess behavioural differences between juvenile wild-type (i.e. non-transgenic, NT) and growth hormone (GH) transgenic (T) coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in a contained simulated ocean environment. T O. kisutch were found across days to maintain higher baseline swimming speeds than NT O. kisutch and differences in response to feeding were detected between T and NT genotypes. This is the first study to assess behaviour of GH transgenic salmonids in a marine environment and has relevance for assessing whether behavioural effects of GH overexpression seen in freshwater environments can be extrapolated to oceanic phases of the life cycle.

  12. [Differentiation of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum populations as revealed with microsatellite and allozyme markers: a comparison].

    PubMed

    Rubtsoba, G A; Afanas'ev, K I; Malinina, T V; Shitova, M V; Rakitskaia, T A; Prokhorovskaia, V D; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2008-07-01

    The character and extent of population differentiation in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta from Sakhalin and Iturup were comparatively studied with 10 microsatellite and 12 allozyme markers. It was demonstrated with the example of allozyme polymorphism at the EstD locus that the effect of an individual locus with one major allele is capable of distorting the total picture of population differentiation. Multiallelic microsatellites were more efficient in revealing the genetic structure of chum salmon populations at the levels of differences between regional populations and between the stocks of individual rivers of the same region.

  13. Application of single nucleotide polymorphism markers to chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta: discovery, genotyping and linkage phase resolution.

    PubMed

    Garvin, M R; Gharrett, A J

    2010-12-01

    This study describes (1) the application of new methods to the discovery of informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, (2) a method to resolve the linkage phase of closely linked SNPs and (3) a method to inexpensively genotype them. Finally, it demonstrates that these SNPs provide information that discriminates among O. keta populations from different geographical regions of the northern Pacific Ocean. These informative markers can be used in conjunction with mixed-stock analysis to learn about the spatial and temporal marine distributions of O. keta and the factors that influence the distributions.

  14. Temperature seasonality during fry out-migration influences the survival of hatchery-reared chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Nakashima, A

    2015-10-01

    Among years, fry-to-adult survival of hatchery-reared chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta was positively correlated with the length (in days) of the fry out-migration period with temperatures suitable for migration. Furthermore, survival decreased with increasing difference in mean temperature between May and June. Thus, prolonged out-migration periods increased the probability of survival from fry to adult, lending support to the hypothesis that long migration periods decrease the risk of mortality (bet-hedging), and increase the probability of migration when environmental conditions in fresh water and the ocean are suitable (match-mismatch).

  15. Novel molecular markers differentiate Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) and the O. clarki (cutthroat trout) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of 26 PCR-based markers was developed that differentiates rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). The markers also differentiated rainbow from other cutthroat trout subspecies (O. clarki), and several of the markers differentiated between cutthroat trout subspecies. This system has numerous positive attributes, including: nonlethal sampling, high species-specificity and products that are easily identified and scored using agarose gel electrophoresis. The methodology described for developing the markers can be applied to virtually any system in which numerous markers are desired for identifying or differentiating species or subspecies.

  16. Experimental evaluation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss predation on longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and in-stream enclosure experiments were used to determine whether rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss influence survival of longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae. In the laboratory, adult rainbow trout preyed on longnose dace in 42% of trials and juvenile rainbow trout did not prey on longnose dace during the first 6 h after rainbow trout introduction. Survival of longnose dace did not differ in the presence of adult rainbow trout previously exposed to active prey and those not previously exposed to active prey ( = 0.28, P = 0.60). In field enclosures, the number of longnose dace decreased at a faster rate in the presence of rainbow trout relative to controls within the first 72 h, but did not differ between moderate and high densities of rainbow trout (F2,258.9 = 3.73, P = 0.03). Additionally, longnose dace were found in 7% of rainbow trout stomachs after 72 h in enclosures. Rainbow trout acclimated to the stream for longer periods had a greater initial influence on the number of longnose dace remaining in enclosures relative to those acclimated for shorter periods regardless of rainbow trout density treatment (F4,148.5 = 2.50, P = 0.04). More research is needed to determine how predation rates will change in natural environments, under differing amounts of habitat and food resources and in the context of whole assemblages. However, if rainbow trout are introduced into the habitat of longnose dace, some predation on longnose dace is expected, even when rainbow trout have no previous experience with active prey.

  17. Biomagnification and tissue distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Goeritz, Ina; Falk, Sandy; Stahl, Thorsten; Schäfers, Christoph; Schlechtriem, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the biomagnification potential as well as the substance and tissue-specific distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in market-size rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout with an average body weight of 314 ± 21 g were exposed to perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) in the diet for 28 d. The accumulation phase was followed by a 28-d depuration phase, in which the test animals were fed with nonspiked trout feed. On days 0, 7, 14, 28, 31, 35, 42, and 56 of the present study, fish were sampled from the test basin for PFAS analysis. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) for all test compounds were determined based on a kinetic approach. Distribution factors were calculated for each test compound to illustrate the disposition of PFASs in rainbow trout after 28 d of exposure. Dietary exposure of market-size rainbow trout to PFASs did not result in biomagnification; BMF values were calculated as 0.42 for PFOS, >0.23 for PFNA, >0.18 for PFHxS, >0.04 for PFOA, and >0.02 for PFBS, which are below the biomagnification threshold of 1. Liver, blood, kidney, and skin were identified as the main target tissues for PFASs in market-size rainbow trout. Evidence was shown that despite relative low PFAS contamination, the edible parts of the fish (the fillet and skin) can significantly contribute to the whole-body burden.

  18. Molecular characterization of a novel orthomyxovirus from rainbow and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Batts, William N; LaPatra, Scott E; Katona, Ryan; Leis, Eric; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Brieuc, Marine S O; Breyta, Rachel B; Purcell, Maureen K; Conway, Carla M; Waltzek, Thomas B; Delwart, Eric; Winton, James R

    2017-02-15

    A novel virus, rainbow trout orthomyxovirus (RbtOV), was isolated in 1997 and again in 2000 from commercially-reared rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Idaho, USA. The virus grew optimally in the CHSE-214 cell line at 15°C producing a diffuse cytopathic effect; however, juvenile rainbow trout exposed to cell culture-grown virus showed no mortality or gross pathology. Electron microscopy of preparations from infected cell cultures revealed the presence of typical orthomyxovirus particles. The complete genome of RbtOV is comprised of eight linear segments of single-stranded, negative-sense RNA having highly conserved 5' and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences. Another virus isolated in 2014 from steelhead trout (also O. mykiss) in Wisconsin, USA, and designated SttOV was found to have eight genome segments with high amino acid sequence identities (89-99%) to the corresponding genes of RbtOV, suggesting these new viruses are isolates of the same virus species and may be more widespread than currently realized. The new isolates had the same genome segment order and the closest pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 16-42% with Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), the type species and currently only member of the genus Isavirus in the family Orthomyxoviridae. However, pairwise comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of the 10 RbtOV and SttOV proteins with orthologs from representatives of the established orthomyxoviral genera and a phylogenetic analysis using the PB1 protein showed that while RbtOV and SttOV clustered most closely with ISAV, they diverged sufficiently to merit consideration as representatives of a novel genus. A set of PCR primers was designed using conserved regions of the PB1 gene to produce amplicons that may be sequenced for identification of similar fish orthomyxoviruses in the future.

  19. Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Mitrowska, Kamila; Pekala, Agnieszka; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tissue distribution and residue depletion of metronidazole (MNZ) was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following oral administration of MNZ in feed at the average dose of 25 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for 7 days at 11 ± 2°C. The MNZ concentration in feed was 0.25% while daily feed intake was 1% of body weight. The concentrations of MNZ and its main metabolite, hydroxymetronidazole (MNZOH), in fish tissues were determined by LC-MS/MS. The drug was well distributed in tissues with maximum concentrations on day 1 post-administration. At this time, the mean MNZ concentrations in muscle, skin, kidney, liver and gill were 14,999, 20,269, 15,070, 10,102 and 16,467 µg kg(-1) respectively. MNZ was converted into MNZOH with the ratio of MNZOH:MNZ up to 7% in all fish tissues throughout the withdrawal period. This shows that MNZ itself is the main residue in rainbow trout. MNZ was detected at the level close to the decision limit (0.20 µg kg(-1)) in muscle, skin and muscle with adhering skin up to 42 days, while in kidney, liver and gill it was up to 28 days post-administration. MNZOH was eliminated more rapidly from fish tissues and it was present in muscle alone up to 21 days. The elimination half-lives of MNZ and MNZOH in rainbow trout tissues were 1.83-2.53 and 1.24-2.12 days, respectively. When muscle without skin was analysed, higher MNZ and MNZOH concentrations were detected, and for a longer period of time, than in muscle with adhering skin. Thus muscle alone could be more appropriate for the effective residue control of MNZ in rainbow trout. For the same reason, it is also essential to ensure direct cooling immediately after sampling, since MNZ and its metabolite degrade in fish muscle and skin stored in non-freezing conditions.

  20. The effect of peptidoglycan enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Casadei, Elisa; Bird, Steve; Vecino, Jose L González; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) peptidoglycan (PG) enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene expression. Fish were divided into 5 groups and fed diets containing 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg, and sampled 1, 7 and 14 days later. The expression of eight AMP genes (four defensins, two cathelicidins and two liver expressed AMPs) was determined in skin, gill, gut and liver, tissues important for first lines of defence or production of acute phase proteins. Up-regulation of many AMPs was found after feeding the PG enriched diets, with sequential expression seen over the time course studied, where defensins were typically expressed early and cathelicidins and LEAPs later on. A number of clear differences in AMP responsiveness between the tissues examined were also apparent. Of the four PG concentrations used, 5 mg PG/Kg did not always elicit AMP gene induction or to the same degree as seen with the other diets. The three higher dose groups generally showed similar trends although differences in fold change were more pronounced in the 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg groups. Curiously several AMPs were down-regulated after 14 days of feeding in gills, gut and liver. Nevertheless, overall the PG enriched diets had a positive effect on AMP expression. Further investigations now need to be undertaken to confirm whether this higher AMP gene expression correlates with protection against common bacterial diseases and if PG enriched diets have value as a means to temporarily boost the piscine immune system.

  1. Purification and characterization of calpain and calpastatin from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Li, Hongqi; Thompson, Valery F; Kunisaki, Naomichi; Goll, Darrel E

    2007-04-01

    Although the calpain system has been studied extensively in mammalian animals, much less is known about the properties of mu-calpain, m-calpain, and calpastatin in lower vertebrates such as fish. These three proteins were isolated and partly characterized from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, muscle. Trout m-calpain contains an 80-kDa large subunit, but the approximately 26-kDa small subunit from trout m-calpain is smaller than the 28-kDa small subunit from mammalian calpains. Trout mu-calpain and calpastatin were only partly purified; identity of trout mu-calpain was confirmed by labeling with antibodies to bovine skeletal muscle mu-calpain, and identity of trout calpastatin was confirmed by specific inhibition of bovine skeletal muscle mu- and m-calpain. Trout mu-calpain requires 4.4+/-2.8 microM and trout m-calpain requires 585+/-51 microM Ca(2+) for half-maximal activity, similar to the Ca(2+) requirements of mu- and m-calpain from mammalian tissues. Sequencing tryptic peptides indicated that the amino acid sequence of trout calpastatin shares little homology with the amino acid sequences of mammalian calpastatins. Screening a rainbow trout cDNA library identified three cDNAs encoding for the large subunit of a putative m-calpain. The amino acid sequence predicted by trout m-calpain cDNA was 65% identical to the human 80-kDa m-calpain sequence. Gene duplication and polyploidy occur in fish, and the amino acid sequence of the trout m-calpain 80-kDa subunit identified in this study was 83% identical to the sequence of a trout m-calpain 80-kDa subunit described earlier. This is the first report of two isoforms of m-calpain in a single species.

  2. Water balance trumps ion balance for early marine survival of juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Sackville, M; Wilson, J M; Farrell, A P; Brauner, C J

    2012-08-01

    Smolting salmonids typically require weeks to months of physiological preparation in freshwater (FW) before entering seawater (SW). Remarkably, pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) enter SW directly following yolk absorption and gravel emergence at a size of 0.2 g. To survive this exceptional SW migration, pink salmon were hypothesized to develop hypo-osmoregulatory abilities prior to yolk absorption and emergence. To test this, alevins (pre-yolk absorption) and fry (post-yolk absorption) were transferred from FW in darkness to SW under simulated natural photoperiod (SNP). Ionoregulatory status was assessed at 0, 1 and 5 days post-transfer. SW alevins showed no evidence of hypo-osmoregulation, marked by significant water loss and no increase in gill Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase (NKA) activity or Na⁺:K⁺:2Cl⁻ cotransporter (NKCC) immunoreactive (IR) cell frequency. Conversely, fry maintained water balance, upregulated gill NKA activity by 50 %, increased the NKA α1b/α1a mRNA expression ratio by sixfold and increased NKCC IR cell frequency. We also provide the first evidence of photoperiod-triggered smoltification in pink salmon, as fry exposed to SNP in FW exhibited preparatory changes in gill NKA activity and α1 subunit expression similar to fry exposed to SNP in SW. Interestingly, fry incurred larger increases in whole body Na⁺ than alevins following both SW and FW + SNP exposure (40 and 20 % in fry vs. 0 % in alevins). The ability to incur and tolerate large ion loads may underlie a novel mechanism for maintaining water balance in SW prior to completing hypo-osmoregulatory development. We propose that pink salmon represent a new form of anadromy termed "precocious anadromy".

  3. The Olfactory Transcriptome and Progression of Sexual Maturation in Homing Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    PubMed Central

    Palstra, Arjan P.; Fukaya, Kosuke; Chiba, Hiroaki; Dirks, Ron P.; Planas, Josep V.; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive homing migration of salmonids requires accurate interaction between the reception of external olfactory cues for navigation to the spawning grounds and the regulation of sexual maturation processes. This study aimed at providing insights into the hypothesized functional link between olfactory sensing of the spawning ground and final sexual maturation. We have therefore assessed the presence and expression levels of olfactory genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) of the olfactory rosettes in homing chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum from the coastal sea to 75 km upstream the rivers at the pre-spawning ground. The progression of sexual maturation along the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis was assessed through determination of plasma steroid levels by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays (TR-FIA), pituitary gonadotropin subunit expression and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sgnrh) expression in the brain by quantitative real-time PCR. RNAseq revealed the expression of 75 known and 27 unknown salmonid olfactory genes of which 13 genes were differentially expressed between fish from the pre-spawning area and from the coastal area, suggesting an important role of these genes in homing. A clear progression towards final maturation was characterised by higher plasma 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) levels, increased pituitary luteinizing hormone β subunit (lhβ) expression and sgnrh expression in the post brain, and lower plasma testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels. Olfactomedins and ependymin are candidates among the differentially expressed genes that may connect olfactory reception to the expression of sgnrh to regulate final maturation. PMID:26397372

  4. Localization of rem2 in the central nervous system of the adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Downs, Anna G; Scholles, Katie R; Hollis, David M

    2016-12-01

    Rem2 is member of the RGK (Rem, Rad, and Gem/Kir) subfamily of the Ras superfamily of GTP binding proteins known to influence Ca(2+) entry into the cell. In addition, Rem2, which is found at high levels in the vertebrate brain, is also implicated in cell proliferation and synapse formation. Though the specific, regional localization of Rem2 in the adult mammalian central nervous system has been well-described, such information is lacking in other vertebrates. Rem2 is involved in neuronal processes where the capacities between adults of different vertebrate classes vary. Thus, we sought to localize the rem2 gene in the central nervous system of an adult anamniotic vertebrate, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In situ hybridization using a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled RNA probe was used to identify the regional distribution of rem2 expression throughout the trout central nervous system, while real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) further supported these findings. Based on in situ hybridization, the regional distribution of rem2 occurred within each major subdivision of the brain and included large populations of rem2 expressing cells in the dorsal telencephalon of the cerebrum, the internal cellular layer of the olfactory bulb, and the optic tectum of the midbrain. In contrast, no rem2 expressing cells were resolved within the cerebellum. These results were corroborated by rtPCR, where differential rem2 expression occurred between the major subdivisions assayed with the highest levels being found in the cerebrum, while it was nearly absent in the cerebellum. These data indicate that rem2 gene expression is broadly distributed and likely influences diverse functions in the adult fish central nervous system.

  5. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  6. Cold-acclimation leads to differential regulation of the steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) coronary microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Isabel A. S. F.; Hein, Travis W.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of vascular resistance in fishes has largely been studied using isolated large conductance vessels, yet changes in tissue perfusion/vascular resistance are primarily mediated by the dilation/constriction of small arterioles. Thus we adapted mammalian isolated microvessel techniques for use in fish and examined how several agents affected the tone/resistance of isolated coronary arterioles (<150 μm ID) from steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to 1, 5, and 10°C. At 10°C, the vessels showed a concentration-dependent dilation to adenosine (ADE; 61 ± 8%), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 35 ± 10%), and serotonin (SER; 27 ± 2%) (all values maximum responses). A biphasic response (mild contraction then dilation) was observed in vessels exposed to increasing concentrations of epinephrine (EPI; 34 ± 9% dilation) and norepinephrine (NE; 32 ± 7% dilation), whereas the effect was less pronounced with bradykinin (BK; 12.5 ± 3.5% constriction vs. 6 ± 6% dilation). Finally, a mild constriction was observed after exposure to acetylcholine (ACh; 6.5 ± 1.4%), while endothelin (ET)-1 caused a strong dose-dependent increase in tone (79 ± 5% constriction). Acclimation temperature had varying effects on the responsiveness of vessels. The dilations induced by EPI, ADE, SER, and SNP were reduced/eliminated at 5°C and/or 1°C as compared with 10°C. In contrast, acclimation to 5 and 1°C increased the maximum constriction induced by ACh and the sensitivity of vessels to ET-1 (but not the maximum response) at 1°C was greater. Acclimation temperature had no effect on the response to NE, and responsiveness to BK was variable. PMID:25715834

  7. Pesticides and PCBs in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and O. kisutch) from Puget Sound, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, S.M.; West, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated a long-term study to monitor levels of contaminants in two species of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and O. kisutch) and other marine fishes of Puget Sound. The study is one component of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP), a multi-agency effort to assess the environmental health of Puget Sound. Here the authors summarize results from their ongoing study of O. tshawytscha and O. kisutch. Samples of muscle tissue were collected for chemical analyses from adult salmon that were purchased from licensed fish buyers or treaty tribal fisherman. From 1992 through 1994, both salmon species were sampled at seven fishing areas in marine waters and river mouths of Puget Sound. 4,4-DDE and 4,4-DDD, metabolites of the pesticide DDT, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) were consistently detected in both species and were consistently higher in O. tshawytscha. Low to moderate concentrations of DDT metabolites (3 to 59 ug/kg wet weight) were detected in the salmon samples but were seldom detected in other fish species sampled by PSAMP. Total PCBs concentrations (Arochlor 1254 + 1260) ranged from 10 to 211 ug/kg wet weight in 0. tshawytscha, with many samples containing PCBs concentrations similar to those detected in benthic flatfish, (Pleuronectes vetulus), sampled from urbanized embayments. A stepwise linear regression model was used to identify parameters correlated with accumulation of PCBs and DDT metabolites in salmon. In addition to species differences, factors such as fish age, percent lipids and sampling location may affect the accumulation of these contaminants. Results of this study are contrasted with contaminant levels previously reported for Canadian and Alaskan Pacific salmon. Possible sources of contaminants are outlined.

  8. Comparison of organotin accumulation in the masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou accompanying migratory histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohji, Madoka; Arai, Takaomi; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2007-05-01

    In order to examine the accumulation pattern of organotin compounds (OTs) accompanying the migration pattern in diadromous fish, tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) compounds and their derivatives were determined in the liver, muscle, gill, and ovary tissues of both sea-run and freshwater-resident masu salmon, which are of the same species, Oncorhynchus masou. Their migratory histories were estimated using strontium (Sr) and calcium (Ca) analysis in the otolith. A significant difference in the mean Sr:Ca ratio from the core to the edge of the otolith was found between sea-run and freshwater-resident masu salmon. The TBT concentration in the liver was significantly higher than that in the other tissues in both sea-run and freshwater-resident fishes. In sea-run masu salmon, the TBT concentrations in all tissues except for the ovary were significantly higher than in those of freshwater-resident individuals. In the sea-run type, the percentage of TBT was higher than that of the freshwater-resident type. The TPT concentration in the liver of the sea-run type was also significantly higher than that in the other tissues, while that in the gill of the freshwater-resident type was significantly higher than that in the other tissues except for the ovary. The TPT concentrations found in the liver and muscle of the sea-run type were significantly higher than those in the freshwater-resident type, whereas the values of the gill in the sea-run type were significantly lower than those in the freshwater-resident fish examined. The percentage of TPT in the sea-run type was higher than that of the freshwater-resident type. These results suggest that the sea-run O. masou has a higher ecological risk of TBT and TPT exposure than the freshwater-residents during their life history.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of macrophage aggregates in brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwindt, Adam R.; Truelove, Nathan; Schreck, Carl B.; Fournie, John W.; Landers, Dixon H.; Kent, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage aggregates (MAs) occur in various organs of fishes, especially the kidney, liver and spleen, and contain melanin, ceroid/lipofuscin and hemosiderin pigments. They have been used as indicators of a number of natural and anthropogenic stressors. Macrophage aggregates occur in salmonids but are poorly organized, irregularly shaped, and are generally smaller than those in derived teleosts. These features complicate quantification, and thus these fishes have seldom been used in studies correlating MAs with environmental stressors. To alleviate these complications, we developed color filtering algorithms for use with the software package ImagePro Plus® (Media Cybernetics) that select and quantify pigmented area (i.e. colors ranging from gold to brown to black) in tissue sections. Image analysis results compared well with subjective scoring when tested on brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss captured from high-elevation lakes or hatcheries. Macrophage aggregate pigments correlated positively with age and negatively with condition factor. Within individual fish, pigmentation correlated positively among organs, suggesting that the kidney, liver or spleen are suitable indicator organs. In age-matched fishes, MA pigments were not different between hatcheries and lakes in the organs examined. Between lakes, differences in pigments were observed in the kidney and spleen, but were not explained by age, condition factor, sex or maturation state. Our results indicate that quantification of the area occupied by MA pigments is an efficient and accurate means of evaluating MAs in salmonid organs and that organ pigmentation correlates with age and condition factor, as seen in studies with more derived fishes. 

  10. Migratory Patterns of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Returning to a Large, Free-flowing River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eiler, John H.; Evans, Allison N.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2015-01-01

    Upriver movements were determined for Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha returning to the Yukon River, a large, virtually pristine river basin. These returns have declined dramatically since the late 1990s, and information is needed to better manage the run and facilitate conservation efforts. A total of 2,860 fish were radio tagged during 2002–2004. Most (97.5%) of the fish tracked upriver to spawning areas displayed continual upriver movements and strong fidelity to the terminal tributaries entered. Movement rates were substantially slower for fish spawning in lower river tributaries (28–40 km d-1) compared to upper basin stocks (52–62 km d-1). Three distinct migratory patterns were observed, including a gradual decline, pronounced decline, and substantial increase in movement rate as the fish moved upriver. Stocks destined for the same region exhibited similar migratory patterns. Individual fish within a stock showed substantial variation, but tended to reflect the regional pattern. Differences between consistently faster and slower fish explained 74% of the within-stock variation, whereas relative shifts in sequential movement rates between “hares” (faster fish becoming slower) and “tortoises” (slow but steady fish) explained 22% of the variation. Pulses of fish moving upriver were not cohesive. Fish tagged over a 4-day period took 16 days to pass a site 872 km upriver. Movement rates were substantially faster and the percentage of atypical movements considerably less than reported in more southerly drainages, but may reflect the pristine conditions within the Yukon River, wild origins of the fish, and discrete run timing of the returns. Movement data can provide numerous insights into the status and management of salmon returns, particularly in large river drainages with widely scattered fisheries where management actions in the lower river potentially impact harvests and escapement farther upstream. However, the substantial variation

  11. Behavioural thermoregulation by subyearling fall (autumn) Chinook salmon oncorhynchus tshawytscha in a reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, K.F.; Kock, T.J.; Connor, W.P.; Steinhorst, R.K.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated behavioural thermoregulation by subyearling fall (autumn) Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in a reservoir on the Snake River, Washington, U.S.A. During the summer, temperatures in the reservoir varied from 23?? C on the surface to 11?? C at 14 m depth. Subyearlings implanted with temperature-sensing radio transmitters were released at the surface at temperatures >20?? C during three blocks of time in summer 2004. Vertical profiles were taken to measure temperature and depth use as the fish moved downstream over an average of 5??6-7??2 h and 6??0-13??8 km. The majority of the subyearlings maintained average body temperatures that differed from average vertical profile temperatures during most of the time they were tracked. The mean proportion of the time subyearlings tracked within the 16-20?? C temperature range was larger than the proportion of time this range was available, which confirmed temperature selection opposed to random use. The subyearlings selected a depth and temperature combination that allowed them to increase their exposure to temperatures of 16-20?? C when temperatures 20?? C were available at lower and higher positions in the water column. A portion of the subyearlings that selected a temperature c. 17??0?? C during the day, moved into warmer water at night coincident with an increase in downstream movement rate. Though subyearlings used temperatures outside of the 16-20?? C range part of the time, behavioural thermoregulation probably reduced the effects of intermittent exposure to suboptimal temperatures. By doing so, it might enhance growth opportunity and life-history diversity in the population of subyearlings studied.

  12. Chronic toxicity of 14 phthalate esters to Daphnia magna and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.E.; Adams, W.J.; Biddinger, G.R.; Robillard, K.A.; Gorsuch, J.W.

