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Sample records for oneidensis mr-1 exposed

  1. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley R.; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M.; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear. PMID

  2. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear.

  3. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear. PMID

  4. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to Different Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    PubMed Central

    Beliaev, A. S.; Klingeman, D. M.; Klappenbach, J. A.; Wu, L.; Romine, M. F.; Tiedje, J. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Zhou, J.

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the complex structure of the energy-generating networks in the dissimilatory metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, global mRNA patterns were examined in cells exposed to a wide range of metal and non-metal electron acceptors. Gene expression patterns were similar irrespective of which metal ion was used as electron acceptor, with 60% of the differentially expressed genes showing similar induction or repression relative to fumarate-respiring conditions. Several groups of genes exhibited elevated expression levels in the presence of metals, including those encoding putative multidrug efflux transporters, detoxification proteins, extracytoplasmic sigma factors and PAS-domain regulators. Only one of the 42 predicted c-type cytochromes in MR-1, SO3300, displayed significantly elevated transcript levels across all metal-reducing conditions. Genes encoding decaheme cytochromes MtrC and MtrA that were previously linked to the reduction of different forms of Fe(III) and Mn(IV), exhibited only slight decreases in relative mRNA abundances under metal-reducing conditions. In contrast, specific transcriptome responses were displayed to individual non-metal electron acceptors resulting in the identification of unique groups of nitrate-, thiosulfate- and TMAO-induced genes including previously uncharacterized multi-cytochrome gene clusters. Collectively, the gene expression results reflect the fundamental differences between metal and non-metal respiratory pathways of S. oneidensis MR-1, where the coordinate induction of detoxification and stress response genes play a key role in adaptation of this organism under metal-reducing conditions. Moreover, the relative paucity and/or the constitutive nature of genes involved in electron transfer to metals is likely due to the low-specificity and the opportunistic nature of the metal-reducing electron transport pathways. PMID:16199584

  5. Electroanalysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Shumyantseva, V V; Shebanova, A S; Chalenko, Ya M; Voeikova, T A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Debabov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of bacterial cells Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were investigated. For registration of the direct electron transfer between S. oneidensis MR-1 and electrode, bacterial cells were pretreated with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), a synthetic membrane-like substance of polycationic nature that exhibits membrane-loosening properties. Such pretreatment of S. oneidensis MR-1 allowed increasing the efficiency of extracellular electron transfer by the proteobacterium due to better availability of electroactive proteins for registration of electron transfer processes. The electroanalysis of bacterial cells S. oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions allows registering redox-active proteins and biomolecules in the range of potentials of-0.40,-0.16, and-0 V, which corresponds to flavohemoproteins, quinone derivatives, and c-type cytochromes of the external membrane of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells.

  6. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2% of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5% of pyruvate and 2% of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35%. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications.

  7. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2% of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5% of pyruvate and 2% of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35%. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications. PMID:26280214

  8. Induction of Rapid Detachment in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Thormann, Kai M.; Saville, Renée M.; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2005-01-01

    Active detachment of cells from microbial biofilms is a critical yet poorly understood step in biofilm development. We discovered that detachment of cells from biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can be induced by arresting the medium flow in a hydrodynamic biofilm system. Induction of detachment was rapid, and substantial biofilm dispersal started as soon as 5 min after the stop of flow. We developed a confocal laser scanning microscopy-based assay to quantify detachment. The extent of biomass loss was found to be dependent on the time interval of flow stop and on the thickness of the biofilm. Up to 80% of the biomass of 16-h-old biofilms could be induced to detach. High-resolution microscopy studies revealed that detachment was associated with an overall loosening of the biofilm structure and a release of individual cells or small cell clusters. Swimming motility was not required for detachment. Although the loosening of cells from the biofilm structure was observed evenly throughout thin biofilms, the most pronounced detachment in thicker biofilms occurred in regions exposed to the flow of medium, suggesting a metabolic control of detachability. Deconvolution of the factors associated with the stop of medium flow revealed that a sudden decrease in oxygen tension is the predominant trigger for initiating detachment of individual cells. In contrast, carbon limitation did not trigger any substantial detachment, suggesting a physiological link between oxygen sensing or metabolism and detachment. In-frame deletions were introduced into genes encoding the known and putative global transcriptional regulators ArcA, CRP, and EtrA (FNR), which respond to changes in oxygen tension in S. oneidensis MR-1. Biofilms of null mutants in arcA and crp were severely impacted in the stop-of-flow-induced detachment response, suggesting a role for these genes in regulation of detachment. In contrast, an ΔetrA mutant displayed a variable detachment phenotype. From this genetic

  9. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution.

