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Sample records for oneidensis mr-1 exposed

  1. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley R.; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M.; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear. PMID

  2. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear.

  3. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to Different Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    PubMed Central

    Beliaev, A. S.; Klingeman, D. M.; Klappenbach, J. A.; Wu, L.; Romine, M. F.; Tiedje, J. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Zhou, J.

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the complex structure of the energy-generating networks in the dissimilatory metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, global mRNA patterns were examined in cells exposed to a wide range of metal and non-metal electron acceptors. Gene expression patterns were similar irrespective of which metal ion was used as electron acceptor, with 60% of the differentially expressed genes showing similar induction or repression relative to fumarate-respiring conditions. Several groups of genes exhibited elevated expression levels in the presence of metals, including those encoding putative multidrug efflux transporters, detoxification proteins, extracytoplasmic sigma factors and PAS-domain regulators. Only one of the 42 predicted c-type cytochromes in MR-1, SO3300, displayed significantly elevated transcript levels across all metal-reducing conditions. Genes encoding decaheme cytochromes MtrC and MtrA that were previously linked to the reduction of different forms of Fe(III) and Mn(IV), exhibited only slight decreases in relative mRNA abundances under metal-reducing conditions. In contrast, specific transcriptome responses were displayed to individual non-metal electron acceptors resulting in the identification of unique groups of nitrate-, thiosulfate- and TMAO-induced genes including previously uncharacterized multi-cytochrome gene clusters. Collectively, the gene expression results reflect the fundamental differences between metal and non-metal respiratory pathways of S. oneidensis MR-1, where the coordinate induction of detoxification and stress response genes play a key role in adaptation of this organism under metal-reducing conditions. Moreover, the relative paucity and/or the constitutive nature of genes involved in electron transfer to metals is likely due to the low-specificity and the opportunistic nature of the metal-reducing electron transport pathways. PMID:16199584

  4. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2% of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5% of pyruvate and 2% of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35%. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications.

  5. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Chromate Insult

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Chourey, Karuna; Brown, Steven D.; Hettich, Robert L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterium originally isolated from a freshwater lake. S. oneidensis MR-1 has the ability to reduce toxic metal ions [e.g., Cr(VI) and U(VI)] found in industrial and governmental waste sites. Cells were grown and exposed to three different metal concentrations in order to probe the dosage response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to Cr(VI) in the form of chromate. Protein fractions were digested with trypsin and analyzed with a multidimensional HPLC-NanoESIMS/MS protocol. The goal of this work is to identify protein components of pathways/mechanisms responsible for both detoxification and reduction of chromate.

  6. Induction of rapid detachment in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Kai M; Saville, Renée M; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M

    2005-02-01

    Active detachment of cells from microbial biofilms is a critical yet poorly understood step in biofilm development. We discovered that detachment of cells from biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can be induced by arresting the medium flow in a hydrodynamic biofilm system. Induction of detachment was rapid, and substantial biofilm dispersal started as soon as 5 min after the stop of flow. We developed a confocal laser scanning microscopy-based assay to quantify detachment. The extent of biomass loss was found to be dependent on the time interval of flow stop and on the thickness of the biofilm. Up to 80% of the biomass of 16-h-old biofilms could be induced to detach. High-resolution microscopy studies revealed that detachment was associated with an overall loosening of the biofilm structure and a release of individual cells or small cell clusters. Swimming motility was not required for detachment. Although the loosening of cells from the biofilm structure was observed evenly throughout thin biofilms, the most pronounced detachment in thicker biofilms occurred in regions exposed to the flow of medium, suggesting a metabolic control of detachability. Deconvolution of the factors associated with the stop of medium flow revealed that a sudden decrease in oxygen tension is the predominant trigger for initiating detachment of individual cells. In contrast, carbon limitation did not trigger any substantial detachment, suggesting a physiological link between oxygen sensing or metabolism and detachment. In-frame deletions were introduced into genes encoding the known and putative global transcriptional regulators ArcA, CRP, and EtrA (FNR), which respond to changes in oxygen tension in S. oneidensis MR-1. Biofilms of null mutants in arcA and crp were severely impacted in the stop-of-flow-induced detachment response, suggesting a role for these genes in regulation of detachment. In contrast, an DeltaetrA mutant displayed a variable detachment phenotype. From this genetic

  7. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution.

  8. Oxygen-dependent autoaggregation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Hill, Eric A.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-07-01

    In aerobic chemostat cultures maintained at 50% dissolved O2 tension (123.5 µM dissolved O2), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 rapidly aggregated upon addition of 0.68 mM CaCl2 and retained this multi-cellular phenotype at high dilution rates. Confocal microscopy analysis of the extracellular matrix material contributing to the stability of the aggregate structures revealed the presence of extracellular DNA, protein, and glycoconjugates. Upon onset of O2-limited growth (dissolved O2 below detection) however, the Ca2+-supplemented chemostat cultures of strain MR-1 rapidly disaggregated and grew as motile dispersed cells. Global transcriptome analysis comparing aerobic aggregated to O2-limited unaggregated cells identified genes encoding cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface adhesion factors whose transcription increased upon exposure to increased O2 concentrations. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes, including mtrD (SO1782), mtrE (SO1781), and mtrF (SO1780). Our data indicate that mechanisms involved in autoaggregation of MR-1 are dependent on the function of pilD gene which encodes a putative prepilin peptidase. Mutants of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 deficient in PilD and associated pathways, including type IV and Msh pili biogenesis, displayed a moderate increase in sensitivity to H2O2. Taken together, our evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis MR-1 may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  9. Electrochemical Characterization Shewanella oneidensis () Mr-1 MtrABC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Ross, D. E.; Hartshorne, R. S.; Brantley, S. L.; Butt, J. N.; Richardson, D.; Tien, M.

    2007-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria have the ability to use a wide range of terminal electron acceptors including solid state iron (oxihydr)oxides. It is generally accepted that electrons are transferred by electron transfer proteins to a series of multiheme c-type cytochromes which enable the electron transport from the periplasm to the extracellular side of the outer cell membrane and across the bacteria-mineral interface to the terminal electron acceptor. In the last decade, the facultative anaerobe organism Shewanella oneidensis Mr-1 has been used as a model organism to identify, purify, and sequence single proteins involved in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, but these studies have provided little biochemical information on the actual electron transfer process within the bacterial cell. In order to extend the knowledge on electron transfer, Ross et al.(in press) have recently purified a complex from Shewanella oneidensis Mr-1 which includes the membrane proteins MtrA, MtrB, and MtrC and spans the space from the periplasm to the extracellular side of the outer membrane. In our study we applied the relatively new technique of protein film electrochemistry to the MtrABC complex to gain more biochemical information on electron transport in the membrane of Shewanella oneidensis Mr-1. A wealth of information on the reaction of redox-active sites in proteins like MtrABC can be acquired by voltammetric studies in which the protein sample is immobilized as a layer onto an electrode surface. By carrying out cyclic voltammetry over a wide range of scan rates, the data can be analyzed in terms of peak potentials versus scan rate. A simple reversible electron transfer process gives rise to a trumpet-shaped plot because the oxidation and the reduction peaks increasingly separate at high scan rate. In this contribution we show a detailed electrochemical picture of the MtrABC complex, which gives insight into the electron transfer from the periplasm to the extracellular side of

  10. Low-Temperature Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Randa; Popa, Radu; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Findlay, Robert H.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a mesophilic bacterium with a maximum growth temperature of ≈35°C but the ability to grow over a wide range of temperatures, including temperatures near zero. At room temperature (≈22°C) MR-1 grows with a doubling time of about 40 min, but when moved from 22°C to 3°C, MR-1 cells display a very long lag phase of more than 100 h followed by very slow growth, with a doubling time of ≈67 h. In comparison to cells grown at 22°C, the cold-grown cells formed long, motile filaments, showed many spheroplast-like structures, produced an array of proteins not seen at higher temperature, and synthesized a different pattern of cellular lipids. Frequent pilus-like structures were observed during the transition from 3 to 22°C. PMID:15691935

  11. Survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 after UV radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyun; Sundin, George W; Chai, Benli; Tiedje, James M

    2004-11-01

    We systematically investigated the physiological response as well as DNA damage repair and damage tolerance in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 following UVC, UVB, UVA, and solar light exposure. MR-1 showed the highest UVC sensitivity among Shewanella strains examined, with D37 and D10 values of 5.6 and 16.5% of Escherichia coli K-12 values. Stationary cells did not show an increased UVA resistance compared to exponential-phase cells; instead, they were more sensitive at high UVA dose. UVA-irradiated MR-1 survived better on tryptic soy agar than Luria-Bertani plates regardless of the growth stage. A 20% survival rate of MR-1 was observed following doses of 3.3 J of UVC m(-2), 568 J of UVB m(-2), 25 kJ of UVA m(-2), and 558 J of solar UVB m(-2), respectively. Photoreactivation conferred an increased survival rate to MR-1 of as much as 177- to 365-fold, 11- to 23-fold, and 3- to 10-fold following UVC, UVB, and solar light irradiation, respectively. A significant UV mutability to rifampin resistance was detected in both UVC- and UVB-treated samples, with the mutation frequency in the range of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Unlike in E. coli, the expression levels of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) component genes uvrA, uvrB, and uvrD were not damage inducible in MR-1. Complementation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UA11079 (uvrA deficient) with uvrA of MR-1 increased the UVC survival of this strain by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Loss of damage inducibility of the NER system appears to contribute to the high sensitivity of this bacterium to UVR as well as to other DNA-damaging agents.

  12. Electrical transport along bacterial nanowires from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Wanger, Greg; Leung, Kar Man; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.; Southam, Gordon; Yang, Jun; Lau, Woon Ming; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires are extracellular appendages that have been suggested as pathways for electron transport in phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and photosynthetic cyanobacteria. However, there has been no evidence presented to demonstrate electron transport along the length of bacterial nanowires. Here we report electron transport measurements along individually addressed bacterial nanowires derived from electron-acceptor–limited cultures of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Transport along the bacterial nanowires was independently evaluated by two techniques: (i) nanofabricated electrodes patterned on top of individual nanowires, and (ii) conducting probe atomic force microscopy at various points along a single nanowire bridging a metallic electrode and the conductive atomic force microscopy tip. The S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires were found to be electrically conductive along micrometer-length scales with electron transport rates up to 109/s at 100 mV of applied bias and a measured resistivity on the order of 1 Ω·cm. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA produce appendages that are morphologically consistent with bacterial nanowires, but were found to be nonconductive. The measurements reported here allow for bacterial nanowires to serve as a viable microbial strategy for extracellular electron transport. PMID:20937892

  13. Current Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bretschger, Orianna; Obraztsova, Anna; Sturm, Carter A.; Chang, In Seop; Gorby, Yuri A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Barua, Soumitra; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Saffarini, Daad; Mansfeld, Florian; Kim, Byung-Hong; Fredrickson, James K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative facultative anaerobe capable of utilizing a broad range of electron acceptors, including several solid substrates. S. oneidensis MR-1 can reduce Mn(IV) and Fe(III) oxides and can produce current in microbial fuel cells. The mechanisms that are employed by S. oneidensis MR-1 to execute these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Several different S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants were generated and tested for current production and metal oxide reduction. The results showed that a few key cytochromes play a role in all of the processes but that their degrees of participation in each process are very different. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of electron transfer to solid and soluble substrates by S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:17644630

  14. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, J.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-15

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 20 _C or 2.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 37 _C) to generate U(IV) solids at ‘‘fast” and ‘‘slow” rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9–3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  15. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, Jeffrey T.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-01

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO 2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO 3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O 2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 20 °C or 2.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 37 °C) to generate U(IV) solids at "fast" and "slow" rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9-3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  16. Energy-Dependent Stability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Saville, Renee M.; Rakshe, Shauna; Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2011-01-01

    Stability and resistance to dissolution are key features of microbial biofilms. How these macroscopic properties are determined by the physiological state of individual biofilm cells in their local physical-chemical and cellular environment is largely unknown. In order to obtain molecular and energetic insight into biofilm stability, we investigated whether maintenance of biofilm stability is an energy-dependent process and whether transcription and/or translation is required for biofilm dissolution. We found that in 12-hour-old Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms, a reduction in cellular ATP concentration, induced either by oxygen deprivation or by addition of the inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), dinitrophenol (DNP), or CN−, resulted in massive dissolution. In 60-hour-old biofilms, the extent of uncoupler-induced cell loss was strongly attenuated, indicating that the integrity of older biofilms is maintained by means other than those operating in younger biofilms. In experiments with 12-hour-old biofilms, the transcriptional and translational inhibitors rifampin, tetracycline, and erythromycin were found to be ineffective in preventing energy starvation-induced detachment, suggesting that neither transcription nor translation is required for this process. Biofilms of Vibrio cholerae were also induced to dissolve upon CCCP addition to an extent similar to that in S. oneidensis. However, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida biofilms remained insensitive to CCCP addition. Collectively, our data show that metabolic energy is directly or indirectly required for maintaining cell attachment, and this may represent a common but not ubiquitous mechanism for stability of microbial biofilms. PMID:21572002

  17. Energy-dependent stability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Saville, Renee M; Rakshe, Shauna; Haagensen, Janus A J; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M

    2011-07-01

    Stability and resistance to dissolution are key features of microbial biofilms. How these macroscopic properties are determined by the physiological state of individual biofilm cells in their local physical-chemical and cellular environment is largely unknown. In order to obtain molecular and energetic insight into biofilm stability, we investigated whether maintenance of biofilm stability is an energy-dependent process and whether transcription and/or translation is required for biofilm dissolution. We found that in 12-hour-old Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms, a reduction in cellular ATP concentration, induced either by oxygen deprivation or by addition of the inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), dinitrophenol (DNP), or CN(-), resulted in massive dissolution. In 60-hour-old biofilms, the extent of uncoupler-induced cell loss was strongly attenuated, indicating that the integrity of older biofilms is maintained by means other than those operating in younger biofilms. In experiments with 12-hour-old biofilms, the transcriptional and translational inhibitors rifampin, tetracycline, and erythromycin were found to be ineffective in preventing energy starvation-induced detachment, suggesting that neither transcription nor translation is required for this process. Biofilms of Vibrio cholerae were also induced to dissolve upon CCCP addition to an extent similar to that in S. oneidensis. However, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida biofilms remained insensitive to CCCP addition. Collectively, our data show that metabolic energy is directly or indirectly required for maintaining cell attachment, and this may represent a common but not ubiquitous mechanism for stability of microbial biofilms.

  18. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various Oxygen Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited (microaerobic) chemostat conditions, using 13C-labeled lactate as the sole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids in biomass were probed using both gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Based on the genome annotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify the central metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route under both conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways were utilized primarily for biomass synthesis (with a flux below 5% of the lactate uptake rate). The anaplerotic reactions (pyruvate to malate and oxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt were active. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount (9% of the lactate uptake rate) of carbon entered the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Under microaerobic conditions, fluxes through the TCA cycle decreased and acetate production increased compared to what was found for carbon-limited conditions, and the flux from glyoxylate to glycine (serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase) became measurable. Although the flux distributions under aerobic, microaerobic, and shake flask culture conditions were different, the relative flux ratios for some central metabolic reactions did not differ significantly (in particular, between the shake flask and aerobic-chemostat groups). Hence, the central metabolism of S. oneidensis appears to be robust to environmental changes. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13C NMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C-labeled substrates and to obtain more-accurate flux values. PMID:17098921

  19. High Pressure Reduction of Selenite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Letard, I.; Bleuet, P.; Cardon, H.; Oger, P.

    2007-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes comprise cold deep-sea environments, hydrothermal vents, and deep subsurface or deep-sea sediments. The latter are less studied, due to the technical difficulties to sample at great depths without contamination. Nevertheless, microbial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis have been found to be spatially distributed in deep deep-sea sediments (1), and sulfate reduction has been shown to be actually more efficient under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in some sediments (2). Sulfate-reducing bacteria obtained from the Japan Sea are characterized by an increased sulfide production under pressure (3,4). Unfortunately, investigations of microbial metabolic activity as a function of pressure are extremely scarce due to the experimental difficulty of such measurements at high hydrostatic pressure. We were able to measure the reduction of selenite Se(IV) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of pressure, to 150 MPa using two different high-pressure reactors that allow in situ X-ray spectroscopy measurements on a synchrotron source. A first series of measurements was carried out in a low-pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) of our own design (5) at ID22 beamline at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); a second one was performed in an autoclave (6) at the BM30B beamline at ESRF. Selenite reduction by strain MR-17 was monitored from ambient pressure to 150 MPa over 25 hours at 30 deg C by XANES spectroscopy (X-ray Analysis of Near Edge Structure). Spectra were recorded hourly in order to quantify the evolution of the oxidation state of selenium with time. Stationary-phase bacteria were inoculated at a high concentration into fresh growth medium containing 5 or 10 M of sodium selenite and 20 mM sodium lactate. Kinetic parameters of the Se (IV) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 could be extracted from the data, as a function of pressure. They show 1) that the rate constant k of the reaction is decreased by a half at high pressure

  20. Anaerobic Decolorization and Detoxification of Cationic Red X-GRL by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Feng, Xiao-Li; Li, Ting-Ting; Lu, Xue-Rong; Liu, Qiu-Yue; Han, Xue; Feng, Yu-Jie; Liu, Zhao-Ying; Zhang, Xi-Jia; Xiao, Xiang

    2017-07-14

    The ability of a electrochemically active bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to decolorize azo dye cationic red X-GRL (X-GRL) was investigated. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a high decolorization capability for X-GRL under anaerobic conditions. The Mtr respiratory pathway was proved to be involved in the extracellular decolorization of X-GRL. The decolorization efficiency of S. oneidensis MR-1 was significantly inhibited when initial X-GRL concentration was over 200 mg L(-1). Increasing the inoculum volume of S. oneidensis MR-1 could obviously promote the X-GRL decolorization. The 100 mg L(-1) X-GRL and 6% (v/v) inoculum volume were chosen as the optimal parameter. Under such a condition, almost all of X-GRL (100 mg L(-1)) could be completely reduced after 12-h incubation at the pH range of 5.5∼8.0 and temperature range of 30∼40 °C. Salinity in the medium also affected X-GRL decolorization. Lactate and citric acid were found to be the suitable electron donors for X-GRL decolorization. Although the genotoxicity increased slightly, the phytotoxicity of X-GRL in the decolorization process was significantly reduced by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  1. Growth Inhibition and Stimulation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by Surfactants and Calcium Polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Kathryn L.; Tilton, Fred A.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Ergas, Sarina J.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miracle, Ann L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-06-14

    Foam delivery technology (FDT) uses surfactant based foam to immobilize subsurface contaminants in situ. Where traditional approaches are impractical, FDT has the potential to overcome many of the technical challenges facing the remediation of contaminated deep vadose zone environments. However, little is known about the effects these reactive chemicals may have on microorganisms inhabiting the contaminated subsurface. In addition, there are currently no standard assays to assess microbial responses to subsurface remedial treatments while these agents are under development. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid laboratory assay to assess the potential growth inhibition and/or stimulation of microorganisms following exposure to candidate FDT components. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) and several surfactants (i.e. sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and NINOL40-CO) have diverse chemistries and are candidate components of FDT. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of these chemicals to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and the growth and viability potential of these components. Concentrations of SDS higher than 700 {micro}M were toxic to S. oneidensis MR-1 growth over the course of four days of exposure. The relative acute toxicity order for these compounds was SDS>>CPS>>NINOL40-CO>SLES-CAPB. Dose dependent growth decreases (20 to 100 mM) were observed in the CAPB and SLES treated cultures and both CPS and NINOL 40-CO were toxic at all concentrations tested (1.45 to 7.25 mM CPS). Both SLES (20 to 100 mM) and SDS at lower concentrations (20 to 500 {micro}M) were stimulatory to S. oneidensis MR-1 indicating a capacity to be used as a carbon source. These studies also identified potentially key component characteristics, such as precipitate formation and oxygen availability, which may prove valuable in assessing the response of subsurface

  2. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  3. Efficiencies of Bio-electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen from Lactate Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown in a chemostatic, continuously-fed bioelectrochemical cell under slightly aerated conditions. The start-up phase was controlled potentiostatically (0.4 V vs. SHE). When a stable performance was achieved, the reactor was switched to bio-electrocatalytic producti...

  4. The outer membrane cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    2004-01-01

    To determine if the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins, and to assess cell surface exposure of the cytochromes by radioiodination. In anaerobic MR-1 cells grown with (3)H-palmitoleic acid, both OmcA and OmcB were radiolabelled. The identities of these bands were confirmed by the absence of each radiolabelled band in the respective mutants lacking individual OM cytochromes. Radioiodination of cell surface proteins in anaerobic cells resulted in (125)I-labelled OmcA. The identity of this band was confirmed by its absence in an OmcA-minus mutant. A ubiquitous radioiodinated band that migrates similarly to OmcB precluded the ability to determine the potential cell surface exposure of OmcB by this method. Both OmcA and OmcB are lipoproteins, and OmcA is cell surface exposed. The lipoprotein modification of these OM cytochromes could be important for their localization or incorporation into the OM. The cell surface exposure of OmcA could allow it to directly transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors (e.g. manganese oxides) and is consistent with its in vivo role.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Response to Elevated Salt Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongqing; Gao, Weimin; Wang, Yue; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Fields, Matthew W.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-01-01

    Whole-genomic expression patterns were examined in Shewanella oneidensis cells exposed to elevated sodium chloride. Genes involved in Na+ extrusion and glutamate biosynthesis were significantly up-regulated, and the majority of chemotaxis/motility-related genes were significantly down-regulated. The data also suggested an important role for metabolic adjustment in salt stress adaptation in S. oneidensis. PMID:15774893

  6. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range

    PubMed Central

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 108 cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 102 CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  7. Survival of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 to GPa pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Daniel, Isabelle; Eakins, Daniel; Meersman, Filip; McMillian, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Most life on Earth is thought to occupy near-surface environments under relatively mild conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity etc. That view is changing following discovery of extremophile organisms that prefer environments based on high or low T, extreme chemistries, or very high pressures. Over the past three decades, geomicrobiologists have discovered an extensive subsurface biosphere, that may account for between 1/10 to 1/3 of Earth's living biomass. We subjected samples of Shewanella oneidensis to several pressure cycles to examine its survival to static high pressures to above 1.5 GPa. Shewanella forms part of a genus that contains several piezophile species like S. violacea and S. benthica. We have obtained growth curves for populations recovered from high P conditions and cultured in the laboratory, before being subjected to even higher pressures. We have also carried out dynamic shock experiments using a specially designed cell to maintain high-P, low-T conditions during shock-recovery experiments and observe colony formation among the survivors. Colony counts, shape and growth curves allow us to compare the static vs dynamic pressure resistance of wild type vs pressure-adapted strains. Leverhulme

  8. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  9. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  10. Biological accumulation of tellurium nanorod structures via reduction of tellurite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Kanaly, Robert A; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2012-12-01

    The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, reduced tellurite (Te(IV), TeO(3)(2-)) to elemental tellurium under anaerobic conditions resulting in the intracellular accumulation of needle shaped crystalline Te(0) nanorods. Fatty acid analyses showed that toxic Te(IV) increased the unsaturated fatty acid composition of the lipid components of the cell membrane, implying a deconstruction of the integrity of the cellular membrane structure. The current results suggest that dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria such as S. oneidensis MR-1 may play an important role in recycling toxic tellurium elements, and may be applied as a novel selective biological filter via the accumulation of industry-applicable rare materials, Te(0) nanorods, in the cell.

  11. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  12. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Luong, Khai; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Blow, Matthew; Korlach, Jonas; Deutschbauer, Adam; Malmstrom, Rex

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Surface-Associated Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Gödeke, Julia; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation starts with single cells attaching to a surface, however, little is known about the initial attachment steps and the adaptation to the surface-associated life style. Here, we describe a hydrodynamic system that allows easy harvest of cells at very early biofilm stages. Using the metal ion-reducing gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism, we analyzed the transcriptional changes occurring during surface-associated growth between 15 and 60 minutes after attachment. 230 genes were significantly upregulated and 333 were downregulated by a factor of ≥2. Main functional categories of the corresponding gene products comprise metabolism, uptake and transport, regulation, and hypothetical proteins. Among the genes highly upregulated those implicated in iron uptake are highly overrepresented, strongly indicating that S. oneidensis MR-1 has a high demand for iron during surface attachment and initial biofilm stages. Subsequent microscopic analysis of biofilm formation under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that addition of Fe(II) significantly stimulated biofilm formation of S. oneidensis MR-1 while planktonic growth was not affected. Our approach to harvest cells for transcriptional analysis of early biofilm stages is expected to be easily adapted to other bacterial species. PMID:22860070

  14. Mechanism and Consequences of Anaerobic Respiration of Cobalt by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Heidi H.; Gilbert, Alan; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Shewanella are the most diverse respiratory organisms studied to date and can utilize a variety of metals and metal(loid)s as terminal electron acceptors. These bacteria can potentially be used in bioremediation applications since the redox state of metals often influences both solubility and toxicity. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which metal transformations occur and the consequences of by-products that may be toxic to the organism and thus inhibitory to the overall process is significant to future applications for bioremediation. Here, we examine the ability of Shewanella oneidensis to catalyze the reduction of chelated cobalt. We describe an unexpected ramification of [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis: the formation of a toxic by-product. We found that [Co(II)-EDTA]2−, the product of [Co(III)-EDTA]− respiration, inhibited the growth of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 and that this toxicity was partially abolished by the addition of MgSO4. We demonstrate that [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis requires the Mtr extracellular respiratory pathway and associated pathways required to develop functional Mtr enzymes (the c-type cytochrome maturation pathway) and ensure proper localization (type II secretion). The Mtr pathway is known to be required for a variety of substrates, including some chelated and insoluble metals and organic compounds. Understanding the full substrate range for the Mtr pathway is crucial for developing S. oneidensis strains as a tool for bioremediation. PMID:18836009

  15. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  16. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  17. Probing regulon of ArcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by integrated genomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin Koo; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    The Arc two-component system is a global regulator controlling many genes involved in aerobic/anaerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism in Escherichia coli. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains a gene encoding a putative ArcA homolog with {approx} 81% amino acid sequence identity to the E. coli ArcA protein but not a full-length arcB gene. To understand the role of ArcA in S. oneidensis, an arcA deletion strain was constructed and subjected to both physiological characterization and microarray analysis. Compared to the wild-type MR-1, the mutant exhibited impaired aerobic growth and a defect in utilizing DMSO in the absence of O{sub 2}. Microarray analyses on cells grown aerobically and anaerobically on fumarate revealed that expression of 1009 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the mutation. In contrast to E. coli ArcA, the protein appears to be dispensable in regulation of the TCA cycle in S. oneidensis. To further determine genes regulated by the Arc system, an ArcA recognition weight matrix from DNA-binding data and bioinformatics analysis was generated and used to produce an ArcA sequence affinity map. By combining both techniques, we identified an ArcA regulon of at least 50 operons, of which only 6 were found to be directly controlled by ArcA in E. coli. These results indicate that the Arc system in S. oneidensis differs from that in E. coli substantially in terms of its physiological function and regulon while their binding motif are strikingly similar.

  18. Genomic reconstruction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism reveals previously uncharacterized machinery for lactate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Osterman, Andrei L.; Dervyn, Etienne; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Collart, Frank R.; Scott, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-02-24

    The ability to utilize lactate as a sole source of carbon and energy is one of the key metabolic signatures of Shewanellae, a diverse group of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria commonly found in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, homology searches failed to recognize orthologs of previously described bacterial D- or L-lactate oxidizing enzymes (Escherichia coli genes dld and lldD) in any of the 13 analyzed genomes of Shewanella spp. Using comparative genomic techniques, we identified a conserved chromosomal gene cluster in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (locus tag: SO1522-SO1518) containing lactate permease and candidate genes for both D- and L-lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The predicted D-LDH gene (dldD, SO1521) is a distant homolog of FAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase from yeast, whereas the predicted L-LDH is encoded by three genes with previously unknown functions (lldEGF, SO1520-19-18). Through a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we experimentally confirmed the predicted physiological role of these novel genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 and carried out successful functional validation studies in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We conclusively showed that dldD and lldEFG encode fully functional D-and L-LDH enzymes, which catalyze the oxidation of the respective lactate stereoisomers to pyruvate. Notably, the S. oneidensis MR-1 LldEFG enzyme is the first described example of a multi-subunit lactate oxidase. Comparative analysis of >400 bacterial species revealed the presence of LldEFG and Dld in a broad range of diverse species accentuating the potential importance of these previously unknown proteins in microbial metabolism.

  19. Genomic reconstruction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism reveals a previously uncharacterized machinery for lactate utilization

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Grigory E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Osterman, Andrei L.; Dervyn, Etienne; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Collart, Frank R.; Scott, James H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to use lactate as a sole source of carbon and energy is one of the key metabolic signatures of Shewanellae, a diverse group of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, homology searches failed to recognize orthologs of previously described bacterial d- or l-lactate oxidizing enzymes (Escherichia coli genes dld and lldD) in any of the 13 analyzed genomes of Shewanella spp. By using comparative genomic techniques, we identified a conserved chromosomal gene cluster in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (locus tag: SO_1522–SO_1518) containing lactate permease and candidate genes for both d- and l-lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The predicted d-LDH gene (dld-II, SO_1521) is a distant homolog of FAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase from yeast, whereas the predicted l-LDH is encoded by 3 genes with previously unknown functions (lldEGF, SO_1520–SO_1518). Through a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we experimentally confirmed the predicted physiological role of these novel genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 and carried out successful functional validation studies in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We conclusively showed that dld-II and lldEFG encode fully functional d-and l-LDH enzymes, which catalyze the oxidation of the respective lactate stereoisomers to pyruvate. Notably, the S. oneidensis MR-1 LldEFG enzyme is a previously uncharacterized example of a multisubunit lactate oxidase. Comparative analysis of >400 bacterial species revealed the presence of LldEFG and Dld-II in a broad range of diverse species accentuating the potential importance of these previously unknown proteins in microbial metabolism. PMID:19196979

  20. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  1. SO2426 is a positive regulator of siderophore expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome encodes a predicted orphan DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426. Previous studies with a SO2426-deficient MR-1 strain suggested a putative functional role for SO2426 in the regulation of iron acquisition genes, in particular, the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis operon so3030-3031-3032. To further investigate the functional role of SO2426 in iron homeostasis, we employed computational strategies to identify putative gene targets of SO2426 regulation and biochemical approaches to validate the participation of SO2426 in the control of siderophore biosynthesis in S. oneidensis MR-1. Results In silico prediction analyses revealed a single 14-bp consensus motif consisting of two tandem conserved pentamers (5'-CAAAA-3') in the upstream regulatory regions of 46 genes, which were shown previously to be significantly down-regulated in a so2426 deletion mutant. These genes included so3030 and so3032, members of an annotated siderophore biosynthetic operon in MR-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the SO2426 protein binds to its motif in the operator region of so3030. A "short" form of SO2426, beginning with a methionine at position 11 (M11) of the originally annotated coding sequence for SO2426, was also functional in binding to its consensus motif, confirming previous 5' RACE results that suggested that amino acid M11 is the actual translation start codon for SO2426. Alignment of SO2426 orthologs from all sequenced Shewanella spp. showed a high degree of sequence conservation beginning at M11, in addition to conservation of a putative aspartyl phosphorylation residue and the helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain. Finally, the so2426 deletion mutant was unable to synthesize siderophores at wild-type rates upon exposure to the iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl. Conclusions Collectively, these data support the functional characterization of SO2426 as a positive regulator of siderophore-mediated iron

  2. Purification and Characterization of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that has been implicated in H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase coupled H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O4− and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O4− but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O4− used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O4− was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2·nH2O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O4− reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O4− reduction directly by coupling to H2 oxidation. PMID:21724888

  3. Purification and characterization of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M; Plymale, Andrew E; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-08-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase) that has been implicated in H(2) production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H(2) at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase coupled H(2) oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O(4)(-) used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O(2)·nH(2)O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction directly by coupling to H(2) oxidation.

  4. Role of electricity production in the anaerobic decolorization of dye mixture by exoelectrogenic bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dan-Ming; Xiao, Xiang; Wu, Yong-Min; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Ming-Na; Wu, Yan-You; Du, Dao-Lin

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the anaerobic decolorization of the dye mixture containing methyl orange (MO) and naphthol green B (NGB) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a strong ability to decolorize the dye mixture. MO was easier to get the electrons and inhibited the reduction of NGB, despite of its lower redox potential than NGB. The Mtr respiratory pathway played an important role in this process. Meantime, addition of extracellular electron shuttles accelerated the decolorization. Those results suggest that the decolorization capacity of S. oneidensis MR-1 is associated with the electricity production. The operating parameters, such as electron acceptors, temperature, and pH, were also investigated in this study. Thus, this work may facilitate a better understanding of the extensive nonspecific reduction capacity of exoelectrogens and is beneficial for promoting their application in bioremediation.

  5. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  6. A Ferrous Iron Exporter Mediates Iron Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brittany D.; Brutinel, Evan D.

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium frequently found in aquatic sediments. In the absence of oxygen, S. oneidensis can respire extracellular, insoluble oxidized metals, such as iron (hydr)oxides, making it intimately involved in environmental metal and nutrient cycling. The reduction of ferric iron (Fe3+) results in the production of ferrous iron (Fe2+) ions, which remain soluble under certain conditions and are toxic to cells at higher concentrations. We have identified an inner membrane protein in S. oneidensis, encoded by the gene SO_4475 and here called FeoE, which is important for survival during anaerobic iron respiration. FeoE, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family, functions to export excess Fe2+ from the MR-1 cytoplasm. Mutants lacking feoE exhibit an increased sensitivity to Fe2+. The export function of FeoE is specific for Fe2+, as an feoE mutant is equally sensitive to other metal ions known to be substrates of other CDF proteins (Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, or Zn2+). The substrate specificity of FeoE differs from that of FieF, the Escherichia coli homolog of FeoE, which has been reported to be a Cd2+/Zn2+ or Fe2+/Zn2+ exporter. A complemented feoE mutant has an increased growth rate in the presence of excess Fe2+ compared to that of the ΔfeoE mutant complemented with fieF. It is possible that FeoE has evolved to become an efficient and specific Fe2+ exporter in response to the high levels of iron often present in the types of environmental niches in which Shewanella species can be found. PMID:26341213

  7. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III) Reduction in Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA), an integral outer-membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB), and an outer-membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC). Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer-membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three) and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III) citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC/mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations) are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA/MtrE/OmcA is able to reduce iron(III) citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications toward the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production. PMID:22363330

  8. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozawa, K.; Tsapin, A. I.; Nealson, K. H.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Akutsu, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  9. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, K; Tsapin, A I; Nealson, K H; Cusanovich, M A; Akutsu, H

    2000-09-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  10. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozawa, K.; Tsapin, A. I.; Nealson, K. H.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Akutsu, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  11. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, Charles E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Poppy, Tara E.; Maloney, Andrea; Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  12. CRP Regulates D-Lactate Oxidation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a heterotrophic facultative anaerobe that respires using various organic and inorganic compounds. This organism has served as a model to study bacterial metabolic and regulatory systems that facilitate their survival in redox-stratified environments. The expression of many anaerobic respiratory genes in MR-1, including those for the reduction of fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and metal oxides, is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). However, relatively little is known about how this organism regulates the expression of catabolic enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of organic compounds, including lactate. Here, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms for the lldP (SO_1522) and dld (SO_1521) genes, which encode putative lactate permease and D-lactate dehydrogenase, respectively, and demonstrate that CRP regulates their expression in MR-1. We found that a crp-deletion mutant of MR-1 (Δcrp) showed impaired growth on D-lactate. Complementary expression of dld in Δcrp restored the ability to grow on D-lactate, indicating that the deficient growth of Δcrp on D-lactate is attributable to decreased expression of dld. In vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that CRP positively regulates the expression of the lldP and dld genes by directly binding to an upstream region of lldP. Taken together, these results indicate that CRP is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates the expression of catabolic and respiratory pathways in MR-1, including D-lactate dehydrogenase and anaerobic terminal reductases.