    1995-11-01

    Chronic toxicity studies were performed with commercial phthalate esters and Daphnia magna (14 phthalates) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (six phthalates). For the lower-molecular-weight phthalate esters--dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), and butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP)--the results of the studies indicated a general trend in which toxicity for both species increased as water solubility decreased. The geometric mean maximum acceptable toxicant concentration(GM-MATC) for D. magna ranged from 0.63 to 34.8 mg/L. For the higher-molecular-weight phthalate esters--dihexyl phthalate (DHP), butyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate (BOP), di-(n-hexyl, n-octyl, n-decyl) phthalate (610P), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), diisooctyl phthalate (DIOP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di-(heptyl, nonyl, undecyl) phthalate (711P), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), diundecyl phthalate (DUP), and ditridecyl phthalate (DTDP)--the GM-MATC values ranged from 0.042 to 0.15 mg/L. Survival was equally sensitive and sometimes more sensitive than reproduction. The observed toxicity to daphnids with most of the higher-molecular-weight phthalate esters appeared to be due to surface entrapment or a mode of toxicity that is not due to exposure to dissolved aqueous-phase chemical. Early life-stage toxicity studies with rainbow trout indicated that survival (DMP) and growth (DBP) were affected at 24 and 0.19 mg/L, respectively. This pattern of observed toxicity with the lower-molecular-weight phthalate esters and not the higher-molecular-weight phthalate esters is consistent with previously reported acute toxicity studies for several aquatic species.

  13. Persistent infections of fish cell lines by paramyxovirus isolates from Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lannan, C.N.

    1989-01-01

    We have reported the isolation of a paramyxovirus from stocks of adult chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to coastal rivers of Oregon, USA (Winton et al 1985). The isolates were obtained from kidney and spleen tissues using the chinook salmon embryo cell line, CHSE-214. Initial cytopathic effect (CPE) was slow to develop, requiring 28 days incubation at 18°C. The virus replicated in CHSE-214, chum heart (CHH-1), kokanee ovary (K0-6), coho salmon embryo (CSE-119), and fathead minnow (FHM) cell lines where it produced a lytic type of CPE.The virus was stable at pH 3-11 and iodo-deoxyuridine did not inhibit wiral replication. Infectivity was lost after treatment with chloroform indicating the presence of essential lipids. The density of virions in CsCl was 1.2 g/ml. The virus hemagglutinated cells of 11 of 14 species of birds, mammals, and fish tested. Electron microscopy of infected cells revealed enveloped particles 125-250 nm in dia. containing coiled nucleocapsids and examination of freon-treated virions showed the nucleocapsid was a helix approximately 18 nm in dia. and > 1000 nm in length (Winton et al 1985).In addition to causing hemagglutination, members of the Paramyxoviridae are known for the ability to establish persistent infections of cell lines (Choppin and Compans 1975). The purpose of this study was to determine if the paramyxovirus isolates from salmon were able to establish persistent infections in fish cell lines and to study the nature of the infection.

  14. The effects of copper on blood and biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dethloff, G.M.; Schlenk, D.; Khan, S.; Bailey, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    Metals are released into aquatic systems from many sources, often at sublethal concentrations. The effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on fish are not entirely understood. The objective of this study was to determine the hematological and biochemical effects of a range of copper concentrations (6.4, 16.0, 26.9 ??g Cu/L) on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a prolonged period of time. Trout were exposed to copper, and, at intervals of 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, selected parameters were evaluated. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, and plasma cortisol levels were elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L at day 3 and then returned to levels comparable to control fish. Plasma protein and lactate levels were not significantly altered in trout from any copper treatment. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression were consistently elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L. Both of these parameters stabilized by day 3, with only hepatic copper concentration showing a further increase at day 21. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression appear to be robust indicators of copper exposure. Most blood-based parameters evaluated appear to be associated with a transitory, nonspecific stress response. The return of elevated hematological and biochemical parameters to control levels after 3 days and thestabilization of hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression and copper concentration over a similar time period suggested acclimation to dissolved copper at 26.9 ??g/L. Further analysis of the data on blood-based parameters indicated that certain parameters (hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, plasma cortisol) may be useful in field monitoring.

  15. Effects of intracerebroventricular administered fluoxetine on cardio-ventilatory functions in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kermorgant, Marc; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Tyler, Charles R; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2014-09-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) is a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor present in the aquatic environment which is known to bioconcentrate in the brains of exposed fish. FLX acts as a disruptor of various neuroendocrine functions in the brain, but nothing is known about the possible consequence of FLX exposure on the cardio-ventilatory system in fish. Here we undertook to investigate the central actions of FLX on ventilatory and cardiovascular function in unanesthetized rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of FLX (dosed between 5 and 25 μg) resulted in a significantly elevated total ventilation (VTOT), with a maximum hyperventilation of +176% (at a dose of 25μg) compared with vehicle injected controls. This increase was due to an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP: +126%) with minor effects on ventilatory frequency. The highest dose of FLX (25 μg) produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (PDA: +20%) without effects on heart rate (ƒH). In comparison, intra-arterial injections of FLX (500-2,500 μg) had no effect on ventilation but the highest doses increased both PDA and ƒH. The ICV and IA cardio-ventilatory effects of FLX were very similar to those previously observed following injections of 5-HT, indicating that FLX probably acts via stimulating endogenous 5-HT activity through inhibition of 5-HT transporter(s). Our results demonstrate for the first time in fish that FLX administered within the brain exerts potent stimulatory effects on ventilation and blood pressure increase. The doses of FLX given to fish in our study are higher than the brain concentrations of FLX in fish that result from acute exposure to FLX through the water. Nonetheless, our results indicate possible disrupting action of long term exposure to FLX discharged into the environment on central target sites sensitive to 5-HT involved in cardio-ventilatory control.

  16. Social stress modulates the cortisol response to an acute stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, J D; Gollock, M J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-01-15

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of subordinate social status, circulating cortisol concentrations were elevated under resting conditions but the plasma cortisol and glucose responses to an acute stressor (confinement in a net) were attenuated relative to those of dominant trout. An in vitro head kidney preparation, and analysis of the expression of key genes in the stress axis prior to and following confinement in a net were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying suppression of the acute cortisol stress response in trout experiencing chronic social stress. With porcine adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as the secretagogue, ACTH-stimulated cortisol production was significantly lower for head kidney preparations from subordinate trout than for those from dominant trout. Dominant and subordinate fish did not, however, differ in the relative mRNA abundance of melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) within the head kidney, although the relative mRNA abundance of these genes was significantly higher in both dominant and subordinate fish than in sham trout (trout that did not experience social interactions but were otherwise treated identically to the dominant and subordinate fish). The relative mRNA abundance of all three genes was significantly higher in trout exposed to an acute net stressor than under control conditions. Upstream of cortisol production in the stress axis, plasma ACTH concentrations were not affected by social stress, nor was the relative mRNA abundance of the binding protein for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-BP). The relative mRNA abundance of CRF in the pre-optic area of subordinate fish was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham fish 1h after exposure to the stressor. Collectively, the results indicate that chronic social stress modulates cortisol production at the level of the interrenal cells, resulting in an attenuated

  17. Validation of a freshwater Otolith microstructure pattern for Nisqually Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind-Null, Angie; Larsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The Nisqually Fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound (Washington) evolutionarily significant unit listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Extensive restoration of the Nisqually River delta ecosystem has taken place to assist in recovery of the stock since estuary habitat is a critical transition zone for juvenile fall Chinook salmon. A pre-restoration baseline that includes the characterization of life history strategies, estuary residence times, growth rates and habitat use is needed to evaluate the potential response of hatchery and natural origin Chinook salmon to restoration efforts and to determine restoration success. Otolith microstructure analysis was selected as a tool to examine Chinook salmon life history, growth and residence in the Nisqually River estuary. The purpose of the current study is to incorporate microstructural analysis from the otoliths of juvenile Nisqually Chinook salmon collected at the downstream migrant trap within true freshwater (FW) habitat of the Nisqually River. The results from this analysis confirmed the previously documented Nisqually-specific FW microstructure pattern and revealed a Nisqually-specific microstructure pattern early in development (“developmental pattern”). No inter-annual variation in the microstructure pattern was visually observed when compared to samples from previous years. Furthermore, the Nisqually-specific “developmental pattern” and the FW microstructure pattern used in combination during analysis will allow us to recognize and separate with further confidence future unmarked Chinook salmon otolith collections into Nisqually-origin (natural or unmarked hatchery) and non-Nisqually origin categories. Freshwater mean increment width, growth rate and residence time were also calculated.

  18. Molecular characterization of a novel orthomyxovirus from rainbow and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; LaPatra, Scott E; Katona, Ryan; Leis, Eric; Fei Fan Ng, Terry; Bruieuc, Marine S O; Breyta, Rachel; Purcell, Maureen; Waltzek, Thomas B; Delwart, Eric; Winton, James

    2017-01-01

    A novel virus, rainbow trout orthomyxovirus (RbtOV), was isolated in 1997 and again in 2000 from commercially-reared rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Idaho, USA. The virus grew optimally in the CHSE-214 cell line at 15°C producing a diffuse cytopathic effect; however, juvenile rainbow trout exposed to cell culture-grown virus showed no mortality or gross pathology. Electron microscopy of preparations from infected cell cultures revealed the presence of typical orthomyxovirus particles. The complete genome of RbtOV is comprised of eight linear segments of single-stranded, negative-sense RNA having highly conserved 5′ and 3′-terminal nucleotide sequences. Another virus isolated in 2014 from steelhead trout (also O. mykiss) in Wisconsin, USA, and designated SttOV was found to have eight genome segments with high amino acid sequence identities (89–99%) to the corresponding genes of RbtOV, suggesting these new viruses are isolates of the same virus species and may be more widespread than currently realized. The new isolates had the same genome segment order and the closest pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 16–42% with Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), the type species and currently only member of the genus Isavirus in the family Orthomyxoviridae. However, pairwise comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of the 10 RbtOV and SttOV proteins with orthologs from representatives of the established orthomyxoviral genera and a phylogenetic analysis using the PB1 protein showed that while RbtOV and SttOV clustered most closely with ISAV, they diverged sufficiently to merit consideration as representatives of a novel genus. A set of PCR primers was designed using conserved regions of the PB1 gene to produce amplicons that may be sequenced for identification of similar fish orthomyxoviruses in the future.

  19. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brieuc, Marine S. O.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Palmer, Alexander D.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h2 = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h2 = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  20. Effects of aquaculture production noise on hearing, growth, and disease resistance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wysocki, L.E.; Davidson, J. W.; Smith, M.E.; Frankel, A.S.; Ellison, W.T.; Mazik, P.M.; Popper, A.N.; Bebak, J.

    2007-01-01

    Intensive aquaculture production often utilizes equipment (e.g., aerators, air and water pumps, harvesters, blowers, filtration systems, and maintenance machinery) that increases noise levels in fish culture tanks. Consequently, chronic exposure to elevated noise levels in tanks could negatively impact cultured species. Possible effects include impairment of the auditory system, increased stress, and reduced growth rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of sound exposure on the hearing sensitivity, growth, and survival of cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Two cohorts of rainbow trout were cultured for 8??months in replicated tanks consisting of three sound treatments: 115, 130, or 150 decibels referenced at 1 micropascal (dB re 1????Pa root mean square [RMS]) levels. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) recordings revealed no significant differences in hearing thresholds resulting from exposure to increased ambient sound levels. Although there was no evident noise-induced hearing loss, there were significant differences in hearing thresholds between the two fish cohorts examined. No statistical effect of sound treatment was found for growth rate and mortality within each fish cohort. There was no significant difference in mortality between sound treatments when fish were exposed to the pathogen Yersinia ruckeri, but there was significantly different mortality between cohorts. This study indicated that rainbow trout hearing sensitivity, growth, survival, stress, and disease susceptibility were not negatively impacted by noise levels common to recirculating aquaculture systems. These findings should not be generalized to all cultured fish species, however, because many species, including catfish and cyprinids, have much greater hearing sensitivity than rainbow trout and could be affected differently by noise. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intersex Occurrence in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Male Fry Chronically Exposed to Ethynylestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Depiereux, Sophie; Liagre, Mélanie; Danis, Lorraine; De Meulder, Bertrand; Depiereux, Eric; Segner, Helmut; Kestemont, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the male-to-female morphological and physiological transdifferentiation process in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to exogenous estrogens. The first objective was to elucidate whether trout develop intersex gonads under exposure to low levels of estrogen. To this end, the gonads of an all-male population of fry exposed chronically (from 60 to 136 days post fertilization – dpf) to several doses (from environmentally relevant 0.01 µg/L to supra-environmental levels: 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/L) of the potent synthetic estrogen ethynylestradiol (EE2) were examined histologically. The morphological evaluations were underpinned by the analysis of gonad steroid (testosterone, estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone) levels and of brain and gonad gene expression, including estrogen-responsive genes and genes involved in sex differentiation in (gonads: cyp19a1a, ER isoforms, vtg, dmrt1, sox9a2; sdY; cyp11b; brain: cyp19a1b, ER isoforms). Intersex gonads were observed from the first concentration used (0.01 µg EE2/L) and sexual inversion could be detected from 0.1 µg EE2/L. This was accompanied by a linear decrease in 11-KT levels, whereas no effect on E2 and T levels was observed. Q-PCR results from the gonads showed downregulation of testicular markers (dmrt1, sox9a2; sdY; cyp11b) with increasing EE2 exposure concentrations, and upregulation of the female vtg gene. No evidence was found for a direct involvement of aromatase in the sex conversion process. The results from this study provide evidence that gonads of male trout respond to estrogen exposure by intersex formation and, with increasing concentration, by morphological and physiological conversion to phenotypic ovaries. However, supra-environmental estrogen concentrations are needed to induce these changes. PMID:25033040

  2. Monitoring of viruses in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) migrating to Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, C-H; Kim, S-R; Kim, W-S; Lee, C-H; Seong, K-B; Lee, C-S; Oh, M-J; Kim, J-H

    2011-06-01

    It is important to investigate the prevalence of salmonid pathogens because they can affect the amount of release of salmonid fry and the migration rate of adult salmonids. In this study, routine surveys were conducted for investigating virus distribution in migrating chum salmon spawners (Oncorhynchus keta) and their offsprings at the Namdae River, Yangyang, Korea, during 2006-2008. Anterior kidneys were removed from chum salmon spawner individuals, homogenized with minimal essential medium, and centrifuged to make supernatants for conducting RT-PCR. Five offspring were pooled to for conducting RT-PCR. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were the target viruses for monitoring. In 2006, only spawners were investigated, and 27.5% of fish (22/80) were found to be IHNV-positive by nested PCR. In 2007, 65.6% of pooled fry (21/32) were IHNV-positive, and 9.4% (3/32) were IPNV-positive by one-step PCR. When nested PCR was conducted, 84.4% (27/32) were IHNV-positive, and 28.1% (9/32) were IPNV-positive. However, only 1.3% of spawners (1/80) were IHNV-positive by nested PCR. In 2008, 25% (8/32) of pooled fry were IHNV-positive by one-step PCR, but 59.4% (19/32) were IHNV-positive and 12.5% (4/32) were IPNV-positive by nested PCR. All of the samples tested were VHSV-negative. Although all viruses detected in this study were from chum salmon, phylogenetic analysis showed that they possibly originated from rainbow trout or clustered with the rainbow trout isolates. More extensive long-term studies are needed to clarify the origins of these viruses and their potential effects on chum salmon migration in Korea.

  3. The Olfactory Transcriptome and Progression of Sexual Maturation in Homing Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Fukaya, Kosuke; Chiba, Hiroaki; Dirks, Ron P; Planas, Josep V; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive homing migration of salmonids requires accurate interaction between the reception of external olfactory cues for navigation to the spawning grounds and the regulation of sexual maturation processes. This study aimed at providing insights into the hypothesized functional link between olfactory sensing of the spawning ground and final sexual maturation. We have therefore assessed the presence and expression levels of olfactory genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) of the olfactory rosettes in homing chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum from the coastal sea to 75 km upstream the rivers at the pre-spawning ground. The progression of sexual maturation along the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis was assessed through determination of plasma steroid levels by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays (TR-FIA), pituitary gonadotropin subunit expression and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sgnrh) expression in the brain by quantitative real-time PCR. RNAseq revealed the expression of 75 known and 27 unknown salmonid olfactory genes of which 13 genes were differentially expressed between fish from the pre-spawning area and from the coastal area, suggesting an important role of these genes in homing. A clear progression towards final maturation was characterised by higher plasma 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) levels, increased pituitary luteinizing hormone β subunit (lhβ) expression and sgnrh expression in the post brain, and lower plasma testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels. Olfactomedins and ependymin are candidates among the differentially expressed genes that may connect olfactory reception to the expression of sgnrh to regulate final maturation.

  4. Endocrine and orexigenic actions of growth hormone secretagogues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Brian S; Johnson, Jaime K; Silverstein, Jeffrey T; Parhar, Ishwar S; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; McGuire, Alison; Weber, Gregory M

    2007-03-01

    The effects of growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) on the teleost somatotropic axis are poorly understood, particularly with respect to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). To assess the endocrine and orexigenic responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to GHS treatment, animals were injected with human GHRH(1-29)-amide, KP-102 or rat ghrelin at 0, 1 or 10 pmol/g body mass. Feed intake was tested at 2 and 5 h post-injection and plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I and the IGFBPs were determined at 3, 6 and 12 h post-injection. Feed intake was significantly elevated by all of the GHSs tested at both post-injection time points. All GHSs elevated plasma GH levels in a time-dependent manner. Plasma IGF-I levels were elevated by all GHSs at 3 h post-injection, whereas those animals treated with KP-102 and ghrelin exhibited depressions at 6 h. Four IGFBPs were identified in the plasma by western blotting. Levels of the 20 kDa IGFBP decreased over the sampling time. Levels of the 32 kDa IGFBP were significantly depressed by all GHSs tested. Levels of the 42 kDa IGFBP were significantly elevated by all GHSs tested. Plasma levels of the 50 kDa IGFBP was decreased in some treatment groups at 3 h, but elevated by 6 h in the ghrelin-treated groups and elevated in all treatment groups by 12 h post-injection. The endocrine and orexigenic responses demonstrate that GHSs influence the teleost neuroendocrine system beyond short-term actions (<3 h post-injection) on GH release and the responses of the IGFBPs to GHS treatment support this notion and clarify their identification as functional homologues to mammalian IGFBPs.

  5. Linking personality to larval energy reserves in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Andersson, Madelene Åberg; Höglund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    There is a surging interest in the evolution, ecology and physiology of personality differences. However, most of the studies in this research area have been performed in adult animals. Trait variations expressed early in development and how they are related to the ontogeny of an animal's personality are far less studied. Genetic differences as well as environmental factors causing functional variability of the central serotonergic system have been related to personality differences in vertebrates, including humans. Such gene-environment interplay suggests that the central serotonergic system plays an important role in the ontogeny of personality traits. In salmonid fishes, the timing of emergence from spawning nests is related to energy reserves, aggression, and social dominance. However, it is currently unknown how the size of the yolk reserve is reflected on aggression and dominance, or if these traits are linked to differences in serotonergic transmission in newly emerged larvae. In this study we investigated the relationship between yolk reserves, social dominance, and serotonergic transmission in newly emerged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae. This was conducted by allowing larvae with the same emergence time, but with different yolk sizes, to interact in pairs for 24 h. The results show that individuals with larger yolks performed more aggressive acts, resulting in a suppression of aggression in individuals with smaller yolks. A higher brain serotonergic activity confirmed subordination in larvae with small yolks. The relationship between social dominance and yolk size was present in siblings, demonstrating a link between interfamily variation in energy reserves and aggression, and suggests that larger yolk reserves fuel a more aggressive personality during the initial territorial establishment in salmonid fishes. Furthermore, socially naïve larvae with big yolks had lower serotonin levels, suggesting that other factors than the social environment

  6. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Marine S O; Purcell, Maureen K; Palmer, Alexander D; Naish, Kerry A

    2015-11-17

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h² = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h² = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  7. The orexinergic system in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and its regulation by dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, Ettore; Russo, Finizia; Coccia, Elena; Turchini, Giovanni Mario; Francis, David Scott; Paolucci, Marina

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report the distribution of orexin A (OXA), orexin B (OXB), and orexin receptor (OX2R) immunoreactive (ir) cells in the hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tract of Oncorhynchus mykiss fed diets with different dietary fatty acid compositions. Trout were fed five iso-energetic experimental diets containing fish oil, or one of four different vegetable oils (olive, sunflower, linseed, and palm oils) as the added dietary lipid source for 12 weeks. OXA, OXB, and OX2R immunoreactive neurons and nervous fibers were identified in the lateral and ventro-medial hypothalamus. OXA, OXB, and OX2R ir cells were found in the mucosa and glands of the stomach and in the mucosa of both the pyloric cecae and intestine. OX2R ir cells were localized in the mucosa layer of both the pyloric cecae and intestine. These immunohistochemical (IHC) results were confirmed via Western blotting. Antibodies against preproorexin (PPO) crossreacted with a band of ∼16 kDa in the hypothalamus, stomach, pyloric cecae, and intestine. Antibodies against OX2R crossreacted with a band of ∼38 kDa in the hypothalamus, pyloric cecae, and intestine. The presence and distribution of OXA, OXB, and OX2R ir cells in the hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tract did not appear to be affected by dietary oils. The presence of orexin system immunoreactive cells in the stomach, pyloric cecae, and intestine of rainbow trout, but not in the enteric nervous system, could suggest a possible role of these peptides as signaling of gastric emptying or endocrine modulation, implying a main local action played by orexins.

  8. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Antunes, S C; Correia, A T; Nunes, B

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  9. Intramuscular challenge of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with two Norwegian field strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Børge N; Furevik, Anette; Gauthier, David; Egenberg, Marie; Paulsen, Erik D; Brudeseth, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing occurrence of Flavobacterium psychrophilum infections in farmed salmonids in Norway. The current study describes two field isolates of F. psychrophilum collected from farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fingerlings and post smolts in Norway. Virulence of the two isolates was tested in vivo by intramuscular (IM) and/or intraperitoneal (IP) challenge of disease free, un-vaccinated rainbow trout. The isolates were concluded to be highly virulent compared to a reference isolate as they yielded high mortality after IM challenge even at low challenge doses. The more virulent of the two isolates was further used to establish a challenge model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines against infections with F. psychrophilum. Three groups were included in the vaccination-challenge study; a vaccinated group given a 6 antigen (Ag) component vaccine containing F. psychrophilum antigens (6 Ag/F.psy(+)), a control vaccinated group administered a similar 5 antigen component vaccine without F. psychrophilum antigens (5 Ag/F.psy(-)), and a non-injected negative control group. Results from the IM challenge demonstrated that 1) our challenge model is able to discriminate between protected and unprotected experimental groups and 2) that the vaccine induced protection is specific against F. psychrophilum as mortality in the 5 Ag/F.psy(-) group was equally high as in the negative control, while the 6 Ag/F.psy(+) induced a high level of protection (RPS60 = 86.7%). The present study is one of the first to describe protection against F. psychrophilum infections induced by a multicomponent injection vaccine.

  10. Flavobacterium oncorhynchi sp. nov., a new species isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zamora, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F; Svensson-Stadler, L A; Palacios, M A; Domínguez, L; Moore, E R B; Vela, A I

    2012-03-01

    Eighteen isolates of a Gram-negative, catalase and oxidase-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, recovered from diseased rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were characterized, using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Studies based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that that the eighteen new isolates shared 99.2-100% sequence similarities. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates from trout belonged to the genus Flavobacterium, showing the highest sequence similarities to F. chungangense (98.6%), F. frigidimaris (98.1%), F. hercynium (97.9%) and F. aquidurense (97.8%). DNA-DNA reassociation values between the trout isolates (exemplified by strain 631-08(T)) and five type strains of the most closely related Flavobacterium species exhibited less than 27% similarity. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.0 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was observed to be menaquinone 6 (MK-6) and iso-C(15:0), C(15:0) and C(16:1) ω7c the predominant fatty acids. The polar lipid profile of strain 631-08(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminolipids AL1 and AL3, lipids L1, L2, L3 and L4 and phospholipid PL1. The novel isolates were differentiated from related Flavobacterium species by physiological and biochemical tests. On the basis of the evidence from this polyphasic study, it is proposed that the isolates from rainbow trout be classified as a new species of the genus Flavobacterium, Flavobacterium oncorhynchi sp. nov. The type strain is 631-08(T) (= CECT 7678(T) = CCUG 59446(T)).

  11. Evaluating Adaptive Divergence Between Migratory and Nonmigratory Ecotypes of a Salmonid Fish, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Matthew C.; Thrower, Frank P.; Berntson, Ewann A.; Miller, Michael R.; Nichols, Krista M.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing and the application of population genomic and association approaches have made it possible to detect selection and unravel the genetic basis to variable phenotypic traits. The use of these two approaches in parallel is especially attractive in nonmodel organisms that lack a sequenced and annotated genome, but only works well when population structure is not confounded with the phenotype of interest. Herein, we use population genomics in a nonmodel fish species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), to better understand adaptive divergence between migratory and nonmigratory ecotypes and to further our understanding about the genetic basis of migration. Restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) tag sequencing was used to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in migrant and resident O. mykiss from two systems, one in Alaska and the other in Oregon. A total of 7920 and 6755 SNPs met filtering criteria in the Alaska and Oregon data sets, respectively. Population genetic tests determined that 1423 SNPs were candidates for selection when loci were compared between resident and migrant samples. Previous linkage mapping studies that used RAD DNA tag SNPs were available to determine the position of 1990 markers. Several significant SNPs are located in genome regions that contain quantitative trait loci for migratory-related traits, reinforcing the importance of these regions in the genetic basis of migration/residency. Annotation of genome regions linked to significant SNPs revealed genes involved in processes known to be important in migration (such as osmoregulatory function). This study adds to our growing knowledge on adaptive divergence between migratory and nonmigratory ecotypes of this species; across studies, this complex trait appears to be controlled by many loci of small effect, with some in common, but many loci not shared between populations studied. PMID:23797103

  12. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  13. The effects of ozonation on performance, health and welfare of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in low-exchange water recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A controlled four-month trial was conducted to compare the effects of ozonation (oxidation-reduction potential setpoint = 250 mV) versus no ozonation on rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance, health, and welfare in replicated WRAS operated at low exchange rates (0.26% of the total recirculat...