  10. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution. PMID:26692509

  11. Oxygen-dependent autoaggregation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Hill, Eric A.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-07-01

    In aerobic chemostat cultures maintained at 50% dissolved O2 tension (123.5 µM dissolved O2), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 rapidly aggregated upon addition of 0.68 mM CaCl2 and retained this multi-cellular phenotype at high dilution rates. Confocal microscopy analysis of the extracellular matrix material contributing to the stability of the aggregate structures revealed the presence of extracellular DNA, protein, and glycoconjugates. Upon onset of O2-limited growth (dissolved O2 below detection) however, the Ca2+-supplemented chemostat cultures of strain MR-1 rapidly disaggregated and grew as motile dispersed cells. Global transcriptome analysis comparing aerobic aggregated to O2-limited unaggregated cells identified genes encoding cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface adhesion factors whose transcription increased upon exposure to increased O2 concentrations. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes, including mtrD (SO1782), mtrE (SO1781), and mtrF (SO1780). Our data indicate that mechanisms involved in autoaggregation of MR-1 are dependent on the function of pilD gene which encodes a putative prepilin peptidase. Mutants of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 deficient in PilD and associated pathways, including type IV and Msh pili biogenesis, displayed a moderate increase in sensitivity to H2O2. Taken together, our evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis MR-1 may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  12. Low-Temperature Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Randa; Popa, Radu; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Findlay, Robert H.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a mesophilic bacterium with a maximum growth temperature of ≈35°C but the ability to grow over a wide range of temperatures, including temperatures near zero. At room temperature (≈22°C) MR-1 grows with a doubling time of about 40 min, but when moved from 22°C to 3°C, MR-1 cells display a very long lag phase of more than 100 h followed by very slow growth, with a doubling time of ≈67 h. In comparison to cells grown at 22°C, the cold-grown cells formed long, motile filaments, showed many spheroplast-like structures, produced an array of proteins not seen at higher temperature, and synthesized a different pattern of cellular lipids. Frequent pilus-like structures were observed during the transition from 3 to 22°C. PMID:15691935

  13. Hydrogen Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Meshulam-Simon, Galit; Behrens, Sebastian; Choo, Alexander D.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative sediment microorganism which uses diverse compounds, such as oxygen and fumarate, as well as insoluble Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as electron acceptors. The electron donor spectrum is more limited and includes metabolic end products of primary fermenting bacteria, such as lactate, formate, and hydrogen. While the utilization of hydrogen as an electron donor has been described previously, we report here the formation of hydrogen from pyruvate under anaerobic, stationary-phase conditions in the absence of an external electron acceptor. Genes for the two S. oneidensis MR-1 hydrogenases, hydA, encoding a periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, and hyaB, encoding a periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase, were found to be expressed only under anaerobic conditions during early exponential growth and into stationary-phase growth. Analyses of ΔhydA, ΔhyaB, and ΔhydA ΔhyaB in-frame-deletion mutants indicated that HydA functions primarily as a hydrogen-forming hydrogenase while HyaB has a bifunctional role and represents the dominant hydrogenase activity under the experimental conditions tested. Based on results from physiological and genetic experiments, we propose that hydrogen is formed from pyruvate by multiple parallel pathways, one pathway involving formate as an intermediate, pyruvate-formate lyase, and formate-hydrogen lyase, comprised of HydA hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, and a formate-independent pathway involving pyruvate dehydrogenase. A reverse electron transport chain is potentially involved in a formate-hydrogen lyase-independent pathway. While pyruvate does not support a fermentative mode of growth in this microorganism, pyruvate, in the absence of an electron acceptor, increased cell viability in anaerobic, stationary-phase cultures, suggesting a role in the survival of S. oneidensis MR-1 under stationary-phase conditions. PMID:17189435