  13. Identification of Mobile Elements and Pseudogenes in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Carlson, Timothy; Norbeck, Angela D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the first of 22 different Shewanella spp. whose genomes have been or are being sequenced and thus serves as the model organism for studying the functional repertoire of the Shewanella genus. The original MR-1 genome annotation revealed a large number of transposase genes and pseudogenes, indicating that many of the genome’s functions may be decaying. Comparative analyses of the sequenced Shewanella strains suggest that 209 genes in MR-1 have in-frame stop codons, frameshifts, or interruptions and/or are truncated and that 65 of the original pseudogene predictions were erroneous. Among the decaying functions are that of one of three chemotaxis clusters, type I pilus production, starch utilization, and nitrite respiration. Many of the mutations could be attributed to members of 41 different types of insertion sequence (IS) elements and three types of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements identified here for the first time. The high copy numbers of individual mobile elements (up to 71) are expected to promote large-scale genome recombination events, as evidenced by the displacement of the algA promoter. The ability of MR-1 to acquire foreign genes via reactions catalyzed by both the integron integrase and the ISSod25-encoded integrases is suggested by the presence of attC sites and genes whose sequences are characteristic of other species downstream of each site. This large number of mobile elements and multiple potential sites for integrasemediated acquisition of foreign DNA indicate that the MR-1 genome is exceptionally dynamic, with many functions and regulatory control points in the process of decay or reinvention.

  14. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  15. Decolorization and detoxification of a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye aniline blue by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongmin; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Cancan; Cao, Danming; Du, Daolin

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the extracellular decolorization of aniline blue, a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye, by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was confirmed. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a high capacity for decolorizing aniline blue even at a concentration of up to 1,000 mg/l under anaerobic conditions. Maximum decolorization efficiency appeared at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Lactate was a better candidate of electron donor for the decolorization of aniline blue. The addition of nitrate, hydrous ferric oxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide all could cause a significant decline of decolorization efficiency. The Mtr respiratory pathway was found to be involved into the decolorization of aniline blue by S. oneidensis MR-1. The toxicity evaluation through phytotoxicity and genotoxicity showed that S. oneidensis MR-1 could decrease the toxicity of aniline blue during the decolorization process. Thus, this work may facilitate a better understanding on the degradation mechanisms of the triphenylmethane dyes by Shewanella and is beneficial to their application in bioremediation.

  16. Shewregdb: Database and visualization environment for experimental and predicted regulatory information in Shewanella oneidensis mr-1

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Leuze, Mike; Kora, Guruprasad; Romine, Margaret F.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2009-10-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an important model organism for environmental research as it has an exceptional metabolic and respiratory versatility regulated by a complex regulatory network. We have developed a database to collect experimental and computational data relating to regulation of gene and protein expression and a visualization environment that enables integration of these data types. The regulatory information in the database was collected from the published literature and different Internet resources. It includes predictions of DNA regulator binding sites, sigma factor binding sites, transcription units, operons, promoters, and RNA regulators including non-coding RNAs, riboswitches, and different types of terminators. A visualization environment based on GBrowser was developed for accessing the collected information and for its overlaying with experimental data (experimental results from studies employing microarrays, proteomics, and/or gene mutagenesis) and other genome annotations.

  17. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gorby, Yuri A; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S; Rosso, Kevin M; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Hill, Eric A; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A; Kennedy, David W; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2006-07-25

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution.

  18. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution. PMID:16849424

  19. Electrochemical Measurement of Electron Transfer Kinetics by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1*

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Daniel; LaBelle, Edward; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 can respire using carbon electrodes and metal oxyhydroxides as electron acceptors, requiring mechanisms for transferring electrons from the cell interior to surfaces located beyond the cell. Although purified outer membrane cytochromes will reduce both electrodes and metals, S. oneidensis also secretes flavins, which accelerate electron transfer to metals and electrodes. We developed techniques for detecting direct electron transfer by intact cells, using turnover and single turnover voltammetry. Metabolically active cells attached to graphite electrodes produced thin (submonolayer) films that demonstrated both catalytic and reversible electron transfer in the presence and absence of flavins. In the absence of soluble flavins, electron transfer occurred in a broad potential window centered at ∼0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrode), and was altered in single (ΔomcA, ΔmtrC) and double deletion (ΔomcA/ΔmtrC) mutants of outer membrane cytochromes. The addition of soluble flavins at physiological concentrations significantly accelerated electron transfer and allowed catalytic electron transfer to occur at lower applied potentials (−0.2 V). Scan rate analysis indicated that rate constants for direct electron transfer were slower than those reported for pure cytochromes (∼1 s−1). These observations indicated that anodic current in the higher (>0 V) window is due to activation of a direct transfer mechanism, whereas electron transfer at lower potentials is enabled by flavins. The electrochemical dissection of these activities in living cells into two systems with characteristic midpoint potentials and kinetic behaviors explains prior observations and demonstrates the complementary nature of S. oneidensis electron transfer strategies. PMID:19661057

  20. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  1. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2006-03-21

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in "extracellular respiration" to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427-SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound.

  2. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in “extracellular respiration” to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427–SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound. PMID:16537430

  3. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sensory box protein involved in aerobic and anoxic growth.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, A; Kurowski, J; Yan, T; Klingeman, D M; Joachimiak, M P; Zhou, J; Naranjo, B; Gralnick, J A; Fields, M W

    2011-07-01

    Although little is known of potential function for conserved signaling proteins, it is hypothesized that such proteins play important roles to coordinate cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In order to elucidate the function of a putative sensory box protein (PAS domains) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, the physiological role of SO3389 was characterized. The predicted open reading frame (ORF) encodes a putative sensory box protein that has PAS, GGDEF, and EAL domains, and an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed (ΔSO3389) with approximately 95% of the ORF deleted. Under aerated conditions, wild-type and mutant cultures had similar growth rates, but the mutant culture had a lower growth rate under static, aerobic conditions. Oxygen consumption rates were lower for mutant cultures (1.5-fold), and wild-type cultures also maintained lower dissolved oxygen concentrations under aerated growth conditions. When transferred to anoxic conditions, the mutant did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as electron acceptors. Biochemical assays demonstrated the expression of different c-type cytochromes as well as decreased fumarate reductase activity in the mutant transferred to anoxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic studies showed the inability of the mutant to up-express and down-express genes, including c-type cytochromes (e.g., SO4047/SO4048, SO3285/SO3286), reductases (e.g., SO0768, SO1427), and potential regulators (e.g., SO1329). The complemented strain was able to grow when transferred from aerobic to anoxic growth conditions with the tested electron acceptors. The modeled structure for the SO3389 PAS domains was highly similar to the crystal structures of FAD-binding PAS domains that are known O2/redox sensors. Based on physiological, genomic, and bioinformatic results, we suggest that the sensory box protein, SO3389, is an O2/redox sensor that is involved in optimization of aerobic growth and transitions to anoxia in S

  4. Substrate-level phosphorylation is the primary source of energy conservation during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kristopher A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Naranjo, Belén; Shikhare, Indraneel D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that respiratory organisms use proton motive force to produce ATP via F-type ATP synthase aerobically and that this process may reverse during anaerobiosis to produce proton motive force. Here, we show that Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a nonfermentative, facultative anaerobe known to respire exogenous electron acceptors, generates ATP primarily from substrate-level phosphorylation under anaerobic conditions. Mutant strains lacking ackA (SO2915) and pta (SO2916), genes required for acetate production and a significant portion of substrate-level ATP produced anaerobically, were tested for growth. These mutant strains were unable to grow anaerobically with lactate and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with substrate-level phosphorylation yielding a significant amount of ATP. Mutant strains lacking ackA and pta were also shown to grow slowly using N-acetylglucosamine as the carbon source and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with some ATP generation deriving from the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with this substrate. A deletion strain lacking the sole F-type ATP synthase (SO4746 to SO4754) demonstrated enhanced growth on N-acetylglucosamine and a minor defect with lactate under anaerobic conditions. ATP synthase mutants grown anaerobically on lactate while expressing proteorhodopsin, a light-dependent proton pump, exhibited restored growth when exposed to light, consistent with a proton-pumping role for ATP synthase under anaerobic conditions. Although S. oneidensis requires external electron acceptors to balance redox reactions and is not fermentative, we find that substrate-level phosphorylation is its primary anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic characterization of an ackA deletion in Shewanella sp. strain MR-4 and genomic analysis of other sequenced strains suggest that this strategy is a common feature of Shewanella.

  5. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  6. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  7. Investigations of structure and metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Majors, Paul D; Reardon, Catherine L; Bilskis, Christina L; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and the spatial distribution of the community members. Using non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated the kinetics and stratification of anaerobic metabolism within live biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pre-grown using a defined minimal medium in a constant-depth film bioreactor and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. Biofilms generated in this manner were subjected to changing substrate/electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate) and the metabolic responses measured. Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively measure hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under O(2)-limited conditions. Reduction of electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicating that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch metabolism from O(2) to fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide or nitrate. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate changes in population response to the availability of electron acceptor and to probe metabolic competition under O(2)-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how these factors relate to environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described herein.

  8. The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

  9. Probing Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a Nanoelectrode Platform and Single-Cell Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    investigate extracellu- lar electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensisMR-1,where an array of nanoholes precludes or single window allows for direct...the single-cell level (Fig. 1B) highlights the re- lative sizes of the nanohole and window openings in the insulating layer deposited over electrodes...relative to individual bacteria such as Shewanella. The nanoholes are sufficiently small to preclude direct contact of the bacterial cell body to the

  10. Promoted reduction of tellurite and formation of extracellular tellurium nanorods by concerted reaction between iron and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    The reduction of tellurite (Te(IV)) by dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was promoted in the presence of Fe(III) in comparison with Te(IV) bioreduction in the absence of Fe(III). Electron microscopic analyses revealed that iron promoted Te(IV) reduction led to form exclusively extracellular crystalline Te(0) nanorods, as compared to the mostly intracellular formation of Te(0) nanorods in the absence of Fe(III). The Te K-edge X-ray absorption spectrometric analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis MR-1 in the presence of Fe(III) reduced Te(IV) to less harmful metallic Te(0) nanorods through the precipitation of tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex by the bacterial respiration of Fe(III) to Fe(II) under anaerobic conditions. However, Fe(II) ion itself was only able to precipitate the solid tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex from the Te(IV) solution, which was not further reduced to Te(0). The results clearly indicated that bacterial S. oneidensis MR-1 plays important roles in the reduction and crystallization of Te(0) nanorods by as yet undetermined biochemical mechanisms. As compared to the slow bacterial Te(IV) reduction in the absence of Fe(III), the rapid reduction of Te(IV) to Te(0) by the concerted biogeochemical reaction between Fe(II) and S. oneidensis MR-1 could be applied for the sequestration and detoxification of Te(IV) in the environments as well as for the preparation of extracellular Te(0) nanorod structures.

  11. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  12. Structure of biogenic uraninite produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan; Suvorova, Elena; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Mehta, Apurva; STAHLMAN, JONATHAN O.; Webb, Samuel M.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Bargar, John R.

    2008-11-01

    The stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is seminal to the success of in-situ bioreduction strategies for remediation of subsurface U(VI) contamination. The properties and hence stability of uraninite are dependent on its size, structure and composition. In this study, the local-, intermediate-, and long-range molecular-scale structure of nanoscale uraninite produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 was investigated using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The uraninite products were found to be structurally homologous with stoichiometric UO2 under all conditions considered. Significantly, there was no evidence for lattice strain of the biogenic uraninite nanoparticles. The fresh nanoparticles were found to exhibit a well-ordered interior core of diameter ca 1 nm and an outer region of thickness ca ~ 1 nm in which the structure is locally distorted. The lack of nanoparticle strain and structural homology with stoichiometric UO2 suggests that established thermodynamic parameters for the latter material are an appropriate starting point to model the behavior of nano-biogenic uraninite. The detailed structural analysis in this study provides an essential foundation for subsequent investigations of more environmentally relevant samples.

  13. Extracellular biosynthesis of copper sulfide nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a photothermal agent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan-Qing; Tian, Li-Jiao; Wang, Yu-Cai; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally invasive and effective cancer treatment method and has a great potential for innovating the conventional chemotherapy approaches. Copper sulfide (CuS) exhibits photostability, low cost, and high absorption in near infrared region, and is recognized as an ideal candidate for PTT. However, CuS, as a photothermal agent, is usually synthesized with traditional chemical approaches, which require high temperature, additional stabilization and hydrophilic modification. Herein, we report, for the first time, the preparation of CuS nanoparticles as a photothermal agent by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella. oneidensis MR-1. The prepared nanoparticles are homogenously shaped, hydrophilic, small-sized (∼5nm) and highly stable. Furthermore, the biosynthesized CuS nanoparticles display a high photothermal conversion efficiency of 27.2% because of their strong absorption at 1100nm. The CuS nanoparticles could be effectively used as a PTT agent under the irradiation of 1064nm. This work provides a simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective approach for fabricating PTT agents.

  14. Validation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Small Proteins by AMT Tag-based Proteome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Fang, Ruihua; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-09-01

    Using stringent criteria for protein identification by accurate mass and time (AMT) tag mass spectrometric methodology, we detected 36 proteins <101 amino acids in length, including 10 that were annotated as hypothetical proteins, in 172 global tryptic digests of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 proteins analyzed. Peptides that map to the conserved, but functionally uncharacterized proteins SO4134 and SO2787, were the most frequently detected small proteins in these samples, while hypotheticals SO2669 and SO2063, conserved hypotheticals SO0335 and SO2176, and the SlyX protein (SO1063) were observed at frequencies similar to small expected abundant ribosomal proteins and translation initiation factor IF-1 and consequently, likely to encode important cellular functions. In addition, 30 proteins including three of the small proteins that map to genes predicted to encode frameshifts, point mutations, or recoding signals were detected. Of these 30 genes, peptides that map to positions beyond internal stop codons were detected in 13 genes (SO0101, SO0419, SO0590, SO0738, SO1113, SO1211, SO3079, SO3130, SO3240, SO4231, SO4328, SO4422, and SO4657). While expression of the full-length formate dehydrogenase encoded by SO0101 can be explained by incorporation of selenocysteine at the internal stop codon, the mechanism of translating downstream sequences in the remaining genes remains unknown.

  15. Comparison of uranium(VI) removal by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in flow and batch reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2008-06-01

    To better understand the interactions among metal contaminants, nutrients, and microorganisms in subsurface under fracture-flow conditions, iron-reducing biofilms (pure cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) were grown in six fracture flow reactors (FFRs) of different geometries. The spatial and temporal distribution of nutrients, contaminant, and bacteria were examined using a tracer dye (brilliant blue FCF) and microscopy. The results showed that plugging by bacterial cells depended on the geometry of the reactor; and iron-reducing biofilms grown in FFRs had a definite U(VI)-reduction capacity. To find out the U(VI)-reduction capacity of iron-reducing biofilms, batch experiments of U(VI) reduction were performed in repetitive addition mode. U(VI)-reduction rates of stationary phase grown iron-reducing cultures with and without spent medium decreased after each U(VI) addition. At the end of the fourth U(VI)-addition, stationary phase iron-reducing cultures treated with U(VI) with and without spent medium yielded grey and black precipitates, respectively. These grey and black U precipitates were analyzed using High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Data for randomly selected area of black and grey U precipitates showed that reduced U particles (3-6 nm) were crystalline and amorphous in nature, respectively. This information obtained in this study could be used to develop substrate addition strategies for metal immobilization in subsurface fracture flow systems.

  16. Reduction of jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and secondary mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingjie, Ouyang; Xiancai, Lu; Huan, Liu; Juan, Li; Tingting, Zhu; Xiangyu, Zhu; Jianjun, Lu; Rucheng, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Jarosite is a common mineral in a variety of environments formed by the oxidation of iron sulfide normally accompanying with the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) in mining areas or acid rock drainages (ARD) in many localities. Decomposition of jarosite by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) influences the mobility of many heavy metals generally accommodated in natural jarosite. This study examined the anaerobic reduction of synthesized jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a typical facultative bacteria. The release of ferrous and ferric ion, as well as sulfate and potassium, in the inoculated experimental group lasting 80 days is much higher than that in abiotic control groups. The detection of bicarbonate and acetate in experimental solution further confirms the mechanism of microbial reduction of jarosite, in which lactate acts as the electron donor. The produced ferrous iron stimulates the subsequent secondary mineralization, leading to precipitation and transformation of various iron-containing minerals. Green rust and goethite are the intermediate minerals of the microbial reduction process under anoxic conditions, and the end products include magnetite and siderite. In aerobic environments, goethite, magnetite and siderite were also detected, but the contents were relatively lower. While in abiotic experiments, only goethite has been detected as a product. Thus, the microbial reduction and subsequent mineral transformation can remarkably influence the geochemical cycling of iron and sulfur in supergene environments, as well as the mobility of heavy metals commonly accommodated in jarosite.

  17. Transient storage of electrical charge in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 growing in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Uría, Naroa; Muñoz Berbel, Xavier; Sánchez, Olga; Muñoz, Francesc Xavier; Mas, Jordi

    2011-12-01

    Current output of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) depends on a number of engineering variables mainly related to the design of the fuel cell reactor and the materials used. In most cases the engineering of MFCs relies on the premise that for a constant biomass, current output correlates well with the metabolic activity of the cells. In this study we analyze to what extent, MFC output is also affected by the mode of operation, emphasizing how discontinuous operation can affect temporal patterns of current output. The experimental work has been carried out with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, grown in conventional two-chamber MFCs subject to periodic interruptions of the external circuit. Our results indicate that after closure of the external circuit, current intensity shows a peak that decays back to basal values. The result suggests that the MFC has the ability to store charge during open circuit situations. Further studies using chronoamperometric analyses were carried out using isolated biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 developed in a MFC and placed in an electrochemistry chamber in the presence of an electron donor. The results of these studies indicate that the amount of excess current over the basal level released by the biofilm after periods of circuit disconnection is proportional to the duration of the disconnection period up to a maximum of approximately 60 min. The results indicate that biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have the ability to store charge when oxidizing organic substrates in the absence of an external acceptor.

  18. A biochemical approach to study the role of the terminal oxidases in aerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes for three terminal oxidases: a bd-type quinol oxidase and two heme-copper oxidases, a A-type cytochrome c oxidase and a cbb 3-type oxidase. In this study, we used a biochemical approach and directly measured oxidase activities coupled to mass-spectrometry analysis to investigate the physiological role of the three terminal oxidases under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that the cbb 3-type oxidase is the major terminal oxidase under aerobic conditions while both cbb 3-type and bd-type oxidases are involved in respiration at low-O2 tensions. On the contrary, the low O2-affinity A-type cytochrome c oxidase was not detected in our experimental conditions even under aerobic conditions and would therefore not be required for aerobic respiration in S. oneidensis MR-1. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that the A-type cytochrome c oxidase is a ccaa 3-type oxidase since an uncommon extra-C terminal domain contains two c-type heme binding motifs. The particularity of the aerobic respiratory pathway and the physiological implication of the presence of a ccaa 3-type oxidase in S. oneidensis MR-1 are discussed.

  19. Anaerobic Central Metabolic Pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Reinterpreted in the Light of Isotopic Metabolite Labeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic or oxygen-limited conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes, in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine to form serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate and glycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine its use of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, we grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source, with either trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor. Analysis of cellular metabolites indicated that a large percentage (>70%) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate or pyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other key metabolites indicate that under anaerobic conditions, although glyoxylate synthesized from the isocitrate lyase reaction can be converted to glycine, a complete serine-isocitrate pathway is not present and serine/glycine is, in fact, oxidized via a highly reversible degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significant activity in the anapleurotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observed to be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of a complete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under certain anaerobic conditions, e.g., TMAO-reducing conditions. PMID:17114268

  20. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-06

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. PMID:25411412

  2. Analyses of current-generating mechanisms of Shewanella loihica PV-4 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Newton, Gregory J; Mori, Shigeki; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2009-12-01

    Although members of the genus Shewanella have common features (e.g., the presence of decaheme c-type cytochromes [c-cyts]), they are widely variable in genetic and physiological features. The present study compared the current-generating ability of S. loihica PV-4 in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with that of well-characterized S. oneidensis MR-1 and examined the roles of c-cyts in extracellular electron transfer. We found that strains PV-4 and MR-1 exhibited notable differences in current-generating mechanisms. While the MR-1 MFCs maintained a constant current density over time, the PV-4 MFCs continued to increase in current density and finally surpassed the MR-1 MFCs. Coulombic efficiencies reached 26% in the PV-4 MFC but 16% in the MR-1 MFCs. Although both organisms produced quinone-like compounds, anode exchange experiments showed that anode-attached cells of PV-4 produced sevenfold more current than planktonic cells in the same chamber, while planktonic cells of MR-1 produced twice the current of the anode-attached cells. Examination of the genome sequence indicated that PV-4 has more c-cyt genes in the metal reductase-containing locus than MR-1. Mutational analysis revealed that PV-4 relied predominantly on a homologue of the decaheme c-cyt MtrC in MR-1 for current generation, even though it also possesses two homologues of the decaheme c-cyt OmcA in MR-1. These results suggest that current generation in a PV-4 MFC is in large part accomplished by anode-attached cells, in which the MtrC homologue constitutes the main path of electrons toward the anode.

  3. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  4. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  5. Enhanced photocurrent production by the synergy of hematite nanowire-arrayed photoanode and bioengineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gaolong; Yang, Yun; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feng; Lu, Anhuai; He, Weidong

    2017-08-15

    Coupling the light-harvesting capabilities of semiconductors with the catalytic power of bacteria is a promising way to increase the efficiency of bioelectrochemical systems. Here, we reported the enhanced photocurrents produced by the synergy of hematite nanowire-arrayed photoanode and the bio-engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a solar-assisted microbial photoelectrochemical system (solar MPS) under the visible light. To increase the supply of bioelectrons, the D-lactate transporter, SO1522, was overexpressed in the recombinant S. oneidensis (T-SO1522) that could digest D-lactate 61% faster than the wild-type S. oneidenesis. Without light illumination, the addition of either the wild-type or the recombinant S. oneidensis to the system did not induce any obvious increase in the current output. However, under one-sun illumination, the photocurrent of the abiotic control was 16±2 μA cm(-2) at 0.8V vs. Ag/AgCl, and the addition of the wild-type S. oneidensis and the recombinant S. oneidensis increased the photocurrent to 70±6 and 95±8 μA cm(-2), respectively, at 0.8V vs. Ag/AgCl. Moreover, the solar MPS with T-SO1522 presented quick and repeatable responses to the on/off illumination cycles, and had relatively stable photocurrent generation in the 273-h operation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that the cell density on the hematite photoelectrode was similar between the recombinant and the wild-type S. oneidensis. These findings revealed the pronounced influence of metabolic rates on the light-to-electricity conversion in the complex photocatalyst-electricigen hybrid system, which is important to promote the development of the solar MPS for electricity production and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation.

    PubMed

    Barchinger, Sarah E; Pirbadian, Sahand; Sambles, Christine; Baker, Carol S; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Golbeck, John H

    2016-09-01

    In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface using extensions of

  7. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation

    PubMed Central

    Barchinger, Sarah E.; Pirbadian, Sahand; Baker, Carol S.; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA. The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. IMPORTANCE Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface

  8. Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-03-30

    EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 following Exposure to UVC, UVB, and UVA Radiation†

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaoyun; Sundin, George W.; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Tiedje, James M.

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is highly sensitive to UVC (254 nm), UVB (290 to 320 nm), and UVA (320 to 400 nm). Here we delineated the cellular response of MR-1 to UV radiation damage by analyzing the transcriptional profile during a 1-h recovering period after UVC, UVB, and UVA exposure at a dose that yields about a 20% survival rate. Although the SOS response was observed with all three treatments, the induction was more robust in response to short-wavelength UV radiation (UVB and UVC). Similarly, more prophage-related genes were induced by short-wavelength UV radiation. MR-1 showed an active detoxification mechanism in response to UVA, which included the induction of antioxidant enzymes and iron-sequestering proteins to scavenge reactive oxygen species. In addition, a great number of genes encoding multidrug and heavy metal efflux pumps were induced following UVA irradiation. Our data suggested that activation of prophages appears the major lethal factor in MR-1 following UVC or UVB irradiation, whereas oxidative damage contributes greatly to the high UVA sensitivity in MR-1. PMID:15866945

  10. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kasai, Takuya; Hirose, Atsumi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer (EET) pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the EET processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extracellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological basis for MFCs. PMID:26136738

  11. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  12. PdeB, a cyclic Di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase that regulates Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 motility and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lily; Rakshe, Shauna; Leff, Maija; Spormann, Alfred M

    2013-09-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gammaproteobacterium with respiratory versatility, forms biofilms on mineral surfaces through a process controlled by the cyclic dinucleotide messenger c-di-GMP. Cellular concentrations of c-di-GMP are maintained by proteins containing GGDEF and EAL domains, which encode diguanylate cyclases for c-di-GMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases for c-di-GMP hydrolysis, respectively. The S. oneidensis MR-1 genome encodes several GGDEF and EAL domain proteins (50 and 31, respectively), with a significant fraction (∼10) predicted to be multidomain (e.g., GGDEF-EAL) enzymes containing an additional Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) sensor domain. However, the biochemical activities and physiological functions of these multidomain enzymes remain largely unknown. Here, we present genetic and biochemical analyses of a predicted PAS-GGDEF-EAL domain-containing protein, SO0437, here named PdeB. A pdeB deletion mutant exhibited decreased swimming motility and increased biofilm formation under rich growth medium conditions, which was consistent with an increase in intracellular c-di-GMP. A mutation inactivating the EAL domain also produced similar swimming and biofilm phenotypes, indicating that the increase in c-di-GMP was likely due to a loss in phosphodiesterase activity. Therefore, we also examined the enzymatic activity of purified PdeB and found that the protein exhibited phosphodiesterase activity via the EAL domain. No diguanylate cyclase activity was observed. In addition to the motility and biofilm phenotypes, transcriptional profiling by DNA microarray analysis of biofilms of pdeB (in-frame deletion and EAL) mutant cells revealed that expression of genes involved in sulfate uptake and assimilation were repressed. Addition of sulfate to the growth medium resulted in significantly less motile pdeB mutants. Together, these results indicate a link between c-di-GMP metabolism, S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm development, and sulfate uptake/assimilation.

  13. Constraint-Based Model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Metabolism: A Tool for Data Analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Eric A.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; De Ingeniis, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaolin; Osterman, Andrei; Scott, James H.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Konopka, Allan E.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox) stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i) used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii) developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations), (iii) classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv) predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v) used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a systems

  14. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  15. In vitro enzymatic reduction kinetics of mineral oxides by membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, Shane S.; Icopini, Gary A.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  16. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  17. An iTRAQ characterisation of the role of TolC during electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Gregory J S; Pereira-Medrano, Ana G; Jaffe, Stephen; Pasternak, Grzegorz; Pham, Trong Khoa; Ledezma, Pablo; Hall, Simon T E; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-11-01

    Anodophilic bacteria have the ability to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by extracellular electron transfer to the anode. We investigated the anode-specific responses of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an exoelectroactive Gammaproteobacterium, using for the first time iTRAQ and 2D-LC MS/MS driven membrane proteomics to compare protein abundances in S. oneidensis when generating power in MFCs, and growing in a continuous culture. The regulated dataset produced was enriched in membrane proteins. Proteins shown to be more abundant in anaerobic electroactive anodic cells included efflux pump TolC and an uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein, whilst the TonB2 system and associated uncharacterised proteins such as TtpC2 and DUF3450 were more abundant in microaerobic planktonic cells. In order to validate the iTRAQ data, the functional role for TolC was examined using a δTolC knockout mutant of S. oneidensis. Possible roles for the uncharacterised proteins were identified using comparative bioinformatics. We demonstrate that employing an insoluble extracellular electron acceptor requires multiple proteins involved in cell surface properties. All MS and processed data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004090.

  18. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  19. Iron reduction in the DAMO/Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 coculture system and the fate of Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Li, Shan-Wei; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation processes play important roles in the global iron and carbon cycle, respectively. This study explored the ferrihydrite reduction process with methane as a carbon source in a coculture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microbes enriched in laboratory and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and then characterized the reduced products. Ferrihydrite reduction was also studied in the DAMO and Shewanella systems alone. The ferrihydrite was reduced slightly (<13.3%) in the separate systems, but greatly (42.0-88.3%) in the coculture system. Isotope experiment of (13)CH4 addition revealed that DAMO microbes coupled to S. oneidensis MR-1 in a ferric iron reduction process with (13)CH4 consumption and (13)CO2 production. Compared with ferrihydrite, the reduced products showed increased crystallinity (from amorphous state to crystallinity 77.1%) and magnetism (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic). The produced ferrous iron was formed into minerals primarily composed of siderite with a small amount vivianite and magnetite. A portion of products covered the cell surface and hindered further reactions. The results presented herein widen the current understanding of iron metabolism and mineralization in the ocean, and show that the coculture systems of DAMO microbes and Shewanella have the potential to be globally important to iron reduction and methane oxidation.

  20. Characterization of an efficient catalytic and organic solvent-tolerant azoreductase toward methyl red from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyi; Lu, Liling; Gao, Fen; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-05-01

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) phosphodiesterase gene (SO 4396) of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 which was analyzed to have azoreductase activity was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The ACP phosphodiesterase was found to reach maximum enzyme velocity 220.59 U/mg, named azoreductase in this study. The azoreductase had highest specific activity (153.16 U/mg) at pH 6.5, which showed a preference for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as electron donor. The phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the azoreductase had preference for NADH and dependence for flavin mononucleotide (FMN). However, the azoreductase from S. oneidensis MR-1 still had high enzyme activity in the absence of FMN. The Mg(2+) had a positive influence on the enzyme activity with 25 mM concentration, whereas Cr(3+), Cd(2+) usually had significantly negative effect on enzyme activity. The purified azoreductase retained nearly 100 % activity after incubating in 30 % dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 30 % acetone, 30 % methanol, 20 % ethanol, 20 % isopropanol, and 10 % propanol.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  2. Plutonium(IV) Reduction by the Metal-Reducing Bacteria Geobacter metallireducens GS15 and Shewanella oneidensis MR1

    PubMed Central

    Boukhalfa, Hakim; Icopini, Gary A.; Reilly, Sean D.; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial reduction of actinides has been suggested as a possible remedial strategy for actinide-contaminated environments, and the bacterial reduction of Pu(VI/V) has the potential to produce highly insoluble Pu(IV) solid phases. However, the behavior of plutonium with regard to bacterial reduction is more complex than for other actinides because it is possible for Pu(IV) to be further reduced to Pu(III), which is relatively more soluble than Pu(IV). This work investigates the ability of the metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter metallireducens GS15 and Shewanella oneidensis MR1 to enzymatically reduce freshly precipitated amorphous Pu(IV) (OH)4 [Pu(IV)(OH)4(am)] and soluble Pu(IV)(EDTA). In cell suspensions without added complexing ligands, minor Pu(III) production was observed in cultures containing S. oneidensis, but little or no Pu(III) production was observed in cultures containing G. metallireducens. In the presence of EDTA, most of the Pu(IV)(OH)4(am) present was reduced to Pu(III) and remained soluble in cell suspensions of both S. oneidensis and G. metallireducens. When soluble Pu(IV)(EDTA) was provided as the terminal electron acceptor, cell suspensions of both S. oneidensis and G. metallireducens rapidly reduced Pu(IV)(EDTA) to Pu(III)(EDTA) with nearly complete reduction within 20 to 40 min, depending on the initial concentration. Neither bacterium was able to use Pu(IV) (in any of the forms used) as a terminal electron acceptor to support growth. These results have significant implications for the potential remediation of plutonium and suggest that strongly reducing environments where complexing ligands are present may produce soluble forms of reduced Pu species. PMID:17644643

  3. Recombinant engineering of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes in Escherichia coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shewanella oneidensis is known to respire with extracellular solid metal oxides (i.e., iron, manganese, uranium) as a terminal electron acceptor. It has become the focus of intensive research not only due to its important bioremediation features, but also as a potential organism for biological elec...

  4. Involvement of cytochrome c CymA in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a cyclic nitramine explosive commonly used for military applications that is responsible for severe soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was shown to efficiently degrade RDX anaerobically (3.5 µmol·h(-1)·(g protein)(-1)) via two initial routes: (1) sequential N-NO(2) reductions to the corresponding nitroso (N-NO) derivatives (94% of initial RDX degradation) and (2) denitration followed by ring cleavage. To identify genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX, a library of ~2500 mutants of MR-1 was constructed by random transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with a reduced ability to degrade RDX compared with the wild type. An RDX-defective mutant (C9) was isolated that had the transposon inserted in the c-type cytochrome gene cymA. C9 transformed RDX at ~10% of the wild-type rate, with degradation occurring mostly via early ring cleavage caused by initial denitration leading to the formation of methylenedinitramine, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, formaldehyde, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Genetic complementation of mutant C9 restored the wild-type phenotype, providing evidence that electron transport components have a role in the anaerobic reduction of RDX by MR-1.

  5. Global detection and characterization of hypothetical proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using LC-MS based proteomics based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2005-08-01

    The availability of whole genome sequences has enabled the application of powerful tools for assaying global expression patterns in environmentally relevant bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A large number of genes in prokaryote genomes, including MR-1, have been annotated as hypothetical indicating that no similar protein has yet been identified in other organisms. Using high-sensitivity mass spectrometry coupled with accurate mass and time (AMT) tag methodology, 1078 tryptic peptides were collectively detected in MR-1 cultures, 671 of which were unique to their parent protein. Using only these unique tryptic peptides and a minimum of 2 peptides per protein, we identified, with high confidence, the expression of 258 hypothetical proteins. These proteins ranged from 3.5 kDa to 139 kDa, with 47 being 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions, presence within a specific cell fraction, and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some hypothetical proteins. Further, by applying this approach a number of proteins were found not only to be expressed, but only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby suggesting function while at the same time isolating several proteins to distinct locales of the cell. These results demonstrate the utility of the AMT tag methodology for comprehensive profiling of the microbial proteome while confirming the expression of a large number of hypothetical genes.

  6. Confirmation of the expression of a large set of conserved hypothetical proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Elias, Dwayne A; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Fredrickson, James K; Lipton, Mary S

    2006-08-01

    High-throughput "omic" technologies have allowed for a relatively rapid, yet comprehensive analysis of the global expression patterns within an organism in response to perturbations. In the current study, 9503 different tryptic peptides were identified with high confidence from capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 26 chemostat cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under various conditions. Using at least one distinctive and a total of two total peptide identifications per protein, we detected the expression of 758 conserved hypothetical proteins. This included 359 such proteins previously described [Kolker, E., Picone, A.F., Galperin, M.Y., Romine, M.F., Higdon, R., Makarova, K.S., Kolker, N., Anderson, G.A., Qiu, X., Auberry, K.J., Babnigg, G., Beliaev, A.S., Edlefsen, P., Elias, D.A., Gorby, Y.A., Holzman, T., Klappenbach, J.A., Konstantinidis, K.T., Land, M.L., Lipton, M.S., McCue, L.A., Monroe, M., Pasa-Tolic, L., Pinchuk, G., Purvine, S., Serres, M.H., Tsapin, S., Zakrajsek, B.A., Zhu, W., Zhou, J., Larimer, F.W., Lawrence, C.E., Riley, M., Collart, F.R., Yates, J.R., III, Smith, R.D., Giometti, C.S., Nealson, K.H., Fredrickson, J.K., Tiedje, J.M., 2005. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102, 2099-2104] with an additional 399 reported herein for the first time. The latter 399 proteins ranged from 5.3 to 208.3 kDa, with 44 being of 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some conserved hypothetical proteins. Such proteins were found not only to be expressed, but 19 were only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby providing insight into potential functions. These findings also impact the genomic annotation for S

  7. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  8. Roles of 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide in regulating extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Yu, Sheng-Song; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is critically involved in many pollutant conversion processes in both natural environment and engineered bioelectrochemical systems (BES), but typically with limited efficiency and poor controllability. In this study, we discover an important role of uncouplers in affecting the microbial energy metabolism and EET. Dose of lower-concentration 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) in the anolyte promoted the current generation and substrate degradation of an MFC inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, higher TCS dosage caused obvious microbial inhibition. Our results suggest a previously unknown role of uncouplers in regulating the microbial EET. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of such processes are investigated. This work broadens our view about the EET behaviors of microorganisms in real water environment where uncouplers are usually present, and suggests a possible new approach to regulate microbial EET in BES. PMID:25612888

  9. Hydrogenase- and Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochrome-Facilitated Reduction of Technetium(VII) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Reed, Samantha B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Simonson, Cody J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-15

    Pertechnetate, 99Tc(VII)O4-, is a highly mobile radionuclide contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy sites that can be enzymatically reduced by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble Tc(IV)O2(s). In other microorganisms, Tc(VII)O4- reduction is generally considered to be catalyzed by hydrogenase. Here, we provide evidence that although the NiFe hydrogenase of MR-1 was involved in the H2-driven reduction of Tc(VII)O4- (presumably through a direct coupling of H2 oxidation and Tc(VII) reduction), the deletion of both hydrogenase genes did not completely eliminate the ability of MR-1 to reduce Tc(VII). With lactate as the electron donor, mutants lacking the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA or the proteins required for the maturation of c-type cytochromes were defective in reducing Tc(VII) to nanoparticulate TcO2·nH2O(s) relative to MR-1 or a NiFe hydrogenase mutant. In addition, reduced MtrC and OmcA were oxidized by Tc(VII)O4-, confirming the capacity for direct electron transfer from these OMCs to TcO4-. c-Type cytochrome-catalyzed Tc(VII) reduction could be a potentially important mechanism in environments where organic electron donor concentrations are sufficient to allow this reaction to dominate.