  14. The effects of ozone and water exchange rates on water quality and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance in replicated water recirculating systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance and water quality were evaluated and compared within six replicated 9.5 cubic meter water recirculating aquaculture systems (WRAS) operated with and without ozone at various water exchange rates. Three separate studies were conducted: 1) low water exchan...

  15. Assessing the suitability of a partial water reuse system for rearing juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha for stocking in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health and welfare of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytsha reared in a pilot circular tank-based partial water reuse system in Washington State were evaluated in comparison to fish from the same spawn reared in a flow-through raceway, in order to assess the suitability of using water reus...

  16. Evaluation of supplemental fish bone meal made from Alaska seafood processing byproducts and dicalcium phosphate in plant-protein based diets for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a balanced dietary mix of plant-proteins supplemented with either fish bone meal (FBM) derived from Alaskan seafood processing byproducts or dicalcium phosphate. Seven experimental diets were formulated to contain two levels of dicalci...

  17. Dataset of proinflammatory cytokine and cytokine receptor gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) measured using a novel GeXP multiplex, RT-PCR assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A GeXP multiplex, RT-PCR assay was developed and optimized that simultaneously measures expression of a suite of immune-relevant genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), concentrating on tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 ligand/receptor systems and acute phase response genes. The dataset ...

  18. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)CCAAT/enhancer binding protein genes and their responses to induction by GH in vitro and in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors consisting of six isoforms and play diverse physiological roles in vertebrates. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), in addition to the reported C/EBPbeta1,we have isolated cDNA of four other isoforms, C/EBPalpha, C/EBPbeta2, C/E...

  19. Comparing the effects of high vs. low nitrate on the health, performance, and welfare of juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss within water recirculating aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research indicates that rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) begin to exhibit health and welfare problems when cultured within water recirculating aquaculture systems (WRAS) operated at low exchange (6.7 days hydraulic retention time) and a mean feed loading rate of 4.1 kg feed/m3 daily make...

  20. Relative virulence of three isolates of Piscirickettsia salmonis for coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, M.L.; Bartholomew, J.L.; Winton, J.R.; Fryer, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis was first recognized as the cause of mortality among pen-reared coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in Chile. Since the initial isolation of this intracellular Gram-negative bacterium in 1989, similar organisms have been described from several areas of the world, but the associated outbreaks were not reported to be as serious as those that occurred in Chile. To determine if this was due to differences in virulence among isolates of P. salmonis, we conducted an experiment comparing isolates from Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and Norway (LF-89, ATL-4-91 and NOR-92, respectively). For each of the isolates, 3 replicates of 30 coho salmon were injected intraperitoneally with each of 3 concentrations of the bacterium. Negative control fish were injected with MEM-10. Mortalities were collected daily for 41 d post-injection. Piscirickettsiosis was observed in fish injected with each of the 3 isolates, and for each isolate, cumulative mortality was directly related to the concentration of bacterial cells administered. The LF-89 isolate was the most virulent, with losses reaching 97% in the 3 replicates injected with 105.0 TCID50, 91% in the replicates injected with 104.0 TCID50, and 57% in the fish injected with 103.0 TCID50. The ATL-4-91 isolate caused losses of 92% in the 3 replicates injected with 105.0 TCID50, 76% in the fish injected with 104.0 TCID50, and 32% in those injected with 103.0 TCID50. The NOR-92 isolate was the least virulent, causing 41% mortality in the replicates injected with 104.6 TCID50. At 41 d post-injection, 6% of the fish injected with 103.6 TCID50 NOR-92 had died. Mortality was only 2% in the fish injected with 102.6 TCID50 NOR-92, which was the same as the negative control group. Because the group injected with the highest concentration (104.6 TCID50) of NOR-92 was still experiencing mortality at 41 d, it was held for an additional 46 d. At 87 d post-injection, the cumulative mortality in this group had reached 70

  1. Innate immune and growth promoting responses to caper (Capparis spinosa) extract in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Bilen, Soner; Altunoglu, Yasemin Celik; Ulu, Ferhat; Biswas, Gouranga

    2016-10-01

    Cytokine responses, non-specific immune activity and growth promotion effect of dietary caper (Capparis spinosa) supplementation were examined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout (12.04 ± 0.71 g) were fed diets containing three doses of caper methanolic extract [0 (Control), 0.1 and 0.5 g kg(-1) of feed] for 30 days. At the end of the feeding trial, expression levels of cytokine genes that included IL-1β, IL-8, TGF-β, IL-12p40, TNF-α1 and IL-10 in head kidney was analyzed using qRT-PCR, and blood and serum were collected to determine superoxide anion production (SAP), phagocytic, lysozyme and myeloperoxidase activities. Expression levels of all cytokines, except TNF-α1 were elevated in the 0.1 g kg(-1) caper extract fed fish group compared to other groups. In 0.5 g kg(-1) caper extract treated fish, only IL-12p40 and IL-10 genes were up-regulated compared to control group fish. SAP was increased in both caper extract treated groups compared to the control, and the highest level was observed in the 0.1 g kg(-1) group. Phagocytic activity in both the caper extract treated groups was increased compared to control with no differences observed between those groups. Lysozyme and myeloperoxidase activities were recorded to be the highest in the 0.1 g kg(-1) fed fish group compared to other groups. Growth promotion was affected positively when caper doses were increased. Survival rate was significantly higher in 0.1 and 0.5 g kg(-1) caper extract treated fish groups compared to control (P < 0.05) after challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila. These results indicate that caper extract stimulates innate immunity through cytokine-mediated responses and promote growth in rainbow trout.

  2. Renal responses to acute lead waterborne exposure in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Patel, Monika; Rogers, Joseph T; Pane, Eric F; Wood, Chris M

    2006-12-30

    The possible nephrotoxic effects of waterborne lead exposure (as Pb(NO3)2) were investigated in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Kidney lead accumulation was time-dependent, increasing upon exposure to 0.57+/-0.01 mg dissolved Pb L(-1) for up to 96 h with a significantly higher burden occurring in the posterior kidney compared to the anterior segment. Urine analyses in trout exposed to 1.20+/-0.09 mg dissolved Pb L(-1) revealed a significant increase in urinary lead excretion rate throughout 96 h of exposure. Urine flow rate and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not impacted with the exception of a significant decrease in GFR from 84 to 96 h in lead-exposed trout. Urine pH decreased significantly over time in lead-exposed fish. Correspondingly, urine ammonia excretion rate showed a marked increase from 48 h onwards. In experimental fish, urine glucose excretion was significantly greater by 96 h while urine lactate, urea and protein excretion were not significantly altered by lead exposure. The urine excretion rate of Ca2+ increased significantly by approximately 43% after only 24 h of lead exposure, and was maintained at a higher rate than controls for up to 96 h. Magnesium excretion increased in a time-dependent fashion, reaching a two- to three-fold rise by 96 h. In contrast, rates of Na+ and Cl- excretion were decreased in experimental fish by approximately 30% by 48 h, this trend continuing for the duration of lead-exposure. There were no changes in any of these parameters in similarly treated control fish. Clearance ratio analyses indicated progressive decreases in the net reabsorption efficiencies of the renal system for Ca2+, Mg2+, Pb, and glucose, suggesting that the active tubular transport mechanisms for these substances were inhibited by lead exposure, while Na+, K+, Cl-, lactate, and protein reabsorptions were unaffected. Net ammonia secretion increased. We conclude that changes in renal function both reflect and help to minimize

  3. Puffy Skin Disease Is an Emerging Transmissible Condition in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Irene; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; van Aerle, Ronny; Paley, Richard K.; Peeler, Edmund J.; Green, Matthew; Rimmer, Georgina S. E.; Savage, Jacqueline; Joiner, Claire L.; Bayley, Amanda E.; Mewett, Jason; Hulland, Jonathan; Feist, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of puffy skin disease (PSD) to rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum was tested in the laboratory by conducting co-habitation challenges with puffy skin (PS)-affected fish (Trojans) collected from the field. Two separate challenges were conducted using Trojans sourced from two different sites and diploid (first trial) or triploid (second trial) naïve fish. PSD-specific clinical signs were observed in both groups of naïve fish, with 66% of the fish sampled during the challenges showing signs of varying severity. The first clinical features of PSD were presented as white oval skin patches on one or both flanks 15–21 days post-challenge (dpc). The extent of the lesions ranged from 10 to 90% of the body surface, depending on the severity of the lesion. Both the severity and number of affected fish increased during the challenge. Macroscopically, oedema of the skin and multifocal petechial haemorrhaging were observed towards the end of the trials. Abnormal fish behaviour consisting of “flashing” and excessive mucous production was noted from 15 dpc onwards. Fish with severe PSD lesions also displayed inappetence and associated emaciation. Rodlet cells were observed in 41% of the fresh skin scrapes analysed from the second trial. Histologically epidermal oedema was observed in 31% of the naive fish showing gross pathology, with additional 12% displaying epidermal hyperplasia, mostly observed at the end of the challenge. Other concomitant features of the PSD lesions in challenged fish were epithelial erosion and sloughing, and occasionally mild or focal inflammation. No consistent pathology of internal organs was observed. The parasites Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Ichthyobodo necator were observed in skin samples of a proportion of naïve challenged fish and in Trojans but not in control fish. The presence of these and other known fish pathogens in the skin of PSD-fish was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing analysis. In summary, we

  4. Toxicogenomic responses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes exposed to model chemicals and a synthetic mixture.

    PubMed

    Finne, E F; Cooper, G A; Koop, B F; Hylland, K; Tollefsen, K E

    2007-03-10

    As more salmon gene expression data has become available, the cDNA microarray platform has emerged as an appealing alternative in ecotoxicological screening of single chemicals and environmental samples relevant to the aquatic environment. This study was performed to validate biomarker gene responses of in vitro cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes exposed to model chemicals, and to investigate effects of mixture toxicity in a synthetic mixture. Chemicals used for 24h single chemical- and mixture exposures were 10 nM 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 0.75 nM 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-di-benzodioxin (TCDD), 100 microM paraquat (PQ) and 0.75 microM 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (NQO). RNA was isolated from exposed cells, DNAse treated and quality controlled before cDNA synthesis, fluorescent labelling and hybridisation to a 16k salmonid microarray. The salmonid 16k cDNA array identified differential gene expression predictive of exposure, which could be verified by quantitative real time PCR. More precisely, the responses of biomarker genes such as cytochrome p4501A and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase to TCDD exposure, glutathione reductase and gammaglutamyl cysteine synthetase to paraquat exposure, as well as vitellogenin and vitelline envelope protein to EE2 exposure validated the use of microarray applied to RNA extracted from in vitro exposed hepatocytes. The mutagenic compound NQO did not result in any change in gene expression. Results from exposure to a synthetic mixture of the same four chemicals, using identical concentrations as for single chemical exposures, revealed combined effects that were not predicted by results for individual chemicals alone. In general, the response of exposure to this mixture led to an average loss of approximately 60% of the transcriptomic signature found for single chemical exposure. The present findings show that microarray analyses may contribute to our mechanistic understanding of single contaminant mode of action as well

  5. Functionalization impacts the effects of carbon nanotubes on the immune system of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Klaper, Rebecca; Arndt, Devrah; Setyowati, Kristin; Chen, Jian; Goetz, Frederick

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for manufactured nanomaterials to reach the aquatic environment. There is a need to determine if these materials will have an impact on aquatic species and at what level of exposure. In addition there is a need to develop models to test the potential effects of the multitude of particle types in production on aquatic vertebrates. The purpose of this research was to determine the impact of manufactured nanomaterials on the immune system of an aquatic vertebrate model, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We investigated how structure and type of functionalization of manufactured nanomaterials could affect immunotoxicity. To assess immunotoxicity, we used a well-studied trout macrophage primary cell culture system in conjunction with the expression of IL-1β and IFNα for proinflammatory and antiviral gene expression. There was a significant difference among the different carbon nanotube-based nanomaterials in their level of stimulation of IL-1β in macrophage cells and the dose at which they became stimulatory. At concentrations that were sublethal to cells, almost all nanomaterials were stimulatory at some concentration. Single-walled nanotubes and multi-walled nanotubes that were differentially functionalized to be water-soluble, varied in their effects; specifically the concentrations at which they were stimulatory and they were more stimulatory to IL-1β expression compared with unfunctionalized nanotubes. Each functionalized nanotube type caused a dose-dependent response with the lowest exposures (0.05-1.0 μg/ml) having no stimulatory response and at the highest concentrations (5 μg/ml and 10 μg/ml) stimulating a response similar to the positive LPS positive control. Anionic functionalized multi-walled nanotubes and zwitterionic single-walled nanotubes were stimulatory at the lowest dose (0.5 μg/ml). Sodium deoxycholate, often used to suspend nanomaterials, was also tested and was as stimulatory to the

  6. A novel member of the family Hepeviridae from cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Batts, William; Yun, Susan; Hedrick, Ronald; Winton, James

    2011-06-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line was used to isolate a novel virus from spawning adult trout in the state of California, USA. Termed the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) virus (CTV), the small, round virus was not associated with disease, but was subsequently found to be present in an increasing number of trout populations in the western USA, likely by a combination of improved surveillance activities and the shipment of infected eggs to new locations. Here, we report that the full length genome of the 1988 Heenan Lake isolate of CTV consisted of 7269 nucleotides of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA beginning with a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by three open reading frames (ORFs), a 3' UTR and ending in a polyA tail. The genome of CTV was similar in size and organization to that of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) with which it shared the highest nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities. Similar to the genomes of human, rodent or avian hepeviruses, ORF 1 encoded a large, non-structural polyprotein that included conserved methyltransferase, protease, helicase and polymerase domains, while ORF 2 encoded the structural capsid protein and ORF 3 the phosphoprotein. Together, our data indicated that CTV was clearly a member of the family Hepeviridae, although the level of amino acid sequence identity with the ORFs of mammalian or avian hepeviruses (13-27%) may be sufficiently low to warrant the creation of a novel genus. We also performed a phylogenetic analysis using a 262nt region within ORF 1 for 63 isolates of CTV obtained from seven species of trout reared in various geographic locations in the western USA. While the sequences fell into two genetic clades, the overall nucleotide diversity was low (less than 8.4%) and many isolates differed by only 1-2 nucleotides, suggesting an epidemiological link. Finally, we showed that CTV was able to form persistently infected cultures of the CHSE-214 cell line that may have use in

  7. Predation on juvenile pacific salmon oncorhynchus spp. in downstream migrant traps in prairie creek, california

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, W.G.; Bjorkstedt, E.P.; Ellings, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Downstream migrant traps are a widely applied fishery management tool for sampling anadromous Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss smolts along theWest Coast of North America and elsewhere, yet predation on juvenile salmonids in traps has not been studied quantitatively.We assessed the frequency of occurrence and abundance of juvenile salmonids in the stomachs of coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii, coho salmon O. kisutch, steelhead, and prickly sculpin Cottus asper (>70 mm fork length) captured in traps and in nearby stream habitats. All four predator species took juvenile salmonids with much greater frequency in traps than in stream habitats. Among free-swimming predators, only coastal cutthroat trout were observed with salmonid fry in their stomachs, but they took fewer salmonid prey and appeared to rely more heavily on insect prey than did coastal cutthroat trout captured in traps. Predators consumed up to 25% of the available prey over a broad range of prey abundances. Over the course of the study, predators consumed 2.5% of all salmonid fry captured in traps, but this fraction ranged from less than 1% to more than 10% in any given year. The number of prey taken in traps increased with predator length and with prey abundance in traps, and predation in traps peaked during the period of most intense downstream migration by salmon fry. In contrast, live-box design and trap location had little or no effect on the total number of prey taken by individual predators.We estimated that the predation mortality of juvenile salmon increased by 0.5-1.0% due to in-trap predation (i.e., a 9-10% relative increase over natural predation rates). We found no evidence that predators selected for prey on the basis of species. These results should motivate additional research on methods that reduce or eliminate predation in trap live-boxes and protocols for efficiently measuring predation associated with the trapping of downstream migrants. ?? American

  8. The effect of chronic chromium exposure on the health of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farag, A.M.; May, T.; Marty, G.D.; Easton, M.; Harper, D.D.; Little, E.E.; Cleveland, L.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to determine fish health impairment of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to chromium. Juvenile Chinook salmon were exposed to aqueous chromium concentrations (0-266 ??g l-1) that have been documented in porewater from bottom sediments and in well waters near salmon spawning areas in the Columbia River in the northwestern United States. After Chinook salmon parr were exposed to 24 and 54 ??g Cr l -1 for 105 days, neither growth nor survival of parr was affected. On day 105, concentrations were increased from 24 to 120 ??g Cr l-1 and from 54 to 266 ??g Cr l-1 until the end of the experiment on day 134. Weight of parr was decreased in the 24/120 ??g Cr l-1 treatment, and survival was decreased in the 54/266 ??g Cr l-1 treatment. Fish health was significantly impaired in both the 24/120 and 54/266 ??g Cr l-1 treatments. The kidney is the target organ during chromium exposures through the water column. The kidneys of fish exposed to the greatest concentrations of chromium had gross and microscopic lesions (e.g. necrosis of cells lining kidney tububules) and products of lipid peroxidation were elevated. These changes were associated with elevated concentrations of chromium in the kidney, and reduced growth and survival. Also, variations in DNA in the blood were associated with pathological changes in the kidney and spleen. These changes suggest that chromium accumulates and enters the lipid peroxidation pathway where fatty acid damage and DNA damage (expressed as chromosome changes) occur to cause cell death and tissue damage. While most of the physiological malfunctions occurred following parr exposures to concentrations ???120 ??g Cr l-1, nuclear DNA damage followed exposures to 24 ??g Cr l-1, which was the smallest concentration tested. The abnormalities measured during this study are particularly important because they are associated with impaired growth and reduced survival at concentrations ???120 ??g Cr l-1. Therefore, these

  9. Performance of juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) produced from untreated and cryopreserved milt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Michael C.; Rubin, Stephen P.; Hensleigh, Jay E.; Reisenbichler, Reginald R.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the expanding use of milt cryopreservation in aquaculture, the performance of fish produced from this technique has not been fully explored beyond initial rearing stages. We compared the performance of juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss produced from untreated (UM) and cryopreserved milt (CM) and reared for 4–9 months. For the 1996 brood, CM alevins were heavier (∼ 1.7%, P < 0.01) than UM alevins and length was influenced by a significant milt-by-family interaction (P < 0.03) suggesting a greater treatment effect for some families. No significant differences were found in length or weight (P > 0.05) for 1997 brood alevins and percent yolk was similar for both broods (P > 0.34). In growth and survival experiment I (GSE-I, 1996), UM and CM juveniles reared in separate tanks and fed to satiation (130 days) showed no significant differences in survival, length or weight (P > 0.05) between milt groups. In contrast, for UM and CM siblings reared in the same tank for 210 days on a low food ration (GSE-II), survival was similar (P > 0.05), but length (UM 4% > CM, P < 0.05) and possibly weight (UM 15% > CM, P = 0.08), were influenced by cryopreservation. Fish from the 1997 brood (GSE-III) were reared for 313 days in a repeat of GSE-II and no differences were found in survival (P = 0.47), length (P = 0.75) or weight (P = 0.76) suggesting considerable heterogeneity between broods. Performance of the 1996 brood was also tested for response to stress and a disease challenge. Cortisol responses of juveniles exposed to acute stress were not significantly different (P = 0.19), but mean cortisol was consistently and significantly greater (P < 0.01) for CM than UM fish exposed to a 48-h stress (increased density). After exposure to three dosages of the bacteria, Listonella anguillarum, we found similar mortality proportions (P = 0.72) for UM and CM fish. Variable juvenile performance for the parameters tested indicated significant

  10. Gene expression patterns in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, exposed to a suite of model toxicants.

    PubMed

    Hook, Sharon E; Skillman, Ann D; Small, Jack A; Schultz, Irvin R

    2006-05-25

    The increased availability and use of DNA microarrays has allowed the characterization of gene expression patterns associated with exposure to different toxicants. An important question is whether toxicant induced changes in gene expression in fish are sufficiently diverse to allow for identification of specific modes of action and/or specific contaminants. In theory, each class of toxicant may generate a gene expression profile unique to its mode of toxic action. In this study, isogenic (cloned) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed to sublethal levels of a series of model toxicants with varying modes of action, including ethynylestradiol (xeno-estrogen), 2,2,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47, thyroid active), diquat (oxidant stressor), chromium VI, and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) for a period of 1-3 weeks. An additional experiment measured trenbolone (anabolic steroid; model androgen) induced gene expression changes in sexually mature female trout. Following exposure, fish were euthanized, livers removed and RNA extracted. Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Atlantic Salmon/Trout array (GRASP project, University of Victoria) spotted with 16,000 cDNA's. The slides were scanned to measure abundance of a given transcript in each sample relative to controls. Data were analyzed via Genespring (Silicon Genetics) to identify a list of up- and downregulated genes, as well as to determine gene clustering patterns that can be used as "expression signatures". The results indicate each toxicant exposure caused between 64 and 222 genes to be significantly altered in expression. Most genes exhibiting altered expression responded to only one of the toxicants and relatively few were co-expressed in multiple treatments. For example, BaP and Diquat, both of which exert toxicity via oxidative stress, upregulated 28 of the same genes, of over 100 genes altered by either treatment. Other genes associated with steroidogenesis

  11. A novel member of the family Hepeviridae from cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William; Yun, Susan; Hedrick, Ronald; Winton, James

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line was used to isolate a novel virus from spawning adult trout in the state of California, USA. Termed the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) virus (CTV), the small, round virus was not associated with disease, but was subsequently found to be present in an increasing number of trout populations in the western USA, likely by a combination of improved surveillance activities and the shipment of infected eggs to new locations. Here, we report that the full length genome of the 1988 Heenan Lake isolate of CTV consisted of 7269 nucleotides of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA beginning with a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by three open reading frames (ORFs), a 3' UTR and ending in a polyA tail. The genome of CTV was similar in size and organization to that of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) with which it shared the highest nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities. Similar to the genomes of human, rodent or avian hepeviruses, ORF 1 encoded a large, non-structural polyprotein that included conserved methyltransferase, protease, helicase and polymerase domains, while ORF 2 encoded the structural capsid protein and ORF 3 the phosphoprotein. Together, our data indicated that CTV was clearly a member of the family Hepeviridae, although the level of amino acid sequence identity with the ORFs of mammalian or avian hepeviruses (13-27%) may be sufficiently low to warrant the creation of a novel genus. We also performed a phylogenetic analysis using a 262. nt region within ORF 1 for 63 isolates of CTV obtained from seven species of trout reared in various geographic locations in the western USA. While the sequences fell into two genetic clades, the overall nucleotide diversity was low (less than 8.4%) and many isolates differed by only 1-2 nucleotides, suggesting an epidemiological link. Finally, we showed that CTV was able to form persistently infected cultures of the CHSE-214 cell line that may have use

  12. Growth, immune responses and intestinal morphology of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) supplemented with commercial probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M A; Gonçalves, J F M; Batista, S; Costas, B; Pires, M A; Rema, P; Ozório, R O A

    2015-07-01

    The influence of two commercial probiotics on the growth, innate immune parameters and intestinal morphology of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) juveniles (initial weight: 16.4 ± 0.4 g) was evaluated. Two probiotic types: A, multi-species (Bacillus sp., Pedicoccus sp., Enterococcus sp., Lactobacillus sp.) and B, mono-species (Pediococcus acidilactici) were tested at two levels each (A1: 1.5 g kg(-1), 8.6 × 10(5) CFU g(-1); A2: 3 g kg(-1), 1.6 × 10(6) CFU g(-1); B1: 0.1 g kg(-1), 2.6 × 10(4) CFU g(-1); B2: 0.2 g kg(-1), 7.2 × 10(4) CFU g(-1)) versus an unsupplemented diet (C). Diets were distributed to sextuplicate tanks, three times a day to visual satiation for 8 weeks. Growth performance and immune responses (plasma lysozyme, ACH50, peroxidase and head kidney respiratory burst) were determined at 4 and 8 weeks of feeding. Body composition and intestine morphology were determined at the end of the feeding trial. At 8 weeks, the lower dose of multi-species probiotic (A1) improved growth rate, while both probiotic types improved feed conversion rate compared to the control animals, at the lower dose of multi-species (A1) and at the higher dose of mono-species (B2) probiotics. Body composition did not vary between treatments. At 4 weeks, ACH50 activity was significantly higher in fish fed higher dose of B probiotic (B2, 123.7 ± 50.6 vs 44.1 ± 7.7 U.ml(-1) in control). At 8 weeks, lysozyme activity was higher in fish fed A1 (13.1 ± 5.2 μg ml(-1)) diet compared to fish fed control diet (7.8 ± 1 μg ml(-1)). Plasma peroxidase and head-kidney respiratory burst did not differ among the dietary treatments. Villi length and integrity and goblet cell counting of a cross section of the anterior intestine were not significantly different between groups. Results suggest benefits in zootechnical performance and immune humoral responses using both probiotic types, in a dose dependent manner, without apparent alterations in intestinal morphology.