  14. Current Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants.

    SciTech Connect

    Bretschger, Orianna; Obraztsova, Anna; Sturm, Carter A.; Chang, In Seop; Gorby, Yuri A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Barua, Soumitra; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong; Beliaev, Alex S.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Saffarini, Daad; Mansfeld, Florian; Kim, Byung Hong; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2007-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a Gram negative facultative anaerobe capable of utilizing a broad range of electron acceptors, including several solid substrates. S. oneidensis MR-1 can reduce Mn(IV) and Fe(III) oxides, and can produce current in microbial fuel cells. The mechanisms that are employed by S. oneidensis MR-1 to execute these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Several different S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants were generated and tested for current production and metal-oxide reduction. The results showed that a few key cytochromes play a role in all of the processes but that their degree of participation in each process is very different. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of electron transfer to solid and soluble substrates by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  15. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, J.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-15

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 20 _C or 2.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 37 _C) to generate U(IV) solids at ‘‘fast” and ‘‘slow” rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9–3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  16. The Electrogenic Bacterium Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and its Mutants with Increased Reducing Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikova, T. A.; Emelyanova, L. K.; Novikova, L. M.; Mordkovich, N. N.; Shakulov, R. S.; Debabov, V. G.

    2013-02-01

    Mutants of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 resistant to fosfomycin, a toxic analogue of phosphoenolpyruvate, were obtained. The mutants exhibited an increased reducing activity and a higher rate of lactate utilization. A correlation was shown between the rates of metabolism of oxidized substrates and the rate of reduction of methylene blue, a mediator of electron transport. The mutants of S.oneidensis MR-1 will be used in microbial fuel cells (MFC) to enhance energy production from organic compounds. The strain S. oneidensis MR-1 and its mutants with an increased electron production will be used as a good source of bioelectricity in MFC in the experiments on the International Space Station.

  17. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  18. Growth Inhibition and Stimulation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by Surfactants and Calcium Polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Kathryn L.; Tilton, Fred A.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Ergas, Sarina J.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miracle, Ann L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-06-14

    Foam delivery technology (FDT) uses surfactant based foam to immobilize subsurface contaminants in situ. Where traditional approaches are impractical, FDT has the potential to overcome many of the technical challenges facing the remediation of contaminated deep vadose zone environments. However, little is known about the effects these reactive chemicals may have on microorganisms inhabiting the contaminated subsurface. In addition, there are currently no standard assays to assess microbial responses to subsurface remedial treatments while these agents are under development. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid laboratory assay to assess the potential growth inhibition and/or stimulation of microorganisms following exposure to candidate FDT components. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) and several surfactants (i.e. sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and NINOL40-CO) have diverse chemistries and are candidate components of FDT. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of these chemicals to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and the growth and viability potential of these components. Concentrations of SDS higher than 700 {micro}M were toxic to S. oneidensis MR-1 growth over the course of four days of exposure. The relative acute toxicity order for these compounds was SDS>>CPS>>NINOL40-CO>SLES-CAPB. Dose dependent growth decreases (20 to 100 mM) were observed in the CAPB and SLES treated cultures and both CPS and NINOL 40-CO were toxic at all concentrations tested (1.45 to 7.25 mM CPS). Both SLES (20 to 100 mM) and SDS at lower concentrations (20 to 500 {micro}M) were stimulatory to S. oneidensis MR-1 indicating a capacity to be used as a carbon source. These studies also identified potentially key component characteristics, such as precipitate formation and oxygen availability, which may prove valuable in assessing the response of subsurface

  19. Robustness of flux distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under environmental stress and genetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Martin, H. G.; Keasling, J.; Tang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental important bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, has the significantly different growth rates under normal growth (doubling time=3hrs) in the minimal lactate medium, salt stress (doubling time > 6 hrs), and enhanced growth with amino acids supplementation (doubling time <1.5hrs). 13C based metabolic flux analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 indicates that the relative central metabolism maintains stable under all growth conditions. Furthermore, screen of MR-1 transposon mutants using high throughput 13C isotopomer analysis method also indicates the robustness of central metabolism under genetic perturbations. These observations reveal a rigid physiology in the level of flux distribution in MR-1, in contrast to the significant change of transcriptomes and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. This study provides evidence that microbial metabolism maintains metabolic stability under various environmental conditions, rather than being geared towards growth rate maximization.

  20. Efficiencies of Bio-electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen from Lactate Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown in a chemostatic, continuously-fed bioelectrochemical cell under slightly aerated conditions. The start-up phase was controlled potentiostatically (0.4 V vs. SHE). When a stable performance was achieved, the reactor was switched to bio-electrocatalytic producti...