  10. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  11. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 H-NOX Regulation of a Histidine Kinase by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Price, Mark S.; Chao, Lily; Marletta, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling in animals controls processes such as smooth muscle relaxation and neurotransmission by activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Prokaryotic homologs of the sGC heme domain, called H-NOX domains, have been identified and are generally found in a predicted operon in conjunction with a histidine kinase. Here, we show that an H-NOX protein (SO2144) from Shewanella oneidensis, directly interacts with the sensor histidine kinase (SO2145), binds NO in a 5-coordinate complex similar to mammalian sGC, and in that form inhibits the activity of a histidine kinase (SO2145). We also describe the first account of NO formation by S. oneidensis under anaerobic growth conditions derived from nitrate and nitrite. These observations suggest that the S. oneidensis H-NOX and histidine kinase pair function as part of a novel two-component signaling pathway that is responsive to NO formation from higher nitrogen oxides used as electron acceptors when oxygen is low and thereby functioning as an environmental sensor. PMID:17988156

  12. Use of SWATH mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomic investigation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms grown on graphite cloth electrodes.

    PubMed

    Grobbler, Christy; Virdis, Bernardino; Nouwens, Amanda; Harnisch, Falk; Rabaey, Korneel; Bond, Philip L

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative proteomics from low biomass, biofilm samples is not well documented. In this study we show successful use of SWATH-MS for quantitative proteomic analysis of a microbial electrochemically active biofilm. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown on carbon cloth electrodes under continuous anodic electrochemical polarizations in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). Using lactate as the electron donor, anodes serving as terminal microbial electron acceptors were operated at three different electrode potentials (+0.71 V, +0.21 V & -0.19 V vs. SHE) and the development of catalytic activity was monitored by measuring the current traces over time. Once maximum current was reached (usually within 21-29 h) the electrochemical systems were shut off and biofilm proteins were extracted from the electrodes for proteomic assessment. SWATH-MS analysis identified 704 proteins, and quantitative comparison was made of those associated with tricarboxcylic acid (TCA) cycle. Metabolic differences detected between the biofilms suggested a branching of the S. oneidensis TCA cycle when grown at the different electrode potentials. In addition, the higher abundance of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle at higher potential indicates an increase in metabolic activity, which is expected given the assumed higher energy gains. This study demonstrates high numbers of identifications on BES biofilm samples can be achieved in comparison to what is currently reported. This is most likely due to the minimal preparation steps required for SWATH-MS.

  13. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 chemotaxis proteins and electron-transport chain components essential for congregation near insoluble electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Harris, H Wayne; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells utilize a behaviour response called electrokinesis to increase their speed in the vicinity of IEAs (insoluble electron acceptors), including manganese oxides, iron oxides and poised electrodes [Harris, El-Naggar, Bretschger, Ward, Romine, Obraztsova and Nealson (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 326-331]. However, it is not currently understood how bacteria remain in the vicinity of the IEA and accumulate both on the surface and in the surrounding medium. In the present paper, we provide results indicating that cells that have contacted the IEAs swim faster than those that have not recently made contact. In addition, fast-swimming cells exhibit an enhancement of swimming reversals leading to rapid non-random accumulation of cells on, and adjacent to, mineral particles. We call the observed accumulation near IEAs 'congregation'. Congregation is eliminated by the loss of a critical gene involved with EET (extracellular electron transport) (cymA, SO_4591) and is altered or eliminated in several deletion mutants of homologues of genes that are involved with chemotaxis or energy taxis in Escherichia coli. These genes include chemotactic signal transduction protein (cheA-3, SO_3207), methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins with the Cache domain (mcp_cache, SO_2240) or the PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain (mcp_pas, SO_1385). In the present paper, we report studies of S. oneidensis MR-1 that lend some insight into how microbes in this group can 'sense' the presence of a solid substrate such as a mineral surface, and maintain themselves in the vicinity of the mineral (i.e. via congregation), which may ultimately lead to attachment and biofilm formation.

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge

    PubMed Central

    Chourey, Karuna; Wei, Wei; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Thompson, Dorothea K

    2008-01-01

    Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon. Results Inactivation of so2426 by an in-frame deletion resulted in enhanced chromate sensitivity and a reduced capacity to remove extracellular Cr(VI) relative to the parental strain. Time-resolved microarray analysis was used to compare transcriptomic profiles of wild-type and SO2426-deficient mutant S. oneidensis under conditions of chromate exposure. In total, 841 genes (18% of the arrayed genome) were up- or downregulated at least twofold in the Δso2426 mutant for at least one of six time-point conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis of temporal transcriptional profiles identified a distinct cluster (n = 46) comprised of co-ordinately regulated genes exhibiting significant downregulated expression (p < 0.05) over time. Thirteen of these genes encoded proteins associated with transport and binding functions, particularly those involved in Fe transport and homeostasis (e.g., siderophore biosynthetic enzymes, TonB-dependent receptors, and the iron-storage protein ferritin). A conserved hypothetical operon (so1188-so1189-so1190), previously identified as a potential target of Fur-mediated repression, as well as a putative bicyclomycin resistance gene (so2280) and cation efflux family protein gene (so2045) also were repressed in the

  15. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  16. Role of outer-membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the biomineralization of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Reardon, C L; Dohnalkova, A C; Nachimuthu, P; Kennedy, D W; Saffarini, D A; Arey, B W; Shi, L; Wang, Z; Moore, D; McLean, J S; Moyles, D; Marshall, M J; Zachara, J M; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer-membrane cytochromes (OMCs), MtrC and OmcA, were characterized for the ability to reduce ferrihydrite (FH) using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemical techniques. Analysis of purified recombinant proteins demonstrated that both cytochromes undergo rapid electron exchange with FH in vitro with MtrC displaying faster transfer rates than OmcA. Immunomicroscopy with cytochrome-specific antibodies revealed that MtrC co-localizes with iron solids on the cell surface while OmcA exhibits a more diffuse distribution over the cell surface. After 3-day incubation of MR-1 with FH, pronounced reductive transformation mineral products were visible by electron microscopy. Upon further incubation, the predominant phases identified were ferrous phosphates including vivianite [Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x8H(2)O] and a switzerite-like phase [Mn(3),Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x7H(2)O] that were heavily colonized by MR-1 cells with surface-exposed outer-membrane cytochromes. In the absence of both MtrC and OmcA, the cells ability to reduce FH was significantly hindered and no mineral transformation products were detected. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of the outer-membrane cytochromes in the reductive transformation of FH and support a role for direct electron transfer from the OMCs at the cell surface to the mineral.

  17. Trace Element Speciation and Distribution Study at Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilm/Mineral/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelabert, A.; Wang, Y.; Gescher, J.; Ha, J.; Cordova, C. D.; Singer, D. M.; Spormann, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; Eng, P. J.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides are among the most reactive mineral surfaces contacted by surface and ground waters, and thus they constitute important sorbents for heavy metal and metalloid ions. As microbial biofilms may be present as coatings on these minerals, they are likely to induce major changes in surface charges and sorption capacities for metal(loid) ions compared to biofilm-free mineral surfaces. In addition, the micro- environments in biofilms can be quite different from those in bulk solutions, which can enhance (or inhibit) metal adsorption on mineral surfaces and produce biominerals that are not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics based on the bulk solution values. In order to provide a more quantitative understanding of these effects, we have carried out a study of the interaction of Zn(II), Pb(II), and As(V) with Shewanella oneidensis (wild type, EPS-deficient mutant, and ppx- and ppk-deficient mutants) grown on highly polished and oriented single crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). This gram-negative bacterium commonly found in soil and sediments can use a wide range of electron donors and terminal electron acceptors including Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. In-situ ATR-FTIR analyses and potentiometric titrations of S. oneidensis biofilm collected from a glass bead-filled column inoculated with S. oneidensis were conducted in order to determine the nature of functional groups present on the bacterial surfaces, to quantify the site densities and protonation constants for these groups, and to determine the electrostatic parameters for S. oneidensis surfaces. GI-XAFS analyses performed on BL 11-2 at SSRL, together with macroscopic metal adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2 to 6.5), metal concentration (10-3 to 10-7 M), and ionic strength (10-1 to 10-3 M), were used to determine ion speciation and local coordination environments in the biofilm and to develop a surface complexation model describing

  18. Global Transcriptional Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Cr(VI) and U(VI) Reduction†

    PubMed Central

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Williams, Sarah Middleton; Haucke, Lisa; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2005-01-01

    Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to examine the gene expression profile of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during U(VI) and Cr(VI) reduction. The same control, cells pregrown with nitrate and incubated with no electron acceptor, was used for the two time points considered and for both metals. U(VI)-reducing conditions resulted in the upregulation (≥3-fold) of 121 genes, while 83 genes were upregulated under Cr(VI)-reducing conditions. A large fraction of the genes upregulated [34% for U(VI) and 29% for Cr(VI)] encode hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Genes encoding proteins known to reduce alternative electron acceptors [fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, Mn(IV), or soluble Fe(III)] were upregulated under both U(VI)- and Cr(VI)-reducing conditions. The involvement of these upregulated genes in the reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI) was tested using mutants lacking one or several of the gene products. Mutant testing confirmed the involvement of several genes in the reduction of both metals: mtrA, mtrB, mtrC, and menC, all of which are involved in Fe(III) citrate reduction by MR-1. Genes encoding efflux pumps were upregulated under Cr(VI)- but not under U(VI)-reducing conditions. Genes encoding proteins associated with general (e.g., groL and dnaJ) and membrane (e.g., pspBC) stress were also upregulated, particularly under U(VI)-reducing conditions, pointing to membrane damage by the solid-phase reduced U(IV) and Cr(III) and/or the direct effect of the oxidized forms of the metals. This study sheds light on the multifaceted response of MR-1 to U(VI) and Cr(VI) under anaerobic conditions and suggests that the same electron transport pathway can be used for more than one electron acceptor. PMID:16269787

  19. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI)reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughputmini-bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-16

    The growth and Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensisMR-1 was examined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlymonitors and controls pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature for each ofits 24, 10-mL reactors. Independent monitoring and control of eachreactor in the cassette allows the exploration of a matrix ofenvironmental conditions known to influence S. oneidensis chromiumreduction. S. oneidensis MR-1 grew in minimal medium without amino acidor vitamin supplementation under aerobic conditions but required serineand glycine supplementation under anaerobic conditions. Growth wasinhibited by dissolved oxygen concentrations>80 percent. Lactatetransformation to acetate was enhanced by low concentration of dissolvedoxygen during the logarithmic growth phase. Between 11 and 35oC, thegrowth rate obeyed the Arrhenius reaction rate-temperature relationship,with a maximum growth rate occurring at 35oC. S. oneidensis MR-1 was ableto grow over a wide range of pH (6-9). At neutral pH and temperaturesranging from 30-35oC, S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced 100 mu M Cr(VI) toCr(III) within 20 minutes in the exponential growth phase, and the growthrate was not affected by the addition of chromate; it reduced chromateeven faster at temperatures between 35 and 39oC. At low temperatures(<25oC), acidic (pH<6.5), or alkaline (pH>8.5) conditions, 100mu M Cr(VI) strongly inhibited growth and chromate reduction. Themini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid determination of theseparameters reproducibly and easily by performing very few experiments.Besides its use for examining parameters of interest to environmentalremediation, the device will also allow one to quickly assess parametersfor optimal production of recombinant proteins or secondarymetabolites

  20. Antibody Recognition Force Microscopy Shows that Outer Membrane Cytochromes OmcA and MtrC Are Expressed on the Exterior Surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Lower, Brian H.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Boily, Jean-François; Lower, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Antibody recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells when Fe(III), including solid-phase hematite (Fe2O3), was the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface between the cell and mineral. MtrC displayed a more uniform distribution across the cell surface. Both cytochromes were associated with an extracellular polymeric substance. PMID:19286784

  1. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Boily, Jean F.; Lower, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Antibody-recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells during anaerobic growth, when Fe(III) served as the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface with hematite, while MtrC was more uniformly displayed on the bacterium’s exterior cell surface. Both cytochromes were also found associated with extracellular material.

  2. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J; Wigginton, Nicholas S; Reardon, Catherine L; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Droubay, Timothy C; Boily, Jean-François; Lower, Steven K

    2009-05-01

    Antibody recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells when Fe(III), including solid-phase hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), was the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface between the cell and mineral. MtrC displayed a more uniform distribution across the cell surface. Both cytochromes were associated with an extracellular polymeric substance.

  3. Systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kipf, Elena; Koch, Julia; Geiger, Bettina; Erben, Johannes; Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2013-10-01

    We present a systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Under anoxic conditions nanoporous activated carbon cloth is a superior anode material in terms of current density normalized to the projected anode area and anode volume (24.0±0.3 μA cm(-2) and 482±7 μA cm(-3) at -0.2 vs. SCE, respectively). The good performance can be attributed to the high specific surface area of the material, which is available for mediated electron transfer through self-secreted flavins. Under aerated conditions no influence of the specific surface area is observed, which we attribute to a shift from primary indirect electron transfer by mediators to direct electron transfer via adherent cells. Furthermore, we show that an aerated initial growth phase enhances the current density under subsequent anoxic conditions fivefold when compared to a similar experiment that was conducted under permanently anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ferrous Phosphate Surface Precipitates Resulting from the Reduction of Intragrain 6-line Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3) and phosphate (P) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. In the intragrain ferrihydrite suspensions, 200-300 µmol L-1 dissolved Fe(III) was released during the initial stages of incubation; no Fe(III)aq was detected in the free ferrihydrite suspensions. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Distinctive surface precipitates of Fe(II) phosphates with spherical morphology were observed on porous silica when P was present. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and fragments of extracellular materials at the end of incubation.

  5. Expression of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Katrin; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Cornish, Adam J.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    H2 generated from renewable resources holds promise as an environmentally innocuous fuel that releases only energy and water when consumed. In biotechnology, photoautotrophic oxygenic diazotrophs could produce H2 from water and sunlight using the cells' endogenous nitrogenases. However, nitrogenases have low turnover numbers and require large amounts of ATP. [FeFe]-hydrogenases found in other organisms can have 1,000-fold higher turnover numbers and no specific requirement for ATP but are very O2 sensitive. Certain filamentous cyanobacteria protect nitrogenase from O2 by sequestering the enzyme within internally micro-oxic, differentiated cells called heterocysts. We heterologously expressed the [FeFe]-hydrogenase operon from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using the heterocyst-specific promoter PhetN. Active [FeFe]-hydrogenase was detected in and could be purified from aerobically grown Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but only when the organism was grown under nitrate-depleted conditions that elicited heterocyst formation. These results suggest that the heterocysts protected the [FeFe]-hydrogenase against inactivation by O2. PMID:23023750

  6. Antibacterial activity of graphene-modified anode on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Deng, Feng; Hu, Yongyou; Sun, Jian; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-09-01

    To clearly illustrate the antibacterial activity of graphene on anodic exoelectrogen, the growth of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm on graphene-modified anodes (GMAs) and bare graphite anodes (BGs) were compared. The GMAs with different amounts of graphene were obtained by the cyclic voltammetric electrodeposition of 5, 20 and 40 potential cycles (5-G, 20-G and 40-G). Confocal scanning laser microscopy and cyclic voltammetry results demonstrated that graphene exhibited an obvious antibacterial effect for initial Shewanella MR biofilm growth. After 5 h of inoculation, 40-G, 20-G and 5-G had 6.3, 8.8 and 13.9% lower levels of biofilm viability, respectively, compared to BG, and all three exhibited approximately 70% lower electrochemical activity compared to BG. However, 18 h later, the biofilm on the GMAs exhibited much higher viability than that of the BG, and the electrochemical activity increased to a similar level. This study revealed the dual effect of graphene, including the antibacterial activity on biofilms and the enhancement of bacterial attachment and electron transfer.

  7. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  8. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  9. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  10. Fate of Fe and Cd upon microbial reduction of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenchen; Yi, Xiaoyun; Dang, Zhi; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Polyferric sulphate has been widely used for emergent control on incidental release of heavy metals such as Cd to surface water, causing precipitation of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs to the sediment. To date, little is known about whether the dissolution of the flocs in the presence of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) can occur and how the dissolution influences the fate of Fe and Cd in the sediment. Here, we demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, as representative DIRB, has the ability to reduce the flocs, resulting in the release of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) to the solution. Batch experiment results showed that the concentrations of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+)reached the maximum values at 48 h and then decreased over the remaining incubation time. The characterizations on the solid phase by the scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technologies revealed the formation of iron minerals such as goethite and magnetite as a consequence of microbial Fe(III) reduction. The newly formed iron minerals played a significant role in re-immobilizing Cd by sorption. These results imply that microbial reduction of polyferric flocs is an important contributor to the transport and transformation of metals in the sediment-water interface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genes That Enhance the Ecological Fitness of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Sediments Reveal the Value of Antibiotic Resistance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Jennifer L.; Luo, Qingwei; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental bacteria persist in various habitats, yet little is known about the genes that contribute to growth and survival in their respective ecological niches. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 coupled with a screen involving incubations of mutant strains in anoxic aquifer sediments allowed us to identify 47 genes that enhance fitness in sediments. Gene functions inferred from annotations provide us with insight into physiological and ecological processes that environmental bacteria use while growing in sediment ecosystems. Identification of the mexF gene and other potential membrane efflux components by STM demonstrated that homologues of multidrug resistance genes present in pathogens are required for sediment fitness of nonpathogenic bacteria. Further studies with a mexF deletion mutant demonstrated that the multidrug resistance pump encoded by mexF is required for resistance to antibiotics, including chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Chloramphenicol-adapted cultures exhibited mutations in the gene encoding a TetR family regulatory protein, indicating a role for this protein in regulating expression of the mexEF operon. The relative importance of mexF for sediment fitness suggests that antibiotic efflux may be a required process for bacteria living in sediment systems. PMID:17114320

  12. ArcS, the cognate sensor kinase in an atypical Arc system of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Jürgen; Henche, Anna-Lena; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M

    2010-05-01

    The availability of oxygen is a major environmental factor for many microbes, in particular for bacteria such as Shewanella species, which thrive in redox-stratified environments. One of the best-studied systems involved in mediating the response to changes in environmental oxygen levels is the Arc two-component system of Escherichia coli, consisting of the sensor kinase ArcB and the cognate response regulator ArcA. An ArcA ortholog was previously identified in Shewanella, and as in Escherichia coli, Shewanella ArcA is involved in regulating the response to shifts in oxygen levels. Here, we identified the hybrid sensor kinase SO_0577, now designated ArcS, as the previously elusive cognate sensor kinase of the Arc system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Phenotypic mutant characterization, transcriptomic analysis, protein-protein interaction, and phosphotransfer studies revealed that the Shewanella Arc system consists of the sensor kinase ArcS, the single phosphotransfer domain protein HptA, and the response regulator ArcA. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that HptA might be a relict of ArcB. Conversely, ArcS is substantially different with respect to overall sequence homologies and domain organizations. Thus, we speculate that ArcS might have adopted the role of ArcB after a loss of the original sensor kinase, perhaps as a consequence of regulatory adaptation to a redox-stratified environment.

  13. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  14. Accumulation of amorphous Cr(III)-Te(IV) nanoparticles on the surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Min-Gyu; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-12-16

    Industrial effluents constitute a major source of metal pollution of aquatic bodies. Moreover, due to their environmental persistence, toxic metal pollution is of special concern. Microbial reduction is considered a promising strategy for toxic metal removal among the several methods available for metal remediation. Here, we describe the coremediation of toxic Cr(VI) and Te(IV) by the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium-Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the presence of both Cr(VI) and Te(IV), S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced Cr(VI) to the less toxic Cr(III) form, but not Te(IV) to Te(0). The reduced Cr(III) ions complexed rapidly with Te(IV) ions and were precipitated from the cell cultures. Electron microscopic analyses revealed that the Cr-Te complexed nanoparticles localized on the bacterial outer membranes. K-edge X-ray absorption spectrometric analyses demonstrated that Cr(III) produced by S. oneidensis MR-1 was rapidly complexed with Te(IV) ions, followed by formation of amorphous Cr(III)-Te(IV) nanoparticles on the cell surface. Our results could be applied for the simultaneous sequestration and detoxification of both Cr(VI) and Te(IV) as well as for the preparation of nanomaterials through environmental friendly processes.

  15. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1interpreted in the light of isotopic metabolite labeling, enzymeactivities and genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-06-27

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  16. Viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO2 stress: implications for ecological effects of CO2 leakage from geologic CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Zhipeng; Hu, Yandi; Tang, Yinjie J; Jun, Young-Shin

    2010-12-01

    To study potential ecological impacts of CO(2) leakage to shallow groundwater and soil/sediments from geologic CO(2) sequestration (GCS) sites, this work investigated the viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO(2) stress. While MR-1 could grow under high-pressure nitrogen gas (500 psi), the mix of 1% CO(2) with N(2) at total pressures of 15 or 150 psi significantly suppressed the growth of MR-1, compared to the N(2) control. When CO(2) partial pressures were over 15 psi, the growth of MR-1 stopped. The reduced bacterial viability was consistent with the pH decrease and cellular membrane damage under high pressure CO(2). After exposure to 150 psi CO(2) for 5 h, no viable cells survived, the cellular contents were released, and microscopy images confirmed significant cell structure deformation. However, after a relatively short exposure (25 min) to 150 psi CO(2), MR-1 could fully recover their growth within 24 h after the stress was removed, and the reduction of MnO(2) by MR-1 was observed right after the stress was removed. Furthermore, MR-1 survived better if the cells were aggregated rather than suspended, or if pH buffering minerals, such as calcite, were present. To predict the cell viability under different CO(2) pressures and exposure times, a two-parameter mathematical model was developed.

  17. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  18. Parameters Controlling the Partitioning of Trace Metals at the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilm/Mineral/Water Interface: Long Period X-ray Standing Wave and XAFS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gélabert, A.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Ha, J.; Cordova-Ardy, C.; Gescher, J.; Bargar, J. R.; Rogers, J.; Eng, P. J.; Ghose, S. K.; Farges, F.; Spormann, A. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial biofilms are common in natural and man-made environments and are often present as coatings on mineral surfaces in soils and aquatic systems. Compared to bare mineral surfaces, biofilms can induce significant changes in surface charges and sorption capacities for metal(loid) ions. However, the effects of biofilm coatings on mineral reactivity and metal cycling are still poorly understood at a molecular level due to the complex nature of these systems and the lack of appropriate tools to accurately probe such interfaces. In this study, we applied long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (XSW-FY) spectroscopy to measure in-situ the partitioning of trace elements between S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished single crystal surfaces of alumina (1-102) and hematite (0001) as a function of several external parameters, including trace element concentration, pH, and time, we also studied competitive effects of different cations and anions by exposing the biofilm/mineral interface to different trace elements simultaneously. In addition, grazing incidence X- ray adsorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopic measurements at specific x-ray incidence angles were conducted to probe ion speciation and local coordination environment at the mineral surface and in the biofilm. Long-period XSW-FY measurements on Pb(II) partitioning at S. oneidensis biofilm-coated alumina (1-102) and hematite (0001) surfaces under aerobic conditions indicate that Pb(II) is preferentially adsorbed on the mineral surface at low concentrations (10-7 to 10-6 M ) at pH 6.0 and is increasingly partitioned into the biofilm at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-5 M). This finding indicates that S. oneidensis biofilm coatings do not block reactive sites on hematite and alumina. Decreasing solution pH from 6.0 to 4.0 for biofilm coated alumina (1-102) sample exposed to 10-6 M Pb(II) showed a shift of Pb(II) partitioning from interface to biofilm due to electrostatic effects

  19. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mónica N; Neto, Sónia E; Alves, Alexandra S; Fonseca, Bruno M; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M; Soares, Cláudio M; Louro, Ricardo O

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  20. Iron Triggers λSo Prophage Induction and Release of Extracellular DNA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Binnenkade, Lucas; Teichmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Prophages are ubiquitous elements within bacterial chromosomes and affect host physiology and ecology in multiple ways. We have previously demonstrated that phage-induced lysis is required for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release and normal biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of prophage λSo spatiotemporal induction in biofilms. To this end, we used a functional fluorescence fusion to monitor λSo activation in various mutant backgrounds and in response to different physiological conditions. λSo induction occurred mainly in a subpopulation of filamentous cells in a strictly RecA-dependent manner, implicating oxidative stress-induced DNA damage as the major trigger. Accordingly, mutants affected in the oxidative stress response (ΔoxyR) or iron homeostasis (Δfur) displayed drastically increased levels of phage induction and abnormal biofilm formation, while planktonic cells were not or only marginally affected. To further investigate the role of oxidative stress, we performed a mutant screen and identified two independent amino acid substitutions in OxyR (T104N and L197P) that suppress induction of λSo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, λSo induction was not suppressed in biofilms formed by both mutants, suggesting a minor role of intracellular H2O2 in this process. In contrast, addition of iron to biofilms strongly enhanced λSo induction and eDNA release, while both processes were significantly suppressed at low iron levels, strongly indicating that iron is the limiting factor. We conclude that uptake of iron during biofilm formation triggers λSo-mediated lysis of a subpopulation of cells, likely by an increase in iron-mediated DNA damage sensed by RecA. PMID:24951794

  1. Ferrous phosphate surface precipitates resulting from the reduction of intragrain 6-line ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3), phosphate (P), and an electron shuttle (AQDS) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Irrespective of buffer and AQDS addition, rosettes of Fe(II) phosphate of approximate 20-30 μm size were observed on porous silica when P was present. The rosettes grew not only on the silica surface but also within it, forming a coherent spherical structure. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and contained extracellular materials at the end of incubation. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances may have adsorbed Fe(II) promoting Fe(II) phosphate nucleation with subsequent crystal growth proceeding in different directions from a common center.

  2. Probing electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a nanoelectrode platform and single-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Biffinger, Justin C; Xie, Ping; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2010-09-28

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a promising approach for sustainable energy production as they generate electricity directly from metabolism of organic substrates without the need for catalysts. However, the mechanisms of electron transfer between microbes and electrodes, which could ultimately limit power extraction, remain controversial. Here we demonstrate optically transparent nanoelectrodes as a platform to investigate extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, where an array of nanoholes precludes or single window allows for direct microbe-electrode contacts. Following addition of cells, short-circuit current measurements showed similar amplitude and temporal response for both electrode configurations, while in situ optical imaging demonstrates that the measured currents were uncorrelated with the cell number on the electrodes. High-resolution imaging showed the presence of thin, 4- to 5-nm diameter filaments emanating from cell bodies, although these filaments do not appear correlated with current generation. Both types of electrodes yielded similar currents at longer times in dense cell layers and exhibited a rapid drop in current upon removal of diffusible mediators. Reintroduction of the original cell-free media yielded a rapid increase in current to ∼80% of original level, whereas imaging showed that the positions of > 70% of cells remained unchanged during solution exchange. Together, these measurements show that electron transfer occurs predominantly by mediated mechanism in this model system. Last, simultaneous measurements of current and cell positions showed that cell motility and electron transfer were inversely correlated. The ability to control and image cell/electrode interactions down to the single-cell level provide a powerful approach for advancing our fundamental understanding of MFCs.

  3. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Mónica N.; Neto, Sónia E.; Alves, Alexandra S.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M.; Soares, Cláudio M.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB–OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC. PMID:26175726

  4. Analyses of Current-Generating Mechanisms of Shewanella loihica PV-4 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Microbial Fuel Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gregory J.; Mori, Shigeki; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2009-01-01

    Although members of the genus Shewanella have common features (e.g., the presence of decaheme c-type cytochromes [c-cyts]), they are widely variable in genetic and physiological features. The present study compared the current-generating ability of S. loihica PV-4 in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with that of well-characterized S. oneidensis MR-1 and examined the roles of c-cyts in extracellular electron transfer. We found that strains PV-4 and MR-1 exhibited notable differences in current-generating mechanisms. While the MR-1 MFCs maintained a constant current density over time, the PV-4 MFCs continued to increase in current density and finally surpassed the MR-1 MFCs. Coulombic efficiencies reached 26% in the PV-4 MFC but 16% in the MR-1 MFCs. Although both organisms produced quinone-like compounds, anode exchange experiments showed that anode-attached cells of PV-4 produced sevenfold more current than planktonic cells in the same chamber, while planktonic cells of MR-1 produced twice the current of the anode-attached cells. Examination of the genome sequence indicated that PV-4 has more c-cyt genes in the metal reductase-containing locus than MR-1. Mutational analysis revealed that PV-4 relied predominantly on a homologue of the decaheme c-cyt MtrC in MR-1 for current generation, even though it also possesses two homologues of the decaheme c-cyt OmcA in MR-1. These results suggest that current generation in a PV-4 MFC is in large part accomplished by anode-attached cells, in which the MtrC homologue constitutes the main path of electrons toward the anode. PMID:19837834

  5. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  6. A mechanistic study of TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with UV-containing simulated solar irradiation: Bacterial growth, riboflavin secretion, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian A; Meyer, Ben M; Christenson, Ky G; Klaper, Rebecca D; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-01

    Toxicity of nanomaterials to ecological systems has recently emerged as an important field of research, and thus, many researchers are exploring the mechanisms of how nanoparticles impact organisms. Herein, we probe the mechanisms of bacteria-nanoparticle interaction by investigating how TiO2 nanoparticles impact a model organism, the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In addition to examining the effect of TiO2 exposure, the effect of synergistic simulated solar irradiation containing UV was explored in this study, as TiO2 nanoparticles are known photocatalysts. The data reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles cause an inhibition of S. oneidensis growth at high dosage without compromising cell viability, yet co-exposure of nanoparticles and illumination does not increase the adverse effects on bacterial growth relative to TiO2 alone. Measurements of intracellular reactive oxygen species and riboflavin secretion, on the same nanoparticle-exposed bacteria, reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles have no effect on these cell functions, but application of UV-containing illumination with TiO2 nanoparticles has an impact on the level of riboflavin outside bacterial cells. Finally, gene expression studies were employed to explore how cells respond to TiO2 nanoparticles and illumination, and these results were correlated with cell growth and cell function assessment. Together these data suggest a minimal impact of TiO2 NPs and simulated solar irradiation containing UV on S. oneidensis MR-1, and the minimal impact could be accounted for by the nutrient-rich medium used in this work. These measurements demonstrate a comprehensive scheme combining various analytical tools to enable a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell interactions and to evaluate the potential adverse effects of nanoparticles beyond viability/growth considerations.

  7. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Steven D. Brown; Robert L. Hettich; Nathan VerBerkmoes; Jizhong Zhou

    2004-03-17

    The mediation of metal reduction by microorganisms has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives; however, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE field sites. Chromium(VI), for example, is one of several risk-driving contaminants at DOE sites and has been targeted by the DOE for bioremediation research. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can potentially be used to immobilize chromium, a toxic and mutagenic metal, by reducing soluble Cr(VI) to the insoluble and less bioavailable form of Cr(III), thus facilitating its removal from contained-storage and natural sites. The overall goal of this study is to integrate targeted biochemical and proteomic analyses with genome-wide gene expression profiling to examine the molecular basis and regulation of chromium(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Towards this goal, we will (1) isolate and identify the terminal chromium(VI) reductase and the gene(s) encoding this activity using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques; (2) verify the function of the gene(s) encoding the terminal Cr(VI) reductase and compare whole transcriptome data with whole proteome data in order to understand the regulation of chromium reduction; and (3) investigate the molecular stress response and adaptation of S. oneidensis to toxic levels of soluble Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. This research will provide important information on the functional components and regulatory mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, which should prove valuable in developing effective assessment strategies for in situ bioremediation and genetically engineering desired bacteria for enhanced bioremediation.

  8. Enhancing Extracellular Electron Transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through Coupling Improved Flavin Synthesis and Metal-Reducing Conduit for Pollutant Degradation.

    PubMed

    Min, Di; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Xue-Na; Li, Dao-Bo; Liu, Dong-Feng; Lau, Tai-Chu; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-05-02

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides, which are used as external electron acceptors by DMRB for their anaerobic respiration. The EET process has important contribution to environmental remediation mineral cycling, and bioelectrochemical systems. However, the low EET efficiency remains to be one of the major bottlenecks for its practical applications for pollutant degradation. In this work, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model DMRB, was used to examine the feasibility of enhancing the EET and its biodegradation capacity through genetic engineering. A flavin biosynthesis gene cluster ribD-ribC-ribBA-ribE and metal-reducing conduit biosynthesis gene cluster mtrC-mtrA-mtrB were coexpressed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Compared to the control strain, the engineered strain was found to exhibit an improved EET capacity in microbial fuel cells and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells, with an increase in maximum current density by approximate 110% and 87%, respectively. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis showed that the current increase correlated with the lower interfacial charge-transfer resistance of the engineered strain. Meanwhile, a three times more rapid removal rate of methyl orange by the engineered strain confirmed the improvement of its EET and biodegradation ability. Our results demonstrate that coupling of improved synthesis of mediators and metal-reducing conduits could be an efficient strategy to enhance EET in S. oneidensis MR-1, which is essential to the applications of DMRB for environmental remediation, wastewater treatment, and bioenergy recovery from wastes.

  9. Kinetics of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Scaling From Purified Proteins to Whole Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S.; Ross, D.; Tien, M.

    2006-12-01

    To predict biogeochemical reactions in the field, it will be necessary to predict rates and processes from fundamental biochemical observations. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative facultative anaerobe that has a versatile respiration system capable of utilizing a large number of terminal electron acceptors. Genetic studies have identified most if not all of the proteins involved in iron reduction; however, the mechanism of iron reduction is yet to be determined. Our research is focused on how this bacterium is able to utilize solid iron forms as its terminal electron acceptor; we are also investigating the reduction of chelated iron forms such as EDTA, NTA and ferric citrate for kinetic comparison. Solid iron oxides are the predominant form which iron is found in the earth's crust under aerobic and circumneutral pH conditions. In order to fully understand how this process works, we have taken a biochemical/kinetics approach. We have measured kinetic constants at three different scales: transient-state kinetic studies using a stop flow, steady-state kinetic from isolated membrane fractions and, whole cell kinetic. With the stop flow, we have measured rate constants between hemeproteins OmcA, MtrA and CctA with EDTA-Fe3+, NTA-Fe3+ and citrate-Fe3+. For steady state kinetics with membrane fractions, we have obtained kinetic constants with EDTA-Fe3+, NTA- Fe3+, citrate-Fe3+ and goethite. The rates are expressed as per mole of MtrC. The hemeprotein MtrC, thought to be the terminal iron reductase, was quantified through Western-blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies. Second order rate constants from stop flow studies are then compared to kcat/Km values obtained from steady state kinetic studies. Similar studies were also performed with whole cells and again normalized to MtrC content. The kinetic constants scale up well for the soluble iron forms but not for the insoluble iron form (goethite). Mechanistic implications from these scale up studies will be

  10. Siderophores Are Not Involved in Fe(III) Solubilization during Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fennessey, Christine M.; Jones, Morris E.; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. ΔSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. ΔSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. PMID:20190086

  11. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  12. Global Molecular and Morphological Effects of 24-Hour Chromium(VI)Exposure on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Brown, Steven D; Shah, Manesh B; Zhou, Jizhong; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Thompson, Dorothea K

    2006-01-01

    The biological impact of 24-h ("chronic") chromium(VI) [Cr(VI) or chromate] exposure on ShewanellaoneidensisMR-1 was assessed by analyzing cellular morphology as well as genome-wide differential gene and protein expression profiles. Cells challenged aerobically with an initial chromate concentration of 0.3 mM in complex growth medium were compared to untreated control cells grown in the absence of chromate. At the 24-h time point at which cells were harvested for transcriptome and proteome analyses, no residual Cr(VI) was detected in the culture supernatant, thus suggesting the complete uptake and/or reduction of this metal by cells. In contrast to the untreated control cells, Cr(VI)-exposed cells formed apparently aseptate, nonmotile filaments that tended to aggregate. Transcriptome profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic charac terization revealed that the principal molecular response to 24-h Cr(VI) exposure was the induction of prophage-related genes and their encoded products as well as a number of functionally undefined hypothetical genes that were located within the integrated phage regions of the MR-1 genome. In addition, genes with annotated functions in DNA metabolism, cell division, biosynthesis and degradation of the murein (pepti doglycan) sacculus, membrane response, and general environmental stress protection were upregulated, while genes encoding chemotaxis, motility, and transport/binding proteins were largely repressed under conditions of 24-h chromate treatment.