  13. Identification, characterization and genetic mapping of TLR1 loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palti, Y.; Rodriguez, M.F.; Gahr, S.A.; Purcell, M.K.; Rexroad, C. E.; Wiens, G.D.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of innate immune pathways is critical for early anti-microbial defense but there is limited understanding of how teleosts recognize microbial molecules and activate these pathways. In mammals, Toll-like receptors (TLR) 1 and 2 form a heterodimer involved in recognizing peptidoglycans and lipoproteins of microbial origin. Herein, we identify and describe the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) TLR1 gene ortholog and its mRNA expression. Two TLR1 loci were identified from a rainbow trout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA sequencing and genetic linkage analyses. Full length cDNA clone and direct sequencing of four BACs revealed an intact omTLR1 open reading frame (ORF) located on chromosome 14 and a second locus on chromosome 25 that contains a TLR1 pseudogene. The duplicated trout loci exhibit conserved synteny with other fish genomes that extends beyond the TLR1 gene sequences. The omTLR1 gene includes a single large coding exon similar to all other described TLR1 genes, but unlike other teleosts it also has a 5??? UTR exon and intron preceding the large coding exon. The omTLR1 ORF is predicted to encode an 808 amino-acid protein with 69% similarity to the Fugu TLR1 and a conserved pattern of predicted leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Phylogenetic analysis grouped omTLR1 with other fish TLR1 genes on a separate branch from the avian TLR1 and mammalian TLR1, 6 and 10. omTLR1 expression levels in rainbow trout anterior kidney leukocytes were not affected by the human TLR2/6 and TLR2/1 agonists diacylated lipoprotein (Pam2CSK4) and triacylated lipoprotein (Pam3CSK4). However, due to the lack of TLR6 and 10 genes in teleost genomes and up-regulation of TLR1 mRNA in response to LPS and bacterial infection in other fish species we hypothesize an important role for omTLR1 in anti-microbial immunity. Therefore, the identification of a TLR2 ortholog in rainbow trout and the development of assays to measure ligand binding and downstream signaling

  14. Identification, characterization and genetic mapping of TLR1 loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palti, Yniv; Rodriguez, M. Fernanda; Gahr, Scott A.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Rexroad, Caird E.; Wiens, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of innate immune pathways is critical for early anti-microbial defense but there is limited understanding of how teleosts recognize microbial molecules and activate these pathways. In mammals, Toll-like receptors (TLR) 1 and 2 form a heterodimer involved in recognizing peptidoglycans and lipoproteins of microbial origin. Herein, we identify and describe the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) TLR1 gene ortholog and its mRNA expression. Two TLR1 loci were identified from a rainbow trout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA sequencing and genetic linkage analyses. Full length cDNA clone and direct sequencing of four BACs revealed an intact omTLR1 open reading frame (ORF) located on chromosome 14 and a second locus on chromosome 25 that contains a TLR1 pseudogene. The duplicated trout loci exhibit conserved synteny with other fish genomes that extends beyond the TLR1 gene sequences. The omTLR1 gene includes a single large coding exon similar to all other described TLR1 genes, but unlike other teleosts it also has a 5' UTR exon and intron preceding the large coding exon. The omTLR1 ORF is predicted to encode an 808 amino-acid protein with 69% similarity to the Fugu TLR1 and a conserved pattern of predicted leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Phylogenetic analysis grouped omTLR1 with other fish TLR1 genes on a separate branch from the avian TLR1 and mammalian TLR1, 6 and 10. omTLR1 expression levels in rainbow trout anterior kidney leukocytes were not affected by the human TLR2/6 and TLR2/1 agonists diacylated lipoprotein (Pam2CSK4) and triacylated lipoprotein (Pam3CSK4). However, due to the lack of TLR6 and 10 genes in teleost genomes and up-regulation of TLR1 mRNA in response to LPS and bacterial infection in other fish species we hypothesize an important role for omTLR1 in anti-microbial immunity. Therefore, the identification of a TLR2 ortholog in rainbow trout and the development of assays to measure ligand binding and downstream signaling are

  15. Growth hormone receptors in ovary and liver during gametogenesis in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Gomez, J M; Mourot, B; Fostier, A; Le Gac, F

    1999-03-01

    Changes of growth hormone receptivity in the ovary during the reproductive cycle were studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A method for characterizing growth hormone receptors in crude ovary homogenate was required for this. Binding of radiolabelled recombinant rainbow trout growth hormone (125I-labelled rtGH) to crude ovary preparation was dependent on ovarian tissue concentration. The sites were specific to growth hormone, with no affinity for prolactins and gonadotrophins. Similar high affinities for 125I-labelled rtGH were obtained with crude ovary (4.2 x 10(9) +/- 0.3 mol l-1) and crude liver preparations (4.9 x 10(9) +/- 0.1 mol l-1) at all stages of ovogenesis, and with ovarian membrane preparations (8.2 x 10(9) mol l-1) tested at the beginning of vitellogenesis. Ovarian growth hormone receptor concentration was highest during the early phases of follicular development (endogenous vitellogenesis: 315-310 fmol g-1 ovary) and decreased regularly during oocyte and follicular growth (exogenous vitellogenesis) to reach a minimal value at oocyte maturation (42 fmol g-1 ovary). In postovulated fish, binding was at a similar level (297 fmol g-1 ovary) to that found in endogenous vitellogenesis. Conversely, the absolute binding capacity of the whole ovary was low from immaturity to early exogenous vitellogenesis (0.1-0.6 pmol per pair of gonads), increased slowly during vitellogenesis and more markedly during rapid oocyte growth and at the time of final maturation (10.8 pmol per pair of gonads). In postovulated fish, the absolute binding capacity decreased partially (4.4 pmol per pair of gonads). Mean hepatic growth hormone receptor concentration did not vary with the reproductive stage for most of the cycle (3.0-4.5 pmol g-1 liver) except in endogenous vitellogenesis where significantly higher concentrations were observed (6.7 pmol g-1 liver). Individual ovarian growth hormone receptor concentrations were correlated with hepatic growth hormone receptor

  16. Genetic Diversity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates from Three Oncorhynchus spp. in the United States, as Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Van Vliet, Danielle; Wiens, Gregory D.; Loch, Thomas P.; Nicolas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) technique has identified the intraspecific genetic diversity of U.S. Flavobacterium psychrophilum, an important pathogen of salmonids worldwide. Prior to this analysis, little U.S. F. psychrophilum genetic information was known; this is of importance when considering targeted control strategies, including vaccine development. Herein, MLST was used to investigate the genetic diversity of 96 F. psychrophilum isolates recovered from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that originated from nine U.S. states. The isolates fell into 34 distinct sequence types (STs) that clustered in 5 clonal complexes (CCs) (n = 63) or were singletons (n = 33). The distribution of STs varied spatially, by host species, and in association with mortality events. Several STs (i.e., ST9, ST10, ST30, and ST78) were found in multiple states, whereas the remaining STs were localized to single states. With the exception of ST256, which was recovered from rainbow trout and Chinook salmon, all STs were found to infect a single host species. Isolates that were collected during bacterial cold water disease outbreaks most frequently belonged to CC-ST10 (e.g., ST10 and ST78). Collectively, the results of this study clearly demonstrate the genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum within the United States and identify STs of clinical significance. Although the majority of STs described herein were novel, some (e.g., ST9, ST10, ST13, ST30, and ST31) were previously recovered on other continents, which demonstrates the transcontinental distribution of F. psychrophilum genotypes. IMPORTANCE Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) and rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS) and is an important bacterial pathogen of wild and farmed salmonids worldwide. These infections are responsible for large economic losses globally, yet the

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Iranian infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adel, Milad; Amiri, Alireza Babaalian; Dada, Maryam; Kurath, Gael; Laktarashi, Bahram; Ghajari, Amrolah; Breyta, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a member of family Rhabdoviridae and genus Novirhabdoviridae, causes a highly lethal disease of salmon and trout. In Iran IHNV was first detected in 2001 on farms rearing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To evaluate the genetic relationships of IHNV from northern and western Iran, the sequences of a 651-nt region of the glycoprotein gene were determined for two Iranian isolates. These sequences were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates representing the five known genogroups of IHNV. Iranian isolates were most closely related to European isolates within the genogroup E rather than those of North American genogroups U, M and L, or the Asian genogroup J. It appears that Iranian IHNV was most likely introduced to Iran from a source in Europe by the movement of contaminated fish eggs.

  18. Some physiological consequences of handling stress in the juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1972-01-01

    The stress of handling juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) in soft water and in water with added salts was evaluated using blood and tissue chemistry fluctuations as indices of metabolic and endocrine function. Changes in plasma glucose, chloride, calcium, and cholesterol levels indicated that significant osmoregulatory and metabolic dysfunctions can occur and persist for about 24 hr after handling in soft water. Pituitary activation, as judged by lack of interrenal ascorbate depletion, did not occur. Increasing the ambient NaCl and Ca++ levels to about 100 milliosmols and 75–120 ppm, respectively, partially or completely alleviated the hyperglycemia and hypochloremia indicating that the stress of handling had been reduced.

  19. Some Antioxidants and Malondialdehyde Levels in the Flesh of Rainbow Trout, (Oncorhynchus mykiss W., 1792) from Various Feeding Habitats.

    PubMed

    Ural, M S; Karatas, F; Calta, M

    2015-11-08

    The present study was aimed to find the effect of feeding habitats on the amounts of some antioxidants (vitamin A, E, C, ß-carotene and selenium) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the flesh of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). For this purpose, vitamins (A, C and E), β-carotene amounts and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined by HPLC and selenium amount was determined by fluorometric method in the flesh of rainbow trout obtained from various feeding habitats. The highest amounts of vitamins (A, C and E), β-carotene and selenium were found in the flesh of wild rainbow trout (WRT), followed by cage reared rainbow trout (CRRT) and pond reared rainbow trout (PRRT). However, the levels of MDA in the flesh of PRRT were the highest, followed by CRRT and the lowest in WRT.

  20. Behavioral response of young rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to forest fire-retardant chemicals in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Jason B.; Little, Edward E.; Calfee, Robin D.

    2004-01-01

    Fire-retardant chemicals often are applied in relatively pristine and environmentally sensitive areas that are potentially inhabited by endangered or threatened aquatic species. Avoidance of contaminants is an adaptive behavior that may reduce exposure to harmful conditions. We evaluated the avoidance responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to concentrations of fire-retardant chemicals and alternate constituent formulations ranging from 0.65 to 26 mg/L. Countercurrent avoidance chambers were used in a flow-through design with receiving water at each end and a drain at the center to create a distinct boundary between treatment water and reference water. Rainbow trout consistently avoided water treated with retardants at all concentrations tested. The magnitude of the avoidance response did not appear to follow a concentration-response relationship, but rather was an all-or-none response.

  1. Behavioral response of young rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to forest fire-retardant chemicals in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jason B; Little, Edward E; Calfee, Robin D

    2004-03-01

    Fire-retardant chemicals often are applied in relatively pristine and environmentally sensitive areas that are potentially inhabited by endangered or threatened aquatic species. Avoidance of contaminants is an adaptive behavior that may reduce exposure to harmful conditions. We evaluated the avoidance responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to concentrations of fire-retardant chemicals and alternate constituent formulations ranging from 0.65 to 26 mg/L. Countercurrent avoidance chambers were used in a flow-through design with receiving water at each end and a drain at the center to create a distinct boundary between treatment water and reference water. Rainbow trout consistently avoided water treated with retardants at all concentrations tested. The magnitude of the avoidance response did not appear to follow a concentration-response relationship, but rather was an all-or-none response.

  2. Severe, chronic proliferative kidney disease (PKD) induced in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss held at a constant 18 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Ferguson, H W; Adams, A

    2005-09-23

    Proliferative kidney disease (PKD), caused by the myxozoan parasite Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, is well documented as a seasonal disease of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Water temperatures influence the course of the infection both within the fish and the invertebrate host, the recovery of fish from the disease being accelerated with decreasing water temperatures. During this study, groups of rainbow trout were held at a constant temperature (18 degrees C) for a sustained period of time following initial exposure to T. bryosalmonae. While the majority of these fish had recovered from the clinical disease after 9 mo, 10% remained infected, showing clinical signs of disease. A histological study revealed that the majority exhibited very high parasite loads and unusually severe symptoms of PKD. This demonstrates that while most rainbow trout can recover from PKD independent of water temperature, there exists a sub-population that cannot.

  3. Behavioural response of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha during a sudden temperature increase and implications for survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Monroe, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The behaviours of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were evaluated during a temperature increase from 8.8 to 23.2°C, which was designed to simulate unique thermal conditions present in a hydroelectric reservoir. The percent of fish with an active swimming behaviour increased from 26 to 93 % and mean opercular beat rates increased from 76 to 159 beats per minute between basal and maximum temperatures. Fish equilibrium did not change significantly throughout the experiment and relatively little mortality (12 %) occurred. Thermal stress is likely incurred by juvenile salmon experiencing a temperature change of this magnitude; however, stress induced in this study was primarily sublethal. Behavioural changes accompanying thermal stress (e.g., erratic swimming) may increase predation potential in the wild despite being sublethal during laboratory experiments.

  4. Evidence That GABA Mediates Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Pathways Associated with Locomotor Activity in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the control of locomotor activity in juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by manipulating 3 neurotransmitter systems-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin-as well as the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of CRH and the GABAAagonist muscimol stimulated locomotor activity. The effect of muscimol was attenuated by administration of a dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Conversely, the administration of a dopamine uptake inhibitor (4???,4??? -difluoro-3-alpha-[diphenylmethoxy] tropane hydrochloride [DUI]) potentiated the effect of muscimol. They found no evidence that CRH-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic systems following concurrent injections of haloperidol or DUI with CRH. Administration of muscimol either had no effect or attenuated the locomotor response to concurrent injections of CRH and fluoxetine, whereas the GABAA antagonist bicuculline methiodide potentiated the effect of CRH and fluoxetine.

  5. Ecosystem experiment reveals benefits of natural and simulated beaver dams to a threatened population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Bouwes, Nicolaas; Weber, Nicholas; Jordan, Chris E.; Saunders, W. Carl; Tattam, Ian A.; Volk, Carol; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Pollock, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Beaver have been referred to as ecosystem engineers because of the large impacts their dam building activities have on the landscape; however, the benefits they may provide to fluvial fish species has been debated. We conducted a watershed-scale experiment to test how increasing beaver dam and colony persistence in a highly degraded incised stream affects the freshwater production of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following the installation of beaver dam analogs (BDAs), we observed significant increases in the density, survival, and production of juvenile steelhead without impacting upstream and downstream migrations. The steelhead response occurred as the quantity and complexity of their habitat increased. This study is the first large-scale experiment to quantify the benefits of beavers and BDAs to a fish population and its habitat. Beaver mediated restoration may be a viable and efficient strategy to recover ecosystem function of previously incised streams and to increase the production of imperiled fish populations. PMID:27373190

  6. Comparative diets of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) in the Salmon River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) have established naturalized populations throughout the Great Lakes. Young-of-year of these species occur sympatrically for about one month in Lake Ontario tributaries. This study examined the diets of subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead relative to available food in the Salmon River, New York. Terrestrial invertebrates and trichopterans were the major prey of Chinook salmon, whereas steelhead fed primarily on baetid nymphs and chironomid larvae. Diet overlap was low (0.45) between the species. The diet of Chinook was closely associated to the composition of the drift (0.88). Steelhead diet drew equally from the drift and benthos during the first year of the study, but more closely matched the benthos during the second year. Differences in prey selection, perhaps associated with differences in fish size, in addition to apparent differences in feeding mode (drift versus benthic), likely reduce competitive interactions between these species.

  7. Behavioural type in newly emerged steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss does not predict growth rate in a conventional hatchery rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Conrad, J L; Sih, A

    2009-10-01

    Behavioural assays were conducted on newly emerged steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss to investigate the presence of behavioural syndromes and to determine whether behavioural type in young fish predicts growth rate in a conventional hatchery rearing environment. Individual fry were consistent in their position choice and activity behaviours across safe and unsafe contexts, as well as among assays conducted on different days. Position choice and activity behaviours, however, were not necessarily correlated to each other. Both behaviours predicted feeding rates during behavioural assays, but there was no relationship between fry behaviour and subsequent growth rate or survival during the first 3 months of hatchery rearing. These results support the hypothesis that selection in captivity may be relaxed with respect to behavioural type rather than directional, allowing for increased behavioural variance in domesticated populations. Modest magnitudes of correlations among fry behaviours, however, suggest that behavioural type may be unstable at the onset of the juvenile feeding stage.

  8. Fasting and diet content affect stress-induced changes in plasma glucose and cortisol in Juvenile chinook salmon. [Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, B.A.; Schreck, C.B. ); Fowler, L.G. )

    1988-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared on low-, medium-, or high-lipid diets for 18 weeks were either kept on their respective diets or fasted for 20 d; then they were subjected to a 30-s handling stress or to handling plus continuous confinement. In fish that were handled but not confined, poststress hyperglycemia was greatest in fed fish that received the high-lipid diet and was generally lower in fasted than in fed fish. Plasma cortisol elevations in response to handling or handling plus confinement stress were not appreciably affected by diet type or fasting. The result indicated that prior feeding regimes and the types of diet fed should be considered when one is interpreting the magnitude of hyperglycemic stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon.

  9. Influence of water temperature on gill sodium, potassium-stimulated ATPase activity in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, W.S.; McLain, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    1. Gill sodium, potassium-stimulated ATPase activity was determined from December to July in gills of yearling coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) maintained at four temperatures, 6, 10, 15 and 20°C.2. Compared to fish held at 6°C, elevation in ATPase activity and the associated parr-smolt transformation were accelerated in fish at 10 and 15°C whereas animals at 20°C experienced at best only a transitory elevation in activity.3. Fish transferred from one temperature to another developed ATPase activities characteristic of fish residing at temperatures to which they were transferred.4. Cold water (6°C) tended to preserve the elevated ATPase activity while higher temperatures (10 and 15°C) caused decreases after an initial accelerated increase.

  10. Heteropolymorphism of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene for the population analysis of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M; Choi, Y S; Jin, H J; Sohn, Y C; Lee, S K; Jin, D H

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) has been frequently used as genetic markers for the population genetic studies. In this study we used chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) from Korea, Japan andAmerica, and compared their mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) genes by DNA sequence analysis. Sequence variation was studied in the ND3 among total 11 individuals from three populations. The ND3 gene was amplified by PCR targeting parts of cytochrome oxidase III gene (COIII) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4L gene (ND4L). ND3 gene sequence, encoded 752 bps, presented some genetic variation in the chum salmon populations. The observed nucleotide variations inferred the distinct genetic differentiation of American salmons from Korean and Japanese chum salmons. Six sites of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) were explored in the ND3 locus. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis also showed a clear heterogenous band in American salmons compared to Asian salmons.

  11. A new species of myxozoan (Myxosporea) from the brain and spinal cord of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from Idaho.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Carla I; Campbell, Matthew R; Johnson, Keith A

    2008-02-01

    A new species of Myxosporea, Myxobolus neurotropus n. sp., is described from the brain and spinal cord of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from Duncan Creek, Owyhee County, Idaho. Spores are oval, have 2 pyriform polar capsules, and possess a thick spore wall (sutural rim) with a short intracapsular offshoot. The mean spore dimensions are length 11.8 microm, width 10.8 microm, and thickness 8.8 microm. This myxozoan is compared to other described Myxobolus species found in cranial tissues of salmonids in terms of spore morphology and phylogenetic analysis. Because it is found in brain and spinal cord, it is encountered while performing screening tests for Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of salmonid whirling disease. Where chronic inflammation and granulomatous lesions are associated with M. cerebralis, histological examination shows no host response to M. neurotropus n. sp. A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test is included as an aid in properly identifying the species.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of Iranian infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) based on the glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Adel, Milad; Amiri, Alireza Babaalian; Dadar, Maryam; Breyta, Rachel; Kurath, Gael; Laktarashi, Bahram; Ghajari, Amrolah

    2016-03-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a member of family Rhabdoviridae and genus Novirhabdoviridae, causes a highly lethal disease of salmon and trout. In Iran IHNV was first detected in 2001 on farms rearing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To evaluate the genetic relationships of IHNV from northern and western Iran, the sequences of a 651-nt region of the glycoprotein gene were determined for two Iranian isolates. These sequences were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates representing the five known genogroups of IHNV. Iranian isolates were most closely related to European isolates within the genogroup E rather than those of North American genogroups U, M and L, or the Asian genogroup J. It appears that Iranian IHNV was most likely introduced to Iran from a source in Europe by the movement of contaminated fish eggs.

  13. A loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Gunimaladevi, I; Kono, T; Lapatra, S E; Sakai, M

    2005-05-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) protocol was developed for detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) RNA in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A set of four primers, two outer and two inner primers for the RT-LAMP and the LAMP assay, were designed based on the sequence of G-protein of IHNV. Time and temperature conditions were optimized for 60 min at 63 degrees C for both RT-LAMP and LAMP protocols. The detection limit was found to be similar for both RT-LAMP and LAMP. When the sensitivity of RT-LAMP and LAMP were compared with conventional nested PCR, a10-fold higher sensitivity was seen for the LAMP protocols.

  14. Mortality and kidney histopathology of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, Caroline L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Landolt, Marsha L.

    2001-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(3) or 1 x 10(6) bacteria fish(-1), or by a 24 h immersion in 1 x 10(5) or 1 x 10(7) bacteria ml(-1). For 22 wk fish were held in 12 degrees C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73 %). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  15. Mortality and kidney histopathology of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Elliott, D.G.; Landolt, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 ?? 103 or 1 ?? 106 bacteria fish-1, or by a 24 h immersion in 1 ?? 105 or 1 ?? 107 bacteria ml-1. For 22 wk fish were held in 12??C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73%). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  16. Demersal fish assemblages along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica: a quantitative and multivariate assessment based on the Victor Hensen Costa Rica expedition (1993/1994).

    PubMed

    Wolff, M

    1996-12-01

    During two cruise legs with the RV Victor Hensen (December 1993, February 1994), the demersal fish assemblages of the Golfo de Nicoya (GN), Bahía Coronado-Sierpe Terraba (ST) and Golfo Dulce (GD) areas were assessed from nearshore (approximately 20 m) to shelf edge (approximately 200 m) waters. 44 Beam- and 29 otter trawl collections were made on an area of 2,119,405 m2, yielding a total of 242 species of fish. Despite the lower number of samples taken, more species were collected by the otter trawl (189 compared to 160), due to a wider area swept. As revealed by the species-area curve and a longnormal-curve constructed from the pooled (log) abundance data, the fish assemblage appeared as well sampled and a theoretical species richness (SR) of-306 was estimated for the whole area. Mean species number per collection and mean biomass per area were much lower in the GD-area (9.3 species, 0.36 g/m2) compared to the ST (15.4, 0.81 g/m2) and GN (17.3, 0.74 g/m2) areas, indicating a depauperate fish assemblage in the former. Lowest species numbers and biomass were found in the central deep part of GD with increasing values towards the sill area at the opening of the gulf and towards the shallow stations above the thermocline. Average biomass was an order of magnitude higher in the interior part of GN compared to the other areas with values up to 18.1 g/m2. Based on results of a multivariate analysis of the collections, the GN area can be divided into (1) an interior shallow area above the thermocline (< 50 m) characterized by scianids, sea carfishes, stingrays, flatfishes, sea robins, (2) an outer part (> 100 m) characterized by cods, scorpionfishes, gobies, cutlassfishes, serranids, anglerfishes and flatfishes and (3) a transition zone of the central and lateral parts with a mixed species assemblage with carangids, pufferfish, snappers, several flatfish species and the lizardfish as common elements. Characteristic for the deep basin of GD were small species of the genera Cynoscion and Porichthys. These occurred in low densities, suggesting a reduced carrying capacity of this deep basin for fish biomass in terms of food and oxygen. Species occurring at the shallow stations of GD are also found at a similar depth in the other areas, but many species are missing, namely ariids and many scianids found in the GN area. The species assemblage of the ST area resembles that of GN. Ariids, however, are missing here too. Biotic station parameters like species richness, biomass, abundance and production were not significantly correlated with abiotic parameters (temperature, oxygen, nutrients) suggesting that other habitat factors not evaluated in this study like habitat heterogeneity, distance to the open ocean, current regime and food availability probably are important factors for the structure of the fish assemblage.

  17. Demersal crustacean assemblages along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica: a quantitative and multivariate assessment based on the Victor Hensen Costa Rica expedition (1993/1994).

    PubMed

    Jesse, S

    1996-12-01

    During the first cruise leg with the RV Victor Hensen to the Pacific coast of Costa Rica in December 1993 (end of the rainy season) the crustacean fauna found in the demersal collections revealed an unexpected species richness and biomass. The Crustacea collections were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively during the fourth leg (February 1994, dry season) in the three study areas Golfo Dulce (GD), Bahía Coronado in the Sierpe-Térraba-estuary (ST) and Golfo de Nicoya (GN). Qualitative data were available for comparison from the first leg in december 1993. A total of 24 beamtrawl and ten ottertrawl sample collections were done on an area of 860.000 m2 yielding a total of 119 species with a biomass of 37.8 kg (10275 specimens). Despite the smaller area covered by the beamtrawl, it collected a higher number of species and more biomass than the ottertrawl due to the smaller mesh size (0.8 cm). Judging from the shape of the species -per-area-curves, the crustacean fauna appeared as representatively sampled for the study area. As compared with the GN (biomass 0.36 g +/- 0.26, SR = 97) and the ST (0.41 g +/- 0.27, SR = 59) and according to the results of the log-series-plots constructed from the abundance data, the GD seems to be a depauperated area with significantly lower biomass (0.05 g +/- 0.07) and species richness (45 sp.). No crustaceans were found in the center of the deep basin of the GD put parts of the interior gulf with adjacent mangrove areas seem to be important as nursery area for some commercially important penaeid shrimp species. The ST-estuary revealed the highest mean species number per station in the whole study area, but the GN had the highest total number of species. Biomass seems to be regularly distributed and not depth-depending within the GN, while species abundance varies clearly, confirming previous results. In contrast, abundance and biomass correlated well in the ST. Based on the results of the multivariate analysis, seven station groups of particular species assemblages can be distinguished in the study areas. Despite a high variability between stations in abundance and biomass, the following four areas of characteristic species assemblages can be identified which are also confirmed by an independent study on demersal fishes: (1) the interior part of the GN, characterized by juvenile shrimps (Sicyonia disdorsalis, Trachypenaeus fuscina), several patchily distributed anomurans, brachyurans and other predator species like portunids (especially Portunus asper) and pre-adult stomatopods (Squilla spp.); (2) the exterior part of the GN with high amounts of caridean (Pantomus affins, Plesionika spp.) and penaeid shrimps (Sicyonia picta, Solenocera mutator), the highly abundant Iliacantha hancocki and some specimens of the stomatopod Hemisquilla stylifera and the deep water portunid Portunus iridescens; (3) a transition zone between 60 and 120 m water depth with a heterogeneous faunal composition, located in the ST and east of Isla Tortugas in the GN, and (4) the oxygen-depleted shelf edge area, dominated by the galatheid Pleuroncodes monodon. Mass occurrence of this species takes place off the GD and to a lesser extent off the ST-estuary, associated with high numbers of Solenocera spp. There seems to be a general trend of species groupings along abiotic gradients (depth, temperature, oxygen saturation) interrupted by small-scale variations in habitat type, current regime, food availability and other factors not identified in this study. Neither total abundance and biomass nor biotic summary parameters like diversity, dominance or species richness correlated well with the abiotic factors measured during this survey.