  1. Identification of diverse carbon utilization pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via expression profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Michael E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Juhn, Frank S.; Serres, Margrethe H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gardner, Timothy S.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and validated the first high-density expression array for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, consisting of 105 oligonucleotide probes differentially targeted to genes and intergenic regions of its genome. Beyond its use for global gene expression profiling, this microarray represents a platform for the identification of small non-coding RNAs, improved operon inference, and CHIP-chip studies.

  2. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range.

    PubMed

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 10(8) cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 10(2) CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  3. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range

    PubMed Central

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 108 cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 102 CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  4. Survival of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 to GPa pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Daniel, Isabelle; Eakins, Daniel; Meersman, Filip; McMillian, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Most life on Earth is thought to occupy near-surface environments under relatively mild conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity etc. That view is changing following discovery of extremophile organisms that prefer environments based on high or low T, extreme chemistries, or very high pressures. Over the past three decades, geomicrobiologists have discovered an extensive subsurface biosphere, that may account for between 1/10 to 1/3 of Earth's living biomass. We subjected samples of Shewanella oneidensis to several pressure cycles to examine its survival to static high pressures to above 1.5 GPa. Shewanella forms part of a genus that contains several piezophile species like S. violacea and S. benthica. We have obtained growth curves for populations recovered from high P conditions and cultured in the laboratory, before being subjected to even higher pressures. We have also carried out dynamic shock experiments using a specially designed cell to maintain high-P, low-T conditions during shock-recovery experiments and observe colony formation among the survivors. Colony counts, shape and growth curves allow us to compare the static vs dynamic pressure resistance of wild type vs pressure-adapted strains. Leverhulme

  5. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  6. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  7. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  8. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  9. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  10. Exploring the Roles of DNA Methylation in the Metal-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Luong, Khai; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Blow, Matthew; Korlach, Jonas; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We performed whole-genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and other cellular processes. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, including three novel targets for type I restriction/modification enzymes. The sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found that S. oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of differentially expressed genes under these conditions, suggesting that DNA methylation is not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicates that DNA methylation may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication. PMID:23995632

  11. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Luong, Khai; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Blow, Matthew; Korlach, Jonas; Deutschbauer, Adam; Malmstrom, Rex

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Surface-Associated Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Gödeke, Julia; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation starts with single cells attaching to a surface, however, little is known about the initial attachment steps and the adaptation to the surface-associated life style. Here, we describe a hydrodynamic system that allows easy harvest of cells at very early biofilm stages. Using the metal ion-reducing gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism, we analyzed the transcriptional changes occurring during surface-associated growth between 15 and 60 minutes after attachment. 230 genes were significantly upregulated and 333 were downregulated by a factor of ≥2. Main functional categories of the corresponding gene products comprise metabolism, uptake and transport, regulation, and hypothetical proteins. Among the genes highly upregulated those implicated in iron uptake are highly overrepresented, strongly indicating that S. oneidensis MR-1 has a high demand for iron during surface attachment and initial biofilm stages. Subsequent microscopic analysis of biofilm formation under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that addition of Fe(II) significantly stimulated biofilm formation of S. oneidensis MR-1 while planktonic growth was not affected. Our approach to harvest cells for transcriptional analysis of early biofilm stages is expected to be easily adapted to other bacterial species. PMID:22860070

  13. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 -a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  14. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  15. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  16. Dual stator dynamics in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Anja; Delalez, Nicolas J; Brenzinger, Susanne; Steel, Bradley C; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an intricate nanomachine which converts ion gradients into rotational movement. Torque is created by ion-dependent stator complexes which surround the rotor in a ring. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expresses two distinct types of stator units: the Na(+)-dependent PomA4 B2 and the H(+)-dependent MotA4 B2. Here, we have explored the stator unit dynamics in the MR-1 flagellar system by using mCherry-labeled PomAB and MotAB units. We observed a total of between 7 and 11 stator units in each flagellar motor. Both types of stator units exchanged between motors and a pool of stator complexes in the membrane, and the exchange rate of MotAB, but not of PomAB, units was dependent on the environmental Na(+)-levels. In 200 mM Na(+), the numbers of PomAB and MotAB units in wild-type motors was determined to be about 7:2 (PomAB:MotAB), shifting to about 6:5 without Na(+). Significantly, the average swimming speed of MR-1 cells at low Na(+) conditions was increased in the presence of MotAB. These data strongly indicate that the S. oneidensis flagellar motors simultaneously use H(+) and Na(+) driven stators in a configuration governed by MotAB incorporation efficiency in response to environmental Na(+) levels.