  13. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  14. ¹³C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; Nealson, Kenneth H; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-02-12

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and (13)C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the (13)C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that (13)C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms.

  15. The role of riboflavin in decolourisation of Congo red and bioelectricity production using Shewanella oneidensis-MR1 under MFC and non-MFC conditions.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ola M; Fapetu, Segun; Kyazze, Godfrey; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2017-03-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria can exchange electrons extracellularly and hold great promise for their use in simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity production. This study investigated the role of riboflavin, an electron carrier, in the decolourisation of Congo red in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism. The contribution of the membrane-bound protein MtrC to the decolourisation process was also investigated. Within the range of riboflavin concentrations tested, 20 µM was found to be the best with >95% of the dye (initial concentration 200 mg/L) decolourised in MFCs within 50 h compared to 90% in the case where no riboflavin was added. The corresponding maximum power density was 45 mW/m(2). There was no significant difference in the overall decolourisation efficiencies of Shewanela oneidensis MR-1 ΔMtrC mutants compared to the wild type. However, in terms of power production the mutant produced more power (Pmax 76 mW/m(2)) compared to the wild type (Pmax 46 mW/m(2)) which was attributed to higher levels of riboflavin secreted in solution. Decolourisation efficiencies in non-MFC systems (anaerobic bottles) were similar to those under MFC systems indicating that electricity generation in MFCs does not impair dye decolourisation efficiencies. The results suggest that riboflavin enhances both decolourisation of dyes and simultaneous electricity production in MFCs.

  16. 13C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H. Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and 13C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the 13C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that 13C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms. PMID:26868848

  17. 13C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H. Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and 13C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the 13C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that 13C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms.

  18. Comparative Temporal Proteomics of a Response Regulator (SO2426)-Deficient Strain and Wild-Type Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 During Chromate Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R; Shah, Manesh B; Zhang, Bing; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    Predicted orphan response regulators encoded in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome are poorly understood from a cellular function perspective. Our previous transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrated that an annotated DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426, was significantly up-regulated in wild-type S. oneidensis cells at both themRNAand protein levels in response to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge, suggesting a potential regulatory role for this protein in metal stress pathways. To investigate the impact of SO2426 activity on chromate stress response at a genome-wide scale, we describe here comparative and temporal proteome characterizations using multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS and statistical analysis to identify differentially expressed proteins in biological replicates of wild-type S. oneidensis MR-1 and a so2426 deletion ( so2426) strain, which exhibited an impaired Cr(VI) transformation rate compared to that of the parental strain. Global protein profiles were examined at different time intervals (0, 1, 3, 4 h) following exogenous chromate challenge. Results indicated that deletion of the so2426 gene negatively affected expression of a small protein subset (27 proteins) including those with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis (SO3032), Fe uptake (SO4743), intracellular Fe storage (Bfr1), and other transport processes. Cr(VI) exposure and subsequent ransformation dramatically increased the number of differentially expressed proteins detected,with up-regulated bundance patterns observed largely for proteins involved in general stress protection and detoxification trategies, cell motility, and protein fate. In addition, the proteome data sets were mined for amino acids with otential post-translational modifications (PTMs) indicative of a level of gene expression regulation extending eyond the transcriptional control imposed by SO2426.

  19. Electrochemical interaction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC with hematite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meitl, Leisa A.; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Colberg, Patricia J.; Khare, Nidhi; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang

    2009-09-15

    Bacterial metal reduction is an important biogeochemical process in anaerobic environments. An understanding of electron transfer pathways from dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) to solid phase metal (hydr)oxides is important for understanding metal redox cycling in soils and sediments, for utilizing DMRB in bioremedation, and for developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells. Here we hypothesize that the outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are the only terminal reductases capable of direct electron transfer to a hematite working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study electron transfer between hematite electrodes and protein films, S. oneidensis MR-1 wild-type cell suspensions, and cytochrome deletion mutants. After controlling for hematite electrode dissolution at negative potential, the midpoint potentials of adsorbed OmcA and MtrC were measured (-201 mV and -163 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively). Cell suspensions of wild-type MR-1, deletion mutants deficient in OmcA (ΔomcA), MtrC (ΔmtrC), and both OmcA and MtrC (ΔmtrC-ΔomcA) were also studied; voltammograms for ΔmtrC-ΔomcA were indistinguishable from the control. When the control was subtracted from the single deletion mutant voltammograms, redox peaks were consistent with the present cytochrome (i.e., ΔomcA consistent with MtrC and ΔmtrC consistent with OmcA). The results indicate that OmcA and MtrC are capable of direct electron exchange with hematite electrodes, consistent with a role as terminal reductases in the S. oneidensis MR-1 anaerobic respiratory pathway involving ferric minerals. There was no evidence for other terminal reductases operating under the conditions investigated. A Marcus-based approach to electron transfer kinetics indicated that the rate constant for electron transfer ket varies from 0.025 s-1 in the absence of a barrier to 63.5 s-1 with a 0.2 eV barrier.

  20. Electrochemical interaction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC with hematite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitl, Leisa A.; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Colberg, Patricia J. S.; Khare, Nidhi; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial metal reduction is an important biogeochemical process in anaerobic environments. An understanding of electron transfer pathways from dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) to solid phase metal (hydr)oxides is important for understanding metal redox cycling in soils and sediments, for utilizing DMRB in bioremedation, and for developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells. Here we hypothesize that the outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are the only terminal reductases capable of direct electron transfer to a hematite working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study electron transfer between hematite electrodes and protein films, S. oneidensis MR-1 wild-type cell suspensions, and cytochrome deletion mutants. After controlling for hematite electrode dissolution at negative potential, the midpoint potentials of adsorbed OmcA and MtrC were measured (-201 mV and -163 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively). Cell suspensions of wild-type MR-1, deletion mutants deficient in OmcA (Δ omcA), MtrC (Δ mtrC), and both OmcA and MtrC (Δ mtrC-Δ omcA) were also studied; voltammograms for Δ mtrC-Δ omcA were indistinguishable from the control. When the control was subtracted from the single deletion mutant voltammograms, redox peaks were consistent with the present cytochrome (i.e., Δ omcA consistent with MtrC and Δ mtrC consistent with OmcA). The results indicate that OmcA and MtrC are capable of direct electron exchange with hematite electrodes, consistent with a role as terminal reductases in the S. oneidensis MR-1 anaerobic respiratory pathway involving ferric minerals. There was no evidence for other terminal reductases operating under the conditions investigated. A Marcus-based approach to electron transfer kinetics indicated that the rate constant for electron transfer ket varies from 0.025 s -1 in the absence of a barrier to 63.5 s -1 with a 0.2 eV barrier.

  1. Plutonium(V/VI) Reduction by the Metal-Reducing Bacteria Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Icopini, Gary A.; Lack, Joe G.; Hersman, Larry E.; Neu, Mary P.; Boukhalfa, Hakim

    2009-01-01

    We examined the ability of the metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to reduce Pu(VI) and Pu(V). Cell suspensions of both bacteria reduced oxidized Pu [a mixture of Pu(VI) and Pu(V)] to Pu(IV). The rate of plutonium reduction was similar to the rate of U(VI) reduction obtained under similar conditions for each bacteria. The rates of Pu(VI) and U(VI) reduction by cell suspensions of S. oneidensis were slightly higher than the rates observed with G. metallireducens. The reduced form of Pu was characterized as aggregates of nanoparticulates of Pu(IV). Transmission electron microscopy images of the solids obtained from the cultures after the reduction of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) by S. oneidensis show that the Pu precipitates have a crystalline structure. The nanoparticulates of Pu(IV) were precipitated on the surface of or within the cell walls of the bacteria. The production of Pu(III) was not observed, which indicates that Pu(IV) was the stable form of reduced Pu under these experimental conditions. Experiments examining the ability of these bacteria to use Pu(VI) as a terminal electron acceptor for growth were inconclusive. A slight increase in cell density was observed for both G. metallireducens and S. oneidensis when Pu(VI) was provided as the sole electron acceptor; however, Pu(VI) concentrations decreased similarly in both the experimental and control cultures. PMID:19363069

  2. Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Msh Pilin Proteins are Involved in Extracellular Electron Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    comparison of the 16 MR-1 Msh pilin complex proteins to Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar El Tor (tax id: 686) using the BLAST-search algorithm [21] for proteins... Vibrio cholerae mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin type 4 pilus gene locus. J Bacteriol 1999;181:1110–7. [23] Ringeisen BR, Henderson E, Wu PK...BLASTp) with default algorithm parameters. Sequence homology of MR-1 Msh proteins to the well-studied Msh pilin complex from V. cholera [22] allowed

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L.

    2012-05-24

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A ° , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A ° .

  5. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  6. Identifying the role of cytochromes upon the attachment, growth and detachment of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on hematite during dissimilatory iron reduction under natural- flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    Current understanding of bacterial respiration by dissimilatory iron (Fe) reduction is based primarily on studies of closed systems using soluble Fe(III). However, natural environments likely to support Fe reduction are typically open systems and contain Fe(III) primarily in the form of crystalline (hydr)oxides. Mechanisms by which electrons are transported between bacteria and mineral terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) under open system conditions are still poorly understood. However, a number of cytochromes have been identified as potentially playing a critical role in the electron transport system of some Fe reducing bacteria. Experiments were performed using (i) omcA, (ii) mtrC, or (iii) omcA and mtrC cytochrome deficient mutants of the Fe-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, in transparent-window flow- reactors containing hematite as the only TEA. These were operated under defined hydrodynamic and anaerobic conditions. Cells expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp), allowing real time measurement of cells at the mineral surface by epifluorescence microscopy. Cytochromes which play a critical role in the anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis by Fe reduction under open system natural-flow conditions could then be identified. Differences in the accumulation, maximum density, detachment and total production of surface-associated cells growing on hematite surfaces were apparent between the mutants, and between the mutants and the wild-type. Mutants deficient in cytochromes grew to a lower max density by up to 2 orders of magnitude than the wild-type, and exhibited no reduced Fe in the reactor effluent or at the surface of the hematite at the conclusion of the experiment, as revealed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Therefore omcA and / or mtrC cytochromes appear critical for electron shuttling and anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis on hematite under natural-flow conditions.

  7. Evidence-Based Annotation of Gene Function in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Genome-Wide Fitness Profiling across 121 Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Shao, Wenjun; Baumohl, Jason K.; Xu, Zhuchen; Nguyen, Michelle; Tamse, Raquel; Davis, Ronald W.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    Most genes in bacteria are experimentally uncharacterized and cannot be annotated with a specific function. Given the great diversity of bacteria and the ease of genome sequencing, high-throughput approaches to identify gene function experimentally are needed. Here, we use pools of tagged transposon mutants in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to probe the mutant fitness of 3,355 genes in 121 diverse conditions including different growth substrates, alternative electron acceptors, stresses, and motility. We find that 2,350 genes have a pattern of fitness that is significantly different from random and 1,230 of these genes (37% of our total assayed genes) have enough signal to show strong biological correlations. We find that genes in all functional categories have phenotypes, including hundreds of hypotheticals, and that potentially redundant genes (over 50% amino acid identity to another gene in the genome) are also likely to have distinct phenotypes. Using fitness patterns, we were able to propose specific molecular functions for 40 genes or operons that lacked specific annotations or had incomplete annotations. In one example, we demonstrate that the previously hypothetical gene SO_3749 encodes a functional acetylornithine deacetylase, thus filling a missing step in S. oneidensis metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate that the orphan histidine kinase SO_2742 and orphan response regulator SO_2648 form a signal transduction pathway that activates expression of acetyl-CoA synthase and is required for S. oneidensis to grow on acetate as a carbon source. Lastly, we demonstrate that gene expression and mutant fitness are poorly correlated and that mutant fitness generates more confident predictions of gene function than does gene expression. The approach described here can be applied generally to create large-scale gene-phenotype maps for evidence-based annotation of gene function in prokaryotes. PMID:22125499

  8. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; McCready, David E.; Lower, Steven K.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration. A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates. Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface. The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice that of the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC. Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite. The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected for an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. There is a strong correlation between the whole-cell and pure-protein force spectra, suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals. Finally, by comparing the magnitudes of binding force for the whole-cell versus pure-protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 by 0.5 μm) expresses ∼104 cytochromes on its outer surface. PMID:17468239

  9. Comparative proteomics reveal the impact of OmcA/MtrC deletion on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to hexavalent chromium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Juan; Hu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Ji-Yun; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Zhao, Feng

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a priority pollutant causing serious environmental issues. Microbial reduction provides an alternative strategy for Cr(VI) remediation. The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was employed to study Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity in this work. To understand the effect of membrane cytochromes on Cr(VI) response, a comparative protein profile analysis from S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant of deleting OmcA and MtrC (△omcA/mtrC) was conducted using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) technology. The 2-DE patterns were compared, and the proteins with abundant changes of up to twofold in the Cr(VI) treatment were detected. Using mass spectrometry, 38 and 45 differentially abundant proteins were identified in the wild type and the mutant, respectively. Among them, 25 proteins were shared by the two strains. The biological functions of these identified proteins were analyzed. Results showed that Cr(VI) exposure decreased the abundance of proteins involved in transcription, translation, pyruvate metabolism, energy production, and function of cellular membrane in both strains. There were also significant differences in protein expressions between the two strains under Cr(VI) treatment. Our results suggest that OmcA/MtrC deletion might result in the Cr(VI) toxicity to outer membrane and decrease assimilation of lactate, vitamin B12, and cystine. When carbohydrate metabolism was inhibited by Cr(VI), leucine and sulfur metabolism may act as the important compensatory mechanisms in the mutant. Furthermore, the mutant may regulate electron transfer in the inner membrane and periplasm to compensate for the deletion of OmcA and MtrC in Cr(VI) reduction.

  10. Chromate/Nitrite Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1: Evidence for Multiple Cr(VI) Reduction Mechanisms Dependent on Physiological Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William Arnold; Viamajala, S.; Peyton, Brent Michael; Petersen, J. N.

    2002-06-01

    Inhibition of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction due to nitrate and nitrite was observed during tests with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (previously named Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 and henceforth referred to as MR-1). Initial Cr(VI) reduction rates were measured at various nitrite concentrations, and a mixed inhibition kinetic model was used to determine the kinetic parameters-maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate and inhibition constant [V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI))]. Values of V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) obtained with MR-1 cultures grown under denitrifying conditions were observed to be significantly different from the values obtained when the cultures were grown with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. It was also observed that a single V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) did not adequately describe the inhibition kinetics of either nitrate-grown or fumarate-grown cultures. The inhibition patterns indicate that Cr(VI) reduction in MR-1 is likely not limited to a single pathway, but occurs via different mechanisms some of which are dependent on growth conditions. Inhibition of nitrite reduction due to the presence of Cr(VI) was also studied, and the kinetic parameters V(max,NO2) and K(i,NO2) were determined. It was observed that these coefficients also differed significantly between MR-1 grown under denitrifying conditions and fumarate reducing conditions. The inhibition studies suggest the involvement of nitrite reductase in Cr(VI) reduction. Because nitrite reduction is part of the anaerobic respiration process, inhibition due to Cr(VI) might be a result of interaction with the components of the anaerobic respiration pathway such as nitrite reductase. Also, differences in the degree of inhibition of nitrite reduction activity by chromate at different growth conditions suggest that the toxicity mechanism of Cr(VI) might also be dependent on the conditions of growth. Cr(VI) reduction has been shown to occur via different pathways, but to our knowledge, multiple

  11. A gold-sputtered carbon paper as an anode for improved electricity generation from a microbial fuel cell inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Zhang, Feng; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhao, Yue; Chen, You-Peng; Zhou, Shi-Yue; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yang-Chao; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-10-15

    Gold is among the highly conductive and stable materials, which are ideal anodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, previous studies have shown that bare gold surface is recalcitrant for the colonization of some exoelectrogens, e.g., Shewanella putrefacians. In this work, the problem regarding the poor bio-compatibility of gold as an anode material was sorted out through coupling it with carbon paper. A new composite anode material was fabricated through sputtering gold layer homogeneously on carbon paper matrix. Results of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) solution demonstrated better electrochemical performance of the carbon paper-gold (C-Au) composite than either carbon paper or bare gold, when they were used in MFCs. With Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as the inoculum, the C-Au anode-based MFC produced total electric charges higher than the carbon-paper-anode-based MFC by 47%. The cyclic voltammetry analysis and the scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the MR-1 biofilm growth was accelerated when the carbon paper surface was sputtered with gold. Utilization of such a carbon paper-gold composite significantly enhanced the MFC performance.

  12. Generation and Validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Clone Set for Protein Expression and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohu; Petrosino, Joseph; Hemphill, Lisa; Wan, Xiufeng; Leaphart, Adam B.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway) cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85%) have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST- tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray) and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis), and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18714347

  13. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. Results The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. Conclusions The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft

  14. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoko; Dale, Jason R

    2013-04-08

    We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft-particle model is a useful tool

  15. Targeted protein degradation of outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrC metal reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 measured using biarsenical probe CrAsH-EDT(2).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K; Bigelow, Diana J; Squier, Thomas C

    2011-11-15

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC (MtrC*) which is dependent on the presence of a functional type 2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC* undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 h(-1) that is insensitive to O(2) concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 h(-1)) that are

  16. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  17. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  18. A Method Adapting Microarray Technology for Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anaerobic Sediment Survival Experiments†

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Jennifer L.; Luo, Qingwei; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is a powerful technique that can be used to identify genes expressed by bacteria during exposure to conditions in their natural environments. To date, there have been no reports of studies in which this approach was used to study organisms of environmental, rather than pathogenic, significance. We used a mini-Tn10 transposon-bearing plasmid, pBSL180, that efficiently and randomly mutagenized Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in addition to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Using these organisms as model sediment-dwelling anaerobic bacteria, we developed a new screening system, modified from former STM procedures, to identify genes that are critical for sediment survival. The screening system uses microarray technology to visualize tags from input and output pools, allowing us to identify those lost during sediment incubations. While the majority of data on survival genes identified will be presented in future papers, we report here on chemotaxis-related genes identified by our STM method in both bacteria in order to validate our method. This system may be applicable to the study of numerous environmental bacteria, allowing us to identify functions and roles of survival genes in various habitats. PMID:16269742

  19. Crystallization of uridine phosphorylase from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the laboratory and under microgravity and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Safonova, Tatyana N; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N; Polyakov, Konstantin M; Manuvera, Valentin A; Veiko, Vladimir P; Popov, Vladimir O

    2012-11-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UDP, EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyses the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The gene expression of UDP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was performed in the recipient strain Escherichia coli. The UDP protein was crystallized on earth (in the free form and in complex with uridine as the substrate) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 296 K and under microgravity conditions (in the free form) aboard the Russian Segment of the International Space Station by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The data sets were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å from crystals of the free form grown on earth, 1.6 Å from crystals of the complex with uridine and 0.95 Å from crystals of the free form grown under microgravity. All crystals belong to the space group P2(1) and have similar unit-cell parameters. The crystal of uridine phosphorylase grown under microgravity diffracted to ultra-high resolution and gave high-quality X-ray diffraction data.

  20. Identification of a Small Tetraheme Cytochrome c and a Flavocytochrome c as Two of the Principal Soluble Cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR1

    PubMed Central

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3 but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c. PMID:11425747

  1. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  2. A method adapting microarray technology for signature tagged mutagenesis of Dusulfovibrio dusulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in anaerobic sediment survival experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groh, Jennifer L.; Luo, Qingwei; Ballard , Jimmy D.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is a powerful technique that can be used to identify genes expressed by bacteria during exposure to conditions in their natural environments. To date, there have been no reports of studies in which this approach was used to study organisms of environmental, rather than pathogenic, significance. We used a mini-Tn10 transposon-bearing plasmid, pBSL180, that efficiently and randomly mutagenized Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in addition to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Using these organisms as model sediment-dwelling anaerobic bacteria, we developed a new screening system, modified from former STM procedures, to identify genes that are critical for sediment survival. The screening system uses microarray technology to visualize tags from input and output pools, allowing us to identify those lost during sediment incubations. While the majority of data on survival genes identified will be presented in future papers, we report here on chemotaxis-related genes identified by our STM method in both bacteria in order to validate our method. This system may be applicable to the study of numerous environmental bacteria, allowing us to identify functions and roles of survival genes in various habitats.

  3. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  4. Deciphering the aggregation mechanism of bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis MR1) in the presence of polyethyleneimine: Effects of the exopolymeric superstructure and polymer molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Marie-Eve M; Lartiges, Bruno; Merlin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation tests between bacteria and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) of low (600g/mol) and high (750,000g/mol) molecular weight were performed in order to address the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the interactions between cationic polymer and bacterial membranes. The selected strain, Schewanella oneidensis MR-1, produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of various lengths depending on the growth conditions. Optical density, bioaggregate size, electrophoretic mobility measurements, TEM and AFM observations, and cell lysis tests (crystal violet release), were collected to describe the PEI-mediated aggregation of LPS-O-antigen-free and LPS-O-antigen-decorated bacteria. The results show that PEI of low molecular weight (600g/mol) fails to aggregate bacteria, whereas PEIs of higher molecular weight (60,000 and 750,000g/mol) lead to flocculation at low polymer concentrations. In addition, the LPS-O antigen bacterial superstructure is shown to act as a protective barrier, thus delaying the harmful effects of the cationic polymer. Despite this protection, the interaction of bacterial membranes with increasing concentrations of PEI leads to a series of deleterious processes including biosurface modification (peeling, membrane permeabilization and/or lysis), aggregation of bacterial cells, and complexation of PEI with both released biosurface fragments and cytoplasmic residues issued from lysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  6. Kinetics of reduction of Fe(III) complexes by outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J; Zachara, John M; Rosso, Kevin M; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-11-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature.

  7. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K.; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-01-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature. PMID:18791025

  8. Kinetic Characterization of OmcA and MtrC, Terminal Reductases Involved in Respiratory Electron Transfer for Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Daniel E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2009-01-01

    We have used scaling kinetics and the concept of kinetic competence to elucidate the role of hemeproteins OmcA and MtrC in iron reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Second-order rate constants for OmcA and MtrC were determined by single-turnover experiments. For soluble iron species, a stopped-flow apparatus was used, and for the less reactive iron oxide goethite, a conventional spectrophotometer was used to measure rates. Steady-state experiments were performed to obtain molecular rate constants by quantifying the OmcA and MtrC contents of membrane fractions and whole cells by Western blot analysis. For reduction of soluble iron, rates determined from transient-state experiments were able to account for rates obtained from steady-state experiments. However, this was not true with goethite; rate constants determined from transient-state experiments were 100 to 1,000 times slower than those calculated from steady-state experiments with membrane fractions and whole cells. In contrast, addition of flavins to the goethite experiments resulted in rates that were consistent with both transient- and steady-state experiments. Kinetic simulations of steady-state results with kinetic constants obtained from transient-state experiments supported flavin involvement. Therefore, we show for the first time that OmcA and MtrC are kinetically competent to account for catalysis of soluble iron reduction in whole Shewanella cells but are not responsible for electron transfer via direct contact alone with insoluble iron-containing minerals. This work supports the hypothesis that electron shuttles are important participants in the reduction of solid Fe phases by this organism. PMID:19542342

  9. Effects of Incubation Conditions on Cr(VI) Reduction by c-type Cytochromes in Intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rui; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Wu, Yundang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) of metal-reducing bacteria play a key role in microbial metal reduction processes. However, the in situ redox status of OM c-Cyts during microbial metal reduction processes remain poorly understood. In this study, diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy is used to investigate the in situ spectral reaction of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts in intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells under different incubation conditions. The reduced c-Cyts decreased transiently at the beginning and then recovered gradually over time. The Cr(VI) reduction rates decreased with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentrations, and Cr(III) was identified as a reduced product. The presence of Cr(III) substantially inhibited Cr(VI) reduction and the recovery of reduced c-Cyts, indicating that Cr(III) might inhibit cell growth. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing cell density. The highest Cr(VI) reduction rate and fastest recovery of c-Cyts were obtained at pH 7.0 and 30°C, with sodium lactate serving as an electron donor. The presence of O2 strongly inhibited Cr(VI) reduction, suggesting that O2 might compete with Cr(VI) as an electron acceptor in cells. This study provides a case of directly examining in vivo reaction properties of an outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under non-invasive physiological conditions. PMID:27242759

  10. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  11. Transcriptional analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an electrode compared to Fe(III)citrate or oxygen as terminal electron acceptor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background. Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research efforts in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially in regards to the respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. Here, we took a global approach ...

  12. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  13. Anaerobic Respiration of Elemental Sulfur and Thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Requires psrA, a Homolog of the phsA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Justin L.; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO32−), thiosulfate (S2O32−), tetrathionate (S4O62−), and elemental sulfur (S0). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S0 and S2O32− respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S0 and S2O32− yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S0 or S2O32− as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O32− terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS−] or SO32−) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S0 respiration. PMID:19542325

  14. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Shi, Liang

    2008-09-12

    Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 possesses up to 42 c-type cytochromes with heme content varying between 1 to as many as 37. Among them, the outer-membrane cytochromes, particularly MtrC and OmcA, are suspected to function as terminal reductases and are responsible for its enzymatic catalysis capability. So far, the mechanisms of metal reduction by these outer-membrane cytochromes are unknown. In this work, we report the study of reduction kinetics of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, NTA and EDTA by abiotically reduced MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods within the framework of the electron transfer theory of Marcus and speciation calculations based on the current thermodynamic database. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction was very fast and appeared to proceed in two stages, a fast stage that completes in much less than a second and a slower stage afterwards. For a given complex, the reaction is faster by reduction with MtrC than OmcA, while for a given protein, the reaction completes in the decreasing order of Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. All the stopped-flow kinetic curves could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 µM-1s-1 for the fast reaction between MtrC with Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 µM-1s-1 for the slow reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate complex. Speciation calculations indicated that at both metal:ligand ratios, 1:1.5 and 1:10, a single dominant ferric complex was responsible for the observed reaction for each ligand and, therefore, the observed dual-reaction pathways was attributed to the differences in the reduction behavior among various heme groups within each protein. The results of redox potential calculations with known thermodynamic data show only small differences on the scale of a few millivolts among the three complexes, suggested that

  15. Periplasmic Electron Transfer via the c-Type Cytochromes MtrA and FccA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Bjoern; Schicklberger, Marcus; Kuermann, Johannes; Spormann, Alfred M.; Gescher, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides is a geochemically and ecologically important process which involves the transfer of cellular, respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane to insoluble, extracellular, mineral-phase electron acceptors. In this paper evidence is provided for the function of the periplasmic fumarate reductase FccA and the decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrA in periplasmic electron transfer reactions in the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Both proteins are abundant in the periplasm of ferric citrate-reducing S. oneidensis cells. In vitro fumarate reductase FccA and c-type cytochrome MtrA were reduced by the cytoplasmic membrane-bound protein CymA. Electron transfer between CymA and MtrA was 1.4-fold faster than the CymA-catalyzed reduction of FccA. Further experiments showing a bidirectional electron transfer between FccA and MtrA provided evidence for an electron transfer network in the periplasmic space of S. oneidensis. Hence, FccA could function in both the electron transport to fumarate and via MtrA to mineral-phase Fe(III). Growth experiments with a ΔfccA deletion mutant suggest a role of FccA as a transient electron storage protein. PMID:19837833

  16. Isolation of a high-affinity functional protein complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A; Mayer, M Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A; Ni, Shuison; Lower, Brian H; Kennedy, David W; Wunschel, David S; Mottaz, Heather M; Marshall, Matthew J; Hill, Eric A; Beliaev, Alexander S; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Squier, Thomas C

    2006-07-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium capable of using soluble and insoluble forms of manganese [Mn(III/IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. To assess the structural association of two outer membrane-associated c-type decaheme cytochromes (i.e., OmcA [SO1779] and MtrC [SO1778]) and their ability to reduce soluble Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), we expressed these proteins with a C-terminal tag in wild-type S. oneidensis and a mutant deficient in these genes (i.e., Delta omcA mtrC). Endogenous MtrC copurified with tagged OmcA in wild-type Shewanella, suggesting a direct association. To further evaluate their possible interaction, both proteins were purified to near homogeneity following the independent expression of OmcA and MtrC in the Delta omcA mtrC mutant. Each purified cytochrome was confirmed to contain 10 hemes and exhibited Fe(III)-NTA reductase activity. To measure binding, MtrC was labeled with the multiuse affinity probe 4',5'-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (1,2-ethanedithiol)2, which specifically associates with a tetracysteine motif engineered at the C terminus of MtrC. Upon titration with OmcA, there was a marked increase in fluorescence polarization indicating the formation of a high-affinity protein complex (Kd < 500 nM) between MtrC and OmcA whose binding was sensitive to changes in ionic strength. Following association, the OmcA-MtrC complex was observed to have enhanced Fe(III)-NTA reductase specific activity relative to either protein alone, demonstrating that OmcA and MtrC can interact directly with each other to form a stable complex that is consistent with their role in the electron transport pathway of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  17. Isolation of a High-Affinity Functional Protein Complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two Outer Membrane Decaheme c-Type Cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A.; Ni, Shuison; Lower, Brian H.; Kennedy, David W.; Wunschel, David S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium capable of using soluble and insoluble forms of manganese [Mn(III/IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. To assess the structural association of two outer membrane-associated c-type decaheme cytochromes (i.e., OmcA [SO1779] and MtrC [SO1778]) and their ability to reduce soluble Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), we expressed these proteins with a C-terminal tag in wild-type S. oneidensis and a mutant deficient in these genes (i.e., ΔomcA mtrC). Endogenous MtrC copurified with tagged OmcA in wild-type Shewanella, suggesting a direct association. To further evaluate their possible interaction, both proteins were purified to near homogeneity following the independent expression of OmcA and MtrC in the ΔomcA mtrC mutant. Each purified cytochrome was confirmed to contain 10 hemes and exhibited Fe(III)-NTA reductase activity. To measure binding, MtrC was labeled with the multiuse affinity probe 4′,5′-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (1,2-ethanedithiol)2, which specifically associates with a tetracysteine motif engineered at the C terminus of MtrC. Upon titration with OmcA, there was a marked increase in fluorescence polarization indicating the formation of a high-affinity protein complex (Kd < 500 nM) between MtrC and OmcA whose binding was sensitive to changes in ionic strength. Following association, the OmcA-MtrC complex was observed to have enhanced Fe(III)-NTA reductase specific activity relative to either protein alone, demonstrating that OmcA and MtrC can interact directly with each other to form a stable complex that is consistent with their role in the electron transport pathway of S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:16788180

  18. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  19. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  20. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation, and detachment during respiration on hematite.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A C; Peterson, L; Reardon, C L; Reed, S B; Culley, D E; Romine, M R; Geesey, G G

    2012-07-01

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to and transfer electrons to hematite has led to the suggestion that they function as terminal reductases when this mineral is used as a respiratory substrate. Differences in their redox behavior and hematite-binding properties, however, indicate that they play different roles in the electron transfer reaction. Here, we investigated how these differences in cytochrome behavior with respect to hematite affected biofilm development when the mineral served as terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Upon attachment to hematite, cells of the wild-type (WT) strain as well as those of a ΔomcA mutant but not those of a ΔmtrC mutant replicated and accumulated on the mineral surface. The results indicate that MtrC but not OmcA is required for growth when this mineral serves as TEA. While an OmcA deficiency did not impede cell replication and accumulation on hematite prior to achievement of a maximum surface cell density comparable to that established by WT cells, OmcA was required for efficient electron transfer and cell attachment to hematite once maximum surface cell density was achieved. OmcA may therefore play a role in overcoming barriers to electron transfer and cell attachment to hematite imposed by reductive dissolution of the mineral surface from cell respiration associated with achievement of high surface cell densities.

  1. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hill, Eric A.; Moran, James J.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Hui, Yang; Hegg, Eric L.

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organism, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  2. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth's near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  3. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth’s near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  4. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  5. MR1 discovery.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2016-08-01

    The moment of MR1 discovery is described. The MR1 gene is the first and the last reported human MHC-related gene intentionally isolated from the human genome composed of three billion base pairs. Evolutionary considerations formed the basis of its isolation. Some details surrounding the moment and some retrospective descriptions with various kinds of encounters are also included.

  6. The Influence of Acidity on Microbial Fuel Cells Containing Shewanella Oneidensis (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    acidity on power production from a bacte- ial consortia within a MFC (Gil et al., 2003). Shewanella oneidensis originally known as Shewanella putrefaciens ...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2008-4508 PREPRINT THE INFLUENCE OF ACIDITY ON MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS CONTAINING SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS (PREPRINT) Justin C...8. However, the effect of pH on the growth and electron transfer abilities of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (wild-type) and DSP10 (spontaneous mutant

  7. Methods for Imaging Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Nanofilaments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    has been made that, “Previous studies may have missed nanowires because bacteria in biofilms are Journal of Microbiological Methods 82 (2010) 187–191...j.mimet.2010.05.011 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Microbiological Methods j ourna l homepage: www.e lsev ie r.com/ locate...188 R. Ray et al. / Journal of Microbiological Methods 82 (2010) 187–191 samples (Technique 3) until the specimens were coated in palladium

  8. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  9. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  10. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  11. The tetraheme cytochrome CymA is required for anaerobic respiration with dimethyl sulfoxide and nitrite in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Carsten; Chapman, Stephen K; Reid, Graeme A

    2003-08-12

    The tetraheme c-type cytochrome, CymA, from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has previously been shown to be required for respiration with Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate [Myers, C. R., and Myers, J. M. (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 1143-1152]. It is located in the cytoplasmic membrane where the bulk of the protein is exposed to the periplasm, enabling it to transfer electrons to a series of redox partners. We have expressed and purified a soluble derivative of CymA (CymA(sol)) that lacks the N-terminal membrane anchor. We show here, by direct measurements of electron transfer between the purified proteins, that CymA(sol) efficiently reduces S. oneidensis fumarate reductase. This indicates that no further proteins are required for electron transfer between the quinone pool and fumarate if we assume direct reduction of CymA by quinols. By expressing CymA(sol) in a mutant lacking CymA, we have shown that this soluble form of the protein can complement the defect in fumarate respiration. We also demonstrate that CymA is essential for growth with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and for reduction of nitrite, implicating CymA in at least five different electron transfer pathways in Shewanella.

  12. Programming the quorum sensing-based AND gate in Shewanella oneidensis for logic gated-microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yidan; Yang, Yun; Katz, Evgeny; Song, Hao

    2015-03-11

    An AND logic gate based on a synthetic quorum-sensing (QS) module was constructed in a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mtrA knockout mutant. The presence of two input signals activated the expression of a periplasmic decaheme cytochrome MtrA to regenerate the extracellular electron transfer conduit, enabling the construction of AND-gated microbial fuel cells.