  18. Optical assessment of large marine particles: development of an imaging and analysis system for quantifying large particle distributions and fluxes. Annual report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.; Gardner, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) is to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean (Program Announcement, 1991). A major component of the OMP will be to measure carbon flux on the shelf and across the shelf to the slope and open ocean. In the first round of OMP funding we proposed to develop an optical instrument package and the analytical techniques to measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment. This particle population, encompassing the ``marine snow`` size particles (diameters > 0.5 mm), is thought to be the major pathway of material flux in the ocean (McCave, 1975; Asper, 1987; Walsh and Gardner, 1992). The overall objective of this proposal was to develop an instrument package and the analytical techniques to precisely measure a wide spectrum of the large aggregate population of particles in the shelf/slope environment at a rate sufficient to integrate the observed particle distributions into the coupled physical and biogeochemical models necessary to understand the shelf and slope as a system. We envisioned three stages of development of the instrument package: (1) design, assembly, and laboratory testing of all components and the package as a whole, (2) a short period of laboratory and field testing of the instrument package to determine the best operational parameters, and (3) operations within a framework of complementary analytical sampling such as an appropriate process study funded under the OMP. The first two stages were covered by this proposal. A renewal proposal follows to cover the third stage. 6 figs.

  19. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2009-03-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and

  20. Physiological measures of neurotoxicity of diazinon and malathion to larval rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and their correlation with behavioral measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauvais, S.L.; Jones, S.B.; Brewer, S.K.; Little, E.E.

    2000-01-01

    Relations between neurotoxicants and changes in physiological parameters and behavior were investigated in larval rainbow trout (RBT; Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to sublethal concentrations of two organophosphate pesticides (OPs). Fish were exposed to diazinon and malathion in static-renewal experiments. After exposures for 24, 96, or 96 h, followed by 48 h of recovery, individual RBT were videotaped to assess locomotory behaviors. Brain tissue from the same fish was assayed for the physiological endpoints, cholinesterase (ChE) activity, muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR) number (B(max)), and MChR affinity (K(D)). Cholinesterase activity decreased significantly with increasing concentrations of both diazinon and malathion and differed significantly among exposure durations, with 24- and 96-h means less than 48-h recovery means. Decreases in B(max) with OP concentration were not significant for either chemical, and K(D) was unaffected. Changes in swimming speed and distance were significantly correlated with changes in ChE activity for both chemicals; rate of turning was significantly correlated with ChE activity in malathion exposures. These results suggest that correlations between physiological and behavioral changes previously seen in mammals also occur in fish.

  1. Isolation and identification of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) from farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Soltani, Mehdi; Mardani, Karim; Shokrpoor, Sara; Rahmati-Holasoo, Hooman; Mokhtari, Abbas; Hasanzadeh, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a rhabdovirus that causes one of the most important fish diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) production industry. During the present study from October 2014 to July 2015, the virus causing viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) was isolated and identified in rainbow trout farms from five of sixteen farms experiencing mass mortalities in six provinces of Iran with major trout production. Cumulative mortalities at VHSV-positive farms ranged from 30 to 70%. Clinical signs of disease included exophthalmia, petechial hemorrhages in the mandible and around the eyes, a swollen abdomen and darkening of the integument, widespread petechiae of the musculature and pyloric regions, severe congestion of the kidney, and pale enlarged livers. In addition, histopathologic examinations of tissues showed severe lesions in muscle, kidney and liver, which were compatible with those already described for VHS. Furthermore, homogenates tissues of diseased fish induced cytopathic effects (CPE) in CHSE-214 cells, and confirmatory diagnosis of VHS was made by RT-PCR reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and identification of VHSV from farmed trout in Iran, which may have originated from Europe.

  2. Linking oceanic food webs to coastal production and growth rates of Pacific salmon ( Oncorhynchus spp.), using models on three scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Kerim Y.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; King, Jacquelynne R.; Megrey, Bernard A.; Myers, Katherine W.

    2005-03-01

    Three independent modeling methods—a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ) model (NEMURO), a food web model (Ecopath/Ecosim), and a bioenergetics model for pink salmon ( Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)—were linked to examine the relationship between seasonal zooplankton dynamics and annual food web productive potential for Pacific salmon feeding and growing in the Alaskan subarctic gyre ecosystem. The linked approach shows the importance of seasonal and ontogenetic prey switching for zooplanktivorous pink salmon, and illustrates the critical role played by lipid-rich forage species, especially the gonatid squid Berryteuthis anonychus, in connecting zooplankton to upper trophic level production in the subarctic North Pacific. The results highlight the need to uncover natural mechanisms responsible for accelerated late winter and early spring growth of salmon, especially with respect to climate change and zooplankton bloom timing. Our results indicate that the best match between modeled and observed high-seas pink salmon growth requires the inclusion of two factors into bioenergetics models: (1) decreasing energetic foraging costs for salmon as zooplankton are concentrated by the spring shallowing of pelagic mixed-layer depth and (2) the ontogenetic switch of salmon diets from zooplankton to squid. Finally, we varied the timing and input levels of coastal salmon production to examine effects of density-dependent coastal processes on ocean feeding; coastal processes that place relatively minor limitations on salmon growth may delay the seasonal timing of ontogenetic diet shifts and thus have a magnified effect on overall salmon growth rates.

  3. Evaluation of strobe lights to reduce turbine entrainment of juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Evans, Scott D.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Kohn, Mike

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a radiotelemetry evaluation to determine if strobe lights could be used to decrease turbine entrainment of juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. We found that radio-tagged juvenile steelhead approached and entered two spillbays (one lighted, one unlighted) in equal proportions. However, the presence of strobe lights was associated with decreased spillbay residence time of juvenile steelhead and increased passage through induction slots (secondary turbine intakes located upstream of the ogee on the spillway). Mean residence time of tagged fish inside the lighted spillbay was 14 min compared to 62 min inside the unlighted spillbay. Radio-tagged steelhead passed through induction slots at a higher proportion in the lighted spillbay (55%) than in the unlighted spillbay (26%). Recent studies have suggested that strobe lights can induce torpor in juvenile salmonids. We believe that strobe light exposure affected fish in our study at a location where they were susceptible to high flows thereby reducing mean residence time and increasing the proportion of tagged fish entering induction slots in the lighted spillbay. Our results suggest that factors such as deployment location, exposure, and flow are important variables that should be considered when evaluating strobe lights as a potential fish-deterring management tool.

  4. Central effects of native urotensin II on motor activity, ventilatory movements, and heart rate in the trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Leprince, Jérôme; Mimassi, Nagi; Mabin, Dominique; Vaudry, Hubert; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-15

    Urotensin II (UII) has been originally isolated from fish urophysis. However, in fish as in mammals, UII is also produced in brain neurons. Although UII binding sites are widely distributed in the fish central nervous system (CNS), little is known regarding its central activities. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of synthetic trout UII on the duration of motor activity (ACT; evidenced by bursts of activity on the trace of the ventilatory signal), ventilatory frequency (VF), ventilatory amplitude (VA), and heart rate (HR) in unanesthesized trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. ICV injection of very low doses of UII (1 and 5 pmol) produced a dose-dependent increase of ACT without affecting VF, VA, or HR. At a higher dose (50 pmol), UII stimulated ACT as well as VF, VA, and HR. ICV injection of trout angiotensin II (5 pmol) did not affect ACT, VF, and VA, but provoked a robust increase in HR. These data provide the first evidence that central administration of UII stimulates motor activity in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

  5. Evaluation of fast green FCF dye for non-lethal detection of integumental injuries in juvenile chinook salmon oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Conway, C.M.; Applegate, L.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    A rapid staining procedure for detection of recent skin and fin injuries was tested in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Immersion of anesthetized fish for 1 min in aerated aqueous solutions of the synthetic food dye fast green FCF (Food Green 3) at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% produced consistent and visible staining of integumental injuries. A 0.1% fast green concentration was satisfactory for visual evaluation of injuries, whereas a 0.5% concentration was preferable for digital photography. A rinsing procedure comprised of two 30 s rinses in fresh water was most effective for removal of excess stain after exposure of fish. Survival studies in fresh water and seawater and histopathological analyses indicated that short exposures to aqueous solutions of fast green were non-toxic to juvenile Chinook salmon. In comparisons of the gross and microscopic appearance of fish exposed to fast green at various times after injury, the dye was observed only in areas of the body where epidermal disruption was present as determined by scanning electron microscopy. No dye was observed in areas where epidermal integrity had been restored. Further comparisons showed that fast green exposure produced more consistent and intense staining of skin injury sites than a previously published procedure using trypan blue. Because of its relatively low cost, ease of use and the rapid and specific staining of integumental injuries, fast green may find widespread application in fish health and surface injury evaluations. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  6. Differences in Ichthyophonus prevalence and infection severity between upper Yukon River and Tanana River chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Hershberger, P.

    2006-01-01

    Two genetically distinct populations of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were simultaneously sampled at the confluence of the Yukon and Tanana rivers in 2003. Upper Yukon-Canadian fish had significantly higher infection prevalence as well as more severe infections (higher parasite density in heart tissue) than the lower Yukon-Tanana River fish. Both populations had migrated the same distance from the mouth of the Yukon River at the time of sampling but had significantly different distances remaining to swim before reaching their respective spawning grounds. Multiple working hypotheses are proposed to explain the differences between the two stocks: (1) the two genetically distinct populations have different inherent resistance to infection, (2) genetically influenced differences in feeding behaviour resulted in temporal and/or spatial differences in exposure, (3) physiological differences resulting from different degrees of sexual maturity influenced the course of disease, and (4) the most severely infected Tanana River fish either died en route or fatigued and were unable to complete their migration to the Tanana River, thus leaving a population of apparently healthier fish. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Landscape-scale evaluation of genetic structure among barrier-isolated populations of coastal cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, T.J.; Gresswell, R.E.; Banks, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Relationships among landscape structure, stochastic disturbance, and genetic diversity were assessed by examining interactions between watershed-scale environmental factors and genetic diversity of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) in 27 barrier-isolated watersheds from western Oregon, USA. Headwater populations of coastal cutthroat trout were genetically differentiated (mean FST = 0.33) using data from seven microsatellite loci (2232 individuals), but intrapopulation microsatellite genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 5, mean He = 0.60) was only moderate. Genetic diversity of coastal cutthroat trout was greater (P = 0.02) in the Coast Range ecoregion (mean alleles = 47) than in the Cascades ecoregion (mean alleles = 30), and differences coincided with indices of regional within-watershed complexity and connectivity. Furthermore, regional patterns of diversity evident from isolation-by-distance plots suggested that retention of within-population genetic diversity in the Coast Range ecoregion is higher than that in the Cascades, where genetic drift is the dominant factor influencing genetic patterns. Thus, it appears that physical landscape features have influenced genetic patterns in these populations isolated from short-term immigration. ?? 2008 NRC.

  8. Environmental enrichment in steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hatcheries: Field evaluation of aggression, foraging, and territoriality in natural and hatchery fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatara, C.P.; Riley, S.C.; Scheurer, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Reforms for salmonid hatcheries include production of hatchery fish with behavioral characteristics similar to wild conspecifics. Enrichment of the hatchery environment has been proposed to achieve this goal. Field experiments of steelhead (i.e., sea-run rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry from a common stock reared under natural (i.e., stream), enriched hatchery, and conventional hatchery conditions indicated no significant differences in the rates of foraging or aggression between rearing treatments. However, the rates of foraging and aggression of natural fry were significantly affected by the type of hatchery fry stocked with them. Natural steelhead fry fed at lower rates and exhibited higher rates of aggression when stocked with steelhead fry raised in enriched hatchery environments. Territory sizes of steelhead fry ranged from 0.015 to 0.801 m2; were significantly, positively related to body length; and were not significantly different between rearing treatments. We conclude that hatchery steelhead fry released into streams establish territories that are proportional to their body length and similar in size to territories of natural steelhead fry. Our results indicate that both conventional and enriched hatchery environments produce natural social behaviors in steelhead released as fry and that fry from enriched hatchery environments may alter the foraging and aggressive behavior of natural, resident steelhead fry. ?? 2008 NRC.

  9. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  10. Differential virulence mechanisms of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include host entry and virus replication kinetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; Purcell, M.K.; Kurath, G.

    2009-01-01

    Host specificity is a phenomenon exhibited by all viruses. For the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), differential specificity of virus strains from the U and M genogroups has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), M IHNV strains are consistently more prevalent and more virulent than U IHNV. The basis of the differential ability of these two IHNV genogroups to cause disease in rainbow trout was investigated in live infection challenges with representative U and M IHNV strains. When IHNV was delivered by intraperitoneal injection, the mortality caused by U IHNV increased, indicating that the low virulence of U IHNV is partly due to inefficiency in entering the trout host. Analyses of in vivo replication showed that U IHNV consistently had lower prevalence and lower viral load than M IHNV during the course of infection. In analyses of the host immune response, M IHNV-infected fish consistently had higher and longer expression of innate immune-related genes such as Mx-1. This suggests that the higher virulence of M IHNV is not due to suppression of the immune response in rainbow trout. Taken together, the results support a kinetics hypothesis wherein faster replication enables M IHNV to rapidly achieve a threshold level of virus necessary to override the strong host innate immune response. ?? 2009 SGM.

  11. Biological control of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using Aeromonas phage PAS-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Choresca, C H; Shin, S P; Han, J E; Jun, J W; Park, S C

    2015-02-01

    The potential control efficacy of Aeromonas phage PAS-1 was evaluated against Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) model in this study. The phage was co-cultured with the virulent A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain AS05 that possesses the type III secretion system (TTSS) ascV gene, and efficient bacteriolytic activity was observed against the bacteria. The administration of PAS-1 in rainbow trout demonstrated that the phage was cleared from the fish within 200 h post-administration, and a temporal neutralizing activity against the phage was detected in the sera of phage-administrated fish. The administration of PAS-1 (multiplicity of infection: 10 000) in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infected rainbow trout model showed notable protective effects, with increased survival rates and mean times to death. These results demonstrated that Aeromonas phage PAS-1 could be considered as an alternative biological control agent against A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infections in rainbow trout culture.

  12. The combine effects of salting and thyme oil on sensory and chemical changes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Pınar Oǧuzhan

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the combine effects of salting and thyme oil on chemical and sensory changes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during storage (4°C) was investigated over a period of 24 days. There groups were constituted: group A-control salted, group B-salted samples with 0.4% of thyme oil and group C-salted samples with 0.8% of thyme oil. Fillets were subject to chemical (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-TBARS, total volatile base nitrogen-TVB-N) and sensory analyses on certain days (0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24th days) of storage. Five experienced panelists, academic staff who were trained in sensory descriptors for fishes, were employed to evaluate the quality of trout fillets during storage. Rainbow trout fillets were assessed on the basis of appearance, taste, texture and odour characteristics using a nine point descriptive scale. TVB-N and TBARS values increased in the duration of storage time in all groups. TVB-N and TBARS values in control groups were higher than other groups. Group C samples were assessed as the most acceptable products by the panellists. Difference in chemical and sensory changes between samples was found to be significant (p<0.05) during storage period.

  13. Effects of oil-contaminated prey on the feeding, growth, and related energetics on pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Walbaum, fry

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Walbaum, fry were exposed to oil contaminated prey (OCP) in a series of experiments to determine the effect of oil exposure via the diet on the ability of pink fry to survive. Brine shrimp, Artemia salina, nauplii were contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons by exposure to the water-soluble fraction (WSF) of Cook Inlet crude oil and fed to the fish. Feeding rates were measured for 10 days using OCP and for 5 days using uncontaminated prey (post-exposure period). In a separate experiment, fry growth was measured over a 50 day period. In another experiment, fry oxygen consumption, food absorption and utilization, and ammonia excretion was measured to determine the effects of OCP on fry metabolic activity. Results indicate that exposure to OCP can reduce fry growth primarily by reducing food intake, but additional nutrition is lost from the non-absorption of ingested food. Reductions in growth could decrease fry survival, and thereby reduce the number of returning adult pink salmon.

  14. The influence of hydrology and waterway distance on population structure of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in a large river.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J B; Beacham, T D; Wetklo, M; Seeb, L W; Smith, C T; Flannery, B G; Wenburg, J K

    2010-04-01

    Adult Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha navigate in river systems using olfactory cues that may be influenced by hydrologic factors such as flow and the number, size and spatial distribution of tributaries. Thus, river hydrology may influence both homing success and the level of straying (gene flow), which in turn influences population structure. In this study, two methods of multivariate analysis were used to examine the extent to which four indicators of hydrology and waterway distance explained population structure of O. tshawytscha in the Yukon River. A partial Mantel test showed that the indicators of hydrology were positively associated with broad-scale (Yukon basin) population structure, when controlling for the influence of waterway distance. Multivariate multiple regression showed that waterway distance, supplemented with the number and flow of major drainage basins, explained more variation in broad-scale population structure than any single indicator. At an intermediate spatial scale, indicators of hydrology did not appear to influence population structure after accounting for waterway distance. These results suggest that habitat changes in the Yukon River, which alter hydrology, may influence the basin-wide pattern of population structure in O. tshawytscha. Further research is warranted on the role of hydrology in concert with waterway distance in influencing population structure in Pacific salmon.

  15. Intestinal nematodes affect selenium bioaccumulation, oxidative stress biomarkers, and health parameters in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Hursky, Olesya; Pietrock, Michael

    2015-02-17

    In environmental studies, parasites are often seen as a product of enhanced host susceptibility due to exposure to one or several stressors, whereas potential consequences of infections on host responses are often overlooked. Therefore, the present study focused on effects of parasitism on bioaccumulation of selenium (Se) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Joint effects of biological (parasite) and chemical (Se) stressors on biomarkers of oxidative stress (glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD)), and fish health (condition factor (K), hepatosomatic index (HSI), gross energy) were also examined. Fish of the control group received uncontaminated food, while test fish, either experimentally infected with the nematode Raphidascaris acus or not, were exposed to dietary selenomethionine (Se-Met) at an environmentally relevant dose over 7 weeks. Selenium bioaccumulation by the parasite was low relative to its host, and parasitized trout showed slowed Se accumulation in the muscle as compared to uninfected fish. Furthermore, GST and SOD activities of trout exposed to both Se-Met and parasites were generally significantly lower than in fish exposed to Se-Met alone. Gross energy concentrations, but not K or HSI, were reduced in fish exposed to both Se-Met and R. acus. Together the experiment strongly calls for consideration of parasites when interpreting effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms in field investigations.

  16. Effects of sodium chloride on chronic silver toxicity to early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Dethloff, Gail M; Naddy, Rami B; Gorsuch, Joseph W

    2007-08-01

    The chronic (early life stage) toxicity of silver to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was determined in flow-through exposures. Rainbow trout embryos were exposed to silver (as AgNO3) from 48 h or less postfertilization to 30 d postswimup in soft water in the presence and absence of 49 mg/L of NaCl (30 mg/L of Cl). The studies determined effect levels for rainbow trout exposed throughout an extended development period and assessed possible protective effects of sodium chloride. Lowest-observed-effect concentrations were greater than 1.25 microg/L of dissolved silver for survival, mean day to hatch, mean day to swimup, and whole-body sodium content in both studies. Whole-body silver concentrations increased significantly at 0.13 microg/L of dissolved silver in unmodified water and at 1.09 microg/L of dissolved silver in amended water. The maximum-acceptable toxicant concentration for growth was greater than 1.25 microg/L of dissolved silver in unmodified water and 0.32 microg/L of dissolved silver in amended water. Whole-body silver concentrations were more sensitive than survival and growth end points in unmodified water. Interpretation of sodium chloride effects on chronic silver toxicity to rainbow trout was complicated by differences in measured effect levels that were potentially the result of strain differences between test organisms in the two studies.

  17. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Narum, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  18. Comparative embryotoxicity of pulp mill extracts in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), American flagfish (Jordanella floridae) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Orrego, Rodrigo; Guchardi, John; Beyger, Lindsay; Krause, Rachelle; Holdway, Douglas

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Chilean pulp mill effluent extracts (untreated, primary and secondary treated pulp mill effluents), along with steroid standards (testosterone and 17β-estradiol) and a wood extractive standard (beta-sitosterol) on developing post-fertilized fish embryos. Our study included a cold freshwater species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and two warm freshwater species American flagfish (Jordanella floridae) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Embryotoxicity results included delay in time to hatch and decreased hatchability but no significant egg and larvae mortality was observed in the pulp mill extract exposed embryos. By contrast, significant early hatching and increased hatchability were observed in beta-sitosterol exposed embryos, along with high mortality of testosterone exposed embryos across species. Teratogenic responses were observed in medaka embryos in all treatments. Abnormalities were detected starting at development stages 19-20 (2-4 somite stages) and included optical deformities (micro-opthalmia, 1 or 2 eyes) and lack of development of brains and hearts. Additionally, phenotypic sex identification of surviving offspring found female-biased sex-ratios in all treatments except testosterone across species. Overall, our study indicated that Chilean pulp and paper mill extractives caused embryotoxicity (post-fertilized embryos) across species and irrespective of the effluent treatment. The effects were mainly associated with delayed time to hatch, decreased hatchability, and species-specific teratogenesis.

  19. Persistent organic pollutants in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha): implications for resident killer whales of British Columbia and adjacent waters.

    PubMed

    Cullon, Donna L; Yunker, Mark B; Alleyne, Carl; Dangerfield, Neil J; O'Neill, Sandra; Whiticar, Michael J; Ross, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    We measured persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in order to characterize dietary exposure in the highly contaminated, salmon-eating northeastern Pacific resident killer whales. We estimate that 97 to 99% of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) in returning adult chinook were acquired during their time at sea. Highest POP concentrations (including PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, and DDT) and lowest lipids were observed in the more southerly chinook sampled. While feeding by salmon as they enter some more POP-contaminated near-shore environments inevitably contribute to their contamination, relationships observed between POP patterns and both lipid content and delta13C also suggest a migration-related metabolism and loss of the less-chlorinated PCB congeners. This has implications for killer whales, with the more PCB-contaminated salmon stocks in the south partly explaining the 4.0 to 6.6 times higher estimated daily intake for sigmaPCBs in southern resident killer whales compared to northern residents. We hypothesize that the lower lipid content of southerly chinook stocks may cause southern resident killer whales to increase their salmon consumption by as much as 50%, which would further increase their exposure to POPs.

  20. Transportation of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, smolts in the Columbia River and effects on adult returns

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, were captured at Little Goose Dam in the Snake River during their seaward migration and transported 400 km downstream to the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam. Their survival was increased from 1.1 to 15 times as compared with control fish which passed by seven mainstem low-level dams and reservoirs. Variations in survival were mainly dependent on species and environmental conditions in the river during the period fish were transported. The homing ability of the adult fish was not significantly diminished; less than 0.2% of strays occurred among adult returns from groups transported. Transportation did not affect ocean age or size of returning adult steelhead, but ocean age of returning adult chinook salmon may have been affected. Steelhead returned to Little Goose Dam at a substantially higher rate (1.4 to 2.7%) than chinook salmon (0.1 to 0.8%) from groups transported. The timing of adult returns of both species to Little Goose Dam was not related to the time of capture and downstream release of smolts.

  1. Effects of elevated dietary iron on the gastrointestinal expression of Nramp genes and iron homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Hamilton, Charmain D; Niyogi, Som

    2013-04-01

    Diet is the primary source of iron (Fe) for freshwater fish, and the absorption of Fe is believed to occur via the Nramp family of divalent metal transporters (also called DMT1). Presently, the homeostatic regulation of dietary Fe absorption in fish is poorly understood. This study examined the gastrointestinal mRNA expression of two Nramp isoforms, Nramp-β and Nramp-γ, in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), following exposure to elevated dietary Fe [1,256 mg Fe/kg food vs. 136 mg Fe/kg food (control)] for 14 days. The physiological performance, plasma Fe status and tissue-specific accumulation of Fe were also evaluated. In general, the mRNA expression level of Nramp was higher in the intestine relative to the stomach. Interestingly, fish fed on a high-Fe diet exhibited a significant induction in Nramp expression after 7 days, followed by a decrease to the level observed in control fish on day 14. The increase in Nramp expression correlated with the elevated gastrointestinal and plasma Fe concentrations. However, the hepatic Fe concentration remained unchanged during the entire exposure period, indicating strong homeostatic regulation of hepatic Fe level in fish. Fish appeared to handle increased systemic Fe level by elevating the plasma transferrin level, thereby enhancing the Fe-binding capacity in the plasma. Overall, our study provides new interesting insights into the homeostatic regulation of dietary Fe uptake and handling in freshwater fish.

  2. Effect of linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS) on non-specific defence mechanisms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Bakirel, Tülay; Keleş, Oya; Karataş, Süheyla; Ozcan, Mukaddes; Türkmen, Gülhan; Candan, Akin

    2005-01-26

    Linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS) is among the most widely disseminated xenobiotics to enter waste streams and the aquatic environment. In the present investigation, we present a novel approach to evaluate in toxicity of LAS. The effects of sublethal levels (0.2 and 0.4 mg/l) of LAS on non-specific immune system, phagocytosis, respiratory burst and lyzosyme activity, and specific growth rate in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during a 54-day exposure were examined by a static bioassay test procedure. The phagocytic activity of leukocytes from fish exposed to 0.4 mg/l LAS statistically decreased compared with the control fish values. No significant reductions were observed in the extra-intracellular respiratory burst and lysozyme activities after exposure to LAS at any of the concentrations tested. The final body weight in fish groups exposed to the LAS were found to be significantly lower than in the control. The specific growth rate results also supported the result above. The results of this study showed sublethal doses (0.2-0.4 mg/l) of LAS caused to statistically insignificant suppression of non-specific immune system mechanisms excluding phagocytosis in fish at laboratory conditions. These doses of LAS may produce potential synergism on immune system when presented with other environmental pollutants.