  13. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  14. Expression and trafficking of MR1.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Rajesh; Ussher, James E

    2017-07-01

    MHC class I-related gene protein (MR1) is a non-polymorphic MHC class IB antigen-presenting molecule that is the restricting molecule for mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a prominent population of innate-like antibacterial T cells. The MAIT cell-MR1 axis represents a new paradigm in antigen presentation, with the MR1 ligand derived from vitamin B compounds or their metabolic precursors. Many bacteria and some fungi produce the activating ligand for MR1. In evolution, MR1 is highly conserved in most, but not all, mammals. In humans and rodents it is expressed in a broad range of cell types, both haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic, although cell surface expression has been difficult to detect. Although MR1 trafficking shares features with both the MHC class I and MHC class II pathways, it is distinct. Several strands of evidence suggest that the intracellular location where MR1 is loaded differs for soluble ligand and for ligand derived from intact bacteria. The regulation of MR1 surface expression may also vary between different cell types. This paper will review what is currently known about the expression and trafficking of MR1 and propose a model for the loading and trafficking of MR1. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells. PMID:24264440

  16. Identification and analysis of the Shewanella oneidensis major oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheboul, Suhaila; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that can use a large number of electron acceptors including metal oxides. During anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 synthesizes a large number of c cytochromes that give the organism its characteristic orange color. Using a modified mariner transposon, a number of S. oneidensis mutants deficient in anaerobic respiration were generated. One mutant, BG163, exhibited reduced pigmentation and was deficient in c cytochromes normally synthesized under anaerobic condition. The deficiencies in BG163 were due to insertional inactivation of hemN1, which exhibits a high degree of similarity to genes encoding anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidases that are involved in heme biosynthesis. The ability of BG163 to synthesize c cytochromes under anaerobic conditions, and to grow anaerobically with different electron acceptors was restored by the introduction of hemN1 on a plasmid. Complementation of the mutant was also achieved by the addition of hemin to the growth medium. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains three putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes. The protein encoded by hemN1 appears to be the major enzyme that is involved in anaerobic heme synthesis of S. oneidensis. The other two putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes may play a minor role in this process.

  17. Promotion of Iron Oxide Reduction and Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis by DMSO

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Dao-Bo; Chen, Jie-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Wu, Chao; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, known for its capacity of reducing iron and manganese oxides, has great environmental impacts. The iron oxides reducing process is affected by the coexistence of alternative electron acceptors in the environment, while investigation into it is limited so far. In this work, the impact of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), a ubiquitous chemical in marine environment, on the reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) by S. oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Results show that DMSO promoted HFO reduction by both wild type and ΔdmsE, but had no effect on the HFO reduction by ΔdmsB, indicating that such a promotion was dependent on the DMSO respiration. With the DMSO dosing, the levels of extracellular flavins and omcA expression were significantly increased in WT and further increased in ΔdmsE. Bioelectrochemical analysis show that DMSO also promoted the extracellular electron transfer of WT and ΔdmsE. These results demonstrate that DMSO could stimulate the HFO reduction through metabolic and genetic regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1, rather than compete for electrons with HFO. This may provide a potential respiratory pathway to enhance the microbial electron flows for environmental and engineering applications. PMID:24244312

  18. Engineering Shewanella oneidensis enables xylose-fed microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Li, Yuanxiu; Sun, Liming; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Changji; An, Xingjuan; Chen, Xiaoli; Tian, Yao; Song, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a green and sustainable technology for electricity energy harvest from biomass, in which exoelectrogens use metabolism and extracellular electron transfer pathways for the conversion of chemical energy into electricity. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, one of the most well-known exoelectrogens, could not use xylose (a key pentose derived from hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass) for cell growth and power generation, which limited greatly its practical applications. Herein, to enable S. oneidensis to directly utilize xylose as the sole carbon source for bioelectricity production in MFCs, we used synthetic biology strategies to successfully construct four genetically engineered S. oneidensis (namely XE, GE, XS, and GS) by assembling one of the xylose transporters (from Candida intermedia and Clostridium acetobutylicum) with one of intracellular xylose metabolic pathways (the isomerase pathway from Escherichia coli and the oxidoreductase pathway from Scheffersomyces stipites), respectively. We found that among these engineered S. oneidensis strains, the strain GS (i.e. harbouring Gxf1 gene encoding the xylose facilitator from C. intermedi, and XYL1, XYL2, and XKS1 genes encoding the xylose oxidoreductase pathway from S. stipites) was able to generate the highest power density, enabling a maximum electricity power density of 2.1 ± 0.1 mW/m(2). To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report on the rationally designed Shewanella that could use xylose as the sole carbon source and electron donor to produce electricity. The synthetic biology strategies developed in this study could be further extended to rationally engineer other exoelectrogens for lignocellulosic biomass utilization to generate electricity power.

  19. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  20. Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to StrontiumStress

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Madhavi; Deshpande, Sameer; Seal,Sudipta; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric; Yang, Yunfeng; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tengfen; Liu, Xueduan; Arkin, Adam; Chourey, Karuna; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2007-03-30

    The physiology and transcriptome dynamics of the metalion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 in response tononradioactive strontium (Sr) exposure were investigated. Studiesindicated that MR-1 was able to grow aerobically in complex medium in thepresence of 180 mMSrCl2 but showed severe growth inhibition at levelsabove that concentration. Temporal gene expression profiles weregenerated from aerobically grown, mid-exponential-phase MR-1 cellsshocked with 180 mM SrCl2 and analyzed for significant differences inmRNA abundance with reference to data for nonstressed MR-1 cells. Geneswith annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis and iron transportwere among the most highly induced (>100-fold [P<0.05]) openreading frames in response to acute Sr stress, and a mutant(SO3032::pKNOCK) defective in siderophore production was found to behypersensitive to SrCl2 exposure, compared to parental and wild-typestrains. Transcripts encoding multidrug and heavy metal efflux pumps,proteins involved in osmotic adaptation, sulfate ABC transporters, andassimilative sulfur metabolism enzymes also were differentially expressedfollowing Sr exposure but at levels that were several orders of magnitudelower than those for iron transport genes. Precipitate formation wasobserved during aerobic growth of MR-1 in broth cultures amended with 50,100, or 150 mM SrCl2 but not in cultures of the SO3032::pKNOCK mutant orin the abiotic control. Chemical analysis of this precipitate usinglaser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and static secondary ion massspectrometry indicated extracellular solid-phase sequestration of Sr,with at least a portion of the heavy metal associated with carbonatephases.

  1. Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Strontium Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Madhavi; Deshpande, Sameer; Seal, Sudipta; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric; Yang, Yunfeng; Wu, Liyou; Yan, Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Arkin, Adam; Chourey, Karuna; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-01-01

    The physiology and transcriptome dynamics of the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 in response to nonradioactive strontium (Sr) exposure were investigated. Studies indicated that MR-1 was able to grow aerobically in complex medium in the presence of 180 mM SrCl2 but showed severe growth inhibition at levels above that concentration. Temporal gene expression profiles were generated from aerobically grown, mid-exponential-phase MR-1 cells shocked with 180 mM SrCl2 and analyzed for significant differences in mRNA abundance with reference to data for nonstressed MR-1 cells. Genes with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis and iron transport were among the most highly induced (>100-fold [P < 0.05]) open reading frames in response to acute Sr stress, and a mutant (SO3032::pKNOCK) defective in siderophore production was found to be hypersensitive to SrCl2 exposure, compared to parental and wild-type strains. Transcripts encoding multidrug and heavy metal efflux pumps, proteins involved in osmotic adaptation, sulfate ABC transporters, and assimilative sulfur metabolism enzymes also were differentially expressed following Sr exposure but at levels that were several orders of magnitude lower than those for iron transport genes. Precipitate formation was observed during aerobic growth of MR-1 in broth cultures amended with 50, 100, or 150 mM SrCl2 but not in cultures of the SO3032::pKNOCK mutant or in the abiotic control. Chemical analysis of this precipitate using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and static secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated extracellular solid-phase sequestration of Sr, with at least a portion of the heavy metal associated with carbonate phases. PMID:16391131

  2. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  3. Concentration responses of toxicity sensor with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 growing in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing

    2013-05-15

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) provide an opportunity to detect biological toxicity of water samples. However, the concentration responses of toxins had not been investigated in detail. Using formaldehyde as a toxic substance, the current responses were analyzed over a concentration range from 0.01% to 0.10% in a single chambered BES with 0mV (versus saturated calomel electrode) applied on the anode. The decay percentages of currents increased in proportion with the concentration of formaldehyde after 10000s (∼2.8h), with the peak R(2) of 0.9361 observed at 35,000s (∼9.7h). Fitting results of exponential decay equation showed that the magnification factor (a) closely related with baseline currents and the toxicity factor (b) was in direct proportion to formaldehyde concentration (from 0% to 0.08%) except over the high concentration of 0.10%. These results provide preliminary information about toxin concentration responses in BESs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    less current than the wild type in an MFC and was unable to reduce Fe(III). These results indicated that although nanofilaments and soluble mediators...mutant that lacks the outer membrane c cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA. This mutant generated significantly less current than the wild type in an MFC and...published previously [34]. The anodes were single-sided carbon-coated titanium flags and the cathode system was graphite paper in 50 mM potassium

  5. Final Summary of "Interdisciplinary Study of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1's Metabolism & Metal Reduction"

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, Eugene

    2007-06-26

    Our project focused primarily on analysis of different types of data produced by global high-throughput technologies, data integration of gene annotation, and gene and protein expression information, as well as on getting a better functional annotation of Shewanella genes. Specifically, four of our numerous major activities and achievements include the development of: statistical models for identification and expression proteomics, superior to currently available approaches (including our own earlier ones); approaches to improve gene annotations on the whole-organism scale; standards for annotation, transcriptomics and proteomics approaches; and generalized approaches for data integration of gene annotation, gene and protein expression information.

  6. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  7. Shewanella oneidensis Hfq promotes exponential phase growth, stationary phase culture density, and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hfq is an RNA chaperone protein that has been broadly implicated in sRNA function in bacteria. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a null allele of the gene that encodes the RNA chaperone Hfq in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium. Results Loss of hfq in S. oneidensis results in a variety of mutant phenotypes, all of which are fully complemented by addition of a plasmid-borne copy of the wild type hfq gene. Aerobic cultures of the hfq∆ mutant grow more slowly through exponential phase than wild type cultures, and hfq∆ cultures reach a terminal cell density in stationary phase that is ~2/3 of that observed in wild type cultures. We have observed a similar growth phenotype when the hfq∆ mutant is cultured under anaerobic conditions with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, and we have found that the hfq∆ mutant is defective in Cr(VI) reduction. Finally, the hfq∆ mutant exhibits a striking loss of colony forming units in extended stationary phase and is highly sensitive to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or methyl viologen (paraquat). Conclusions The hfq mutant in S. oneidensis exhibits pleiotropic phenotypes, including a defect in metal reduction. Our results also suggest that hfq mutant phenotypes in S. oneidensis may be at least partially due to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. PMID:23394078

  8. Iron Reduction and Carbonate Precipitation by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z.; Tice, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study is to contribute to better understanding of how Archean microbes induced carbonate diagenesis in mats and stromatolites. Previous studies showed sulfate reduction, a common promoter of carbonate precipitation in modern mats[1], is likely to have been less effective in Archean mats in marine fluids lower in sulfate[2]. Alternatively, iron reduction produces far more alkalinity per unit carbon respired than sulfate reduction. Therefore, we hypothesize iron reduction can promote much more carbonate precipitation than sulfate reduction. Our study might also have some relevance to banded iron formation on which microbial iron reduction played a potential role[3]. To test our hypothesis, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium will be cultured anaerobically (79%N2, 20%CO2 and 1%H2) in basal medium to trigger iron reduction. Lactate will be used as electron donor, and the electron acceptor will be fresh ferrihydrite. Culture medium will be added with various metal ions, such as Ca2+ and Mg2+, to obtain potential carbonate precipitate. Escherichia coli (with fumarate added as an electron acceptor) will be used to provide a comparison to live but non-iron- reduction cells. After 20 days incubation, precipitate will be collected, washed and identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides, iron reduction rate (ferrozine assay)[4], PH and amount of precipitate (carbonate and oxidize fractions)[5] will be measured over time to well understand how S. oneidensis drives carbonate precipitation.

  9. AMT Tag Approach to Proteomic Characterization of Deinococcus Radiodurans and Shewanella Oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Hixson, Kim K.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Tolic, Nikola; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-09-01

    Biology is transitioning from a largely qualitative, mostly descriptive science to a quantitative and ultimately predictive science. Advances in high throughput DNA sequencing have made increasing numbers of genome sequences available and enabled a “systems” level analysis of complex biological organisms. The ability to quantitatively measure the array of proteins, also termed the proteome, in prokaryotic cells and communities of cells is key to understanding microbial systems. This chapter focuses on the utility of the AMT tag mass spectrometric approach used to characterize the proteomes of two microbes, Deinococcus radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  10. Characterization of the Shewanella oneidensis Fur gene: roles in iron and acid tolerance response

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Wu, Liyou; Parsons, Andrea B; Palumbo, Anthony V; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron homeostasis is a key metabolism for most organisms. In many bacterial species, coordinate regulation of iron homeostasis depends on the protein product of a Fur gene. Fur also plays roles in virulence, acid tolerance, redox-stress responses, flagella chemotaxis and metabolic pathways. Results We conducted physiological and transcriptomic studies to characterize Fur in Shewanella oneidensis, with regard to its roles in iron and acid tolerance response. A S. oneidensisfur deletion mutant was defective in growth under iron-abundant or acidic environment. However, it coped with iron depletion better than the wild-type strain MR-1. Further gene expression studies by microarray of the fur mutant confirmed previous findings that iron uptake genes were highly de-repressed in the mutant. Intriguingly, a large number of genes involved in energy metabolism were iron-responsive but Fur-independent, suggesting an intimate relationship of energy metabolism to iron response, but not to Fur. Further characterization of these genes in energy metabolism suggested that they might be controlled by transcriptional factor Crp, as shown by an enriched motif searching algorithm in the corresponding cluster of a gene co-expression network. Conclusion This work demonstrates that S. oneidensis Fur is involved in iron acquisition and acid tolerance response. In addition, analyzing genome-wide transcriptional profiles provides useful information for the characterization of Fur and iron response in S. oneidensis. PMID:18366600

  11. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Christopher M; Mazzucca, Nicholas Q; Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M; Keane, Meaghan L; Leonard, Jessica N; Scola, Shelby E; Beer, Emma N; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  12. Reduced Heme Levels Underlie the Exponential Growth Defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M.; Keane, Meaghan L.; Leonard, Jessica N.; Scola, Shelby E.; Beer, Emma N.; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J.

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step. PMID:25356668

  13. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  14. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Krumholz, Elias W; Brutinel, Evan D; Palani, Nagendra P; Sadowsky, Michael J; Odlyzko, Andrew M; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-09-01

    Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA). TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1) previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2) flux balance analysis (FBA) predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  16. Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Validation of Shewanella oneidensis Using Transposon Insertion Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong; Krumholz, Elias W.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Palani, Nagendra P.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Odlyzko, Andrew M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA). TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1) previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2) flux balance analysis (FBA) predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions. PMID:25233219

  17. Physiological and Transcriptomic Analyses to Characterize the Function of Fur and Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Wu, Liyou; Parsons, Andrea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining iron homeostasis is a key metabolic challenge for most organisms. In many bacterial species, regulation of iron homeostasis is carried out by the global transcriptional regulator Fur. Physiological examination showed that Shewanella oneidensis harboring a fur deletion mutation had deficiencies in both growth and acid tolerance response. However, the fur mutant better tolerated iron-limited environments than the wild-type strain MR-1. Transcriptomic studies comparing the fur mutant and MR-1 confirmed previous findings that iron acquisition systems were highly induced by Fur inactivation. In addition, the temporal gene expression profiling of the fur mutant in response to iron depletion and repletion suggested that a number of genes involved in energy transport were iron-responsive but Fur-independent. Further identification of Fur-independent genes was obtained by generating a gene co-expression network from temporal gene expression profiles. A group of genes is involved in heat shock and has an rpoH-binding site at their promoters, and genes related to anaerobic energy transport has a highly conserved Crp binding site at the promoters. Together, this work provides useful information for the characterization of the function of Fur and the iron response in S. oneidensis.

  18. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  19. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M.; Monty, Chelsea N.

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  20. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  1. Electrochemical selection and characterization of a high current-generating Shewanella oneidensis mutant with altered cell-surface morphology and biofilm-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Oba, Hitomi; Tajima, Nozomi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-07-16

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits extracellular electron transfer (EET) activity that is influenced by various cellular components, including outer-membrane cytochromes, cell-surface polysaccharides (CPS), and regulatory proteins. Here, a random transposon-insertion mutant library of S. oneidensis MR-1 was screened after extended cultivation in electrochemical cells (ECs) with a working electrode poised at +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to isolate mutants that adapted to electrode-respiring conditions and identify as-yet-unknown EET-related factors. Several mutants isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited rough morphology and extraordinarily large colonies on agar plates compared to wild-type MR-1. One of the isolated mutants, designated strain EC-2, produced 90% higher electric current than wild-type MR-1 in ECs and was found to have a transposon inserted in the SO_1860 (uvrY) gene, which encodes a DNA-binding response regulator of the BarA/UvrY two-component regulatory system. However, an in-frame deletion mutant of SO_1860 (∆SO_1860) did not exhibit a similar level of current generation as that of EC-2, suggesting that the enhanced current-generating capability of EC-2 was not simply due to the disruption of SO_1860. In both EC-2 and ∆SO_1860, the transcription of genes related to CPS synthesis was decreased compared to wild-type MR-1, suggesting that CPS negatively affects current generation. In addition, transcriptome analyses revealed that a number of genes, including those involved in biofilm formation, were differentially expressed in EC-2 compared to those in ∆SO_1860. The present results indicate that the altered expression of the genes related to CPS biosynthesis and biofilm formation is associated with the distinct morphotype and high current-generating capability of strain EC-2, suggesting an important role of these genes in determining the EET activity of S. oneidensis.

  2. Dynamics in the Dual Fuel Flagellar Motor of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Brenzinger, Susanne; Thormann, Kai M

    2017-01-01

    The stator is an eminent component of the flagellar motor and determines a number of the motor's properties, such as the rotation-energizing coupling ion (H(+) or Na(+)) or the torque that can be generated. The stator consists of several units located in the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the flagellar drive shaft. Studies on flagellar motors of several bacterial species have provided evidence that the number as well as the retention time of stators coupled to the motor is highly dynamic and depends on the environmental conditions. Notably, numerous species possess more than a single distinct set of stators. It is likely that the presence of different stator units enables these bacteria to adjust the flagellar motor properties and function to meet the environmental requirements. One of these species is Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 that is equipped with a single polar flagellum and two stator units, the Na(+)-dependent PomAB and the H(+)-dependent MotAB. Here, we describe a method to determine stator dynamics by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating how bacteria can change the composition of an intricate molecular machine according to environmental conditions.

  3. Rapid Precipitation of Amorphous Silica in Experimental Systems with Nontronite (NAu-1) and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-15

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and... reviewing the collection of Information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, Including...suspensions of organoclay complexes for TEM into fresh LB media and cultured under continuous ultrathin sectioning (Perret et al., 1991; Wilkinson et al

  4. MR1 presentation of vitamin B-based metabolite ligands.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Birkinshaw, Richard W; Villadangos, Jose A; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I-related molecule MR1 can bind a novel class of antigens, namely a family of related small organic vitamin B metabolites. When bound to MR1 these metabolites are presented to a population of innate-like T cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR). Several non-activating and activating MR1-restricted ligands have been described, which are the degradation products of, or intermediates of, vitamin B9 (folic acid) or vitamin B2 (riboflavin), respectively. The MAIT-activating intermediates of the riboflavin synthesis pathway are unique to a wide range of microbes, and accordingly represent a molecular signature of microbial infection. Recently insights into the binding of these vitamin B metabolites to MR1, and subsequent recognition by the MAIT TCR, have been gleaned, illustrating a novel antigen presentation system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye-Sensitized TiO2.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Emma V; Lockwood, Colin W J; White, Gaye F; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A; Jeuken, Lars J C; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N

    2016-12-14

    The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar-assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), trans-outer-membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer-membrane-spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR-1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on Ru(II) -dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein-coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer-membrane-associated cytochromes of MR-1 for solar-driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  6. Disruption of Putrescine Biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis Enhances Biofilm Cohesiveness and Performance in Cr(VI) Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui

    2014-01-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O72−), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms. PMID:24362428

  7. Disruption of putrescine biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis enhances biofilm cohesiveness and performance in Cr(VI) immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O7(2-)), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms.

  8. Impact of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Flavin Secretion in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Meyer, Ben M.; Christenson, Cole J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of nanoparticle impacts on critical bacteria functions allows us to gain a mechanistic understanding of toxicity and guides us towards design rules for creating safe nanomaterials. Herein and using analytical techniques, biofilm formation, a general bacteria function, and riboflavin secretion, a species-specific function, were monitored in Shewanella oneidensis, a metal reducing bacterium, following exposure to a variety of TiO2 nanoparticle types (synthesized, Aeroxide P25, and T-Eco). TEM images show that dosed nanoparticles are in close proximity to the bacteria but they are not internalized. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), it was revealed that S. oneidensis biofilm formation is slowed in the presence of nanoparticles. Though S. oneidensis grows more slowly in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, riboflavin secretion, a function related to the S. oneidensis metal reducing capacity, was increased significantly in a nanoparticle dose-dependent manner. Both changes in biofilm formation and riboflavin secretion are supported by changes in gene expression in nanoparticle-exposed S. oneidensis. This broad study of bacterial nanotoxicity, including use of sensitive analytical tools for functional assessments of biofilm formation, riboflavin secretion, and gene expression has implications for total ecosystem health as the use of engineered nanoparticles grows. PMID:23701037

  9. Biofabrication of discrete spherical gold nanoparticles using the metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Broich, Michael L; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystallites have garnered substantial interest due to their varying applications including catalysis. Consequently important aspects related to control of shape/size and syntheses through economical and non-hazardous means are desirable. Highly efficient bioreduction based natural fabrication approaches that utilize microbes and or -plant extracts are poised to meet these needs. Here we show that the gamma- proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, can reduce tetrachloro aurate (III) ions, producing discrete extracellular spherical gold nanocrystallites. The particles were homogeneous with multiple size distributions and produced under ambient conditions at high yield, 88% of theoretical maximum. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 2-50 nm, with an average of 12 5 nm. The nanoparticles were hydrophilic, biocompatible, and resisted aggregation even after several months. The particles are likely capped by a detachable protein/peptide coat. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectra and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirmed the formation as well the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of these gold nanoparticles was assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Toxicity assessments divulged that the particles were neither toxic nor inhibitory to any of these bacteria.

  10. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  11. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of Shewanella oneidensis cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions by accurate mass and time tag approach.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A; Monroe, Matthew E; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D; Callister, Stephen J; Moore, Ronald J; Gorby, Yuri A; Adkins, Joshua N; Fredrickson, Jim K; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of LC-MS without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomic analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions. LC-MS/MS was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC-FTICR was used to confirm these identifications as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as statistical analysis of microarrays, whereas another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis was transitioned from aerobic to suboxic conditions.

  12. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  13. Cell surface expression of MR1B, a splice variant of the MHC class I-related molecule MR1, revealed with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hisateru; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2014-01-10

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related molecule, MR1, is highly conserved in mammals and can present bacteria-derived vitamin B metabolites to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, possibly having important defense function in the microbial infection. MR1B is a splice variant of MR1 and possesses an intriguing domain structure with only two extracellular domains resembling some NKG2D ligand molecules. Thus far, cell surface expression of MR1B could not be analyzed with flow cytometry due to a lack of appropriate antibodies reactive with MR1B. Here we clarified the expression of MR1B recombinant protein on the cell surface of the transfected cells by flow cytometry analyses using the antiserum against MR1. Consistently, MR1B tagged with FLAG peptide at the N-terminus also could be detected with anti-FLAG monoclonal antibodies. Our result showed that MR1B can be recognized on the cell surface by macromolecules such as antibodies, indicating its potential of interaction with certain receptor(s). We discuss possibility of interaction of MR1B and/or the full-length MR1 with some receptor(s) other than αβ T cell receptor (TCR) of MAIT cells based on the highly conserved characteristic residues of the ligand-binding domains of MR1 and its MAIT cells αβTCR footprints.

  14. Electrochemical selection and characterization of a high current-generating Shewanella oneidensis mutant with altered cell-surface morphology and biofilm-related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits extracellular electron transfer (EET) activity that is influenced by various cellular components, including outer-membrane cytochromes, cell-surface polysaccharides (CPS), and regulatory proteins. Here, a random transposon-insertion mutant library of S. oneidensis MR-1 was screened after extended cultivation in electrochemical cells (ECs) with a working electrode poised at +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to isolate mutants that adapted to electrode-respiring conditions and identify as-yet-unknown EET-related factors. Results Several mutants isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited rough morphology and extraordinarily large colonies on agar plates compared to wild-type MR-1. One of the isolated mutants, designated strain EC-2, produced 90% higher electric current than wild-type MR-1 in ECs and was found to have a transposon inserted in the SO_1860 (uvrY) gene, which encodes a DNA-binding response regulator of the BarA/UvrY two-component regulatory system. However, an in-frame deletion mutant of SO_1860 (∆SO_1860) did not exhibit a similar level of current generation as that of EC-2, suggesting that the enhanced current-generating capability of EC-2 was not simply due to the disruption of SO_1860. In both EC-2 and ∆SO_1860, the transcription of genes related to CPS synthesis was decreased compared to wild-type MR-1, suggesting that CPS negatively affects current generation. In addition, transcriptome analyses revealed that a number of genes, including those involved in biofilm formation, were differentially expressed in EC-2 compared to those in ∆SO_1860. Conclusions The present results indicate that the altered expression of the genes related to CPS biosynthesis and biofilm formation is associated with the distinct morphotype and high current-generating capability of strain EC-2, suggesting an important role of these genes in determining the EET activity of S. oneidensis. PMID:25028134

  15. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Le Laz, Sébastien; kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  16. Evolution of Cell Size Homeostasis and Growth Rate Diversity during Initial Surface Colonization of Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Calvin K; Kim, Alexander J; Santos, Giancarlo S; Lai, Peter Y; Lee, Stella Y; Qiao, David F; Anda, Jaime De; Young, Thomas D; Chen, Yujie; Rowe, Annette R; Nealson, Kenneth H; Weiss, Paul S; Wong, Gerard C L

    2016-09-06

    Cell size control and homeostasis are fundamental features of bacterial metabolism. Recent work suggests that cells add a constant size between birth and division ("adder" model). However, it is not known how cell size homeostasis is influenced by the existence of heterogeneous microenvironments, such as those during biofilm formation. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use diverse energy sources on a range of surfaces via extracellular electron transport (EET), which can impact growth, metabolism, and size diversity. Here, we track bacterial surface communities at single-cell resolution to show that not only do bacterial motility appendages influence the transition from two- to three-dimensional biofilm growth and control postdivisional cell fates, they strongly impact cell size homeostasis. For every generation, we find that the average growth rate for cells that stay on the surface and continue to divide (nondetaching population) and that for cells that detach before their next division (detaching population) are roughly constant. However, the growth rate distribution is narrow for the nondetaching population, but broad for the detaching population in each generation. Interestingly, the appendage deletion mutants (ΔpilA, ΔmshA-D, Δflg) have significantly broader growth rate distributions than that of the wild type for both detaching and nondetaching populations, which suggests that Shewanella appendages are important for sensing and integrating environmental inputs that contribute to size homeostasis. Moreover, our results suggest multiplexing of appendages for sensing and motility functions contributes to cell size dysregulation. These results can potentially provide a framework for generating metabolic diversity in S. oneidensis populations to optimize EET in heterogeneous environments.

  17. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Characterization of the Fur Modulon in the Metal-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiu-Feng; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; McCue, Lee Ann; Stanek, Dawn; Connelly, Heather; Hauser, Loren J.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tingfen; Leaphart, Adam; Hettich, Robert L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has permitted a comprehensive characterization of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) modulon in this dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. We have employed targeted gene mutagenesis, DNA microarrays, proteomic analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and computational motif discovery tools to define the S. oneidensis Fur regulon. Using this integrated approach, we identified nine probable operons (containing 24 genes) and 15 individual open reading frames (ORFs), either with unknown functions or encoding products annotated as transport or binding proteins, that are predicted to be direct targets of Fur-mediated repression. This study suggested, for the first time, possible roles for four operons and eight ORFs with unknown functions in iron metabolism or iron transport-related functions. Proteomic analysis clearly identified a number of transporters, binding proteins, and receptors related to iron uptake that were up-regulated in response to a fur deletion and verified the expression of nine genes originally annotated as pseudogenes. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data revealed strong correlation for genes shown to be undergoing large changes at the transcript level. A number of genes encoding components of the electron transport system were also differentially expressed in a fur deletion mutant. The gene omcA (SO1779), which encodes a decaheme cytochrome c, exhibited significant decreases in both mRNA and protein abundance in the fur mutant and possessed a strong candidate Fur-binding site in its upstream region, thus suggesting that omcA may be a direct target of Fur activation. PMID:15576789

  18. Spatiometabolic stratification of Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Teal, Tracy K; Lies, Douglas P; Wold, Barbara J; Newman, Dianne K

    2006-11-01

    Biofilms, or surface-attached microbial communities, are both ubiquitous and resilient in the environment. Although much is known about how biofilms form, develop, and detach, very little is understood about how these events are related to metabolism and its dynamics. It is commonly thought that large subpopulations of cells within biofilms are not actively producing proteins or generating energy and are therefore dead. An alternative hypothesis is that within the growth-inactive domains of biofilms, significant populations of living cells persist and retain the capacity to dynamically regulate their metabolism. To test this, we employed unstable fluorescent reporters to measure growth activity and protein synthesis in vivo over the course of biofilm development and created a quantitative routine to compare domains of activity in independently grown biofilms. Here we report that Shewanella oneidensis biofilm structures reproducibly stratify with respect to growth activity and metabolism as a function of size. Within domains of growth-inactive cells, genes typically upregulated under anaerobic conditions are expressed well after growth has ceased. These findings reveal that, far from being dead, the majority of cells in mature S. oneidensis biofilms have actively turned-on metabolic programs appropriate to their local microenvironment and developmental stage.

  19. [Cloning of mMR-1 gene and expression in Pichia pastoris systems].

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Bo; Hu, Yang; Wang, Yi-Guang; Xia, Huan-Zhang

    2005-01-01

    hMR-1 (Homo Myofibrillogenesis Regulator 1, AF417001) is a novel homo gene, which was firstly cloned in our laboratory. The former studies revealed that hMR-1 is a transmembrane protein which shows protein interaction with sarcomeric proteins like myomesin I, myosin regulatory light chain, alpha-enolase and some cell regulator proteins such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor3 subunit 5 (eIF3S5) and etc. In this work, we focused on cloning the homologous gene of hMR-1 from mouse C57BL/6J and exploring its expression using Pichia pastoris yeast system. Two pairs of primers were synthesized according to the hMR-1 gene homologous sequence on mouse genome chromosome 1. The mouse MR-1 gene (mMR-1) was cloned by PCR following the first round RT-PCR from mouse C57BL/6J spleen total RNA. Sequence analysis verified that mMR-1 gene and amino acids sequence showed 90.4% and 90.1% identity with hMR-1, respectively. The prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane structure of mMR-1 suggested it is also a transmembrane protein. The mMR-1 Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC9-mMR-1 was constructed by fusion of the flanking mMR-1 ORF in the pPIC9 plasmid. After linearization of pPIC9-mMR-1 with Sal I, the 8.5kb DNA fragment was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 strain by electroporation. GS115/Mut+ pPIC9-mMR-1 transformants were selected on minimal methanol medium. Integration of mMR-1 gene into the yeast genome in the recombinants was verified by PCR from the transformants total DNA. The mMR-1 protein was expressed by induction under the concentration of 0.5 % methanol. The specific induced protein of 25 kD molecular mass in SDS-PAGE was confirmed to be the mMR-1 protein by Western blot rsing hMR-1 polyclonal antibody. The expression level of this recombinant mMR-1 protein was about 50 mg/L. The successful expression of mMR-1 in the Pichia pastoris GS115 will facilitate the further functional analysis of the novel gene MR-1 in animal model.

  20. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Intracellular Bioreduction of Chromate in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Sandeep P.; Henne, Kristene L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This proposed research aims to use novel nanoparticle sensors and spectroscopic tools constituting surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging (FLIM) to study intracellular chemical activities within single bioremediating microorganism. The grand challenge is to develop a mechanistic understanding of chromate reduction and localization by the remediating bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by chemical and lifetime imaging. MR-1 has attracted wide interest from the research community because of its potential in reducing multiple chemical and metallic electron acceptors. While several biomolecular approaches to decode microbial reduction mechanisms exist, there is a considerable gap in the availability of sensor platforms to advance research from population-based studies to the single cell level. This study is one of the first attempts to incorporate SERS imaging to address this gap. First, we demonstrate that chromate-decorated nanoparticles can be taken up by cells using TEM and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging to confirm the internalization of gold nanoprobes. Second, we demonstrate the utility of a Raman chemical imaging platform to monitor chromate reduction and localization within single cells. Distinctive differences in Raman signatures of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) enabled their spatial identification within single cells from the Raman images. A comprehensive evaluation of toxicity and cellular interference experiments conducted revealed the inert nature of these probes and that they are non-toxic. Our results strongly suggest the existence of internal reductive machinery and that reduction occurs at specific sites within cells instead of at disperse reductive sites throughout the cell as previously reported. While chromate-decorated gold nanosensors used in this study provide an improved means for the tracking of specific chromate interactions within the cell and on the cell surface, we expect our single cell imaging tools to be

  2. A study on the polymorphism of human MHC class I-related MR1 gene and identification of an MR1-like pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cuadrado, J F; Navarro, P; Mirones, I; Setién, F; Oteo, M; Martínez-Naves, E

    2000-08-01

    Human MR1 is a recently discovered, ubiquitously transcribed gene very similar to the HLA class I loci and of unknown function. Mouse and rat MR1 sequences have also been described showing high similarity with the human gene. The goal of this work was to investigate if human MR1 was polymorphic. We have found that DNA sequences of MR1-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products obtained from samples of diverse ethnic origin were invariant except in one case in which two silent mutations were detected. We also found an MR1-like sequence displaying significant differences with the previously described, the most remarkable of which is a STOP codon in the alpha2 domain indicating that is a pseudogene.

  3. Molecular Underpinnings of Nitrite Effect on CymA-Dependent Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Miao; Fu, Huihui; Yin, Jianhua; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs). In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass. PMID:27493647

  4. Rapid construction of a whole-genome transposon insertion collection for Shewanella oneidensis by Knockout Sudoku

    PubMed Central

    Baym, Michael; Shaket, Lev; Anzai, Isao A.; Adesina, Oluwakemi; Barstow, Buz

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome knockout collections are invaluable for connecting gene sequence to function, yet traditionally, their construction has required an extraordinary technical effort. Here we report a method for the construction and purification of a curated whole-genome collection of single-gene transposon disruption mutants termed Knockout Sudoku. Using simple combinatorial pooling, a highly oversampled collection of mutants is condensed into a next-generation sequencing library in a single day, a 30- to 100-fold improvement over prior methods. The identities of the mutants in the collection are then solved by a probabilistic algorithm that uses internal self-consistency within the sequencing data set, followed by rapid algorithmically guided condensation to a minimal representative set of mutants, validation, and curation. Starting from a progenitor collection of 39,918 mutants, we compile a quality-controlled knockout collection of the electroactive microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 containing representatives for 3,667 genes that is functionally validated by high-throughput kinetic measurements of quinone reduction. PMID:27830751

  5. The Influence of Cultivation Methods on Shewanella oneidensis Physiology and Proteome Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2008-04-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell metabolic variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research.

  6. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F.

    2007-02-01

    We have characterized the outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at the single-molecule level using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). These cytochrome proteins are of great interest because they are thought to mediate bacterial electron transfer reactions in anoxic waters that control the reductive dissolution of oxide minerals. In our study, to characterize the electron transfer properties of these proteins on a model surface, the purified cytochromes were chemically immobilized as molecular monolayers on Au(111) substrates via a recombinant tetra-cysteine sequence as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy images confirm the monolayer films were ˜5-8 nm thick which is consistent with the apparent lateral dimensions of individual cytochrome molecules obtained with STM. Current-voltage TS of single cytochrome molecules revealed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate tunneling current despite having otherwise very similar molecular and biochemical properties. These observations suggest that, based on their electron tunneling properties, the two cytochromes could have specific roles during bacterial metal reduction. Additionally, this study establishes single-molecule STM/TS as an effective means for revealing insights into biogeochemical redox processes in the environment.