  3. Changing patterns in coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) diet and prey in a gradient of deciduous canopies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romero, N.; Gresswell, R.E.; Li, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the influence of riparian vegetation patterns on coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki clarki diet and prey from the summer of 2001 through the spring of 2002. Benthic and drifting invertebrates, allochthonous prey, and fish diet were collected from deciduous, conifer, and mixed sections of three Oregon coastal watersheds. The nine sites were best characterized as a continuum of deciduous cover, and shrub cover and proportion of deciduous canopy were positively correlated (r = 0.74). Most sources of prey (benthic invertebrate biomass, allochthonous invertebrate inputs, aquatic and total invertebrate drift) and aquatic prey ingested by coastal cutthroat trout were greater where shrub cover was more abundant. Only aquatic drift, total invertebrate drift, and allochthonous invertebrates were positively correlated with deciduous vegetation. Compared with coniferous sites, allochthonous invertebrates under deciduous and mixed canopies were almost 30% more abundant. Stream discharge likely influenced seasonal fluxes of aquatic invertebrate biomass in the benthos and drift. Aquatic insects dominated gut contents during this study; however, terrestrial prey were most common in the diet during the summer and fall. In the Pacific northwest, systematic removal of deciduous riparian vegetation to promote conifers may have unintended consequences on food resources of coastal cutthroat trout and aquatic food web interactions. ?? 2005 NRC.

  4. Landscape scale measures of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioenergetic growth rate potential in Lake Michigan and comparison with angler catch rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, T.O.; Rutherford, E.S.; Brines, Shannon J.; Geddes, C.A.; Mason, D.M.; Schwab, D.J.; Fleischer, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    The relative quality of a habitat can influence fish consumption, growth, mortality, and production. In order to quantify habitat quality, several authors have combined bioenergetic and foraging models to generate spatially explicit estimates of fish growth rate potential (GRP). However, the capacity of GRP to reflect the spatial distributions of fishes over large areas has not been fully evaluated. We generated landscape scale estimates of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) GRP throughout Lake Michigan for 1994-1996, and used these estimates to test the hypotheses that GRP is a good predictor of spatial patterns of steelhead catch rates. We used surface temperatures (measured with AVHRR satellite imagery) and acoustically measured steelhead prey densities (alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus) as inputs for the GRP model. Our analyses demonstrate that potential steelhead growth rates in Lake Michigan are highly variable in both space and time. Steelhead GRP tended to increase with latitude, and mean GRP was much higher during September 1995, compared to 1994 and 1996. In addition, our study suggests that landscape scale measures of GRP are not good predictors of steelhead catch rates throughout Lake Michigan, but may provide an index of interannual variation in system-wide habitat quality.

  5. Topographical Mapping of the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Microbiome Reveals a Diverse Bacterial Community with Antifungal Properties in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, Liam; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Tacchi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of wild and farmed aquatic vertebrates face the threat of many aquatic pathogens, including fungi. These surfaces are colonized by diverse symbiotic bacterial communities that may contribute to fight infection. Whereas the gut microbiome of teleosts has been extensively studied using pyrosequencing, this tool has rarely been employed to study the compositions of the bacterial communities present on other teleost mucosal surfaces. Here we provide a topographical map of the mucosal microbiome of an aquatic vertebrate, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, we revealed novel bacterial diversity at each of the five body sites sampled and showed that body site is a strong predictor of community composition. The skin exhibited the highest diversity, followed by the olfactory organ, gills, and gut. Flectobacillus was highly represented within skin and gill communities. Principal coordinate analysis and plots revealed clustering of external sites apart from internal sites. A highly diverse community was present within the epithelium, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and pyrosequencing. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that two Arthrobacter sp. skin isolates, a Psychrobacter sp. strain, and a combined skin aerobic bacterial sample inhibit the growth of Saprolegnia australis and Mucor hiemalis, two important aquatic fungal pathogens. These results underscore the importance of symbiotic bacterial communities of fish and their potential role for the control of aquatic fungal diseases. PMID:26209676

  6. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (Jurea) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of Jurea by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while Jurea increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of Jurea, while the gills became the dominant site for Jurea only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial Jurea. Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. PMID:26608657

  7. An attenuated virus vaccine appears safe to the central nervous system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after intranasal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larragoite, Erin T.; Tacchi, Luca; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccines are very effective but the olfactory organ provides direct access of antigens to the brain. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is known to cause high mortalities in salmonids. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of a live attenuated IHNV nasal (I.N) vaccine in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the olfactory organ, the vaccine was detected 1 and 4 days after primary I.N vaccination but not in the intramuscular (i.m) or control groups. In the brain, IHNV was detected by RT-qPCR 4 and 21 days after i.m primary vaccination. One i.m and one I.N vaccinated trout were positive at days 4 and 28 days post-boost, respectively. Presence of IHNV in the brain of i.m vaccinated fish correlated with moderate increases in IL-1β and TNF-α expression in this tissue. These results demonstrate that IHNV vaccine lasts for 4 days in the local nasal environment and that nasal vaccination appears to be safe to the CNS of rainbow trout. PMID:26772477

  8. Effects of surgically and gastrically implanted radio transmitters on swimming performance and predator avoidance of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, N.S.; Rondorf, D.W.; Evans, S.D.; Kelly, J.E.; Perry, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Radiotelemetry data are often used to make inferences about an entire study population; therefore, the transmitter attachment method should be the one that least affects the study animal. Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) <120 mm in fork length (FL) with either gastrically or surgically implanted transmitters had significantly lower critical swimming speeds than control fish 1 and 19-23 days after tagging. For fish >120 mm FL, fish with gastric implants swam as well as controls 1 day but not 19-23 days after tagging. In contrast, fish with surgical implants swam as well as controls 19-23 days but not 1 day after tagging. During predation trials, fish with gastric or surgical implants were eaten by smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in significantly greater numbers than controls. We do not recommend implanting transmitters (representing 4.6-10.4% of the fish's body weight) in fish <120 mm FL. Furthermore, surgical implants (representing 2.2-5.6% of the fish's body weight) may be the preferred method for biotelemetry studies of juvenile chinook salmon >120 mm FL.

  9. The role of beaver in shaping steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) habitat complexity and thermal refugia in a central Oregon stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolati, F.; Wheaton, J. M.; Neilson, B. T.; Bouwes, N.; Pollock, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The incised and degraded habitat of Bridge Creek, tributary to the John Day River in central Oregon, is thought to be limiting the local population of ESA-listed steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Restoration efforts for this watershed are aimed to improve their habitat through reconnecting the channel with portions of its former floodplain (now terraces) to increase stream habitat complexity and the extent of riparian vegetation. This is being done via the installation of over a hundred beaver dam support (BDS) structures that are designed to either mimic beaver dams or support existing beaver dams. The overall objective of this study is to determine if the BDS structures have had an effect on stream channel habitat complexity and thermal refugia in selected sections of Bridge Creek. Analysis of stream temperature data in restoration treatment and control areas will show the effects of beaver dams on stream temperature. Analysis of aerial imagery and high resolution topographic data will exhibit how the number and types of geomorphic units have changed after the construction of beaver dams. Combined, the results of this research are aimed to increase our understanding of how beaver dams impact fish habitat and stream temperature.

  10. Genetic characterization of hybridization and introgression between anadromous rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki).

    PubMed

    Young, W P; Ostberg, C O; Keim, P; Thorgaard, G H

    2001-04-01

    Interspecific hybridization represents a dynamic evolutionary phenomenon and major conservation problem in salmonid fishes. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to describe the extent and characterize the pattern of hybridization and introgression between coastal rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). Hybrid individuals were initially identified using principle coordinate analysis of 133 polymorphic AFLP markers. Subsequent analysis using 23 diagnostic AFLP markers revealed the presence of F1, rainbow trout backcross, cutthroat trout backcross and later-generation hybrids. mtDNA analysis demonstrated equal numbers of F1 hybrids with rainbow and cutthroat trout mtDNA indicating reciprocal mating of the parental types. In contrast, rainbow and cutthroat trout backcross hybrids always exhibited the mtDNA from the recurrent parent, indicating a male hybrid mating with a pure female. This study illustrates the usefulness of the AFLP technique for generating large numbers of species diagnostic markers. The pattern of hybridization raises many questions concerning the existence and action of reproductive isolating mechanisms between these two species. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that introgression between anadromous populations of coastal rainbow and coastal cutthroat trout is limited by an environment-dependent reduction in hybrid fitness.

  11. Discovery and characterization of novel genetic markers for use in the management of Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi).

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Victoria L; Campbell, Nathan R; Narum, Shawn R; Peacock, Mary M; Garza, John Carlos

    2013-03-01

    The Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi) is threatened by habitat destruction, over-harvest and hybridization with nonnative trout. Currently, three Geographic Management Units (GMUs) are recognized within the taxon. Here, we describe a suite of 68 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic markers for use in the study and management of Lahontan cutthroat trout and a closely related subspecies, the Paiute cutthroat trout (O. c. seleneris). These include markers variable within the two subspecies (n = 35), diagnostic for the two subspecies (n = 23) and diagnostic for Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. c. bouvieri) and other closely related subspecies (n = 10). Sixty-three markers were discovered by Sanger sequencing of 171 EST loci in an ascertainment panel including Lahontan cutthroat trout from four populations representing all GMUs. Five markers were identified in a secondary sequencing effort with a single population of Lahontan cutthroat trout. TaqMan assays were validated on six Lahontan cutthroat trout populations and a diverse panel of other trout. Over 90% of the markers variable in Lahontan cutthroat trout were polymorphic in at least two populations, and 66% were variable within all three GMUs. All Lahontan diagnostic markers were also fixed for the Lahontan allele in Paiute cutthroat trout. Most of the Yellowstone diagnostic markers can also be used for this purpose in other cutthroat trout subspecies. This is the first set of SNP markers to be developed for Lahontan cutthroat trout, and will be an important tool for conservation and management.

  12. Effects of dietary selenomethionine on cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) growth and reproductive performance over a life cycle.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Ronald W; Oram, Libbie L; Möller, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A 2.5-year feeding trial was conducted in which cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) were fed either a basal diet (1.2 microg Se/g diet) or the basal diet supplemented with 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 microg Se/g diet as selenomethionine from 1 g weight to maturation [corrected]. After 44 weeks of feeding, a subsample of fish was removed from dietary treatment groups and fed the basal diet for an additional 32 weeks. Concentrations of Se in whole fish and eggs increased in proportion to dietary Se intake, but no differences in growth, feed intake, survival, or egg hatchability were observed among dietary groups. Cranial-facial deformities in second-generation offspring were less than 6% in all treatment groups except for fish fed the diet supplemented with 4 microg Se/g diet as selenomethionine [corrected], where a 9.2% incidence was observed. Fish switched from selenomethionine-supplemented diets to the basal diet lost Se, calculated as microg Se lost/g weight gain, at 1.01, 2.84, 4.42, and 4.42 for dietary treatment groups 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively. Results suggest no toxicity of dietary selenomethionine up to 10 microg/g supplemented diet and that with total life-cycle exposure, cutthroat trout increase Se excretion to maintain whole-body concentrations below toxic levels.

  13. The Dual Challenges of Generality and Specificity When Developing Environmental DNA Markers for Species and Subspecies of Oncorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Taylor M; Carim, Kellie J; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is a powerful tool for detecting invasive and native aquatic species. Often, species of conservation interest co-occur with other, closely related taxa. Here, we developed qPCR (quantitative PCR) markers which distinguish westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewsi), Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri), and rainbow trout (O. mykiss), which are of conservation interest both as native species and as invasive species across each other's native ranges. We found that local polymorphisms within westslope cutthroat trout and rainbow trout posed a challenge to designing assays that are generally applicable across the range of these widely-distributed species. Further, poorly-resolved taxonomies of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and Bonneville cutthroat trout (O. c. utah) prevented design of an assay that distinguishes these recognized taxa. The issues of intraspecific polymorphism and unresolved taxonomy for eDNA assay design addressed in this study are likely to be general problems for closely-related taxa. Prior to field application, we recommend that future studies sample populations and test assays more broadly than has been typical of published eDNA assays to date.

  14. The Dual Challenges of Generality and Specificity When Developing Environmental DNA Markers for Species and Subspecies of Oncorhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Taylor M.; Carim, Kellie J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is a powerful tool for detecting invasive and native aquatic species. Often, species of conservation interest co-occur with other, closely related taxa. Here, we developed qPCR (quantitative PCR) markers which distinguish westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewsi), Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri), and rainbow trout (O. mykiss), which are of conservation interest both as native species and as invasive species across each other’s native ranges. We found that local polymorphisms within westslope cutthroat trout and rainbow trout posed a challenge to designing assays that are generally applicable across the range of these widely-distributed species. Further, poorly-resolved taxonomies of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and Bonneville cutthroat trout (O. c. utah) prevented design of an assay that distinguishes these recognized taxa. The issues of intraspecific polymorphism and unresolved taxonomy for eDNA assay design addressed in this study are likely to be general problems for closely-related taxa. Prior to field application, we recommend that future studies sample populations and test assays more broadly than has been typical of published eDNA assays to date. PMID:26536367

  15. Ovarian expression and localization of a vitellogenin receptor with eight ligand binding repeats in the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki).

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Hiroko; Luo, Wenshu; Ito, Yuta; Mushirobira, Yuji; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko; Reading, Benjamin J; Sullivan, Craig V; Hiramatsu, Naoshi

    2013-09-01

    A cDNA encoding a vitellogenin receptor with 8 ligand binding repeats (vtgr) was cloned from ovaries of the cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR analyses revealed that the main site of vtgr mRNA expression was the oocytes. Expression was strongly detected in perinucleous stage oocytes, gradually decreased as oocytes grew, and became hardly detectable in vitellogenic oocytes. A rabbit antibody (a-Vtgr) was raised against a recombinant Vtgr protein in order to immunologically detect and localize Vtgr within the ovarian follicles. Western blotting using a-Vtgr detected a bold band with an apparent mass of ~95-105kDa in an ovarian preparation that also bound Sakhalin taimen, Hucho perryi, vitellogenin in ligand blots. Immunohistochemistry using a-Vtgr revealed that the Vtgr was uniformly distributed throughout the ooplasm of perinucleolus stage oocytes, subsequently translocated to the periphery of lipid droplet stage oocytes, and became localized to the oolemma during vitellogenesis. We provide the first characterization of Vtgr at both the transcriptional and the translational levels in the cutthroat trout, and our results suggest that this receptor is involved in uptake of Vtg by oocytes of this species.

  16. Cortisol-induced changes in oxygen consumption and ionic regulation in coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) parr.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D; Iwama, G K

    1996-11-01

    The influence of cortisol on oxygen consumption and osmoregulatory variables was examined in coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) parr kept in fresh water (FW) and transferred to seawater (SW). Intraperitoneal implants containing cortisol (50 μg g(-1)) in vegetable oil resulted in elevated plasma cortisol titres similar to those observed in fish following a 24h SW exposure. Cortisol treatment significantly increased the oxygen consumption and plasma glucose levels of trout in FW, consistent with the glucocorticoid role of cortisol. Cortisol treatment did not cause any changes in plasma ion concentrations or gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in FW after 10 days. Cortisol-implanted fish exposed to SW for 24h showed slightly improved ion regulatory ability compare to non-implanted controls. The results of this study suggest that during SW transfer in juvenile salmonids, increases in cortisol may act as both a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid, depending on the developmental state of the fish (e.g., smolt versus parr). Furthermore, the relative energetic costs of osmoregulation and that of the stress associated SW transfer cannot be discerned using whole-animal oxygen consumption rates.

  17. The effects of low pH and elevated aluminum on yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri)

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, A.M. ); Woodward, D.F. ); Little, E.E.; Steadman, B. ); Vertucci, F.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Although acid deposition is not considered a problem in the western US, surface waters in high elevations and fish inhabiting these waters may be vulnerable to acidification. This study examined the sensitivity of a wester salmonid to acid and aluminum stress. Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri; YSC) were exposed for 7 d during each of four early life stages, or continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch, to decreased pH and elevated Al. The authors monitored survival, growth, whole-body ion content, and behavior of the exposed fish. Sensitivity of early life stages of YSC may be expressed by survival or by survival and sublethal effects. In their study, eggs were the most sensitive life stage of YSC to low pH if survival alone was considered. However, the sublethal effects on growth, tissue ion content, and behavior revealed the alevins and swim-up larvae were more sensitive to reduced pH and increased Al than eggs or eyed embryos. They also observed that survival was significantly decreased if YSC were exposed to pH 6.0 and 50 [mu]g Al per liter continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch.

  18. Factors influencing coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) seasonal survival rates: A spatially continuous approach within stream networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, A.M.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Mark-recapture methods were used to examine watershed-scale survival of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) from two headwater stream networks. A total of 1725 individuals (???100 mm, fork length) were individually marked and monitored seasonally over a 3-year period. Differences in survival were compared among spatial (stream segment, subwatershed, and watershed) and temporal (season and year) analytical scales, and the effects of abiotic (discharge, temperature, and cover) and biotic (length, growth, condition, density, movement, and relative fish abundance) factors were evaluated. Seasonal survival was consistently lowest and least variable (years combined) during autumn (16 September - 15 December), and evidence suggested that survival was negatively associated with periods of low stream discharge. In addition, relatively low (-) and high (+) water temperatures, fish length (-), and boulder cover (+) were weakly associated with survival. Seasonal abiotic conditions affected the adult cutthroat trout population in these watersheds, and low-discharge periods (e.g., autumn) were annual survival bottlenecks. Results emphasize the importance of watershed-scale processes to the understanding of population-level survival.

  19. Patterns of variation and covariation in the shapes of mandibular bones of juvenile salmonids in the genus Oncorhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sawyer; Couture, Ryan B.; McKibben, Natasha S.; Nichols, James T.; Richardson, Shannon E.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY What is the nature of evolutionary divergence of the jaw skeleton within the genus Oncorhynchus? How can two associated bones evolve new shapes and still maintain functional integration? Here, we introduce and test a ‘concordance’ hypothesis, in which an extraordinary matching of the evolutionary shape changes of the dentary and angular articular serves to preserve their fitting together. To test this hypothesis, we examined morphologies of the dentary and angular articular at parr (juvenile) stage, and at three levels of biological organization – between salmon and trout, between sister species within both salmon and trout, and among three types differing in life histories within one species, O. mykiss. The comparisons show bone shape divergences among the groups at each level; morphological divergence between salmon and trout is marked even at this relatively early life history stage. We observed substantial matching between the two mandibular bones in both pattern and amount of shape variation, and in shape covariation across species. These findings strongly support the concordance hypothesis, and reflect functional and/or developmental constraint on morphological evolution. We present evidence for developmental modularity within both bones. The locations of module boundaries were predicted from the patterns of evolutionary divergences, and for the dentary, at least, would appear to facilitate its functional association with the angular articular. The modularity results suggest that development has biased the course of evolution. PMID:26372063

  20. Organization of glomerular territories in the olfactory bulb of post-embryonic wild chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Cory L; Suntres, Tina; Zygowska, Alexandra; Pitcher, Trevor; Zielinski, Barbara S

    2017-04-01

    The post-embryonic odor imprinting paradigm suggests Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) acquire memory to stream-specific amino acid olfactory odors prior to emergence as fry. Because effects of olfactory experience on development can be examined by mapping olfactory sensory neurons extending into distinct territories of glomerular neuropil in the olfactory bulb, glomerular patterning from early yolk-sac larva to fry was documented in wild salmonids, a temporal scale not yet thoroughly explored. Labeling olfactory sensory neurons with anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (anti-KLH) revealed seven spatially conserved glomerular territories visible at hatch and well established by the late yolk-sac larva developmental stage. Because of the responsiveness of microvillous olfactory sensory neurons to amino acids, corresponding glomeruli in the lateral bulbar region were mapped using anti-calretinin. The dorsolateral territory, distinct glomeruli of the lateral glomerular territory and the ventromedial glomeruli were immunoreactive to both KLH and calretinin. This study offers a morphological description of glomerular patterning in post-embryonic stages in wild Chinook salmon, a temporal window previously shown to be significant for olfactory imprinting. J. Morphol. 278:464-474, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of Using Tricaine Methanesulfonate and Metomidate before Euthanasia on the Contractile Properties of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jordan C; Syme, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Because many anesthetics work through depressing cell excitability, unanesthetized euthanasia has become common for research involving excitable tissues (for example muscle and nerve) to avoid these depressive effects. However, anesthetic use during euthanasia may be indicated for studies involving isolated tissues if the potential depressive effects of brief anesthetic exposure dissipate after subsequent tissue isolation, washout, and saline perfusion. We explore this here by measuring whether, when applied prior to euthanasia, standard immersion doses of 2 fish anesthetics, tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS; 100 mg/L, n = 6) and methyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (metomidate, 10 mg/L, n = 6), have residual effects on the contractile properties (force and work output) of isolated and saline-perfused ventricular compact myocardium from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results suggest that direct exposure of muscle to immersion doses of TMS—but not metomidate—impairs muscle contractile performance. However, brief exposure (2 to 3 min) to either anesthetic during euthanasia only—providing that the agent is washed out prior to tissue experimentation—does not have an effect on the contractile properties of the myocardium. Therefore, the use of TMS, metomidate, and perhaps other anesthetics that depress cell excitability during euthanasia may be indicated when conducting research on isolated and rinsed tissues. PMID:27657711

  2. How much does inbreeding contribute to the reduced fitness of hatchery-born steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the wild?

    PubMed

    Christie, Mark R; French, Rod A; Marine, Melanie L; Blouin, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Many declining populations are supplemented with captive-born individuals that are released directly into the wild. Because captive-born individuals can have lower fitness in the wild than their wild-born counterparts, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the reduced fitness of these individuals is required for appropriate conservation and management decisions. Inbreeding among captive-born individuals is one plausible mechanism because captive breeding programs frequently use small numbers of breeders to create large numbers of siblings that are subsequently released together into the wild. We tested this hypothesis in a supplementation program for steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from the Hood River, Oregon, for which first-generation hatchery fish were demonstrated to have lower fitness in the wild than their wild-born counterparts. To determine the contribution of inbreeding to this fitness decline, we first assigned 11 run-years of hatchery steelhead (3005 fish) back to their broodstock parents (462 fish) using 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci. By combining pedigree analyses with species-specific estimates of genetic load, we found that inbreeding could at most account for a 1-4% reduction in the fitness of hatchery fish relative to wild fish. Thus, inbreeding alone cannot adequately explain the 15% average fitness decline observed in first-generation hatchery fish from this population.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Gyrodactylus salmonis (Monogenea) on the Body of Captive Fingerling Oncorhynchus mykiss, Including Attachment Within the Olfactory Chamber.

    PubMed

    Lari, Ebrahim; Cone, David K; Goater, Cameron P; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-04-01

    Gyrodactylus salmonis is a common ectoparasite on the fins and body of North American salmonids in fresh water. In this study, the spatial distribution of G. salmonis on 60 captive hatchery-reared rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss , is reported. The highest parasite densities occurred on 5 × 5-mm(2) sections of the dorsal fin followed by the trunk, other fins, and the olfactory chamber, with the lowest densities on the head. The finding of infections within the olfactory chamber of 93% of the fish was unexpected. One possibility is that such infections represented spillover from high-density infrapopulations that occur on the skin and fins. However, this possibility is unlikely, because worm densities at various sites along the body surface of infected fish did not correlate with densities within the olfactory chamber. The parasite conceivably enters the chamber either via water incurrent or by crawling in from the head and subsequently remaining at this site to feed and reproduce. Results from scanning electron microscopy are consistent with physical modification to the olfactory epithelium associated with the attachment/reattachment of the opisthaptor and epithelial grazing.

  4. The first report of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) on Italian cultured stocks of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Paladini, Giuseppe; Gustinelli, Andrea; Fioravanti, Maria L; Hansen, Haakon; Shinn, Andrew P

    2009-11-12

    The monogenean Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 is considered one of the most important parasites of wild salmonids in the European Community due to the heavy ecological and economical damage it has inflicted on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr populations. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is susceptible to G. salaris and can act as a suitable carrier host and, consequently, its trade in EU territory is restricted in relation to the status of "recognized free" zones. Despite the economic importance of rainbow trout farming in Italy, information on the Italian gyrodactylid fauna is lacking and prior to this study, G. salaris had not been officially reported. During a routine health examination of farmed rainbow trout stock throughout Central and Northern Italy in 2004-2005, five fish farms were found to be infected with G. salaris alongside three other gyrodactylids. Morphological and molecular characterisation confirmed the presence of G. salaris, Gyrodactylus teuchis Lautraite, Blanc, Thiery, Daniel et Vigneulle, 1999 and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides Malmberg, Collins, Cunningham et Jalali, 2007, while Gyrodactylus truttae Gläser, 1974 was identified by morphological analysis only. The findings from this study extend the distribution of G. salaris within Europe and highlight the importance of the rainbow trout trade in its dissemination.

  5. An attenuated virus vaccine appears safe to the central nervous system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after intranasal delivery.

    PubMed

    Larragoite, Erin T; Tacchi, Luca; LaPatra, Scott E; Salinas, Irene

    2016-02-01

    Nasal vaccines are very effective but the olfactory organ provides direct access of antigens to the brain. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is known to cause high mortalities in salmonids. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of a live attenuated IHNV nasal (I.N) vaccine in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the olfactory organ, the vaccine was detected 1 and 4 days after primary I.N vaccination but not in the intramuscular (i.m) or control groups. In the brain, IHNV was detected by RT-qPCR 4 and 21 days after i.m primary vaccination. One i.m and one I.N vaccinated trout were positive at days 4 and 28 days post-boost, respectively. Presence of IHNV in the brain of i.m vaccinated fish correlated with moderate increases in IL-1β and TNF-α expression in this tissue. These results demonstrate that IHNV vaccine lasts for 4 days in the local nasal environment and that nasal vaccination appears to be safe to the CNS of rainbow trout.