  7. Impact of silver(I) on the metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Law, Nicholas; Pearson, Geraldine; van Dongen, Bart E; Jarvis, Roger M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Anaerobic cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduced toxic Ag(I), forming nanoparticles of elemental Ag(0), as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. The addition of 1 to 50 microM Ag(I) had a limited impact on growth, while 100 microM Ag(I) reduced both the doubling time and cell yields. At this higher Ag(I) concentration transmission electron microscopy showed the accumulation of elemental silver particles within the cell, while at lower concentrations the metal was exclusively reduced and precipitated outside the cell wall. Whole organism metabolite fingerprinting, using the method of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of cells grown in a range of silver concentrations, confirmed that there were significant physiological changes at 100 microM silver. Principal component-discriminant function analysis scores and loading plots highlighted changes in certain functional groups, notably, lipids, amides I and II, and nucleic acids, as being discriminatory. Molecular analyses confirmed a dramatic drop in cellular yields of both the phospholipid fatty acids and their precursor molecules at high concentrations of silver, suggesting that the structural integrity of the cellular membrane was compromised at high silver concentrations, which was a result of intracellular accumulation of the toxic metal.

  8. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  9. Surface display of roGFP for monitoring redox status of extracellular microenvironments in Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cheng, Hsin-I; Zhang, Yingdan; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are the most ubiquitous and resilient form of microbial life on earth. One most important feature of a biofilm is the presence of a self-produced matrix, which creates highly heterogeneous and dynamic microenvironments within biofilms. Redox status in biofilm microenvironments plays a critical role in biofilm development and function. However, there is a lack of non-intrusive tools to quantify extracellular redox status of microenvironments within a biofilm matrix. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism, we demonstrated a novel approach to monitor extracellular redox status in biofilm microenvironments. Specifically, we displayed a redox sensitive fluorescence protein roGFP onto the cell surface of S. oneidensis by fusing it to the C-terminus of BpfA, a large surface protein, and used the surface displayed roGFP as a sensor to quantify the extracellular redox status in the matrix of S. oneidensis biofilms. The fusion of roGFP into BpfA has no negative impacts on cell growth and biofilm formation. Upon exposure to oxidizing agents such as H2 O2 , Ag(+) , and SeO3 (2-) , S. oneidensis BpfA-roGFP cells exhibited a characteristic fluorescence of roGFP. Proteinase treatment assay and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy confirmed the surface localization of BpfA-roGFP. We further used the surface displayed roGFP monitored the extracellular redox status in the matrix at different depths of a biofilm exposed to H2 O2 . This study provides a novel approach to non-invasively monitor extracellular redox status in microenvironments within biofilms, which can be used to understand redox responses of biofilms to environmental perturbations.

  10. Single-Molecule Methods for the Large-Scale Characterization of Expression Levels and Protein-Protein Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2008-10-01

    This project has demonstrated a new approach to localize binding sites of proteins regulating gene expression (also known as transcription factors) on the genome of bacteria. Knowledge of the precise binding site(s) of a specific transcription factor helps determining its role in the cell cycle and by extension provides further understanding of the mechanisms at play in the organism. The approach entails labeling transcription factors (or any other DNA-binding protein of interest) with quantum dots, a new class of very bright fluorescent probes, which allow detection of individual molecules with a simple microscope. Detection is then followed with very accurate localization of the probe (with nanometer resolution) with respect to specific parts of the DNA or other proteins bound to the DNA. We have confirmed the precision of our measurement using another technique based on atomic force microscopy, which provides a nanometer-resolution topographic picture of a sample. Quantum dots and DNA are readily observable (and distinguishable) in the atomic force microscope, and can be simultaneously observed by fluorescence microscopy, allowing a direct comparison of the two methods. Precise nanometer-localization of protein binding sites using fluorescent quantum dots is thus a direct and visual method for physical mapping of transcription factor binding sites on whole genomes.

  11. In Situ Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MR1 Biofilms by SALVI and ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Komorek, Rachel; Wei, Wenchao; Yu, Xiaofei; Hill, Eric; Yao, Juan; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are surface-associated communities that are vastly studied to understand their self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their roles in environmental microbiology. This study outlines a method to cultivate biofilm attachment to the System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI) and achieve in situ chemical mapping of a living biofilm by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). This is done through the culturing of bacteria both outside and within the SALVI channel with our specialized setup, as well as through optical imaging techniques to detect the biofilm presence and thickness before ToF-SIMS analysis. Our results show the characteristic peaks of the Shewanella biofilm in its natural hydrated state, highlighting upon its localized water cluster environment, as well as EPS fragments, which are drastically different from the same biofilm’s dehydrated state. These results demonstrate the breakthrough capability of SALVI that allows for in situ biofilm imaging with a vacuum-based chemical imaging instrument.

  12. Systematic Assessment of the Benefits and Caveats in Mining Microbial Post-Translational Modifications from Shotgun Proteomic Data; Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromate Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Microbes are known to regulate both gene expression and protein activity through the use of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Common PTMs involved in cellular signaling and gene control include methylations, acetylations, and phosphorylations; whereas oxidations have been implicated as an indicator for stress. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative bacterium that demonstrates both respiratory versatility and the ability to sense and adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The dataset used in this study consisted of tandem mass spectra derived from mid-log phase aerobic cultures of S. oneidensis shocked either with or without 1 mM chromate [Cr(VI)]. In this study, three algorithms (DBDigger, Sequest, and InsPecT) were evaluated for their ability to scrutinize shotgun proteomic data for evidence of PTMs. The use of conservative scoring filters for peptides or proteins versus creating a sub-database first from a non-modification search was evaluated with DBDigger. The use of higher scoring filters for peptide identifications was found to result in optimal identifications of PTM peptides with a 2% false discovery rate (FDR) for the total dataset using the DBDigger algorithm. However, the FDR climbs to about 50% when considering PTM peptides only. Sequest was evaluated as a method for confirming PTM peptides putatively identified using DBDigger; however, there was a low identification rate (~25%) for the searched spectra. InsPecT was found to have a lower FDR (~9%) than DBDigger for PTM peptides. Comparisons between InsPecT and DBDigger were made with respect to both the FDR and PTM peptide identifications. As a demonstration of this approach, a number of S. oneidensis chemotaxis proteins as well as low-abundance signal transduction proteins were identified as being post-translationally modified in response to chromate challenge.

  13. Electrochemical analysis of Shewanella oneidensis engineered to bind gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kane, Aunica L; Bond, Daniel R; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2013-02-15

    Growth in three-electrode electrochemical cells allows quantitative analysis of mechanisms involved in electron flow from dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria to insoluble electron acceptors. In these systems, gold electrodes are a desirable surface to study the electrophysiology of extracellular respiration, yet previous research has shown that certain Shewanella species are unable to form productive biofilms on gold electrodes. To engineer attachment of Shewanella oneidensis to gold, five repeating units of a synthetic gold-binding peptide (5rGBP) were integrated within an Escherichia coli outer membrane protein, LamB, and displayed on the outer surface of S. oneidensis. Expression of LamB-5rGBP increased cellular attachment of S. oneidensis to unpoised gold surfaces but was also associated with the loss of certain outer membrane proteins required for extracellular respiration. Loss of these outer membrane proteins during expression of LamB-5rGBP decreased the rate at which S. oneidensis was able to reduce insoluble iron, riboflavin, and electrodes. Moreover, poising the gold electrode resulted in repulsion of the engineered cells. This study provides a strategy to specifically immobilize bacteria to electrodes while also outlining challenges involved in merging synthetic biology approaches with native cellular pathways and cell surface charge.

  14. MHC class I-related molecule, MR1, and mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Salou, Marion; Legoux, Francois; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yue; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The MHC-related 1, MR1, molecule presents a new class of microbial antigens (derivatives of the riboflavin [Vitamin B2] biosynthesis pathway) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. This raises many questions regarding antigens loading and intracellular trafficking of the MR1/ligand complexes. The MR1/MAIT field is also important because MAIT cells are very abundant in humans and their frequency is modified in many infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both MR1 and the invariant TCRα chain expressed by MAIT cells are strikingly conserved among species, indicating important functions. Riboflavin is synthesized by plants and most bacteria and yeasts but not animals, and its precursor derivatives activating MAIT cells are short-lived unless bound to MR1. The recognition of MR1 loaded with these compounds is therefore an exquisite manner to detect invasive bacteria. Herein, we provide an historical perspective of the field before describing the main characteristics of MR1, its ligands, and the few available data regarding its cellular biology. We then summarize the current knowledge of MAIT cell differentiation and discuss the definition of MAIT cells in comparison to related subsets. Finally, we describe the phenotype and effector activities of MAIT cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. MR1 uses an endocytic pathway to activate mucosal-associated invariant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shouxiong; Gilfillan, Susan; Kim, Sojung; Thompson, Bruce; Wang, Xiaoli; Sant, Andrea J.; Fremont, Daved H.; Lantz, Olivier; Hansen, Ted H.

    2008-01-01

    Like CD1d-restricted iNKT cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) are “innate” T cells that express a canonical TCRα chain, have a memory phenotype, and rapidly secrete cytokines upon TCR ligation. Unlike iNKT cells, MAIT cells require the class Ib molecule MHC-related protein I (MR1), B cells, and gut flora for development and/or expansion, and they preferentially reside in the gut lamina propria. Evidence strongly suggests that MAIT cell activation is ligand-dependent, but the nature of MR1 ligand is unknown. In this study, we define a mechanism of endogenous antigen presentation by MR1 to MAIT cells. MAIT cell activation was dependent neither on a proteasome-processed ligand nor on the chaperoning by the MHC class I peptide loading complex. However, MAIT cell activation was enhanced by overexpression of MHC class II chaperones Ii and DM and was strikingly diminished by silencing endogenous Ii. Furthermore, inhibiting the acidification of the endocytic compartments reduced MR1 surface expression and ablated MAIT cell activation. The importance of the late endosome for MR1 antigen presentation was further corroborated by the localization of MR1 molecules in the multivesicular endosomes. These findings demonstrate that MR1 traffics through endocytic compartments, thereby allowing MAIT cells to sample both endocytosed and endogenous antigens. PMID:18443227

  16. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Wenjian; Chen, Haiyang; Jiang, Jiandong; Kong, Weijia; Wang, Yiguang

    2010-01-15

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-{alpha}, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  17. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Flagellar Assembly in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Wang, Jixuan; Tang, Peng; Chen, Haijiang; Gao, Haichun

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a highly motile organism by virtue of a polar flagellum. Unlike most flagellated bacteria, it contains only one major chromosome segment encoding the components of the flagellum with the exception of the motor proteins. In this region, three genes encode flagellinsaccording to the original genome annotation. However, we find that only flaA and flaB encode functional filament subunits. Although these two genesare under the control of different promoters, they are actively transcribed and subsequently translated, producing a considerable number of flagellin proteins. Additionally, both flagellins are able to interact with their chaperon FliS and are subjected to feedback regulation. Furthermore, FlaA and FlaB are glycosylated by a pathwayinvolving a major glycosylating enzyme,PseB, in spite of the lack of the majority of theconsensus glycosylation sites. In conclusion, flagellar assembly in S. oneidensis has novel features despite the conservation of homologous genes across taxa. PMID:21731763

  18. MR1 Restricted Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) Cells Respond to Mycobacterial Vaccination and Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Justin M.; Dash, Pradyot; Roy, Sobhan; McMurtrey, Curtis; Awad, Walid; Reed, Jason S.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed; Wu, Helen L.; Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Roth, Benjamin F.; Morrow, David W.; Ford, Julia C.; Xu, Guangwu; Bae, Joseph Y.; Crank, Hugh; Legasse, Alfred W.; Dang, Thurston H.; Greenaway, Hui Yee; Kurniawan, Monica; Gold, Marielle C.; Harriff, Melanie J.; Lewinsohn, Deborah A.; Park, Byung S.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Stanton, Jeffrey J.; Hansen, Scott G.; Picker, Louis J.; Venturi, Vanessa; Hildebrand, William; Thomas, Paul G.; Lewinsohn, David M.; Adams, Erin J.; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) in nonhuman primates (NHP), a physiologically relevant model of human immunity, are handicapped due to a lack of macaque MAIT-specific reagents. Here we show that while MR1 ligand-contact residues are conserved between human and multiple NHP species, three T cell receptor (TCR) contact residue mutations in NHP MR1 diminish binding of human MR1 tetramers to macaque MAITs. Construction of naturally loaded macaque MR1 tetramers facilitated identification and characterization of macaque MR1-binding ligands and MAITs, both of which mirrored their human counterparts. Using the macaque MR1 tetramer we show that NHP MAITs activated in vivo in response to both BCG vaccination and M. tuberculosis infection. These results demonstrate that NHP and human MR1 and MAITs function analogously, and establish a preclinical animal model to test MAIT-targeted vaccines and therapeutics for human infectious and autoimmune disease. PMID:27759023

  19. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in Continuously-fed Bioelectrochemical Systems for Power and Hydrogen Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, iron(III) reduction, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell. The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerab...

  20. Activation of an Otherwise Silent Xylose Metabolic Pathway in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Ramanan; Shin, Hyun Dong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis is unable to metabolize the sugar xylose as a carbon and energy source. In the present study, an otherwise silent xylose catabolic pathway was activated in S. oneidensis by following an adaptive evolution strategy. Genome-wide scans indicated that the S. oneidensis genome encoded two proteins similar to the xylose oxido-reductase pathway enzymes xylose reductase (SO_0900) and xylulokinase (SO_4230), and purified SO_0900 and SO_4230 displayed xylose reductase and xylulokinase activities, respectively. The S. oneidensis genome was missing, however, an Escherichia coli XylE-like xylose transporter. After 12 monthly transfers in minimal growth medium containing successively higher xylose concentrations, an S. oneidensis mutant (termed strain XM1) was isolated for the acquired ability to grow aerobically on xylose as a carbon and energy source. Whole-genome sequencing indicated that strain XM1 contained a mutation in an unknown membrane protein (SO_1396) resulting in a glutamine-to-histidine conversion at amino acid position 207. Homology modeling demonstrated that the Q207H mutation in SO_1396 was located at the homologous xylose docking site in XylE. The expansion of the S. oneidensis metabolic repertoire to xylose expands the electron donors whose oxidation may be coupled to the myriad of terminal electron-accepting processes catalyzed by S. oneidensis. Since xylose is a lignocellulose degradation product, this study expands the potential substrates to include lignocellulosic biomass. IMPORTANCE The activation of an otherwise silent xylose metabolic system in Shewanella oneidensis is a powerful example of how accidental mutations allow microorganisms to adaptively evolve. The expansion of the S. oneidensis metabolic repertoire to xylose expands the electron donors whose oxidation may be coupled to the myriad of terminal electron-accepting processes catalyzed by S. oneidensis. Since xylose is a lignocellulose degradation product, this

  1. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-07-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1-2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8(+) T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8(+) subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8(+)  TRAV1-2(+) cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161(hi) was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161(dim) . Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1-2, and CD26(hi) in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis.

  2. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  3. TLR signaling in human antigen‐presenting cells regulates MR1‐dependent activation of MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Hannaway, Rachel F.; Ruustal, Kerstin; Phalora, Prabhjeet; Kurioka, Ayako; Hansen, Ted H.; Willberg, Christian B.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal‐associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an abundant innate‐like T lymphocyte population that are enriched in liver and mucosal tissues. They are restricted by MR1, which presents antigens derived from a metabolic precursor of riboflavin synthesis, a pathway present in many microbial species, including commensals. Therefore, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation must be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate activation and immunopathology. Using an in vitro model of MR1‐mediated activation of primary human MAIT cells, we investigated the mechanisms by which it is regulated. Uptake of intact bacteria by antigen presenting cells (APCs) into acidified endolysosomal compartments was required for efficient MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation, while stimulation with soluble ligand was inefficient. Consistent with this, little MR1 was seen at the surface of human monocytic (THP1) and B‐cell lines. Activation with a TLR ligand increased the amount of MR1 at the surface of THP1 but not B‐cell lines, suggesting differential regulation in different cell types. APC activation and NF‐κB signaling were critical for MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. In primary cells, however, prolonged TLR signaling led to downregulation of MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. Overall, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation is a tightly regulated process, dependent on integration of innate signals by APCs. PMID:27105778

  4. Engineering of Isogenic Cells Deficient for MR1 with a CRISPR/Cas9 Lentiviral System: Tools To Study Microbial Antigen Processing and Presentation to Human MR1-Restricted T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Angharad; Meermeier, Erin W.; Crowther, Michael D.; Connor, Thomas R.; Dolton, Garry; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Gold, Marielle C.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The nonclassical HLA molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1) presents metabolites of the vitamin B synthesis pathways to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and other MR1-restricted T cells. This new class of Ags represents a variation on the classical paradigm of self/non-self discrimination because these T cells are activated through their TCR by small organic compounds generated during microbial vitamin B2 synthesis. Beyond the fundamental significance, the invariant nature of MR1 across the human population is a tantalizing feature for the potential development of universal immune therapeutic and diagnostic tools. However, many aspects of MR1 Ag presentation and MR1-restricted T cell biology remain unknown, and the ubiquitous expression of MR1 across tissues and cell lines can be a confounding factor for experimental purposes. In this study, we report the development of a novel CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing lentiviral system and its use to efficiently disrupt MR1 expression in A459, THP-1, and K562 cell lines. We generated isogenic MR1−/− clonal derivatives of the A549 lung carcinoma and THP-1 monocytic cell lines and used these to study T cell responses to intracellular pathogens. We confirmed that MAIT cell clones were unable to respond to MR1−/− clones infected with bacteria whereas Ag presentation by classical and other nonclassical HLAs was unaffected. This system represents a robust and efficient method to disrupt the expression of MR1 and should facilitate investigations into the processing and presentation of MR1 Ags as well as into the biology of MAIT cells. PMID:27307560

  5. Engineering of Isogenic Cells Deficient for MR1 with a CRISPR/Cas9 Lentiviral System: Tools To Study Microbial Antigen Processing and Presentation to Human MR1-Restricted T Cells.

    PubMed

    Laugel, Bruno; Lloyd, Angharad; Meermeier, Erin W; Crowther, Michael D; Connor, Thomas R; Dolton, Garry; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; Gold, Marielle C; Lewinsohn, David M; Sewell, Andrew K

    2016-08-01

    The nonclassical HLA molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1) presents metabolites of the vitamin B synthesis pathways to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and other MR1-restricted T cells. This new class of Ags represents a variation on the classical paradigm of self/non-self discrimination because these T cells are activated through their TCR by small organic compounds generated during microbial vitamin B2 synthesis. Beyond the fundamental significance, the invariant nature of MR1 across the human population is a tantalizing feature for the potential development of universal immune therapeutic and diagnostic tools. However, many aspects of MR1 Ag presentation and MR1-restricted T cell biology remain unknown, and the ubiquitous expression of MR1 across tissues and cell lines can be a confounding factor for experimental purposes. In this study, we report the development of a novel CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing lentiviral system and its use to efficiently disrupt MR1 expression in A459, THP-1, and K562 cell lines. We generated isogenic MR1(-/-) clonal derivatives of the A549 lung carcinoma and THP-1 monocytic cell lines and used these to study T cell responses to intracellular pathogens. We confirmed that MAIT cell clones were unable to respond to MR1(-/-) clones infected with bacteria whereas Ag presentation by classical and other nonclassical HLAs was unaffected. This system represents a robust and efficient method to disrupt the expression of MR1 and should facilitate investigations into the processing and presentation of MR1 Ags as well as into the biology of MAIT cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  7. Posttranslational Modification of Flagellin FlaB in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Jin, Miao; Ding, Wen; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a highly motile organism by virtue of a polar, glycosylated flagellum composed of flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In this study, the functional flagellin FlaB was isolated and analyzed with nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem MS. In combination with the mutational analysis, we propose that the FlaB flagellin protein from S. oneidensis is modified at five serine residues with a series of novel O-linked posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that differ from each other by 14 Da. These PTMs are composed in part of a 274-Da sugar residue that bears a resemblance to the nonulosonic acids. The remainder appears to be composed of a second residue whose mass varies by 14 Da depending on the PTM. Further investigation revealed that synthesis of the glycans initiates with PseB and PseC, the first two enzymes of the Pse pathway. In addition, a number of lysine residues are found to be methylated by SO4160, an analogue of the lysine methyltransferase of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. PMID:23543712

  8. Validating Annotations for Uncharacterized Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Brenton; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Higdon, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Proteins of unknown function are a barrier to our understanding of molecular biology. Assigning function to these “uncharacterized” proteins is imperative, but challenging. The usual approach is similarity searches using annotation databases, which are useful for predicting function. However, since the performance of these databases on uncharacterized proteins is basically unknown, the accuracy of their predictions is suspect, making annotation difficult. To address this challenge, we developed a benchmark annotation dataset of 30 proteins in Shewanella oneidensis. The proteins in the dataset were originally uncharacterized after the initial annotation of the S. oneidensis proteome in 2002. In the intervening 5 years, the accumulation of new experimental evidence has enabled specific functions to be predicted. We utilized this benchmark dataset to evaluate several commonly utilized annotation databases. According to our criteria, six annotation databases accurately predicted functions for at least 60% of proteins in our dataset. Two of these six even had a “conditional accuracy” of 90%. Conditional accuracy is another evaluation metric we developed which excludes results from databases where no function was predicted. Also, 27 of the 30 proteins' functions were correctly predicted by at least one database. These represent one of the first performance evaluations of annotation databases on uncharacterized proteins. Our evaluation indicates that these databases readily incorporate new information and are accurate in predicting functions for uncharacterized proteins, provided that experimental function evidence exists. PMID:18687039

  9. The Toll-like receptor 9 signalling pathway regulates MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation in B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2017-10-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are conserved T cells that express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (Vα7.2 in humans and Vα19 in mice). The development of MAIT cells requires the antigen-presenting MHC-related protein 1 (MR1), as well as commensal bacteria. The mechanisms that regulate the functional expression of MR1 molecules and their loading with bacterial antigen in antigen-presenting cells are largely unknown. We have found that treating B cells with the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist CpG increases MR1 surface expression. Interestingly, activation of TLR9 by CpG-A (but not CpG-B) enhances MR1 surface expression. This is limited to B cells and not other types of cells such as monocytes, T or natural killer cells. Knocking-down TLR9 expression by short hairpin RNA reduces MR1 surface expression and MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation. CpG-A triggers early endosomal TLR9 activation, whereas CpG-B is responsible for late endosomal/lysosomal activation of TLR9. Consistently, blocking endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi protein transport, rather than lysosomal acidification, suppressed MR1 antigen presentation. Overall, our results indicate that early endosomal TLR9 activation is important for MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1, a Methylarsenate-Reducing Bacterial Isolate from Florida Golf Course Soil

    PubMed Central

    Pawitwar, Shashank S.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yoshinaga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the environmental organoarsenical biocycle, we isolated a soil organism, Burkholderia sp. MR1, which reduces relatively nontoxic pentavalent methylarsenate to the more toxic trivalent methylarsenite, with the goal of identifying the gene for the reductase. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1. PMID:26044439

  11. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; ...

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  12. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  13. Biochemical and Physiological Characterization: Development & Apply Optical Methods for Charaterizing Biochemical Protein-Protein Interactions in MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon

    2006-08-30

    The objectives of this report are to: Develop novel site-specific protein labeling chemistries for assaying protein-protein interactions in MR-1; and development of a novel optical acquisition and data analysis method for characterizing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 model systems. Our work on analyzing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 is divided in four areas: (1) expression and labeling of MR-1 proteins; (2) general scheme for site-specific fluorescent labeling of expressed proteins; (3) methodology development for monitoring protein-protein interactions; and (4) study of protein-protein interactions in MR-1. In this final report, we give an account for our advances in all areas.

  14. MR1-restricted mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Marielle C.; Napier, Ruth J.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and its human host have long co-evolved. Although the host cellular immune response is critical to the control of the bacterium information on the specific contribution of different immune cell subsets in humans is incomplete. Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a prevalent and unique T-cell population in humans with the capacity to detect intracellular infection with bacteria including Mtb. MAIT cells detect bacterially derived metabolites presented by the evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex-like molecule MR1. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of this T-cell subset and address the potential roles for MR1-restricted T cells in the control, diagnosis, and therapy of tuberculosis. PMID:25703558

  15. humMR1, a highly specific humanized single chain antibody for targeting EGFRvIII.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Omidfar, Kobra; Khalili, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    Production of an efficient humanized single chain antibody is reported here to specifically target EGFRvIII, a truncated receptor expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. CDR loops of MR1, a phage display-derived murine single chain antibody developed against this mutant receptor, were grafted on human frameworks that had been selected based on similarity to MR1 in terms of two distinct parameters, variable domain protein sequence and CDR canonical structures. Moreover, two point mutations were introduced in CDR-H2 and CDR-H3 loops of the humanized antibody to destroy its cross-reactivity to wild-type EGFR. The resultant antibody, referred to as humMR1, was found by MTT assay, ELISA and western blot techniques to be highly specific for EGFRvIII. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII-specific 14-amino acid synthetic peptide and HC2 cells were measured to be 1.87 × 10(10) and 2.17 × 10(10)/M respectively. This humanized antibody leads to 78.5% inhibition in proliferation of EGFRvIII-overexpressing cells.

  16. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  17. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; ...

    2016-05-30

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) bindsmore » preferentially to the alpha-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10–7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10–6 to 10–4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10–7 to 10–4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10–7 M; at 10–5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10–5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb L-III-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn

  18. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  19. Involvement and specificity of Shewanella oneidensis outer membrane cytochromes in the reduction of soluble and solid-phase terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Bücking, Clemens; Popp, Felix; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The formation of outer membrane (OM) cytochromes seems to be a key step in the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. They are believed to be the endpoints of an extended respiratory chain to the surface of the cell that establishes the connection to insoluble electron acceptors such as iron or manganese oxides. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains the genetic information for five putative OM cytochromes. In this study, the role and specificity of these proteins were investigated. All experiments were conducted using a markerless deletion mutant in all five OM cytochromes that was complemented via the expression of single, plasmid-encoded genes. MtrC and MtrF were shown to be potent reductases of chelated ferric iron, birnessite, and a carbon anode in a microbial fuel cell. OmcA-producing cells were unable to catalyze iron and electrode reduction, although the protein was correctly produced and oriented. However, OmcA production resulted in a higher birnessite reduction rate compared with the mutant. The presence of the decaheme cytochrome SO_2931 as well as the diheme cytochrome SO_1659 did not rescue the phenotype of the deletion mutant.

  20. CD1d- and MR1-Restricted T Cells in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Peter A.; Anantha, Ram V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; McCormick, John K.; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to infection, such as those encountered in sepsis, can be catastrophic. Sepsis is typically triggered by an overwhelming systemic response to an infectious agent(s) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality even under optimal critical care. Recent studies have implicated unconventional, innate-like T lymphocytes, including CD1d- and MR1-restricted T cells as effectors and/or regulators of inflammatory responses during sepsis. These cell types are typified by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, variant NKT (vNKT) cells, and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. iNKT and vNKT cells are CD1d-restricted, lipid-reactive cells with remarkable immunoregulatory properties. MAIT cells participate in antimicrobial defense, and are restricted by major histocompatibility complex-related protein 1 (MR1), which displays microbe-derived vitamin B metabolites. Importantly, NKT and MAIT cells are rapid and potent producers of immunomodulatory cytokines. Therefore, they may be considered attractive targets during the early hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis when immediate interventions are urgently needed, and also in later phases when adjuvant immunotherapies could potentially reverse the dangerous state of immunosuppression. We will highlight recent findings that point to the significance or the therapeutic potentials of NKT and MAIT cells in sepsis and will also discuss what lies ahead in research in this area. PMID:26322041

  1. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation. PMID:27482926

  2. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-12-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation.

  3. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in continuously fed bioelectrochemical systems for power and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerably enhanced to a maximum current density of 0.45 A/m(2) or 80.3 A/m(3) (mean: 0.34 A/m(2), 57.2 A/m(3)) compared to anaerobically grown cultures. Biocatalyzed hydrogen production rates with aerated S. oneidensis were studied within the applied potential range of 0.3-0.9 V and were highest at 0.9 V with 0.3 m(3) H(2)/m(3) day, which has been reported for mixed cultures, but is approximately 10 times higher than reported for an anaerobic culture of S. oneidensis. Aerated MFC experiments produced a maximum power density of 3.56 W/m(3) at a 200-Omega external resistor. The main reasons for enhanced electrochemical performance are higher levels of active biomass and more efficient substrate utilization under aerobic conditions. Coulombic efficiencies, however, were greatly reduced due to losses of reducing equivalents to aerobic respiration in the anode chamber. The next challenge will be to optimize the aeration rate of the bacterial culture to balance between maximization of bacterial activation and minimization of aerobic respiration in the culture.

  4. Unexpected chemoreceptors mediate energy taxis towards electron acceptors in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Baraquet, Claudine; Théraulaz, Laurence; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile

    2009-07-01

    Shewanella oneidensis uses a wide range of terminal electron acceptors for respiration. In this study, we show that the chemotactic response of S. oneidensis to anaerobic electron acceptors requires functional electron transport systems. Deletion of the genes encoding dimethyl sulphoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide reductases, or inactivation of these molybdoenzymes as well as nitrate reductase by addition of tungstate, abolished electron acceptor taxis. Moreover, addition of nigericin prevented taxis towards trimethylamine N-oxide, dimethyl sulphoxide, nitrite, nitrate and fumarate, showing that this process depends on the DeltapH component of the proton motive force. These data, together with those concerning response to metals (Bencharit and Ward, 2005), support the idea that, in S. oneidensis, taxis towards electron acceptors is governed by an energy taxis mechanism. Surprisingly, energy taxis in S. oneidensis is not mediated by the PAS-containing chemoreceptors but rather by a chemoreceptor (SO2240) containing a Cache domain. Four other chemoreceptors also play a minor role in this process. These results indicate that energy taxis can be mediated by new types of chemoreceptors.

  5. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  6. Deletion of degQ gene enhances outer membrane vesicle production of Shewanella oneidensis cells.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Mohanadas, Thivagaran; Kitamura, Kosei; Nunogami, Shota; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2017-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe that can use a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. In this study, S. oneidensis degQ gene, encoding a putative periplasmic serine protease, was cloned and expressed. The activity of purified DegQ was inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a typical serine protease-specific inhibitor, indicating that DegQ is a serine protease. In-frame deletion and subsequent complementation of the degQ were carried out to examine the effect of envelope stress on the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Analysis of periplasmic proteins from the resulting S. oneidensis strain showed that deletion of degQ induced protein accumulation and resulted in a significant decrease in protease activity within the periplasmic space. OMVs from the wild-type and mutant strains were purified and observed by transmission electron microscopy. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the OMVs showed a prominent band at ~37 kDa. Nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified three outer membrane porins (SO3896, SO1821, and SO3545) as dominant components of the band, suggesting that these proteins could be used as indices for comparing OMV production by S. oneidensis strains. Quantitative evaluation showed that degQ-deficient cells had a fivefold increase in OMV production compared with wild-type cells. Thus, the increased OMV production following the deletion of DegQ in S. oneidensis may be responsible for the increase in envelope stress.

  7. Acetoin production via unbalanced fermentation in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Bursac, Thea; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Gescher, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    This study describes the realization of an anoxic acetoin production process using the proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Fermentative processes are of high biotechnological relevance since they offer high productivity and a low percentage of substrate consumption for anabolic processes. Nevertheless, the range of compounds that can be produced as sole end product of a fermentative process is limited, since the average oxidation state of substrate and products has to be identical in the absence of an external electron acceptor. This limitation could be overcome by the transfer of the surplus of electrons to a poised electrode surface, which of note is the only known anaerobic electron acceptor that cannot be depleted. In the first genetic engineering step, deletion mutants were developed that are devoid of either one, two, or all three prophages in their genome with the aim to construct a more stable chassis strain for microbe-electrode interaction, due to less prophage induced cell lysis (Gödeke et al., 2011). Current production in a bioelectrochemical system together with the analysis of cells on the anode surface were used as surrogate for the stability assessment. The λ-prophage deletion mutant produced overall 1.34fold more current (6.7 μA cm(-2) ) than the wild type and all other constructed strains and showed with 1.1 × 10(11) cells the highest cell density on the anode surface (2.3fold more than the wild type). The strain was further modified to contain codon optimized versions of acetolactate synthase and acetolactate decarboxylase derived from Bacillus subtilis. This allowed for the production of a mixture of acetoin and acetate from lactate in an almost 0.4:1 ratio. Further process improvement was reached by the deletion of the acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase genes ackA/pta. The acetoin yield increased in this mutant from 40 to 86% of the theoretical maximum and acetoin was the only detectable end product. Biotechnol. Bioeng

  8. Silver nanocrystallites: Facile biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Wang, Wei; Pelletier, Dale A; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the -proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, upon incubation with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the size range 2 11 nm (with an average of 4 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) are compared to similar chemically synthesized nanoparticles (colloidal silver [colloidal-Ag] and oleate capped silver [oleate-Ag]). The determination of the bactericidal effect of these different silver nanoparticles was assessed using both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria and based on the diameter of the inhibition zone in disc diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, Live/Dead staining assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, a clear synthesis procedure, and a surface coat- and strain-dependent inhibition were observed for silver nanoparticles. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity when compared to colloidal-Ag for both E. coli and B. subtilis. E. coli was found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, Oleate-Ag was not toxic to either of the bacteria. These findings have important implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  9. Direct Involvement of Type II Secretion System in Extracellular Translocation of Shewanella Oneidensis Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Deng, Shuang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-08-01

    Outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are extracellular lipoproteins important for dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides during anaerobic respiration. To investigate the roles of type II secretion system (T2S) in translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane, we measured the effects of deleting two T2S genes, gspD and gspG, on the secretion of MtrC and OmcA when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. Deletion of gspD or gspG resulted in slightly yellowish supernatants, different from the pink supernatant of wild type (wt). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that, although MtrC, OmcA and NrfA, a periplasmic nitrite reductase, were present the supernatants of wt and ΔgspD mutant, their peptides counts were much lower in ΔgspD than in wt. Subsequent analyses with heme-staining and Western blot not only confirmed that deletion of gspD or gspG reduced the abundances of MtrC and OmcA in the supernatants, but also revealed that the deletions consequently increased their abundances inside the cells. Complementation of ΔgspG mutant with functional GspG could reverse the effects of deleting gspG on the colors of the supernatants and the abundances of MtrC and OmcA. In contrast, Western results showed that the abundance of NrfA was reduced in the supernatant and the cells of ΔgspD mutant, suggesting that reduced NrfA in the periplasm, where MtrC and OmcA were accumulated, contributed to its reduction in the supernatant. Thus, our results demonstrate at the first time that T2S facilitates translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane.