  6. Predator avoidance ability of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) subjected to sublethal exposures of gas-supersaturated water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the effects of gas bubble trauma (GBT) on the predator avoidance ability of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), we created groups of fish that differed in prevalence and severity of gas emboli in their lateral lines, fins, and gills by exposing them to 112% total dissolved gas (TDG) for 13 days, 120% TDG for 8 h, or 130% TDG for 3.5 h. We subjected exposed and unexposed control fish simultaneously to predation by northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in water of normal gas saturation in 6, 18, and 10 tests using prey exposed to 112, 120, and 130% TDG, respectively. Only fish exposed to 130% TDG showed a significant increase in vulnerability to predation. The signs of GBT exhibited by fish sampled just prior to predator exposure were generally more severe in fish exposed to 130% TDG, which had the most extensive occlusion of the lateral line and gill filaments with gas emboli. Fish exposed to 112% TDG had the most severe signs of GBT in the fins. Our results suggest that fish showing GBT signs similar to those of our fish exposed to 130% TDG, regardless of their precise exposure history, may be more vulnerable to predation.

  7. Identification by in situ hybridization of segmented filamentous bacteria in the intestine of diarrheic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Urdaci, M C; Regnault, B; Grimont, P A

    2001-01-01

    Nonculturable segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) have been described in the gut of rats, mice and chickens, and 16S rRNA sequences for these organisms are available. These organisms, peripherically related to Clostridium phylogenetic group I, have been provisionally named 'Candidatus Arthromitus'. This work reports the observation of similar bacteria in the intestinal content of the distal intestine, preferentially, in the adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that exhibited episodic acute diarrhea, usually during the summer. Abdominal distension, intestinal fluid-mucus content and epithelium detachment were observed in trout. The demonstration that the observed microorganisms are bacteria and belong in the 'Candidatus Arthromitus' group was achieved by in situ hybridization with, respectively, a eubacterial probe and an oligonucleotide probe designed to react specifically with SFB 16S rRNA (encoded by the rrs gene) sequences. The sequenced rrs gene was compared with published sequences and found to be closely related to (although distinct from) other SFB sequences. Implication of these bacteria in trout diarrheic illness remains hypothetical.

  8. Modulation of innate immune response, mucosal parameters and disease resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) upon synbiotic feeding.

    PubMed

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Sharifian, Maryam; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigates the effects of dietary supplements of galactooligosaccharides (GOS), Pediococcus acidilactici and P. acidilactici + GOS on innate immune response, skin mucus as well as disease resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fingerlings (15.04 ± 0.52 g). After 8 weeks of feeding, several innate immune (lysozyme, alternative complement and respiratory burst activities) and skin mucus parameters (bactericidal activity against Streptococcus faecium, Streptococcus iniae, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and mucus protein content) were studied. The results indicated that the three supplemented diet significantly increased innate immune response and skin mucus parameters in rainbow trout. The highest innate immune response, skin mucus activity as well as protein level was observed in synbiotic fed fish. Furthermore, at the end of the feeding experiment, some fish were intraperitoneally injected with Streptococcus iniae to determine the disease resistance. The mortality of fingerlings fed supplemented diet was significantly lower than fish from control group being the lowest mortality recorded in synbiotic fed fish group.

  9. Theoretical life history responses of juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss to changes in food availability using a dynamic state-dependent approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romine, Jason G.; Benjamin, Joseph R.; Perry, Russell W.; Casal, Lynne; Connolly, Patrick J.; Sauter, Sally S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine subsidies can play an important role in the growth, survival, and migratory behavior of rearing juvenile salmonids. Availability of high-energy, marine-derived food sources during critical decision windows may influence the timing of emigration or the decision to forego emigration completely and remain in the freshwater environment. Increasing growth and growth rate during these decision windows may result in an altered juvenile population structure, which will ultimately affect the adult population age-structure. We used a state dependent model to understand how the juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss population structure may respond to increased availability of salmon eggs in their diet during critical decision windows. Our models predicted an increase in smolt production until coho salmon eggs comprised more than 50 percent of juvenile O. mykiss diet at the peak of the spawning run. At higher-than intermediate levels of egg consumption, smolt production decreased owing to increasing numbers of fish adopting a resident life-history strategy. Additionally, greater growth rates decreased the number of age-3 smolts and increased the number of age-2 smolts. Increased growth rates with higher egg consumption also decreased the age at which fish adopted the resident pathway. Our models suggest that the introduction of a high-energy food source during critical periods of the year could be sufficient to increase smolt production.

  10. Genetic effects of ELISA-based segregation for control of bacterial kidney disease in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hard, J.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Chase, D.M.; Park, L.K.; Winton, J.R.; Campton, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated genetic variation in ability of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to resist two bacterial pathogens: Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and Listonella anguillarum, an agent of vibriosis. After measuring R. salmoninarum antigen in 499 adults by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we mated each of 12 males with high or low antigen levels to two females with low to moderate levels and exposed subsets of their progeny to each pathogen separately. We found no correlation between R. salmoninarum antigen level in parents and survival of their progeny following pathogen exposure. We estimated high heritability for resistance to R. salmoninarum (survival h2 = 0.890 ?? 0.256 (mean ?? standard error)) independent of parental antigen level, but low heritability for resistance to L. anguillarum (h2 = 0.128 ?? 0.078). The genetic correlation between these survivals (rA = -0.204 ?? 0.309) was near zero. The genetic and phenotypic correlations between survival and antigen levels among surviving progeny exposed to R. salmoninarum were both negative (rA = -0.716 ?? 0.140; rP = -0.378 ?? 0.041), indicating that variation in antigen level is linked to survival. These results suggest that selective culling of female broodstock with high antigen titers, which is effective in controlling BKD in salmon hatcheries, will not affect resistance of their progeny. ?? 2006 NRC.

  11. Growth-Enhanced Transgenic Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Strains Have Varied Success in Simulated Streams: Implications for Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Leggatt, Rosalind A; Sundström, L Fredrik; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic fish have accelerated growth and could improve production efficiency in aquaculture. However, concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish should they escape rearing facilities. While environmental effects have been examined in some GH transgenic models, there is a lack of information on whether effects differ among different constructs or strains of transgenic fish. We compared growth and survival of wild-type coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) fry, a fast-growing GH transgenic strain containing a metallothionein promoter (TMT), and three lines/strains containing a reportedly weaker histone-3 promoter (TH3) in hatchery conditions and semi-natural stream tanks with varying levels of natural food and predators. Rank order of genotype size and survival differed with varying environmental conditions, both within and among experiments. Despite accelerated growth in hatchery conditions, TMT fry gained little or no growth enhancement in stream conditions, had enhanced survival when food was limiting, and inconsistent survival under other conditions. Rank growth was inconsistent in TH3 strains, with one strain having highest, and two strains having the lowest growth in stream conditions, although all TH3 strains had consistently poor survival. These studies demonstrate the importance of determining risk estimates for each unique transgenic model independent of other models.

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Liver, Gill, and Olfactory Rosettes of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) After Acclimation to Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Bammler, Theo K.; Gallagher, Evan P.; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Beyer, Richard P.; Farin, Federico M.; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Most Pacific salmonids undergo smoltification and transition from freshwater to saltwater, making various adjustments in metabolism, catabolism, osmotic, and ion regulation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are largely unknown. In the present study, we acclimated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to four different salinities and assessed gene expression through microarray analysis of gills, liver, and olfactory rosettes. Gills are involved in osmotic regulation, liver plays a role in energetics, and olfactory rosettes are involved in behavior. Between all salinity treatments, liver had the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 1616, gills had 1074, and olfactory rosettes had 924, using a 1.5-fold cutoff and a false discovery rate of 0.5. Higher responsiveness of liver to metabolic changes after salinity acclimation to provide energy for other osmoregulatory tissues such as the gills may explain the differences in number of differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes were tissue- and salinity-dependent. There were no known genes differentially expressed that were common to all salinity treatments and all tissues. Gene ontology term analysis revealed biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components that were significantly affected by salinity, a majority of which were tissue-dependent. For liver, oxygen binding and transport terms were highlighted. For gills, muscle, and cytoskeleton-related terms predominated and for olfactory rosettes, immune response-related genes were accentuated. Interaction networks were examined in combination with GO terms and determined similarities between tissues for potential osmosensors, signal transduction cascades, and transcription factors. PMID:26260986

  13. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Kirsty L.; Anderson, Victoria L.; Davis, Katie S.; Van Den Berg, Albert H.; Christie, James S.; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J.; Van West, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments. PMID:25088077

  14. A putative serine protease, SpSsp1, from Saprolegnia parasitica is recognised by sera of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kirsty L; Anderson, Victoria L; Davis, Katie S; Van Den Berg, Albert H; Christie, James S; Löbach, Lars; Faruk, Ali Reza; Wawra, Stephan; Secombes, Chris J; Van West, Pieter

    2014-07-01

    Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by Saprolegnia sp., results in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Current control methods are inadequate, as they are either largely ineffective or present environmental and fish health concerns. Vaccination of fish presents an attractive alternative to these control methods. Therefore we set out to identify suitable antigens that could help generate a fish vaccine against Saprolegnia parasitica. Unexpectedly, antibodies against S. parasitica were found in serum from healthy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The antibodies detected a single band in secreted proteins that were run on a one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel, which corresponded to two protein spots on a two-dimensional gel. The proteins were analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mascot and bioinformatic analysis resulted in the identification of a single secreted protein, SpSsp1, of 481 amino acid residues, containing a subtilisin domain. Expression analysis demonstrated that SpSsp1 is highly expressed in all tested mycelial stages of S. parasitica. Investigation of other non-infected trout from several fish farms in the United Kingdom showed similar activity in their sera towards SpSsp1. Several fish that had no visible saprolegniosis showed an antibody response towards SpSsp1 suggesting that SpSsp1 might be a useful candidate for future vaccination trial experiments.

  15. The Effects of Acute Waterborne Exposure to Sublethal Concentrations of Molybdenum on the Stress Response in Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Chelsea D.; Bates, William R.; Reid, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if molybdenum (Mo) is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo) and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit) and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills) stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l-1 did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout. PMID:25629693

  16. A microsatellite linkage map of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) characterized by large sex-specific differences in recombination rates.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Danzmann, R G; Gharbi, K; Howard, P; Ozaki, A; Khoo, S K; Woram, R A; Okamoto, N; Ferguson, M M; Holm, L E; Guyomard, R; Hoyheim, B

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a genetic linkage map for a tetraploid derivative species, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), using 191 microsatellite, 3 RAPD, 7 ESMP, and 7 allozyme markers in three backcross families. The linkage map consists of 29 linkage groups with potential arm displacements in the female map due to male-specific pseudolinkage arrangements. Synteny of duplicated microsatellite markers was used to identify and confirm some previously reported pseudolinkage arrangements based upon allozyme markers. Fifteen centromeric regions (20 chromosome arms) were identified with a half-tetrad analysis using gynogenetic diploids. Female map length is approximately 10 M, but this is a large underestimate as many genotyped segments remain unassigned at a LOD threshold of 3.0. Extreme differences in female:male map distances were observed (ratio F:M, 3.25:1). Females had much lower recombination rates (0.14:1) in telomeric regions than males, while recombination rates were much higher in females within regions proximal to the centromere (F:M, 10:1). Quadrivalent formations that appear almost exclusively in males are postulated to account for the observed differences. PMID:10880492

  17. Organically bound tritium (OBT) formation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): HTO and OBT-spiked food exposure experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Shultz, C; Stuart, M; McNamara, E; Festarini, A; Bureau, D P

    2013-02-01

    In order to determine the rate of organically bound tritium (OBT) formation, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to tritiated water (HTO) or OBT-spiked food. The HTO (in water) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 7000 Bq/L and the OBT (in food) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 30,000 Bq/L. Fish in both studies were expected to be exposed to similar tritium levels assuming 25% incorporation of the tritiated amino acids found in the food. Four different sampling campaigns of HTO exposure (Day 10, 30, 70, 140) and five different sampling campaigns of OBT-spiked food exposure (Day 9, 30, 70, 100, 140) were conducted to measure HTO and OBT activity concentrations in fish tissues. OBT depuration was also evaluated over a period of 30 days following the 140 d exposure studies. The results suggested that the OBT formation rate was slower when the fish were exposed to HTO compared to when the fish were ingesting OBT. In addition, the results indicated that OBT can bioaccumulate in fish tissues following OBT-spiked food exposure.

  18. Effects of didecyldimethylammonium chloride on the biochemistry, swimming performance, gill histology and disease resistance of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.D.; Wood, A.W.; Farrell, A.P.; Kennedy, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The acute lethal and sublethal toxicity of the antisapstain didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was investigated. The 96-h LC{sub 50} value in a flow-through exposure system was 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were significantly elevated after an acute 24-h exposure to 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Values for hepato-somatic index (HSI), haematocit, leucocrit, plasma haemoglobin, and liver glycogen remained unchanged. Swimming performance decreased significantly after exposure to 0.2 mg-1{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h and 24-h and to 0.4 mg{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h, 24-h, and 48-h. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross lesions in gill epithelia as a result of toxicant exposure. In disease challenge experiments, exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDAC for 24-h did not effect the susceptibility of rainbow trout to the pathogen Vibrio anguilarum. Of a suite of toxicity tests, specific biochemical markers were unsatisfactory in revealing sublethal toxic effects. These were best revealed by an integrative measure of performance, namely swimming performance, but not disease resistance.

  19. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  20. Sublethal and acute toxicity of the ethylene glycol butyl ether ester formulation of triclopyr to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Johansen, J A; Geen, G H

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of Garlon4, the ethylene glycol butyl ether ester formulation of the herbicide tryclopyr, to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) was investigated at several lethal and sublethal concentrations. Fish behavior, random activity and oxygen uptake were monitored. Coho salmon exhibited three distinct responses related to concentration and duration of exposure: (1) at concentrations greater than 0.56 mg/L fish were initially lethargic, then regressed to a highly distressed condition characterized by elevated oxygen uptake and finally death, (2) at 0.32-0.43 mg/L fish were lethargic throughout the exposure period with reduced oxygen uptake, and (3) at concentrations less than or equal to 0.10 mg/L fish were hypersensitive to stimuli, exhibiting elevated activity and oxygen uptake levels during photoperiod transitions. Whole body residue analysis showed that uptake of the ester and subsequent hydrolysis to the acid form in the fish was rapid, with significant accumulation of the acid in the tissues. This suggests that some threshold tissue concentrations were associated with the observed results. For juvenile coho salmon the 96-hr LC50 of Garlon4 was 0.84 mg/L.

  1. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M

    2014-09-01

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whether phytoestrogens promote similar effects. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocyte cultures, the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and R- and S-equol reduced rates of protein synthesis and genistein, the phytoestrogen of greatest abundance in soy, also increased rates of protein degradation. Increased expression of the ubiquitin ligase fbxo32 and autophagy-related genes was observed with high concentrations of genistein (100 μM), and R- and S-equol (100 μM) also up-regulated autophagy-related genes. In contrast, low genistein concentrations in vitro (0.01-0.10 μM) and in vivo (5 μg/g body mass) decreased fbxo32 expression, suggesting a potential metabolic benefit for low levels of genistein exposure. Phytoestrogens reduced cell proliferation, indicating that effects of phytoestrogens extend from metabolic to mitogenic processes. Co-incubation of genistein with the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182,780, ameliorated effects of genistein on protein degradation, but not protein synthesis or cell proliferation, indicating that effects of genistein are mediated through ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms. Collectively, these data warrant additional studies to determine the extent to which dietary phytoestrogens, especially genistein, affect physiological processes that impact growth and nutrient retention.

  2. Effects of Renibacterium salmoninarum on olfactory organs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Conway, Carla M.; Bruno, D.W.; Elliott, D.G.; Nowak, B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum can cause significant morbidity and mortality in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), particularly in Chinook salmon of the stream (spring) life history type, which migrate to sea as yearlings rather than subyearlings. R. salmoninarum can be transmitted vertically from the female parent to the progeny in association with the egg, as well as horizontally from fish to fish. This study was conducted as part of a research project to investigate whether the prevalence and intensity of R. salmoninarum infections in adult spring Chinook salmon could affect the survival and pathogen prevalence and intensity in their progeny (Pascho et al., 1991, 1993; Elliott et al., 1995). Fish from two brood years (1988 and 1989) were reared at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (Idaho, USA) for about 1-1/2 years, released as yearling smolts, and allowed to migrate to the Pacific Ocean for maturation. The majority of progeny fish were marked with coded wire tags (CWTs) about 4 months before they were released from the hatchery so that adult returns could be monitored. The CWTs were implanted in the snouts of the fish by an experienced team of fish markers using automated wire-tagging machines. The intended placement site was the cartilage, skeletal muscle or loose connective tissue of the snout.

  3. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2016-02-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (J(urea)) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of J(urea) by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while J(urea) increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of J(urea), while the gills became the dominant site for J(urea) only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial J(urea). Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity.

  4. Elemental signatures in otoliths of hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Distinctiveness and utility fo detecting origins and movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson-Reinemer, D. K.; Johnson, B.M.; Martinez, P.J.; Winkelman, D.L.; Koenig, A.E.; Woodhead, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Otolith chemistry in freshwater has considerable potential to reveal patterns of origin and movement, which would benefit traditional fisheries management and provide a valuable tool to curb the spread of invasive and illicitly stocked species. We evaluated the relationship between otolith and water chemistry for five markers (Ba/Ca, Mn/Ca, Sr/ Ca, Zn/Ca, and 87Sr/86Sr) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using the existing hatchery system in Colorado and Wyoming, USA, to provide controlled, seminatural conditions. Otolith Ba/Ca, Sr/Ca, and 87Sr/86Sr reflected ambient levels, whereas Mn/Ca and Zn/Ca did not. Using only the markers correlated with water chemistry, we classified fish to their hatchery of origin with up to 96% accuracy when element and isotope data were used together. Large changes in 87Sr/Sr were evident in otolith transects, although subtler changes in Sr/Ca were also detectable. Our results suggest the relatively few otolith markers that reflect ambient chemistry can discriminate among locations and track movements well enough to provide valuable insight in a variety of applied contexts.

  5. Assessment of potential impacts of major groundwater contaminants to fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, D.R.; Poston, T.M.; Dauble, D.D.

    1994-10-01

    Past operations of Hanford Site facilities have contaminated the groundwater adjacent to the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, with various chemical and radiological constituents. The groundwater is hydraulically connected to the river and contains concentrations of contaminants that sometimes exceed federal and/or state drinking water standards or standards for the protection of aquatic life. For example, concentrations of chromium in shoreline seeps and springs at most 100 Area operable units exceed concentrations found to be toxic to fish. Nitrate and tritium concentrations in shoreline seeps are generally below drinking water standards and concentrations potentially toxic to aquatic life, but nitrate concentrations may be high enough to synergistically interact with and exacerbate chromium toxicity. The Hanford Reach also supports the largest run of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Columbia River Basin. Numbers of fall chinook salmon returning to the Hanford Reach have increased relative to other mainstem populations during the last 30 years. Groundwater discharge appears to occur near some salmon spawning areas, but contaminants are generally not detectable in surface water samples. The concentration and potential toxicity of contaminants in the interstitial waters of the substrate where fall chinook salmon embryogenesis occurs are presently unknown. New tools are required to characterize the extent of groundwater contaminant discharge to the Hanford Reach and to resolve uncertainties associated with assessment of potential impacts to fall chinook salmon.

  6. Estimating Common Growth Patterns in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Diverse Genetic Stocks and a Large Spatial Extent

    PubMed Central

    Scheuerell, Mark D.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Bottom, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Life history variation in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) supports species resilience to natural disturbances and fishery exploitation. Within salmon species, life-history variation often manifests during freshwater and estuarine rearing, as variation in growth. To date, however, characterizing variability in growth patterns within and among individuals has been difficult via conventional sampling methods because of the inability to obtain repeated size measurements. In this study we related otolith microstructures to growth rates of individual juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) from the Columbia River estuary over a two-year period (2010–2012). We used dynamic factor analysis to determine whether there were common patterns in growth rates within juveniles based on their natal region, capture location habitat type, and whether they were wild or of hatchery origin. We identified up to five large-scale trends in juvenile growth rates depending on month and year of capture. We also found that hatchery fish had a narrower range of trend loadings for some capture groups, suggesting that hatchery fish do not express the same breadth of growth variability as wild fish. However, we were unable to resolve a relationship between specific growth patterns and habitat transitions. Our study exemplifies how a relatively new statistical analysis can be applied to dating or aging techniques to summarize individual variation, and characterize aspects of life history diversity. PMID:27695094

  7. Effects of disturbance on contribution of energy sources to growth of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in boreal streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, R.W.; Bradford, M.J.; Grout, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We used stable isotopes of carbon in a growth-dependent tissue-turnover model to quantify the relative contribution of autochthonous and terrestrial energy sources to juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in five small boreal streams tributary to the upper Yukon River. We used a tissue-turnover model because fish did not grow enough to come into isotopic equilibrium with their diet. In two streams, autochthonous energy sources contributed 23 and 41% to the growth of juvenile salmon. In the other three, fish growth was largely due to terrestrial (i.e., allochthonous) energy sources. This low contribution of autochthonous energy appeared to be related to stream-specific disturbances: a recent forest fire impacted two of the streams and the third was affected by a large midsummer spate during the study. These disturbances reduced the relative abundance of herbivorous macroinvertebrates, the contribution of autochthonous material to other invertebrates, and ultimately, the energy flow between stream algae and fish. Our findings suggest that disturbances to streams can be an important mechanism affecting transfer of primary energy sources to higher trophic levels.

  8. Acute toxicity of fire-retardant and foam-suppressant chemicals to early life stages of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhl, Kevin J.; Hamilton, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratorys studies were conducted to determine the acute toxicity of three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol LCG-R, and Phos-Chek D75-F), and two fire-suppressant foams (Phos-Chek WD-881 and Ansul Silv-Ex) to early life stages of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in hard and soft water. Regardless of water type, swim-up fry and juveniles (60 and 90 d posthatch) exhibited similar sensitivities to each chemical and these life stages were more sensitive than eyed eggs. Foam suppressants were more toxic to each life stage than the fire retardants in both water types. The descending rank order of toxicity for these chemicals tested with swim-up fry and juveniles (range of 96-h median lethal concentrations [LC50s]) was Phos-Chek WD-881 (7–13 mg/L) > Ansul Silv-Ex (11–22 mg/L) > Phos-Chek D75-F (218–305 mg/L) > Fire-Trol GTS-R (218–412 mg/L) > Fire-Trol LCG-R (685–1,195 mg/L). Water type had a minor effect on the toxicity of these chemicals. Comparison of acute toxicity values with recommended application concentrations indicates that accidental inputs of these chemicals into stream environments would require substantial dilution (237- to 1,429-fold) to reach concentrations equivalent to their 96-h LC50s.

  9. Effect of acetaminophen exposure in Oncorhynchus mykiss gills and liver: detoxification mechanisms, oxidative defence system and peroxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A S; Correia, A T; Antunes, S C; Gonçalves, F; Nunes, B

    2014-05-01

    The increasing presence of pharmaceutical drugs in nature is cause of concern due to the occurrence of oxidative stress in non-target species. Acetaminophen is widely used in human medicine as an analgesic and antipyretic drug, and it is one of the most sold non-prescription drugs. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in Oncorhynchus mykiss following acute and chronic exposures in realistic levels. In order to evaluate the APAP effects in the rainbow trout, gills and liver were analyzed with biochemical biomarkers, such as catalase (CAT), total and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) activity and also lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS). The results obtained in all tests indicate that a significant response of oxidative stress was established, along with the increase of APAP concentrations. The establishment of an oxidative stress scenario occurred with the involvement of all tested biomarkers, sustaining a generalized set of pro-oxidative effects elicited by APAP. Additionally, the occurrence of oxidative damage strongly suggests the impairment of the antioxidant defense mechanism of O. mykiss. It is important to note that the occurrence of oxidative deleterious effects and peroxidative damages occurred for concentrations similar to those already reported for several freshwater ecosystems. The importance of these assumptions is further discussed under the scope of ecological relevance of the assessment of effects caused by pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms.

  10. Growth-Enhanced Transgenic Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Strains Have Varied Success in Simulated Streams: Implications for Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, L. Fredrik; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic fish have accelerated growth and could improve production efficiency in aquaculture. However, concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish should they escape rearing facilities. While environmental effects have been examined in some GH transgenic models, there is a lack of information on whether effects differ among different constructs or strains of transgenic fish. We compared growth and survival of wild-type coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) fry, a fast-growing GH transgenic strain containing a metallothionein promoter (TMT), and three lines/strains containing a reportedly weaker histone-3 promoter (TH3) in hatchery conditions and semi-natural stream tanks with varying levels of natural food and predators. Rank order of genotype size and survival differed with varying environmental conditions, both within and among experiments. Despite accelerated growth in hatchery conditions, TMT fry gained little or no growth enhancement in stream conditions, had enhanced survival when food was limiting, and inconsistent survival under other conditions. Rank growth was inconsistent in TH3 strains, with one strain having highest, and two strains having the lowest growth in stream conditions, although all TH3 strains had consistently poor survival. These studies demonstrate the importance of determining risk estimates for each unique transgenic model independent of other models. PMID:28068416

  11. Antioxidant effect of a marine oligopeptide preparation from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) by enzymatic hydrolysis in radiation injured mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiyue; Wang, Junbo; Liu, Zhigang; Pei, Xinrong; Han, Xiaolong; Li, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Marine oligopeptide preparation (MOP) obtained from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) by the method of enzymatic hydrolysis, has been found to possess a radioprotective property through stimulation of the radiation-induced immunosuppression. The current study aimed to further investigate the free radicals scavenging and antioxidant effects of MOP in radiation injured mice. Female ICR mice (6-8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 5 groups, i.e., blank control, irradiation control and MOP (0.225, 0.450 and 1.350 g/kg body weight) plus an irradiation-treated group. The result revealed that MOP significantly increased the white blood cell counts after irradiation, and lessened the radiation-induced oxidative damage. These effects may be caused by augmentation of the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GSH-Px, reduction of the lipid peroxidation (MDA level) in liver, and protection against radiation-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we propose that MOP be used as an ideal antioxidant to alleviate radiation-induced oxidation damage in cancer patients.

  12. Oil spill impact on Pacific salmon (g. Oncorhynchus) of northwestern Sakhalin (Tengi River Basin as a pattern)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexander N.; Tarasov, Nikolay N.; Pusankov, Konstantin L.; Ivanova, Lubov V.; Pusankova, Ekaterina N.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Sakhalin is a region of the intensive oil and gas transportation by oil-pipe lines. In July 2, 1997, the oil spill has happened at the oil-pipe line 'Okha-Komsomolsk-on- Amur.' Oil pollution spread over the basin of Tengi Rive (Amur estuary). The Tengi River is a spawning area for endemic and important commercial fish. There is a reserve on the river. Genus Oncorhynchus (pink and chum salmon) prevail in ichthyofauna. A satellite data analysis (NOAA-12, NOAA-14) was a success to accurate the oil distribution over the Amur estuary. As a result of the accident, more than 120 t of oil have been spilled. 26.3 km of the river area, more than 60 km of the Amur estuary coast and about 850 km2 of its water area were polluted. In the basin of Tengi River about 58000 m2 of spawning area were lost. The main damage (89%) was caused to the fry feeding near the coast. The loss of fish production has constituted about 1800 t. By species the damage was as follows: 53% -- pink salmon, 29% -- chum salmon, 11% -- masu salmon and 7% -- coho salmon.

  13. Identification of estrogen-responsive vitelline envelope protein fragments from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) plasma using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salinas, K; Hemmer, M J; Serrano, J; Higgins, L; Anderson, L B; Benninghoff, A D; Williams, D E; Walker, C

    2010-11-01

    Plasma peptides previously associated with exposure of juvenile male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to the hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Specifically, plasma peptides of interest were fractionated and subsequently identified via spectra obtained by MALDI QqTOF MS/MS and LC-MALDI TOFTOF MS/MS analysis, de novo sequencing and database matching. The two peptide masses were identified as significant matches for fragments of the C-terminal propeptides from rainbow trout vitelline envelope protein (VEP)α and VEPγ isoforms. Our findings document the presence of the C-terminal propeptides from rainbow trout VEPα and VEPγ proteins in the bloodstream of juvenile male rainbow trout exposed to E2 via MALDI-TOF-MS detection. We provide three possible explanations for the presence of C-terminal propeptides in the bloodstream, as well as compare previously obtained hepatic transcriptomic results with the plasma proteomic results obtained in the present study.

  14. Effects of temperature on disease progression and swimming stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Hershberger, P.; Sanders, G.; Winton, J.

    2009-01-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were infected with Ichthyophonus sp. and held at 10 ??C, 15 ??C and 20 ??C for 28 days to monitor mortality and disease progression. Infected fish demonstrated more rapid onset of disease, higher parasite load, more severe host tissue reaction and reduced mean-day-to-death at higher temperature. In a second experiment, Ichthyophonus-infected fish were reared at 15 ??C for 16 weeks then subjected to forced swimming at 10 ??C, 15 ??C and 20 ??C. Stamina improved significantly with increased temperature in uninfected fish; however, this was not observed for infected fish. The difference in performance between infected and uninfected fish became significant at 15 ??C (P = 0.02) and highly significant at 20 ??C (P = 0.005). These results have implications for changes in the ecology of fish diseases in the face of global warming and demonstrate the effects of higher temperature on the progression and severity of ichthyophoniasis as well as on swimming stamina, a critical fitness trait of salmonids. This study helps explain field observations showing the recent emergence of clinical ichthyophoniasis in Yukon River Chinook salmon later in their spawning migration when water temperatures were high, as well as the apparent failure of a substantial percentage of infected fish to successfully reach their natal spawning areas. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Impacts of chloramine-T treatment on antioxidant enzyme activities and genotoxicity in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Boran, H; Altinok, I

    2014-05-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) were exposed to therapeutic, and higher concentrations of chloramine-T (Cl-T) to assess the effects of this chemical on the antioxidant enzyme system and genetic structure. Red blood cells acetylcholinesterase, ∆-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, paraoxonase and liver glutathione S-transferase activity were increased at 10 and 20 mg L(-1) Cl-T-exposed fish, while they were decreased at 30 mg L(-1) Cl-T-exposed fish. On the other hand, liver catalase activity and liver protein levels increased at 10 mg L(-1) and decreased at 20 and 30 mg L(-1) concentrations of Cl-T. Liver super-oxide dismutase activity decreased at 10 mg L(-1) and 20 mg L(-1) Cl-T and increased at 30 mg L(-1) of Cl-T. Compared to control, comet assay indicated that Cl-T did not cause significant DNA damage to red blood cells of the fish. Results indicate that 10 or 20 mg L(-1) Cl-T can be safely used to prevent or treat external parasitic and bacterial infection of rainbow trout.

  16. The impact of small irrigation diversion dams on the recent migration rates of steelhead and redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, Dana E.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Powell, Madison S.

    2013-01-01

    Barriers to migration are numerous in stream environments and can occur from anthropogenic activities (such as dams and culverts) or natural processes (such as log jams or dams constructed by beaver (Castor canadensis)). Identification of barriers can be difficult when obstructions are temporary or incomplete providing passage periodically. We examine the effect of several small irrigation diversion dams on the recent migration rates of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in three tributaries to the Methow River, Washington. The three basins had different recent migration patterns: Beaver Creek did not have any recent migration between sites, Libby Creek had two-way migration between sites and Gold Creek had downstream migration between sites. Sites with migration were significantly different from sites without migration in distance, number of obstructions, obstruction height to depth ratio and maximum stream gradient. When comparing the sites without migration in Beaver Creek to the sites with migration in Libby and Gold creeks, the number of obstructions was the only significant variable. Multinomial logistic regression identified obstruction height to depth ratio and maximum stream gradient as the best fitting model to predict the level of migration among sites. Small irrigation diversion dams were limiting population interactions in Beaver Creek and collectively blocking steelhead migration into the stream. Variables related to stream resistance (gradient, obstruction number and obstruction height to depth ratio) were better predictors of recent migration rates than distance, and can provide important insight into migration and population demographic processes in lotic species.

  17. Genetic characterization of hybridization and introgression between anadromous rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (o. clarki clarki)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, W.P.; Ostberg, C.O.; Keim, P.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization represents a dynamic evolutionary phenomenon and major conservation problem in salmonid fishes. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to describe the extent and characterize the pattern of hybridization and introgression between coastal rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). Hybrid individuals were initially identified using principle coordinate analysis of 133 polymorphic AFLP markers. Subsequent analysis using 23 diagnostic AFLP markers revealed the presence of F1, rainbow trout backcross, cutthroat trout backcross and later-generation hybrids. mtDNA analysis demonstrated equal numbers of F1 hybrids with rainbow and cutthroat trout mtDNA indicating reciprocal mating of the parental types. In contrast, rainbow and cutthroat trout backcross hybrids always exhibited the mtDNA from the recurrent parent, indicating a male hybrid mating with a pure female. This study illustrates the usefulness of the AFLP technique for generating large numbers of species diagnostic markers. The pattern of hybridization raises many questions concerning the existence and action of reproductive isolating mechanisms between these two species. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that introgression between anadromous populations of coastal rainbow and coastal cutthroat trout is limited by an environment-dependent reduction in hybrid fitness.

  18. Genetic variation in chinook, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and coho, O. Kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisenbichler, R.R.; Phelps, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    We used starch-gel electrophoresis to genetically characterize the populations of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and coho salmon, O. kisutch, in the major drainages of the north coast of Washington (the Quillayute, Uoh, Queets, and Quinault Rivers). Of 55 loci examined for electrophoretically detectable variation. 6 were polymorphic (frequency of the common allele was less than 0.95) in chinook salmon and 3 in coho salmon. Statistical tests of interdrainage and intradrainage variation for coho salmon were tenuous because most of the fish examined were from a single year class so that we could not account for variation among year classes. Nevertheless, these tests suggested that distinct stocks ofcoho salmon exist within drainages. and that variation was not significantly greater among drainages than within drainages. Interdrainage variation for wild chinook salmon was not significant. The data suggested that summer chinook salmon were electrophoretically different from fall chinook salmon, and the hatchery populations of chinook salmon were distinct from wild fish. A hatchery population developed primarily from north coast fish was electrophoretically more similar to wild chinook salmon than were the others.

  19. Differential virulence mechanisms of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include host entry and virus replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Ma Michelle D; Purcell, Maureen K; Kurath, Gael

    2009-09-01

    Host specificity is a phenomenon exhibited by all viruses. For the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), differential specificity of virus strains from the U and M genogroups has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), M IHNV strains are consistently more prevalent and more virulent than U IHNV. The basis of the differential ability of these two IHNV genogroups to cause disease in rainbow trout was investigated in live infection challenges with representative U and M IHNV strains. When IHNV was delivered by intraperitoneal injection, the mortality caused by U IHNV increased, indicating that the low virulence of U IHNV is partly due to inefficiency in entering the trout host. Analyses of in vivo replication showed that U IHNV consistently had lower prevalence and lower viral load than M IHNV during the course of infection. In analyses of the host immune response, M IHNV-infected fish consistently had higher and longer expression of innate immune-related genes such as Mx-1. This suggests that the higher virulence of M IHNV is not due to suppression of the immune response in rainbow trout. Taken together, the results support a kinetics hypothesis wherein faster replication enables M IHNV to rapidly achieve a threshold level of virus necessary to override the strong host innate immune response.

  20. Sympathetic, parasympathetic and enteric regulation of the gastrointestinal vasculature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under normal and postprandial conditions.

    PubMed

    Seth, Henrik; Axelsson, Michael

    2010-09-15

    The control of the gastrointestinal hyperemia that occurs after feeding in most animals is of fundamental importance for the subsequent absorption, metabolism and redistribution of nutrients. Yet, in fish, it has received little attention and the nature of it is far from clear. We sought to investigate the importance of extrinsic and intrinsic innervation of the gastrointestinal tract in the regulation of gastrointestinal blood flow in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The contribution of the extrinsic innervation, i.e. by the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system, was examined by comparing the response to the injection of a predigested nutrient diet into the proximal intestine of untreated fish with the response in fish in which the splanchnic and vagal innervation of the gut had been removed. We also injected the predigested nutrient diet into anaesthetized fish treated with tetrodotoxin that would block the intrinsic innervation of the gut (i.e. enteric nervous system). Our results confirm the notion that the sympathetic portion of the extrinsic innervation maintains the basal vascular tone, but neither the splanchnic nor the vagal innervation is fundamental to the postprandial hyperemia. However, the tetrodotoxin treatment completely abolished the postprandial hyperemia, indicating the importance of the enteric nervous system. In conclusion, it seems as though the enteric nervous system is essential to the regulation of the postprandial hyperemia, and that the extrinsic innervation is involved mainly in the regulation of gastrointestinal blood flow under normal conditions and in response to central coordination with other organs.

  1. Susceptibility of captive adult winter-run Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to waterborne exposures with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Arkush, K D; Mendonca, H L; McBride, A M; Hedrick, R P

    2004-06-11

    Sexually mature female Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha with no prior history of exposure to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were susceptible to experimental infection induced by additions of virus to the water. The resulting infections resembled those observed among naturally infected hatchery and wild populations of Chinook salmon. Virus was detected as early as 4 d post-exposure (p.e.) and subsequently in all virus-exposed fish that died or that were examined at 14 d p.e. when the study was terminated. The greatest concentrations of virus, up to 10(8) plaque-forming units (pfu) ml(-1), were found in the ovarian fluid at 13 to 14 d p.e., but the virus was also found in high concentrations in the gill, kidney/spleen and plasma. In contrast, the virus was not recovered from unexposed control adult salmon that died or were sampled at the end of the study. Despite detecting concentrations of IHNV in excess of 10(7) pfu g(-1) of tissue, no specific microscopic lesions were found in IHNV-exposed compared to unexposed control salmon. The results of this initial study suggest that virus in the spawning environment, either from adult salmon or other sources, may contribute to its rapid spread among adult Chinook salmon, thereby considerably increasing the prevalence of IHNV infection in both wild and hatchery populations of adult Chinook salmon.

  2. A soluble nonglycosylated recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) G-protein induces IFNs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Verjan, Noel; Ooi, Ei Lin; Nochi, Tomonori; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2008-07-01

    Viral glycoproteins interact with cell-surface receptors to mediate virus entry and innate immune system activation. We found that a soluble recombinant infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus G-protein (rIHNV-G) stimulated an early innate immune response mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, IFN1 and IFN-gamma in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry. Expression of both IFN1 and IFN-gamma mRNA transcripts was an early event and was rIHNV-G dose-dependent. In addition, preliminary evidence revealed that the innate immune response induced by rIHNV-G protein could protect rainbow trout fry from a subsequent IHNV virus challenge. Finally, the binding and distribution of FITC-rIHNV-G protein on rainbow trout spleen and head kidney leukocytes resemble morphological changes which occur on the cell membrane during antigen-receptor interaction including membrane reorganization, patching, polarization and capping. Thus a soluble nonglycosylated rIHNV-G protein could mediate the activation of rainbow trout leukocytes, with concomitant production of proinflammatory cytokines and IFNs.

  3. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection.

    PubMed

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, Lourdes; Lorenzen, Ellen; Bovo, Giuseppe; Evensen, Øystein; Lapatra, Scott; Lorenzen, Niels

    2009-02-18

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides protection by 4 days post vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site expressed both G proteins. This study confirms the applied potential of using a combined DNA vaccination for protection of fish against two different rhabdoviral diseases.

  4. Rapid growth in the early marine period improves the marine survival of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, Elisabeth J.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of early marine entry timing and body size on the marine (smolt-to-adult) survival of Puget Sound Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We used data from coded wire tag release groups of hatchery Chinook salmon to test whether hatchery release date, release size, and size in offshore waters in July and September influenced marine survival. Marine survival was most strongly related to the average body size in July, with larger sizes associated with higher survivals. This relationship was consistent over multiple years (1997–2002), suggesting that mortality after July is strongly size-dependent. Release size and date only slightly improved this relationship, whereas size in September showed little relationship to marine survival. Specifically, fish that experienced the highest marine survivals were released before 25 May and were larger than 17 g (or 120 mm fork length) by July. Our findings highlight the importance of local conditions in Puget Sound (Washington, USA) during the spring and summer, and suggest that declines in marine survival since the 1980s may have been caused by reductions in the quality of feeding and growing conditions during early marine life.

  5. Rapid growth in the early marine period improves the marine survival of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, E.J.; Beauchamp, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of early marine entry timing and body size on the marine (smolt-to-adult) survival of Puget Sound Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We used data from coded wire tag release groups of hatchery Chinook salmon to test whether hatchery release date, release size, and size in offshore waters in July and September influenced marine survival. Marine survival was most strongly related to the average body size in July, with larger sizes associated with higher survivals. This relationship was consistent over multiple years (1997-2002), suggesting that mortality after July is strongly size-dependent. Release size and date only slightly improved this relationship, whereas size in September showed little relationship to marine survival. Specifically, fish that experienced the highest marine survivals were released before 25 May and were larger than 17 g (or 120 mm fork length) by July. Our findings highlight the importance of local conditions in Puget Sound (Washington, USA) during the spring and summer, and suggest that declines in marine survival since the 1980s may have been caused by reductions in the quality of feeding and growing conditions during early marine life.

  6. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Thorgaard, Gary H; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-05-04

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis.

  7. New subtype of salmonid alphavirus (SAV), Togaviridae, from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hodneland, K; Bratland, A; Christie, K E; Endresen, C; Nylund, A

    2005-09-05

    In Europe, 2 closely related alphaviruses (Togaviridae) are regarded as the causative agents of sleeping disease (SD) and salmon pancreas disease (SPD): SD virus (SDV) has been isolated from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in France and the UK, while SPD virus (SPDV) has been isolated from salmon Salmo salar in Ireland and the UK. Farmed salmonids in western Norway also suffer from a disease called pancreas disease (PD), and this disease is also believed to be caused by an alphavirus. However, this virus has not yet been characterised at the molecular level. We have cultured a Norwegian salmonid alphavirus from moribund fishes diagnosed with cardiac myopathy syndrome (CMS) and fishes diagnosed with PD. The virus has also been found in salmon suffering from haemorrhagic smolt syndrome in the fresh water phase. The genomic organisation of the Norwegian salmonid alphavirus is identical to that in SPDV and SDV, and the nucleotide sequence similarity to the other 2 alphaviruses is 91.6 and 92.9%, respectively. Based on the pathological changes, host species and the nucleotide sequence, we suggest naming this virus Norwegian salmonid alphavirus (NSAV). Together with SPDV and SDV it constitutes a third subtype of salmonid alphavirus (SAV) species within the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae.

  8. Effect of salinity changes on olfactory memory-related genes and hormones in adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Lim, Sang-Gu; Jeong, Minhwan; Jin, Deuk-Hee; Choi, Cheol Young

    2015-09-01

    Studies of memory formation have recently concentrated on the possible role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NRs). We examined changes in the expression of three NRs (NR1, NR2B, and NR2C), olfactory receptor (OR), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) during salinity change (seawater→50% seawater→freshwater). NRs were significantly detected in the diencephalon and telencephalon and OR was significantly detected in the olfactory epithelium. The expression of NRs, OR, and ACTH increased after the transition to freshwater. We also determined that treatment with MK-801, an antagonist of NRs, decreased NRs in telencephalon cells. In addition, a reduction in salinity was associated with increased levels of dopamine, ACTH, and cortisol (in vivo). Reductions in salinity evidently caused NRs and OR to increase the expression of cortisol and dopamine. We concluded that memory capacity and olfactory imprinting of salmon is related to the salinity of the environment during the migration to spawning sites. Furthermore, salinity affects the memory/imprinting and olfactory abilities, and cortisol and dopamine is also related with olfactory-related memories during migration.

  9. Comparisons of spawning areas and times for two runs of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Kenai River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, C.V.; Wilmot, R.L.; Wangaard, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    From 1979 to 1982,188 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were tagged with radio transmitters to locate spawning areas in the glacial Kenai River, southcentral Alaska. Results confirmed that an early run entered the river in May and June and spawned in tributaries, and a late run entered the river from late June through August and spawned in the main stem. Spawning peaked during August in tributaries influenced by lakes, but during July in other tributaries. Lakes may have increased fall and winter temperatures of downstream waters, enabling successful reproduction for later spawning fish within these tributaries. This hypothesis assumes that hatching and emergence can be completed in a shorter time in lake-influenced waters. The time of upstream migration and spawning (mid- to late August) of the late run is unique among chinook stocks in Cook Inlet. This behavior may have developed only because two large lakes (Kenai and Skilak) directly influence the main-stem Kenai River. If run timing is genetically controlled, and if the various components of the two runs are isolated stocks that have adapted to predictable stream temperatures, there are implications for stock transplantation programs and for any activities of man that alter stream temperatures.

  10. Vulnerability to predation and physiological stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) experimentally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Poe, T.P.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    We experimentally infected juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), to examine the vulnerability to predation of fish with differing levels of Rs infection and assess physiological change during progression of the disease. Immersion challenges conducted during 1992 and 1994 produced fish with either a low to moderate (1992) or high (1994) infection level of Rs during the 14-week postchallenge rearing period. When equal numbers of treatment and unchallenged control fish were subjected to predation by either northern squaw fish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), Rs-challenged fish were eaten in significantly greater numbers than controls by nearly two to one. In 1994, we also sampled fish every 2 weeks after the challenge to determine some stressful effects of Rs infection. During disease progression in fish, plasma cortisol and lactate increased significantly whereas glucose decreased significantly. Our results indicate the role that BKD may play in predator-prey interactions, thus ascribing some ecological significance to this disease beyond that of direct pathogen-related mortality. In addition, the physiological changes observed in our fish during the chronic progression of BKD indicate that this disease is stressful, particularly during the later stages.

  11. Enhancement of the immune response and protection induced by probiotic lactic acid bacteria against furunculosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Vendrell, Daniel; Gironés, Olivia; Muzquiz, José Luis

    2007-10-01

    We analysed the effect of probiotic strains on the cellular and humoral immune responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and their capacity to prevent furunculosis during a challenge trial. Probiotic strains (Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis CLFP 100, Leuconostoc mesenteroides CLFP 196, and Lactobacillus sakei CLFP 202) were administered orally to fish for 2 weeks at 10(6) CFU g(-1) of feed. In comparison to untreated control fish, the phagocytic activity of head kidney leukocytes and the alternative complement activity in serum were significantly greater in all probiotic groups at the end of the second week. With the exception of the group fed with Lactobacillus sakei, superoxide anion production was also significantly increased in the probiotic groups. Analysis of lysozyme activity did not exhibit any significant difference in the probiotic and control groups. Fifteen days after the start of the probiotic feeding, fish were challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida ssp. salmonicida. The fish supplemented with probiotics exhibited survival rates ranging from 97.8% to 100%, whereas survival was 65.6% in fish not treated with the probiotics. These results demonstrate that probiotic supplementation to fish can reduce the severity of furunculosis, and suggest that this reduction may be associated with enhanced humoral and cellular immune response.

  12. Fish in hot water: hypoxaemia does not trigger catecholamine mobilization during heat shock in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Currie, S; Ahmady, E; Watters, M A; Perry, S F; Gilmour, K M

    2013-06-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to an acute heat shock (1 h at 25 °C after raising water temperature from 13 °C to 25 °C over 4 h) mount a significant catecholamine response. The present study investigated the proximate mechanisms underlying catecholamine mobilization. Trout exposed to heat shock in vivo exhibited a significant reduction in arterial O(2) tension, but arterial O(2) concentration was not affected by heat shock, nor was catecholamine release during heat shock prevented by prior and concomitant exposure to hyperoxia (to prevent the fall in arterial O(2) tension). Thus, catecholamine mobilization probably was not triggered by impaired blood O(2) transport. Heat-shocked trout also exhibited an elevation of arterial CO(2) tension coupled with a fall in arterial pH, but these factors are not expected to trigger catecholamine release. The changes in blood O(2) and CO(2) tension occurred despite a significant hyperventilatory response to heat shock. Future studies should investigate whether catecholamine mobilization during heat shock in rainbow trout is triggered by a specific effect of high temperature activating the sympathetic nervous system via a thermosensitive transient receptor potential channel.

  13. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, Doug; Lewis, Bert; Griswold, Bob (Biolines, Stanley, ID

    1999-08-01

    Since the late 1980's, Snake River sockeye Oncorhynchus nerka adults have only returned to Redfish Lake, one of five lakes in the Sawtooth Basin which historically reared sockeye. 1997 project objectives included (1) characterization of the limnology of Sawtooth Valley lakes; (2) fertilization of Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (3) O.nerka lake population surveys; (4) estimation of kokanee escapement and fry production in Alturas Lake Creek, Stanley Lake Creek, and Fishhook Creek; (5) reduce the number of spawning kokanee in Fishook Creek; (6) evaluate hatchery rainbow trout overwinter survival and potential competition and predation interactions with O.nerka in Pettit Lake; (7) assess predation from bull trout Salvelinus malma, brook trout S.fontinalis, and northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonsis on lentic O.nerka; (8) establish screw tap and weir sites to monitor smolt emigration.

  14. First record of human infection with the tapeworm Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense in North America.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Barbara; Scholz, Tomás; Peduzzi, Raffaele; Kuchta, Roman

    2008-02-01

    The tapeworm Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidea), originally described from Japan, is reported from a man in North America for the first time. Species identification was based on sequences of ribosomal (partial 18S rRNA) and mitochondrial (partial Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I) genes of proglottids expelled from a Czech tourist who ate raw Pacific sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from British Columbia, Canada.

  15. 78 FR 1201 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha): endangered upper Columbia River (UCR); threatened Snake River (SR...; threatened middle Columbia River (MCR). Sockeye salmon (O. nerka): endangered SR. Authority Scientific... years a permit under which they have been conducting six research projects in the Snake River basin...

  16. 76 FR 20956 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... notice is relevant to the Snake River Spring/summer Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River Fall-run Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha), and Snake River Sockeye Salmon (O. nerka) evolutionarily significant units (ESU), and the Snake River Steelhead (O. mykiss) distinct population segment (DPS). IDFG...

  17. 50 CFR 223.102 - Enumeration of threatened marine and anadromous species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... desotoi Wherever found. 56 FR 49653; Sep 30, 1991 68 FR 13370; Mar 19, 2003. (3) Ozette Lake sockeye Oncorhynchus nerka U.S.A.- WA, including all naturally spawned populations of sockeye salmon in Ozette Lake and streams and tributaries flowing into Ozette Lake, Washington, as well as two artificial...

  18. 50 CFR 223.102 - Enumeration of threatened marine and anadromous species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Program; Fall Chinook Acclimation Ponds Program; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program; and the Oxbow Hatchery...; Sandy Hatchery Program (ODFW Stock #11); and the Bonneville/Cascade/Oxbow Complex (ODFW Stock #14.... Salmon, sockeye (Ozette Lake ESU) Oncorhynchus nerka Naturally spawned sockeye salmon originating...

  19. 50 CFR 223.102 - Enumeration of threatened marine and anadromous species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; Sep 30, 1991 68 FR 13370; Mar 19, 2003. (3) Ozette Lake sockeye Oncorhynchus nerka U.S.A.- WA, including all naturally spawned populations of sockeye salmon in Ozette Lake and streams and tributaries flowing into Ozette Lake, Washington, as well as two artificial propagation programs: the Umbrella...

  20. 50 CFR 223.102 - Enumeration of threatened marine and anadromous species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; Mar 19, 2003. (3) Ozette Lake sockeye Oncorhynchus nerka U.S.A.- WA, including all naturally spawned populations of sockeye salmon in Ozette Lake and streams and tributaries flowing into Ozette Lake, Washington... Program, Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery, and Oxbow Hatchery fall-run Chinook hatchery programs. 57 FR...