  10. Highly efficient in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1 and their characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Yujun; Zhou, Rongying; Ye, Xiujuan; Gao, Shanshan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in diverse fields due to their superior properties. Currently the biosynthesis of AgNPs is in the limelight of modern nanotechnology because of its green properties. However, relatively low yield and inefficiency diminish the prospect of applying these biosynthesized AgNPs. In this work, a rapid mass AgNP biosynthesis method using the cell-free extract of a novel bacterial strain, Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1, which has been isolated from a chemical fertilizer plant, is reported. In addition, the optimum synthesis conditions of AgNPs were investigated. The optimum pH, temperature, dosage, and reaction time were 12, 70 °C, 20 mM AgNO3, and 75 min, respectively. Finally, AgNPs were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, zeta potential and size distribution analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that these biosynthesized AgNPs were bimolecular covered, stable, well-dispersed face centered cubic (fcc) spherical crystalline particles with diameters in the range 5–20 nm. The advantages of this approach are its simplicity, high efficiency, and eco-friendly and cost-effective features. PMID:27877754

  11. Domain Analysis of ArcS, the Hybrid Sensor Kinase of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Arc Two-Component System, Reveals Functional Differentiation of Its Two Receiver Domains

    PubMed Central

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In all species of the genus Shewanella, the redox-sensing Arc two-component system consists of the response regulator ArcA, the sensor kinase ArcS, and the separate phosphotransfer protein HptA. Compared to its counterpart ArcB in Escherichia coli, ArcS has a significantly different domain structure. Resequencing and reannotation revealed that in the N-terminal part, ArcS possesses a periplasmic CaChe-sensing domain bracketed by two transmembrane domains and, moreover, that ArcS has two cytoplasmic PAS-sensing domains and two receiver domains, compared to a single one of each in ArcB. Here, we used a combination of in vitro phosphotransfer studies on purified proteins and phenotypic in vivo mutant analysis to determine the roles of the different domains in ArcS function. The analysis revealed that phosphotransfer occurs from and toward the response regulator ArcA and involves mainly the C-terminal RecII domain. However, RecI also can receive a phosphate from HptA. In addition, the PAS-II domain, located upstream of the histidine kinase domain, is crucial for function. The results support a model in which phosphorylation of RecI stimulates histidine kinase activity of ArcS in order to maintain an appropriate level of phosphorylated ArcA according to environmental conditions. In addition, the study reveals some fundamental mechanistic differences between ArcS/HptA and ArcB with respect to signal perception and phosphotransfer despite functional conservation of the Arc system in Shewanella and E. coli. PMID:23161031

  12. Microbial-enzymatic-hybrid biological fuel cell with optimized growth conditions for Shewanella oneidensis DSP-10.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jared N; Luckarift, Heather R; Sizemore, Susan R; Farrington, Karen E; Lau, Carolin; Johnson, Glenn R; Atanassov, Plamen

    2013-07-10

    In this work we present a biological fuel cell fabricated by combining a Shewanella oneidensis microbial anode and a laccase-modified air-breathing cathode. This concept is devised as an extension to traditional biochemical methods by incorporating diverse biological catalysts with the aim of powering small devices. In preparing the biological fuel cell anode, novel hierarchical-structured architectures and biofilm configurations were investigated. A method for creating an artificial biofilm based on encapsulating microorganisms in a porous, thin film of silica was compared with S. oneidensis biofilms that were allowed to colonize naturally. Results indicate comparable current and power densities for artificial and natural biofilm formations, based on growth characteristics. As a result, this work describes methods for creating controllable and reproducible bio-anodes and demonstrates the versatility of hybrid biological fuel cells.

  13. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor. PMID:26394222

  14. A Crp-Dependent Two-Component System Regulates Nitrate and Nitrite Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangyang; Wang, Jixuan; Fu, Huihui; Zhou, Guangqi; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2012-01-01

    We have previously illustrated the nitrate/nitrite respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis, which is renowned for its remarkable versatility in respiration. Here we investigated the systems regulating the pathway with a reliable approach which enables characterization of mutants impaired in nitrate/nitrite respiration by guaranteeing biomass. The S. oneidensis genome encodes an Escherichia coli NarQ/NarX homolog SO3981 and two E. coli NarP/NarL homologs SO1860 and SO3982. Results of physiological characterization and mutational analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis possesses a single two-component system (TCS) for regulation of nitrate/nitrite respiration, consisting of the sensor kinase SO3981(NarQ) and the response regulator SO3982(NarP). The TCS directly controls the transcription of nap and nrfA (genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, respectively) but regulates the former less tightly than the latter. Additionally, phosphorylation at residue 57 of SO3982 is essential for its DNA-binding capacity. At the global control level, Crp is found to regulate expression of narQP as well as nap and nrfA. In contrast to NarP-NarQ, Crp is more essential for nap rather than nrfA. PMID:23240049

  15. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  16. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marielle C; McLaren, James E; Reistetter, Joseph A; Smyk-Pearson, Sue; Ladell, Kristin; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn M; Yu, Yik Y L; Hansen, Ted H; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Gerritsen, Bram; Kesmir, Can; Miles, John J; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Price, David A; Lewinsohn, David M

    2014-07-28

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire as a whole, especially for TCRβ chain sequences. Moreover, different pathogen-specific responses were characterized by distinct TCR usage, both between and within individuals, suggesting that MAIT cell adaptation was a direct consequence of exposure to various exogenous MR1-restricted epitopes. In line with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped by microbial exposure.

  17. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to <1% at 10

  18. A New Method For Processing Backscatter Imagery Collected By Multibeam Sonars: The HAWAII MR1 Sidescan Sonar Software Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R.; Appelgate, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Hawaii Mapping Research Group of the University of Hawaii has developed and used in-house software to process seafloor acoustic imagery (sidescan sonar) data acquired by its own shallow-towed HAWAII-MR1 phase-difference sidescan bathymetry mapping system, as well as phase-difference sonars operated by other institutions (NAVO SEAMAP-C, LDEO SCAMP, WHOI DSL-120A). During 2003 the HAWAII MR1 software tools were modified to operate on multibeam backscatter data collected by the University of Hawaii research vessel Kilo Moana to test whether the software could improve the quality of the multibeam backscatter and the resulting data products. We found that the MR1 processing tools are effective in eliminating speckle and stripe noise, and cross-track amplitude variability due to angle-varying gain. HMRG software was also used to produce final mosaics of sonar imagery. Once we determined the viability of using the MR1 tools to process Kilo Moana data, we expanded the toolkit to allow operation on data from other multibeam systems as well. HMRG processing software runs on Linux, Unix and Irix platforms. The main processing modules can be run in either graphical or command-line modes. The preferred processing scheme involves using the graphical interface to interactively determine noise filters appropriate for each survey. Once characterized, these filters are then applied in batch processes that run faster than graphical methods allow. Once processing is completed, the HMRG software is used to grid the data and then to assemble individual grids into mosaics. The mosaics can be output as Sun raster files, geotiffs, or Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) grids, which allow the mosaics to be imported into other GIS and charting programs. Here we present results from several recent surveys that used different hull-mounted multibeam systems: 12kHz Sea Beam 2112 data from the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy, 12kHz Simrad EM120 data from deep water surveys aboard the R/V Kilo Moana

  19. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-30

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the alpha-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10–7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10–6 to 10–4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10–7 to 10–4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10–7 M; at 10–5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn

  20. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-30

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the alpha-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10–7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10–6 to 10–4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10–7 to 10–4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10–7 M; at 10–5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn

  1. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  2. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; ...

    2016-05-07

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10–5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0more » 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10–6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10–7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10–7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10–6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10–7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.« less

  3. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  4. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    PubMed Central

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration. PMID:23538304

  5. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals.

    PubMed

    White, Gaye F; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A

    2013-04-16

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 10(3) times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 10(3) times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  6. An essential role for UshA in processing of extracellular flavin electron shuttles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth D; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Kotloski, Nicholas J; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis can reduce a number of insoluble extracellular metals. Direct adsorption of cells to the metal surface is not necessary, and it has been shown that S. oneidensis releases low concentrations flavins, including riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), into the surrounding medium to act as extracellular electron shuttles. However, the mechanism of flavin release by Shewanella remains unknown. We have conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen to identify mutants deficient in extracellular flavin accumulation. Mutations in ushA, encoding a predicted 5'-nucleotidase, resulted in accumulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in culture supernatants, with a corresponding decrease in FMN and riboflavin. Cellular extracts of S. oneidensis convert FAD to FMN, whereas extracts of ushA mutants do not, and fractionation experiments show that UshA activity is periplasmic. We hypothesize that S. oneidensis secretes FAD into the periplasmic space, where it is hydrolysed by UshA to FMN and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). FMN diffuses through outer membrane porins where it accelerates extracellular electron transfer, and AMP is dephosphorylated by UshA and reassimilated by the cell. We predict that transport of FAD into the periplasm also satisfies the cofactor requirement of the unusual periplasmic fumarate reductase found in Shewanella.

  7. Identification and characterization of a HEPN-MNT family type II toxin–antitoxin in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Fei; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. However, related studies in the ecologically and bioelectrochemically important strain Shewanella oneidensis are limited. Here, we show that SO_3166, a member of the higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding (HEPN) superfamily, strongly inhibited cell growth in S. oneidensis and Escherichia coli. SO_3165, a putative minimal nucleotidyltransferase (MNT), neutralized the toxicity of SO_3166. Gene SO_3165 lies upstream of SO_3166, and they are co-transcribed. Moreover, the SO_3165 and SO_3166 proteins interact with each other directly in vivo, and antitoxin SO_3165 bound to the promoter of the TA operon and repressed its activity. Finally, the conserved Rx4-6H domain in HEPN family was identified in SO_3166. Mutating either the R or H abolished SO_3166 toxicity, confirming that Rx4-6H domain is critical for SO_3166 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SO_3166 and SO_3165 in S. oneidensis form a typical type II TA pair. This TA pair plays a critical role in regulating bacterial functions because its disruption led to impaired cell motility in S. oneidensis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that HEPN-MNT can function as a TA system, thereby providing important insights into the understanding of the function and regulation of HEPNs and MNTs in prokaryotes. PMID:26112399

  8. Exoprotein Production Correlates with Morphotype Changes of Nonmotile Shewanella oneidensis Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wu, Lin; Xia, Yu; Chen, Haijiang; Luo, Qixia; Sun, Linlin

    2013-01-01

    We report a previously undescribed mechanism for the rugose morphotype in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for investigating redox transformations of environmental contaminants. Bacteria may form smooth or rugose colonies on agar plates. In general, conversion from the smooth to rugose colony morphotype is attributed to increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). In this work, we discovered that aflagellate S. oneidensis mutants grew into rugose colonies, whereas those with nonfunctional flagellar filaments remained smooth. EPS production was not altered in either case, but mutants with the rugose morphotype showed significantly reduced exoprotein secretion. The idea that exoproteins at a reduced level correlate with rugosity gained support from smooth suppressor strains of an aflagellate rugose fliD (encoding the capping protein) mutant, which restored the exoprotein level to the levels of the wild-type and mutant strains with a smooth morphotype. Further analyses revealed that SO1072 (a putative GlcNAc-binding protein) was one of the highly upregulated exoproteins in these suppressor strains. Most intriguingly, this study identified a compensatory mechanism of SO1072 to flagellins possibly mediated by bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP. PMID:23335418

  9. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  10. Expression of blaA Underlies Unexpected Ampicillin-Induced Cell Lysis of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Chi, Xun; Zhu, Weiming; Qi, Shu-hua; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium possessing remarkably diverse respiratory capacities for reducing various organic and inorganic substrates. As a veteran research model for investigating redox transformations of environmental contaminants the bacterium is well known to be a naturally ampicillin-resistant microorganism. However, in this study we discovered that ampicillin has a significant impact on growth of S. oneidensis. Particularly, cell lysis occurred only with ampicillin at levels ranging from 0.49 to 6.25 µg/ml but not at 50 µg/ml. This phenotype is attributable to insufficient expression of the β-lactamase BlaA. The subsequent analysis revealed that the blaA gene is strongly induced by ampicillin at high (50 µg/ml), but not at low levels (2.5 µg/ml). In addition, we demonstrated that penicillin binding protein 5 (PBP5), the most abundant low molecular weight PBP (LMW PBP), is the only one relevant to β-lactam resistance under the tested conditions. This nonessential PBP, largely resembling its Escherichia coli counterpart in functionality, mediates expression of the blaA gene. PMID:23555975

  11. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Shewanella and description of Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, K; Moser, D P; Dollhopf, M E; Lies, D P; Saffarini, D A; MacGregor, B J; Ringelberg, D B; White, D C; Nishijima, M; Sano, H; Burghardt, J; Stackebrandt, E; Nealson, K H

    1999-04-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  12. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Shewanella and description of Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Moser, D. P.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Lies, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.; MacGregor, B. J.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Nishijima, M.; Sano, H.; hide

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  13. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  14. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c‐type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Summary Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c‐type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c‐type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr ‐1, 36 in‐frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c‐type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c‐type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well‐studied c‐type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr ‐1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c‐type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. PMID:21255343

  15. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Shewanella and description of Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Moser, D. P.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Lies, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.; MacGregor, B. J.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Nishijima, M.; Sano, H.; Burghardt, J.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  16. Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome CymA in Anaerobic Electron Transport in Cells of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 with Normal Levels of Menaquinone

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 possesses a complex electron transport system which facilitates its ability to use a diverse array of compounds as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. A previous report described a mutant strain (CMTn-1) deficient in CymA, a tetraheme cytochrome c. However, the interpretation of the electron transport role of CymA was complicated by the fact that CMTn-1 was also markedly deficient in menaquinones. This report demonstrates that the depressed menaquinone levels were the result of the rifampin resistance phenotype of the parent of CMTn-1 and not the interruption of the cymA gene. This is the first report of rifampin resistance leading to decreased menaquinone levels, indicating that rifampin-resistant strains should be used with caution when analyzing electron transport processes. A site-directed gene replacement approach was used to isolate a cymA knockout strain (MR1-CYMA) directly from MR-1. While MR1-CYMA retained menaquinone levels comparable to those of MR-1, it lost the ability to reduce iron(III), manganese(IV), and nitrate and to grow by using fumarate as an electron acceptor. All of these functions were restored to wild-type efficacy, and the presence of the cymA transcript and CymA protein was also restored, by complementation of MR1-CYMA with the cymA gene. The requirement for CymA in anaerobic electron transport to iron(III), fumarate, nitrate, and manganese(IV) is therefore not dependent on the levels of menaquinone in these cells. This represents the first successful use of a suicide vector for directed gene replacement in MR-1. PMID:10613864

  17. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  18. Structure of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase from Shewanella oneidensis at 1.6 A: identification of farnesyl pyrophosphate trapped in a hydrophobic cavity.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Marsing, Gregory C; Bussiere, Dirksen E; Kennedy, Michael A

    2004-11-01

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a universal building block for the ubiquitous isoprenoids that are essential to all organisms. The enzymes of the non-mevalonate pathway for IPP synthesis, which is unique to many pathogenic bacteria, have recently been explored as targets for antibiotic development. Several crystal structures of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclophosphate (MECDP) synthase, the fifth of seven enzymes involved in the non-mevalonate pathway for synthesis of IPP, have been reported; however, the composition of metal ions in the active site and the presence of a hydrophobic cavity along the non-crystallographic threefold symmetry axis has varied between the reported structures. Here, the structure of MEDCP from Shewanella oneidensis MR1 (SO3437) was determined to 1.6 A resolution in the absence of substrate. The presence of a zinc ion in the active-site cleft, tetrahedrally coordinated by two histidine side chains, an aspartic acid side chain and an ambiguous fourth ligand, was confirmed by zinc anomalous diffraction. Based on analysis of anomalous diffraction data and typical metal-to-ligand bond lengths, it was concluded that an octahedral sodium ion was 3.94 A from the zinc ion. A hydrophobic cavity was observed along the threefold non-crystallographic symmetry axis, filled by a well defined non-protein electron density that could be modeled as farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), a downstream product of IPP, suggesting a possible feedback mechanism for enzyme regulation. The high-resolution data clarified the FPP-binding mode compared with previously reported structures. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that the residues critical to the formation of the hydrophobic cavity and for coordinating the pyrophosphate group of FPP are present in the majority of MEDCP synthase enzymes, supporting the idea of a specialized biological function related to FPP binding in a subfamily of MEDCP synthase homologs.

  19. Putative Mineral-Specific Proteins Synthesized by the Metal Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lower, B. H.; Hochella, M. F.; Lower, S. K.

    2003-12-01

    For over three billion years the Earth has been home to millions of different species of prokaryotic organisms. The life and propagation of many of these microbial cells has relied on intimate contact with mineral surfaces (e.g., the use of metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors). An interface is formed at the junction of a bacterium and a mineral surface that is, by its very nature, nanoscale in size. The process of natural selection has shaped bacteria such that they are masters of the art of synthesizing fully functional structures and utilizing properties that exist only at the nanometer scale. We have begun to explore the bacterium-mineral interface to determine precisely how fundamental, nanoscale forces guide and are themselves modulated by a cell's expression of outer membrane proteins localized at a mineral surface. Recent work in our laboratory suggests that a species of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria expresses proteins that have a high affinity for specific mineral phases. Using biological force microscopy (BFM), we have discovered that one such organism, Shewanella oneidensis, appears to recognize the surface of iron hydroxides - versus isostructural aluminum hydroxide counterparts - such that it produces and/or localizes putative mineral-specific proteins at the interface with goethite (FeOOH). These particular high molecular weight proteins are expressed only under anaerobic conditions, when the Fe(III) in the mineral phase is expected to serve as the microorganism's terminal electron acceptor. Protein expression patterns provided by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis confirm that specific, high molecular weight proteins are targeted to the outer membrane of S. oneidensis when Fe(III) is provided as a terminal electron acceptor. The results suggest that these proteins are synthesized by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions to function in iron oxide binding and/or Fe(III) reduction. If this is the case, than it is possible that the

  20. Role for Outer Membrane Cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 in Reduction of Manganese Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can use a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration, including certain insoluble manganese and iron oxides. To examine whether the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes of MR-1 play a role in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, mutants lacking the OM cytochrome OmcA or OmcB were isolated by gene replacement. Southern blotting and PCR confirmed replacement of the omcA and omcB genes, respectively, and reverse transcription-PCR analysis demonstrated loss of the respective mRNAs, whereas mRNAs for upstream and downstream genes were retained. The omcA mutant (OMCA1) resembled MR-1 in its growth on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), dimethyl sulfoxide, nitrate, fumarate, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate and its reduction of nitrate, nitrite, ferric citrate, FeOOH, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid. Similarly, the omcB mutant (OMCB1) grew on fumarate, nitrate, TMAO, and thiosulfate and reduced ferric citrate and FeOOH. However, OMCA1 and OMCB1 were 45 and 75% slower than MR-1, respectively, at reducing MnO2. OMCA1 lacked only OmcA. While OMCB1 lacked OmcB, other OM cytochromes were also missing or markedly depressed. The total cytochrome content of the OM of OMCB1 was less than 15% of that of MR-1. Western blots demonstrated that OMCB1 still synthesized OmcA, but most of it was localized in the cytoplasmic membrane and soluble fractions rather than in the OM. OMCB1 had therefore lost the ability to properly localize multiple OM cytochromes to the OM. Together, the results suggest that the OM cytochromes of MR-1 participate in the reduction of Mn(IV) but are not required for the reduction of Fe(III) or other electron acceptors. PMID:11133454

  1. Loss of OxyR reduces efficacy of oxygen respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2017-01-01

    In many bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling cellular response to H2O2. A common phenotype resulting from OxyR loss is reduced growth rate, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We demonstrated in Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, that the defect is primarily due to an electron shortage to major terminal oxidase cytochrome cbb3. The loss of OxyR leads to enhanced production of electron carriers that compete for electrons against cytochrome cbb3, cytochrome bd in particular. We further showed that the oxyR mutation also results in increased production of menaquinone, an additional means to lessen electrons to cytochrome cbb3. Although regulation of OxyR on these biological processes appears to be indirect, these data indicate that the regulator plays a previously underappreciated role in mediating respiration. PMID:28195212

  2. Monodispersed biocompatible silver sulfide nanoparticles: Facile extracellular biosynthesis using the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Moon, Ji Won; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size- and shape-dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs has become a priority. In the present article we report for the first time on the efficient generation of extracellular silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are reasonably monodispersed and homogeneously shaped. They are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85% theoretical maximum. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical and surface properties, purity and crystallinity of the synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres with a mean diameter of 9 {+-} 3.5 nm, and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these biogenic Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles on Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) bacterial systems, as well as eukaryotic cell lines including mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells, showed that the particles were non-inhibitory and non-cytotoxic to any of these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles. These particles are dispersible and biocompatible, thus providing excellent potential for use in optical imaging, electronic devices and solar cell applications.

  3. Laue Crystal Structure of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase from a High-yield Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, is reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein “Small Tetra-heme c” replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated ~20 mg crude ccNiR/L culture, compared with 0.5–1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for E. coli ccNiR, and is stable for over two weeks in pH 7 solution at 4° C. UV/Vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified 5 independent 1-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the 5 reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed amongst the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good quality crystals, with which the 2.59 Å resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein). PMID:22382353

  4. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  5. System-level approach to studying oxygen stress and acclimation of Shewanella oneidensis to growth under aerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, A.

    2008-12-01

    Systems-level approaches have been proven extremely useful in elucidating the mechanisms involved in stress response and acclimation of microorganisms to different environments. Recent studies of Shewanella oneidensis, a dissimilatory metal reducer catalyzing biogeochemical cycling of Fe and Mn, demonstrate that this facultatively aerobic bacterium is inhibited by high concentrations of oxygen. Physiological and genomic studies demonstrated that growth under aerobic conditions triggers autoaggregation of S. oneidensis leading to significant physiological and morphological changes which are consistent with biofilm mode of growth. Global transcriptome profiling of the aggregates revealed coordinated upregulation of various attachment and adhesion factors which is governed through coordinate regulation by the RpoS, SpoIIA, and Crp transcription factors. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes. The experimental evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  6. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  7. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  8. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  9. Cell growth and protein expression of Shewanella oneidensis in biofilms and hydrogel-entrapped cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingdan; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    The performance of biofilm-based bioprocesses is difficult to predict and control because of the intrinsic heterogeneous and dynamic properties of microbial biofilms. Biofilm mimics, such as microbial cells entrapped in polymeric scaffolds that are permeable for nutrients, have been proposed to replace real biofilms to achieve long-term robust performance in engineering applications. However, the physiological differences between cells that are physically entrapped in a synthetic polymeric matrix and biofilm cells that are encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix remain unknown. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism and alginate hydrogel as a model synthetic matrix, we compared the cell growth and protein expression in entrapped cultures and biofilms. The hydrogel-entrapped cultures were found to exhibit a growth rate comparable with biofilms. There was no substantial difference in cell viability, surface charge, as well as hydrophobicity between the cells grown in alginate hydrogel and those grown in biofilms. However, the gel-entrapped cultures were found to be physiologically different from biofilms. The gel-entrapped cultures had a higher demand for metabolic energy. The siderophore-mediated iron uptake was repressed in the gel-entrapped cells. The presence of the hydrogel matrix decreased the expression of proteins involved in biofilm formation, while inducing the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the gel-entrapped cultures. These results advance the fundamental understanding of the physiology of hydrogel-entrapped cells, which can lead to more efficient biofilm mimic-based applications.

  10. Graphene oxide as nanogold carrier for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of Shewanella oneidensis with silver enhancement strategy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong

    2014-02-15

    The genus Shewanella is ubiquitous in environment and has been extensively studied for their applications in bioremediation. A novel immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of Shewanella oneidensis was presented based on graphene oxide (GO) as nanogold carrier with silver enhancement strategy. The enhanced sensitivity was achieved by employing conjugate-featuring gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and antibodies (Ab) assembled on bovine serum albumin (BSA)-modified GO (Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO). After a sandwich-type antigen-antibody reaction, Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO conjugate binding on the target analyte produced an enhanced immune-recognition response by the reduction of silver ion in the present of hydroquinone. The deposited silver metal was dissolved with nitric acid and subsequently quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry. The high AuNPs loading capacity of GO and the obvious signal amplification by gold-catalyzed silver deposition offer an excellent detection method with a wide range of linear relationship between 7.0 × 10(1) and 7.0 × 10(7)cfu/mL. Furthermore, the immunoassay developed in this work exhibited high sensitivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility. This simple and sensitive assay method has promising application in various fields for rapid detection of bacteria, protein and DNA.

  11. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å−1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  12. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F

    2016-01-07

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth's deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å(-1) corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  13. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  14. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, Nicholas S; Rosso, Kevin M; Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F

    2007-02-01

    In this report, we describe the characterization of two outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC purified from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). OmcA and MtrC were solubilized with a common detergent and irreversibly bound to Au (111) substrates as self-assembled cytochrome films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified that OmcA and MtrC were covalently bound to the Au surface via thiol bonds to cysteine residues. Initial STM images show that a layer of detergent covers and protects the cytochrome films. Temporary application of high bias voltage causes the detergent film to reorganize around the tip, opening a window for direct STM imaging of the cytochrome layer underneath. The STM apparent sizes of both OmcA and MtrC are 58 nanometers in diameter consistent with expectations from their molecular masses. Current-voltage TS over individual cytochromes showed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate the tunneling current, reflecting differences in their electronic structures. The data suggest that the two cytochromes could have different roles in the electron transport chain during metal reduction.

  15. An arsenic-specific biosensor with genetically engineered Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Webster, Dylan P; TerAvest, Michaela A; Doud, Devin F R; Chakravorty, Arun; Holmes, Eric C; Radens, Caleb M; Sureka, Swati; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-12-15

    Genetically engineered microbial biosensors have yet to realize commercial success in environmental applications due, in part, to difficulties associated with transducing and transmitting traditional bioluminescent information. Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) output a direct electric signal that can be incorporated into devices for remote environmental monitoring. Here, we describe a BES-based biosensor with genetically encoded specificity for a toxic metal. By placing an essential component of the metal reduction (Mtr) pathway of Shewanella oneidensis under the control of an arsenic-sensitive promoter, we have genetically engineered a strain that produces increased current in response to arsenic when inoculated into a BES. Our BES-based biosensor has a detection limit of ~40 μM arsenite with a linear range up to 100 μM arsenite. Because our transcriptional circuit relies on the activation of a single promoter, similar sensing systems may be developed to detect other analytes by the swap of a single genetic part. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis cytochromome : a first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    SciTech Connect

    Londer, Y. Y.; Giuliani, S.; Peppler, T.; Collart, F.; Biosciences Division

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain--are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  17. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis "cytochromome": the first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Londer, Yuri Y; Giuliani, Sarah E; Peppler, Terese; Collart, Frank R

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain-are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  18. Deciphering the Thermal and Rheological Evolution of Deep Submarine Lava Flows Using the HAWAII MR-1 Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Appelgate, T. B.; Harris, A. J.; Rowland, S. K.

    2001-12-01

    The North Hawaiian Arch Volcanic Field is a 24,000 km3 region of young submarine volcanic landforms located 100-390 km north of Oahu and Kauai, centered on the flexural arch created by the Hawaiian Islands. The lavas are emplaced on Cretaceous seafloor at a depth of approximately 4000 m, and the relative youth of the field is indicated by GLORIA backscatter imagery [Holcomb et al. 1988]. Alkalic lavas sampled from the flow field yielded inferred ages of 0.5-1.5 Ma based on palagonite thickness and thickness of overlying sediment. The lavas range in composition from nephelenite to alkalic basalt, with low volatile contents [Frey et al. 2000]. We used the HAWAII MR-1 seafloor imaging system to obtain acoustic imagery and bathymetry of the southern part of the volcanic field. Individual lava flows are resolvable in our data set due to the large backscatter contrast between the young lavas and the pelagic sediments they overlie. This backscatter contrast permits precise resolution of flow boundaries, and supports the measurement of morphological parameters such as flow width and minimum length. The bathymetric data provide information on the regional slope of the seafloor upon which the lavas were emplaced. We can compare these measurements with those of well-studied subaerial lava flows to model the thermal and rheological evolution of the flows of the North Hawaiian Arch. FLOWGO, a thermo-rheological numerical model used to predict lava flow lengths for rapidly moving channelized lava flows in the subaerial regime, is in the process of being modified for the submarine environment, allowing the measured lava flow parameters to help constrain the model. Preliminary applications of the FLOWGO model suggest that if these long individual flows were emplaced in a rapid, channelized thermal regime, they would have had effusion rates and channel velocities close to an order of magnitude higher than have been observed historically, with the exception of the 1783 Laki eruption

  19. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-07

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10–5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10–6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10–7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10–7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10–6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10–7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.

  20. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-07

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10–5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10–6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10–7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10–7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10–6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10–7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.

  1. The effect of metal loading on Cd adsorption onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cell envelopes: The role of sulfhydryl sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Cd onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells with and without blocking of sulfhydryl sites was measured in order to determine the effect of metal loading and to understand the role of sulfhydryl sites in the adsorption reactions. The observed adsorption/desorption behaviors display strong dependence on metal loading. Under a high loading of 40 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, blocking the sulfhydryl sites within the cell envelope by exposure of the biomass to monobromo(trimethylammonio)bimane bromide (qBBr) does not significantly affect the extent of Cd adsorption, and we observed fully reversible adsorption under this condition. In contrast, under a low metal loading of 1.3 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, the extent of Cd adsorption onto sulfhydryl-blocked S. oneidensis cells was significantly lower than that onto untreated cells, and only approximately 50-60% of the adsorbed Cd desorbed from the cells upon acidification. In conjunction with previous EXAFS results, our findings demonstrate that Cd adsorption onto S. oneidensis under low metal loading conditions is dominated by sulfhydryl binding, and thus is controlled by a distinct adsorption mechanism from the non-sulfhydryl site binding which controls Cd adsorption under high metal loading conditions. We use the data to develop a surface complexation model that constrains the values of the stability constants for individual Cd-sulfhydryl and Cd-non-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes, and we use this approach to account for the Cd adsorption behavior as a function of both pH and metal loading. This approach is crucial in order to predict metal adsorption onto bacteria under environmentally relevant metal loading conditions where sulfhydryl binding sites can dominate the adsorption reaction.

  2. Comparative characterization and expression analysis of the four Old Yellow Enzyme homologues from Shewanella oneidensis indicate differences in physiological function

    PubMed Central

    Brigé, Ann; Van Den Hemel, Debbie; Carpentier, Wesley; De Smet, Lina; Van Beeumen, Jozef J.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis contains four genes that encode proteins that have high sequence identity with yeast OYE (Old Yellow Enzyme, an NADPH oxidoreductase), the well-studied archetype of the OYE protein family. The present paper describes the first comparative study of OYEs that are present in a single bacterial species, performed to gain insight into their biochemical properties and physiological importance. The four proteins [named SYE1–SYE4 (Shewanella Yellow Enzyme 1–4)] were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The yield of SYE2, however, was too low for further characterization, even after expression attempts in S. oneidensis. The SYE1, SYE3 and SYE4 proteins were found to have characteristics similar to those of other OYE family members. They were identified as flavoproteins that catalyse the reduction of different α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and form charge transfer complexes with a range of phenolic compounds. Whereas the properties of SYE1 and SYE3 were very similar, those of SYE4 were clearly different in terms of ligand binding, catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity. Also, the activity of SYE4 was found to be NADPH-dependent, whereas SYE1 and SYE3 had a preference for NADH. It has been suggested that yeast OYE protects the actin cytoskeleton from oxidative stress. There are indications that bacterial OYEs are also involved in the oxidative stress response, but their exact role is unclear. Induction studies in S. oneidensis revealed that yeast and bacterial OYEs may share a common physiological role, i.e. the protection of cellular components against oxidative damage. As only SYE4 was induced under oxidative stress conditions, however, a functional divergence between bacterial OYEs is likely to exist. PMID:16293111

  3. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  4. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  5. The diheme cytochrome c peroxidase from Shewanella oneidensis requires reductive activation†

    PubMed Central

    Pulcu, Gökçe Su; Frato, Katherine E.; Gupta, Rupal; Hsu, Hao-Ru; Levine, George A.; Hendrich, Michael P.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the characterization of the diheme cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) from Shewanella oneidensis (So) using UV/Visible absorbance, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. While sequence alignment with other bacterial diheme cytochrome c peroxidases suggests that So CcP may be active in the as-isolated state, we find that So CcP requires reductive activation for full activity, similar to the canonical Pseudomonas-type of bacterial CcP enzyme. Peroxide turnover initiated with oxidized So CcP shows a distinct lag-phase, which we interpret as reductive activation in situ. A simple kinetic model is sufficient to recapitulate the lag-phase behavior of the progress curves and separate the contributions of reductive activation and peroxide turnover. The rates of catalysis and activation differ between MBP-fusion and tag-free So CcP, and also depend on the identity of the electron donor. Combined with Michaelis-Menten analysis these data suggest that So CcP can accommodate electron donor binding in several possible orientations, and that the presence of the MBP tag affects the availability of certain binding sites. To further investigate the structural basis of reductive activation in So CcP we introduced mutations into two different regions of the protein that have been suggested to be important for reductive activation in homologous bacterial CcPs. Mutations in a flexible loop region neighboring the low-potential heme significantly increased the activation rate, confirming the importance of flexible loop regions of the protein in converting the inactive, as-isolated enzyme into the activated form. PMID:22239664

  6. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  7. Shewanella oneidensis FabB: A β-ketoacyl-ACP Synthase That Works with C16:1-ACP.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qixia; Li, Meng; Fu, Huihui; Meng, Qiu; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    It is established that Escherichia coli β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) I (encoded by EcfabB) is the primary, if not exclusive, factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (C10:1-ACP) but not effective with C16:1- or longer-chain-ACPs. To test the extent to which these features apply to KAS I proteins in other species, in this study, we examined the physiological role of FabB in Shewanella oneidensis, an excellent model for researching type II fatty acid synthetic (FAS) system and its regulation. We showed that the loss of either FabA (the enzyme that introduces double bond) or FabB, in the absence of DesA which desaturizes C16 and C18 to generate respective C16:1 and C18:1, leads to a UFA auxotroph. However, fatty acid profiles of membrane phospholipid of the fabA and fabB mutants are significantly different, suggesting that FabB participates in steps beyond elongation of C10:1-ACP. Further analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis FabB differs from EcFabB in that (i) it is not the only enzyme capable of catalyzing elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA, (ii) it plays a critical role in elongation of C16:1- and longer-chain-ACPs, and (iii) its overproduction is detrimental.

  8. Conduction-band edge dependence of carbon-coated hematite stimulated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Tang, Jiahuan; Yuan, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria-based bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are promising technologies used for alternative energy generation, wastewater treatment, and environmental monitoring. However, their practical application is limited by the bioelectrode performance, mainly resulting from low extracellular electron transfer (EET) efficiency. In this study, a carbon-coated hematite (C/Hematite) electrode was successfully obtained by a green and solvent-free route, that is, heat treatment in an oxygen-rich environment using solid ferrocene as the precursor. The as-prepared C/Hematite electrode was evaluated as a high-performance electrode material in a Shewanella oneidensis-inoculated BES. The maximum biocurrent density of the Shewanella-attached C/Hematite electrode reached 0.22 ± 0.01 mA cm(-2), which is nearly 6-times higher than that of a bare carbon cloth (CC) electrode (0.036 ± 0.005 mA cm(-2)). Electrochemical measurements revealed that the enhanced conductivity and better energy matching between the outer membrane c-type cytochromes of S. oneidensis and the electrode contributed to the improved EET efficiency. The results of this study demonstrated that the semiconductive properties of iron oxides play important roles for the involved bacterial extracellular respiration activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the GenusShewanellaand Description ofShewanellaoneidensis sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, K.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA--DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  10. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I.; Russell, Jonathan S.; Dominy, Stephen S.; Patel, Kunjal; McKenna, Matt; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU). Methods In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT), Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT), oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD). Covariates for oral health parameters were examined using zero-inflated negative binomial regression and ordinal logistic regression models. Results Eleven sites enrolled 209 PHIV and 126 PHEU. Higher DT scores were observed in participants who were PHIV [Adjusted Mean Ratio (aMR) = 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5)], female [aMR = 1.4 (1.0–1.9)], had no source of regular dental care [aMR = 2.3 (1.5–3.4)], and had a high frequency of meals/snacks [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.9 (1.1–3.1)] and juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.6 (1.1–2.4)]. Higher DMFT scores were observed in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2–2.9)], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0–1.3)], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1–1.7)] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6–1.0)]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health outcomes after adjustment. Conclusions Oral health was poor in PHIV and PHEU youth. This was dismaying since most HIV infected children in the U.S. are carefully followed at medical health care clinics. This data underscore the need for regular dental care. As PHIV youth were at higher risk for cavities, it will be important to better understand this relationship in order to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27299992

  11. The influence of cultivation methods on Shewanella oneidensis physiology and proteome expression

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been largely overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research. PMID:18030449

  12. Protein-protein interactions among the components of the biosynthetic machinery responsible for exopolysaccharide production in Streptococcus thermophilus MR-1C.

    PubMed

    Cefalo, A D; Broadbent, J R; Welker, D L

    2011-03-01

    This study identified protein-protein interactions among the biosynthetic machinery responsible for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Streptococcus thermophilus MR-1C. Protein-protein interactions were investigated using the yeast two-hybrid system. A strong protein-protein interaction was detected between the transmembrane activation protein Wzd and the protein tyrosine kinase Wze. Weaker protein-protein interactions were detected between two duplicate Wze proteins and between Wze and the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Wzh. Protein-protein interactions involving a Wzd/Wze fusion protein and Wzd and Wze may indicate that these proteins form multi-protein complexes. All combinations of the Wzh, Wzd, Wze, Wzg (regulation), CpsE (glycosyl-1-phosphate transferase), CpsS (polymerization), CpsL (unknown), CpsW (regulation) and CpsU (membrane translocation) were analysed for protein-protein interactions but no additional interactions were discovered using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions among the phosphotyrosine phosphatase, tyrosine kinase, and transmembrane activation protein are important in the regulation of capsule biosynthesis in Strep. thermophilus MR-1C. This study provides some valuable insight into the organization and interactions between the many proteins involved in EPS production. A better understanding of this process may facilitate the genetic manipulation of capsule production to impart desirable properties to dairy starter cultures. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  14. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem ‘modules’ similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV–visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  15. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  16. Monodispersed biocompatible Ag2S nanoparticles: Facile extracellular bio-fabrication using the gamma-proteobacterium, S. oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Retterer, Scott T; Allison, David P; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size and or shape dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs have become a priority. In the present illustration we report for the first time the efficient generation of extracellular Ag2S nanoparticles by the metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are nearly monodispersed with homogeneous shape distributions and are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85 % theoretical maximum. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical properties, purity, and crystallinity of the as-synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 1-22 nm, with an average size of 9 3 nm and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these silver sulfide nanoparticles on Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacterial systems as well as eukaryotic; mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells showed that the particles were non-inhibitory or non-cytotoxic to both these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag2S nanoparticles which are dispersible and biocompatible; thus providing excellent potential for their uses in optical imaging and electronic devices, and solar cell applications.

  17. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  18. Metabolite-enabled mutualistic interaction between Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli in a co-culture using an electrode as electron acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Cao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions in planktonic microbial communities have been extensively studied. However, our understanding on mutualistic communities consisting of co-existing planktonic cells and biofilms is limited. Here, we report a planktonic cells-biofilm mutualistic system established by the fermentative bacterium Escherichia coli and the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical device, where planktonic cells in the anode media interact with the biofilms on the electrode. Our results show that the transfer of formate is the key mechanism in this mutualistic system. More importantly, we demonstrate that the relative distribution of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the liquid media and biofilm is likely driven by their metabolic functions towards an optimum communal metabolism in the bioelectrochemical device. RNA sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses of the interacting organisms in the mutualistic system potentially reveal differential expression of genes involved in extracellular electron transfer pathways in both species in the planktonic cultures and biofilms. PMID:26061569

  19. Mutation Analysis of MR-1, SLC2A1, and CLCN1 in 28 PRRT2-negative Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Hong-Fu; Liu, Gong-Lu; Wen, Xiao-Dan; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is the most common subtype of paroxysmal dyskinesias and is caused by mutations in PRRT2 gene. The majority of familial PKD was identified to harbor PRRT2 mutations. However, over two-third of sporadic PKD patients did not carry any PRRT2 mutation, suggesting an existence of additional genetic mutations or possible misdiagnosis due to clinical overlap. Methods: A cohort of 28 Chinese patients clinically diagnosed with sporadic PKD and excluded PRRT2 mutations were recruited. Clinical features were evaluated, and all subjects were screened for MR-1, SLC2A1, and CLCN1 genes, which are the causative genes of paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD), paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia, and myotonia congenita (MC), respectively. In addition, 200 genetically matched healthy individuals were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 16 genetic variants including 4 in MR-1 gene, 8 in SLC2A1 gene, and 4 in CLCN1 gene were detected. Among them, SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was detected in one case, and CLCN1 c.1205C>T mutation was detected in other two cases. Neither of them was found in 200 controls as well as 1000 Genomes database and ExAC database. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by SIFT and PolyPhen2. The SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was novel. Conclusions: The phenotypic overlap may lead to the difficulty in distinguishing PKD from PNKD and MC. For those PRRT2- negative PKD cases, screening of SLC2A1 and CLCN1 genes are useful in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:27098784

  20. Isolation and Characterization of a Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 Electron Transport Regulator etrA Mutant: Reassessment of the Role of EtrA

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Tamara M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 has emerged as a good model to study anaerobic respiration and electron transport-linked metal reduction. Its remarkable respiratory plasticity suggests the potential for a complex regulatory system to coordinate electron acceptor use in the absence of O2. It had previously been suggested that EtrA (electron transport regulator A), an analog of Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator) from Escherichia coli, may regulate gene expression for anaerobic electron transport. An etrA knockout strain (ETRA-153) was isolated from MR-1 using a gene replacement strategy. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of total RNA demonstrated the loss of the etrA mRNA in ETRA-153. ETRA-153 cells retained the ability to grow on all electron acceptors tested, including fumarate, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), thiosulfate, dimethyl sulfoxide, ferric citrate, nitrate, and O2, as well as the ability to reduce ferric citrate, manganese(IV), nitrate, and nitrite. EtrA is therefore not necessary for growth on, or the reduction of, these electron acceptors. However, ETRA-153 had reduced initial growth rates on fumarate and nitrate but not on TMAO. The activities for fumarate and nitrate reductase were lower in ETRA-153, as were the levels of fumarate reductase protein and transcript. ETRA-153 was also deficient in one type of ubiquinone. These results are in contrast to those previously reported for the putative etrA mutant METR-1. Molecular analysis of METR-1 indicated that its etrA gene is not interrupted; its reported phenotype was likely due to the use of inappropriate anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:11466298

  1. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  2. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-12-28

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  3. Transcription factors FabR and FadR regulate both aerobic and anaerobic pathways for unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qixia; Shi, Miaomiao; Ren, Yedan; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    As genes for type II fatty acid synthesis are essential to the growth of Escherichia coli, its sole (anaerobic) pathway has significant potential as a target for novel antibacterial drug, and has been extensively studied. Despite this, we still know surprisingly little about fatty acid synthesis in bacteria because this anaerobic pathway in fact is not widely distributed. In this study, we show a novel model of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthesis in Shewanella, emerging human pathogens in addition to well-known metal reducers. We identify both anaerobic and aerobic UFA biosynthesis pathways in the representative species, S. oneidensis. Uniquely, the bacterium also contains two regulators FabR and FadR, whose counterparts in other bacteria control the anaerobic pathway. However, we show that in S. oneidensis these two regulators are involved in regulation of both pathways, in either direct or indirect manner. Overall, our results indicate that the UFA biosynthesis and its regulation are far more complex than previously expected, and S. oneidensis serves as a good research model for further work.

  4. Effect of oxygen on the per‐cell extracellular electron transfer rate of Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1 explored in bioelectrochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mengqian; Chan, Shirley; Babanova, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a mechanism that enables microbes to respire solid‐phase electron acceptors. These EET reactions most often occur in the absence of oxygen, since oxygen can act as a competitive electron acceptor for many facultative microbes. However, for Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1, oxygen may increase biomass development, which could result in an overall increase in EET activity. Here, we studied the effect of oxygen on S. oneidensis MR‐1 EET rates using bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). We utilized optically accessible BESs to monitor real‐time biomass growth, and studied the per‐cell EET rate as a function of oxygen and riboflavin concentrations in BESs of different design and operational conditions. Our results show that oxygen exposure promotes biomass development on the electrode, but significantly impairs per‐cell EET rates even though current production does not always decrease with oxygen exposure. Additionally, our results indicated that oxygen can affect the role of riboflavin in EET. Under anaerobic conditions, both current density and per‐cell EET rate increase with the riboflavin concentration. However, as the dissolved oxygen (DO) value increased to 0.42 mg/L, riboflavin showed very limited enhancement on per‐cell EET rate and current generation. Since it is known that oxygen can promote flavins secretion in S. oneidensis, the role of riboflavin may change under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 96–105. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27399911

  5. High- and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with p Ka values of 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.4, and 9.4 ± 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9(±2.6) × 10 -5, 1.3(±0.2) × 10 -4, 5.9(±3.3) × 10 -5, and 1.1(±0.6) × 10 -4 moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low concentration of very high

  6. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  7. Impaired cell envelope resulting from arcA mutation largely accounts for enhanced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting; Dong, Yangyang; Ju, Lili; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major challenges that Shewanella encounter routinely because they thrive in redox-stratified environments prone to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, letting alone that ROS can be generated endogenously. As respiration is the predominant process for endogenous ROS, regulators mediating respiration have been demonstrated and/or implicated to play a role in oxidative stress response. In our efforts to unveil the involvement of global regulators for respiration in the oxidative stress response, we found that loss of the Arc system increases S. oneidensis sensitivity to H2O2 whereas neither Fnr nor Crp has a significant role. A comparison of transcriptomic profiles of the wild-type and its isogenic arcA mutant revealed that the OxyR regulon is independent of the Arc system. We then provided evidence that the enhanced H2O2 sensitivity of the arcA mutant is due to an increased H2O2 uptake rate, a result of a cell envelope defect. Although one of three proteases of the ArcA regulon when in excess is partially accountable for the envelope defect, the major contributors remain elusive. Overall, our data indicate that the Arc system influences the bacterial cell envelope biosynthesis, a physiological aspect that has not been associated with the regulator before. PMID:25975178

  8. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  9. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression. PMID:26381456

  10. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  11. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye‐Sensitized TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Emma V.; Lockwood, Colin W. J.; White, Gaye F.; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar‐assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1 (MR‐1), trans‐outer‐membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer‐membrane‐spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR‐1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on RuII‐dye‐sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein‐coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer‐membrane‐associated cytochromes of MR‐1 for solar‐driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. PMID:27685371

  12. Two Residues Predominantly Dictate Functional Difference in Motility between Shewanella oneidensis Flagellins FlaA and FlaB*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Shi, Miaomiao; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    Nearly half of flagellated microorganisms possess a multiple-flagellin system. Although a functional filament can be formed from one of multiple flagellins alone in many bacteria, it is more common that one flagellin is the major constituent and others contribute. Underlying mechanisms proposed for such scenarios cover flagellin regulation of various levels, including transcription, translation, post-translational modification, secretion, and filament assembly. In Shewanella oneidensis, the flagellar filament is composed of FlaA and FlaB flagellins; the latter is the major one in terms of motility. In this study, we showed that regulation of all levels except for filament assembly is indistinguishable between these two flagellins. Further analyses revealed that two amino acid residues predominantly dictated functional difference with respect to motility. Given that Shewanella prefer a solid surface-associated life style, of which filaments consisting of either FlaA or FlaB are equally supportive, we envision that roles of flagella in surface adhesion and formation of bacterial communities are particularly important for their survival and proliferation in these specific niches. PMID:24733391

  13. NapB in excess inhibits growth of Shewanella oneidensis by dissipating electrons of the quinol pool

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Miao; Zhang, Qianyun; Sun, Yijuan; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella, a group of ubiquitous bacteria renowned for respiratory versatility, thrive in environments where various electron acceptors (EAs) of different chemical and physiological characteristics coexist. Despite being extensively studied, we still know surprisingly little about strategies by which multiple EAs and their interaction define ecophysiology of these bacteria. Previously, we showed that nitrite inhibits growth of the genus representative Shewanella oneidensis on fumarate and presumably some other CymA (quinol dehydrogenase)-dependent EAs by reducing cAMP production, which in turn leads to lowered expression of nitrite and fumarate reductases. In this study, we demonstrated that inhibition of fumarate growth by nitrite is also attributable to overproduction of NapB, the cytochrome c subunit of nitrate reductase. Further investigations revealed that excessive NapB per se inhibits growth on all EAs tested, including oxygen. When overproduced, NapB acts as an electron shuttle to dissipate electrons of the quinol pool, likely to extracellullar EAs, because the Mtr system, the major electron transport pathway for extracellular electron transport, is implicated. The study not only sheds light on mechanisms by which certain EAs, especially toxic ones, impact the bacterial ecophysiology, but also provides new insights into how electron shuttle c-type cytochromes regulate multi-branched respiratory networks. PMID:27857202

  14. The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA reveals new insight at the microbe-mineral interface

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Baiden, Nanakow; Johs, Alexander; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Liang, Liyuan; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2014-05-21

    The x-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA, an extracellular decaheme cytochrome involved in mineral reduction, was solved to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The four OmcA molecules in the asymmetric unit were arranged so the distance between heme-5 on adjacent OmcA monomers was less than 1 nm, indicative of a transient OmcA dimer capable of intermolecular electron transfer. A previously identified hematite binding motif was identified near heme 10, forming a hydroxylated surface that would bring a heme-10 electron egress site to ~ 1 nm of mineral surface.

  15. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin K; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-08-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  16. Reduction of Nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-04-23

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  17. Cloning and sequence of cymA, a gene encoding a tetraheme cytochrome c required for reduction of iron(III), fumarate, and nitrate by Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    1997-01-01

    The cymA gene, which encodes a tetraheme cytochrome c, was cloned from Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1. This gene complemented a mutant which had a TnphoA insertion in cymA and which was deficient in the respiratory reduction of iron(III), nitrate, fumarate, and manganese(IV). The 561-bp nucleotide sequence of cymA encodes a protein of 187 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 20.8 kDa. No N-terminal signal sequence was readily apparent; consistent with this, a cytochrome with a size of 21 kDa was detected in the wild type but was absent in the insertional mutant. The cymA gene is transcribed into an mRNA; the major transcript was approximately 790 bases, suggesting that it is not part of a multicistronic operon. This RNA transcript was not detected in the cymA mutant. The CymA protein was found in the cytoplasmic membrane and soluble fraction of MR-1, and it shares partial amino acid sequence homology with multiheme c-type cytochromes from other bacteria. These cytochromes are ostensibly involved in the transfer of electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane to acceptors in the periplasm. The localization of the fumarate and iron(III) reductases to the periplasm and outer membrane of MR-1, respectively, suggests the possibility of a similar electron transfer role for CymA. PMID:9023196

  18. Charge-associated effects of fullerene derivatives on microbialstructural integrity and central metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Chen, Ding; Min, Guangwei; Kim, Chul; Murkhejee, Bipasha; Larabell, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D.; Chen,Fanqing Frank

    2007-01-23

    The effects of four types of fullerene compounds (C60,C60-OH, C60-COOH, C60-NH2) were examined on two model microorganisms(Escherichia coli W3110 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1). Positivelycharged C60-NH2 at concentrations as low as 10 mg/L inhibited growth andreduced substrate uptake for both microorganisms. Scanning ElectronMicroscopy (SEM) revealed damage to cellular structures.Neutrally-charged C60 and C60-OH had mild negative effects on S.oneidensis MR-1, whereas the negatively-charged C60-COOH did not affecteither microorganism s growth. The effect of fullerene compounds onglobal metabolism was further investigated using [3-13C]L-lactateisotopic labeling, which tracks perturbations to metabolic reaction ratesin bacteria by examining the change in the isotopic labeling pattern inthe resulting metabolites (often amino acids).1-3 The 13C isotopomeranalysis from all fullerene-exposed cultures revealed no significantdifferences in isotopomer distributions from unstressed cells. Thisresult indicates that microbial central metabolism is robust toenvironmental stress inflicted by fullerene nanoparticles. In addition,although C60-NH2 compounds caused mechanical stress on the cell wall ormembrane, both S. oneidensis MR-1 and E. coli W3110 can efficientlyalleviate such stress by cell aggregation and precipitation of the toxicnanoparticles. The results presented here favor the hypothesis thatfullerenes cause more membrane stress4, 5, 6 than perturbation to energymetabolism7

  19. Suppression of fabB Mutation by fabF1 Is Mediated by Transcription Read-through in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Luo, Qixia; Gao, Haichun

    2016-11-15

    As type II fatty acid synthesis is essential for the growth of Escherichia coli, its many components are regarded as potential targets for novel antibacterial drugs. Among them, β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (KAS) FabB is the exclusive factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (cis-3-C10-ACP). In our previous study, we presented evidence to suggest that this may not be the case in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging model gammaproteobacterium renowned for its respiratory versatility. Here, we identified FabF1, another KAS, as a functional replacement for FabB in S. oneidensis In fabB(+) or desA(+) (encoding a desaturase) cells, which are capable of making unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), FabF1 is barely produced. However, UFA auxotroph mutants devoid of both fabB and desA genes can be spontaneously converted to suppressor strains, which no longer require exogenous UFAs for growth. Suppression is caused by a TGTTTT deletion in the region upstream of the fabF1 gene, resulting in enhanced FabF1 production. We further demonstrated that the deletion leads to transcription read-through of the terminator for acpP, an acyl carrier protein gene immediately upstream of fabF1 There are multiple tandem repeats in the region covering the terminator, and the TGTTTT deletion, as well as others, compromises the terminator efficacy. In addition, FabF2 also shows an ability to complement the FabB loss, albeit substantially less effectively than FabF1.

  20. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  1. High-and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Boyanov, M.; Bunker, B. A.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with pK{sub a} values of 3.3 {+-} 0.2, 4.8 {+-} 0.2, 6.7 {+-} 0.4, and 9.4 {+-} 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -5}, 1.3({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -4}, 5.9({+-}3.3) x 10{sup -5}, and 1.1({+-}0.6) x 10{sup -4} moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low

  2. Crater with Exposed Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-17

    On Earth, geologists can dig holes and pull up core samples to find out what lies beneath the surface. On Mars, geologists cannot dig holes very easily themselves, but a process has been occurring for billions of years that has been digging holes for them: impact cratering. Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. The energy of the explosion, and the resulting size of the impact crater, depends on the size and density of the impactor, as well as the properties of the surface it hits. In general, the larger and denser the impactor, the larger the crater it will form. The impact crater in this image is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter. The impact revealed layers when it excavated the Martian surface. Layers can form in a variety of different ways. Multiple lava flows in one area can form stacked sequences, as can deposits from rivers or lakes. Understanding the geology around impact craters and searching for mineralogical data within their layers can help scientists on Earth better understand what the walls of impact craters on Mars expose. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12328

  3. Sun exposed skin disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Percy

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of dermatoses may arise in exposed areas and are at the same time induced or exacerbated by irradiation from the sun. The spectrum may range from acute sunburn to chronic effects of sun damage, including elastosis and ultraviolet-induced skin cancer. Inflammatory ultraviolet-induced dermatoses have a confusing nomenclature and classification that often leads to difficulties in the differential diagnosis. Modern nosology differentiates primary from secondary photodermatoses. Primary photodermatoses are believed to be mainly irradiation-induced and immunologically mediated. If the pathophysiology is not clearly defined, they are also called idiopathic. In cases of a known photosensitizer, local and systemic phototoxic or photoallergic reactions can be differentiated. Secondary photodermatoses have an established pathophysiology; for example, an enzyme defect such as occurs in the porphyrias or xeroderma pigmentosum, which leads to the abnormal sun sensitivity. Finally, preexisting dermatoses may be exacerbated by irradiation from the sun, as in systemic lupus erythematosus or Darier disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-08

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel α-Conotoxin Mr1.7 from Conus marmoreus Targeting Neuronal nAChR α3β2, α9α10 and α6/α3β2β3 Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Cong; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Na; Du, Weihong; Dai, Qiuyun

    2015-05-27

    In the present study, we synthesized and, structurally and functionally characterized a novel α4/7-conotoxin Mr1.7 (PECCTHPACHVSHPELC-NH2), which was previously identified by cDNA libraries from Conus marmoreus in our lab. The NMR solution structure showed that Mr1.7 contained a 310-helix from residues Pro7 to His10 and a type I β-turn from residues Pro14 to Cys17. Electrophysiological results showed that Mr1.7 selectively inhibited the α3β2, α9α10 and α6/α3β2β3 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an IC50 of 53.1 nM, 185.7 nM and 284.2 nM, respectively, but showed no inhibitory activity on other nAChR subtypes. Further structure-activity studies of Mr1.7 demonstrated that the PE residues at the N-terminal sequence of Mr1.7 were important for modulating its selectivity, and the replacement of Glu2 by Ala resulted in a significant increase in potency and selectivity to the α3β2 nAChR. Furthermore, the substitution of Ser12 with Asn in the loop2 significantly increased the binding of Mr1.7 to α3β2, α3β4, α2β4 and α7 nAChR subtypes. Taken together, this work expanded our knowledge of selectivity and provided a new way to improve the potency and selectivity of inhibitors for nAChR subtypes.

  6. EXPOSE-R on Mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Kloss, Maria; Reitz, Guenther

    Currently EXPOSE-R is on mission! This astrobiological exposure facility was accommodated at the universal workplace URM-D Zenith payload site, located outside the Russian Svezda Module of the International Space Station (ISS) by extravehicular activity (EVA) on March 10th 2009. It contains 3 trays accommodating 12 sample compartments with sample carriers in three levels either open to space vacuum or kept in a defined gas environment. In its 8 experiments of biological and chemical content, more than 1200 individual samples are exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiations, vacuum, cosmic rays or extreme temperature variations. In their different experiments the involved scientists are studying the question of life's origin on Earth and the results of their experiments are contributing to different aspects of the evolution and distribution of life in the Universe. Additionally integrated into the EXPOSE-R facility are several dosimeters monitoring the ionising and the solar UV-radiation during the mission to deliver useful information to complement the sample analysis. In close cooperation with the DLR and the Technical University Munich (TUM), the Rheinisch -Westfülische Technischen Hochschule Aachen (RWTH Aachen) operates the experiment "Spores". a This is one of the 6 astrobiological experiments of the ROSE-Consortium" (Response of Or-ganisms to Space Environment) of the EXPOSE-R mission. In these experiments spores of bacteria, fungi and ferns are being over layered or mixed with meteorite material. The analysis of the effect of the space parameters on different biological endpoints of the spores of the mi-croorganism Bacillus subtilis will be performed after the retrieval of the experiment scheduled for the end of 2010. Parallel to the space mission an identical set of samples was accommodated into EXPOSE-R trays identical in construction to perform the Mission Ground Reference (MGR) Test. Currently this MGR Test is carried out in the Planetary and Space

  7. The three-dimensional crystal structure of the PrpF protein of Shewanella oneidensis complexed with trans-aconitate: insights into its biological function.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Graeme S; Rocco, Christopher J; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Rayment, Ivan

    2007-07-01

    In bacteria, the dehydration of 2-methylcitrate to yield 2-methylaconitate in the 2-methylcitric acid cycle is catalyzed by a cofactor-less (PrpD) enzyme or by an aconitase-like (AcnD) enzyme. Bacteria that use AcnD also require the function of the PrpF protein, whose function was previously unknown. To gain insights into the function of PrpF, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the PrpF protein from the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis was solved at 2.0 A resolution. The protein fold of PrpF is strikingly similar to those of the non-PLP-dependent diaminopimelate epimerase from Haemophilus influenzae, a putative proline racemase from Brucella melitensis, and to a recently deposited structure of a hypothetical protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results from in vitro studies show that PrpF isomerizes trans-aconitate to cis-aconitate. It is proposed that PrpF catalysis of the cis-trans isomerization proceeds through a base-catalyzed proton abstraction coupled with a rotation about C2-C3 bond of 2-methylaconitate, and that residue Lys73 is critical for PrpF function. The newly identified function of PrpF as a non-PLP-dependent isomerase, together with the fact that PrpD-containing bacteria do not require PrpF, suggest that the isomer of 2-methylaconitate that serves as a substrate of aconitase must have the same stereochemistry as that synthesized by PrpD. From this, it follows that the 2-methylaconitate isomer generated by AcnD is not a substrate of aconitase, and that PrpF is required to generate the correct isomer. As a consequence, the isomerase activity of PrpF may now be viewed as an integral part of the 2-methylcitric acid cycle.

  8. Correlations between the Electronic Properties of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase (ccNiR) and Its Structure: Effects of Heme Oxidation State and Active Site Ligation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Natalia; Love, Daniel; Judd, Evan T; Elliott, Sean J; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2015-06-23

    The electrochemical properties of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), a homodimer that contains five hemes per protomer, were investigated by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectropotentiometries. Global analysis of the UV-vis spectropotentiometric results yielded highly reproducible values for the heme midpoint potentials. These midpoint potential values were then assigned to specific hemes in each protomer (as defined in previous X-ray diffraction studies) by comparing the EPR and UV-vis spectropotentiometric results, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of EPR spectra to the structural microenvironment of paramagnetic centers. Addition of the strong-field ligand cyanide led to a 70 mV positive shift of the active site's midpoint potential, as the cyanide bound to the initially five-coordinate high-spin heme and triggered a high-spin to low-spin transition. With cyanide present, three of the remaining hemes gave rise to distinctive and readily assignable EPR spectral changes upon reduction, while a fourth was EPR-silent. At high applied potentials, interpretation of the EPR spectra in the absence of cyanide was complicated by a magnetic interaction that appears to involve three of five hemes in each protomer. At lower applied potentials, the spectra recorded in the presence and absence of cyanide were similar, which aided global assignment of the signals. The midpoint potential of the EPR-silent heme could be assigned by default, but the assignment was also confirmed by UV-vis spectropotentiometric analysis of the H268M mutant of ccNiR, in which one of the EPR-silent heme's histidine axial ligands was replaced with a methionine.

  9. Gaseous ligand selectivity of the H-NOX sensor protein from Shewanella oneidensis and comparison to those of other bacterial H-NOXs and soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2017-09-01

    To delineate the commonalities and differences in gaseous ligand discrimination among the heme-based sensors with Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen binding protein (H-NOX) scaffold, the binding kinetic parameters for gaseous ligands NO, CO, and O2, including KD, kon, and koff, of Shewanella oneidensis H-NOX (So H-NOX) were characterized in detail in this study and compared to those of previously characterized H-NOXs from Clostridium botulinum (Cb H-NOX), Nostoc sp. (Ns H-NOX), Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX), Vibrio cholera (Vc H-NOX), and human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), an H-NOX analogue. The KD(NO) and KD(CO) of each bacterial H-NOX or sGC follow the "sliding scale rule"; the affinities of the bacterial H-NOXs for NO and CO vary in a small range but stronger than those of sGC by at least two orders of magnitude. On the other hand, each bacterial H-NOX exhibits different characters in the stability of its 6c NO complex, reactivity with secondary NO, stability of oxyferrous heme and autoxidation to ferric heme. A facile access channel for gaseous ligands is also identified, implying that ligand access has only minimal effect on gaseous ligand selectivity of H-NOXs or sGC. This comparative study of the binding parameters of the bacterial H-NOXs and sGC provides a basis to guide future new structural and functional studies of each specific heme sensor with the H-NOX protein fold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  11. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  12. PBP1a/LpoA but Not PBP1b/LpoB Are Involved in Regulation of the Major β-Lactamase Gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Mao, Yinting; Jin, Miao

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamase production is one of the most important strategies for Gram-negative bacteria to combat β-lactam antibiotics. Studies of the regulation of β-lactamase expression have largely been focused on the class C β-lactamase AmpC, whose induction by β-lactams requires LysR-type regulator AmpR and permease AmpG-dependent peptidoglycan recycling intermediates. In Shewanella, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance, production of the class D β-lactamase BlaA confers bacteria with natural resistance to many β-lactams. Expression of the blaA gene in the genus representative Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the AmpC paradigm because of the lack of an AmpR homologue and the presence of an additional AmpG-independent regulatory pathway. In this study, using transposon mutagenesis, we identify proteins that are involved in blaA regulation. Inactivation of mrcA and lpoA, which encode penicillin binding protein 1a (PBP1a) and its lipoprotein cofactor, LpoA, respectively, drastically enhances blaA expression in the absence of β-lactams. Although PBP1b and its cognate, LpoB, also exist in S. oneidensis, their roles in blaA induction are dispensable. We further show that the mrcA-mediated blaA expression is independent of AmpG. PMID:25824223

  13. Brucellosis in Occupationally Exposed Groups

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Annapurna G.; Mohite, Shivajirao T.; Gajul, Shivali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In India, high incidence of human brucellosis may be expected, as the conditions conducive for human brucellosis exist. Limited studies have been undertaken on human brucellosis especially in occupationally-exposed groups. Aim To estimate prevalence of anti-brucellar antibodies, evaluate the clinical manifestations, risk factors and Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) levels about brucellosis among occupationally exposed groups. Materials and Methods Blood samples were collected from 2337 occupationally exposed individuals. The serum samples were screened for the presence of anti-brucellar antibodies by Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT), Serum Agglutination Test (SAT) and 2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME). Clinical manifestations, risk factors and KAP levels were evaluated by personal interview using a structured questionnaire. Results Seroprevalence of brucellosis by RBPT, SAT and 2-ME test was 9.46%, 4.45% and 3.64 % respectively. Clinical symptoms resembling brucellosis were seen in 91 subjects. The major risk factors were animal exposure in veterinarians and abattoirs, both animal exposure and raw milk ingestion in farmers and shepherds, exposure to raw milk and its ingestion in dairy workers and exposure to Brucella culture in laboratory workers. Except laboratory workers, few veterinarians and dairy workers none had heard about brucellosis. KAP levels regarding brucellosis were too poor in all the groups except laboratory workers. Conclusion Brucellosis most of the times was missed or misdiagnosed. Regular screenings for brucellosis and awareness programmes to increase KAP levels are necessary to control brucellosis in occupationally exposed groups. PMID:27190804

  14. The ORGANIC Experiment on the ISS EXPOSE-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, K.; Peeters, Z.; Salama, F.; Foing, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Jessberger, E.; Bischoff, A.; Breitfellner, M.; Schmidt, W.

    2011-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aromatic networks are among the most abundant organic material in space. PAHs and fullerenes have been identified in meteorites and are proposed as carriers for numerous astronomical absorption and emission features. Recently the fullerenes C60 and C70 have been discovered in a young planetary nebula, Tc 1 and in other astronomical environments. Thin films of selected PAHs and fullerenes have been subjected to the low Earth orbit environment as part of the ORGANIC experiment on the multi-user facility EXPOSE-R, which was deployed onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in March 2009 and retrieved by extra-vehicular activity (EVA) in January 2011. The ORGANIC experiment monitors the chemical evolution, survival, destruction, and chemical modification of PAHs and fullerenes exposed to solar illumination and cosmic radiation. The radiation dose that is collected on the ISS by the samples cannot be accurately simulated in Earth laboratories. Dark samples are shielded from the UV photons and will enable us to differentiate between the effects of exposure to photons and cosmic rays. The samples are monitored before and after space exposure; ground control samples were continuously monitored. We describe the ORGANIC experiment on the Space Station and report on laboratory ground-control measurements in the UV-Vis-NIR at NASA-Ames. Extended space exposure allows us to collect data on multiple samples which can be extrapolated to other astrophysical environments and thus greatly enhance our knowledge on the evolution of organic compounds in space environment.

  15. Reprocessing of nonoptimally exposed holograms

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.S.; Robertson, C.E.; Tamashiro, F.M.

    1980-03-01

    Two reprocessing techniques have been investigated that are capable of correcting the effects of nonoptimum optical density of photographic amplitude holograms recorded on Agfa-Gevaert type 10E75 plates. In some cases a reprocessed hologram will exhibit a diffraction efficiency even higher than that obtainable from a hologram exposed and processed to the optimum density. The SNR of the reprocessed holograms is much higher than that of the same holograms belached with cupric bromide. In some cases the SNR approaches the optimum value for a properly exposed amplitude hologram. Subjective image quality and resolution of reprocessed hologram reconstructins appear to be no different than for normal single-development holograms. Repeated reprocessing is feasible and in some cases desirable as a means of increasing diffraction efficiency.

  16. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  17. The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-08-01

    As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

  18. Advances in treating exposed fractures.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Giglio, Pedro; Fogaça Cristante, Alexandre; Ricardo Pécora, José; Partezani Helito, Camilo; Lei Munhoz Lima, Ana Lucia; Dos Santos Silva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The management of exposed fractures has been discussed since ancient times and remains of great interest to present-day orthopedics and traumatology. These injuries are still a challenge. Infection and nonunion are feared complications. Aspects of the diagnosis, classification and initial management are discussed here. Early administration of antibiotics, surgical cleaning and meticulous debridement are essential. The systemic conditions of patients with multiple trauma and the local conditions of the limb affected need to be taken into consideration. Early skeletal stabilization is necessary. Definitive fixation should be considered when possible and provisional fixation methods should be used when necessary. Early closure should be the aim, and flaps can be used for this purpose.

  19. Fire resistance of exposed wood members

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2004-01-01

    Fire resistance data on exposed wood beams and columns are plentiful, but few studies have been done on exposed wood members in tension and in decks. To provide data to verify the application of a new calculation procedure, a limited series of fire resistance tests were conducted on wood members loaded in tension and on exposed wood decks.

  20. [Drug Exposed Infants and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This bulletin issue addresses the theme of drug-exposed infants and the services required by these infants and their families. "Cocaine-Exposed Infants: Myths and Misunderstandings" (Barbara J. Myers and others) comments on the negative accounts of drug-exposed babies presented by mass media and reviews the mix of positive and negative…

  1. Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, R. Louise; Sobell, Mark; Velasquez, Mary M.; Ingersoll, Karen; Nettleman, Mary; Sobell, Linda; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Ceperich, Sherry; von Sternberg, Kirk; Bolton, Burt; Skarpness, Bradley; Nagaraja, Jyothi

    2010-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure is a leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities in the United States. Design A randomized controlled trial (2002–2005; data analyzed 2005–2006) of a brief motivational intervention to reduce the risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP) in preconceptional women by focusing on both risk drinking and ineffective contraception use. Setting/Participants A total of 830 nonpregnant women, aged 18–44 years, and currently at risk for an AEP were recruited in six diverse settings in Florida, Texas, and Virginia. Combined settings had higher proportions of women at risk for AEP (12.5% overall) than in the general population (2%). Interventions Participants were randomized to receive information plus a brief motivational intervention (n=416) or to receive information only (n=414). The brief motivational intervention consisted of four counseling sessions and one contraception consultation and services visit. Main Outcome Measures Women consuming more than five drinks on any day or more than eight drinks per week on average, were considered risk drinkers; women who had intercourse without effective contraception were considered at risk of pregnancy. Reversing either or both risk conditions resulted in reduced risk of an AEP. Results Across the follow-up period, the odds ratios (ORs) of being at reduced risk for AEP were twofold greater in the intervention group: 3 months, 2.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.69–3.20); 6 months, 2.15 (CI=1.52–3.06); 9 months, 2.11 (CI=1.47–3.03). Between-groups differences by time phase were 18.0%, 17.0%, and 14. 8%, respectively. Conclusions A brief motivational intervention can reduce the risk of an AEP. PMID:17218187

  2. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  3. Proof-of-Concept Study: Novel Microbially-Driven Fenton Reaction for In Situ Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with 1,4-Dioxane, Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and Trichloroethene (TCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-17

    and PCE degradation process was driven by the Fe(III)-reducing facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis. S. oneidensis batch cultures were...provided with lactate, Fe(III), and either 1,4-dioxane, TCE or PCE and exposed to alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions. During the aerobic phase...S. oneidensis reduced O2 to H2O2, while during the anaerobic phase, S. oneidensis reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). During the aerobic-to- anaerobic

  4. Silent Victims: Children Exposed to Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Kathryn R.; Davey, Debrynda

    2007-01-01

    Annually an estimated 3 million or more children are exposed to acts of domestic violence between adults in their homes. These children are at risk for abuse themselves as well as other immediate and long-term problems, especially if they have been exposed to repeated episodes of domestic violence. Multiple behavioral manifestations, including…

  5. 3 EXPOSE Missions - overview and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, E.; Willnekcer, R.; Reitz, G.; Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Cman, C.

    2011-10-01

    The International Space Station ISS provides a variety of external research platforms for experiments aiming at the utilization of space parameters like vacuum, temperature oscillation and in particular extraterrestrial short wavelength UV and ionizing radiation which cannot be simulated accurately in the laboratory. Three Missions, two past and one upcoming, will be presented. A family of astrobiological experimental ESA facilities called "EXPOSE" were and will be accommodated on these outside exposure platforms: on one of the external balconies of the European Columbus Module (EXPOSE-E) and on the URM-D platform on the Russian Zvezda Module (EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-R2). Exobiological and radiation experiments, exposing chemical, biological and dosimetric samples to the harsh space environment are - and will be - accommodated on these facilities to increase our knowledge on the origin, evolution and distribution of life, on Earth and possibly beyond. The biological experiments investigate resistance and adaptation of organisms like bacteria, Achaea, fungi, lichens, plant seeds and small animals like mosquito larvae to extreme environmental conditions and underlying mechanisms like DNA repair. The organic chemical experiment