  17. Probing regulon of ArcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by integrated genomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin Koo; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    The Arc two-component system is a global regulator controlling many genes involved in aerobic/anaerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism in Escherichia coli. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains a gene encoding a putative ArcA homolog with {approx} 81% amino acid sequence identity to the E. coli ArcA protein but not a full-length arcB gene. To understand the role of ArcA in S. oneidensis, an arcA deletion strain was constructed and subjected to both physiological characterization and microarray analysis. Compared to the wild-type MR-1, the mutant exhibited impaired aerobic growth and a defect in utilizing DMSO in the absence of O{sub 2}. Microarray analyses on cells grown aerobically and anaerobically on fumarate revealed that expression of 1009 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the mutation. In contrast to E. coli ArcA, the protein appears to be dispensable in regulation of the TCA cycle in S. oneidensis. To further determine genes regulated by the Arc system, an ArcA recognition weight matrix from DNA-binding data and bioinformatics analysis was generated and used to produce an ArcA sequence affinity map. By combining both techniques, we identified an ArcA regulon of at least 50 operons, of which only 6 were found to be directly controlled by ArcA in E. coli. These results indicate that the Arc system in S. oneidensis differs from that in E. coli substantially in terms of its physiological function and regulon while their binding motif are strikingly similar.

  18. Genomic reconstruction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism reveals previously uncharacterized machinery for lactate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Osterman, Andrei L.; Dervyn, Etienne; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Collart, Frank R.; Scott, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-02-24

    The ability to utilize lactate as a sole source of carbon and energy is one of the key metabolic signatures of Shewanellae, a diverse group of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria commonly found in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, homology searches failed to recognize orthologs of previously described bacterial D- or L-lactate oxidizing enzymes (Escherichia coli genes dld and lldD) in any of the 13 analyzed genomes of Shewanella spp. Using comparative genomic techniques, we identified a conserved chromosomal gene cluster in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (locus tag: SO1522-SO1518) containing lactate permease and candidate genes for both D- and L-lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The predicted D-LDH gene (dldD, SO1521) is a distant homolog of FAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase from yeast, whereas the predicted L-LDH is encoded by three genes with previously unknown functions (lldEGF, SO1520-19-18). Through a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we experimentally confirmed the predicted physiological role of these novel genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 and carried out successful functional validation studies in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We conclusively showed that dldD and lldEFG encode fully functional D-and L-LDH enzymes, which catalyze the oxidation of the respective lactate stereoisomers to pyruvate. Notably, the S. oneidensis MR-1 LldEFG enzyme is the first described example of a multi-subunit lactate oxidase. Comparative analysis of >400 bacterial species revealed the presence of LldEFG and Dld in a broad range of diverse species accentuating the potential importance of these previously unknown proteins in microbial metabolism.

  19. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Acute Chromate Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2007-01-01

    Proteome alterations in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to different acute dose challenges (0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM) of the toxic metal chromate [Cr(VI)] were characterized with multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS on a linear trapping quadrupole MS. A total of 2,406 functionally diverse proteins were identified, with a subset demonstrating dosage-dependent up- and down-regulated expression, such as proteins involved in detoxification and iron binding and transport.

  20. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Herve; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-02

    The γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that was implicated in both H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned into a protein expression vector. The resulting plasmid was transformed into a MR-1 mutant deficient in H2 formation. Expression of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant’s ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for wild type. Following expression, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase was purified to near homogeneity. The purified MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase could couple H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII) and methyl viologen directly. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated Tc(VII) but not methyl viologen reductions. Under the conditions tested, Tc(VII) reduction was complete in Tris buffer but not in HEPES buffer. The reduced Tc(IV) was soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc(IV) precipitates formed in HEPES buffer were packed with crystallites. Although X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the reduction products found in both buffers were Tc(IV), extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure measurements revealed that these products were very different. While the product in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2•nH2O. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase is a bidirectional enzyme that catalyzes both H2 formation and oxidation as well as Tc(VII) reduction directly by coupling H2 oxidation.

  2. Purification and Characterization of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that has been implicated in H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase coupled H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O4− and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O4− but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O4− used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O4− was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2·nH2O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O4− reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O4− reduction directly by coupling to H2 oxidation. PMID:21724888

  3. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Picone, Alex F; Galperin, Michael Y; Romine, Margaret F; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Auberry, Kenneth J; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alex S; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A; Gorby, Yuri A; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel A; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Land, Miriam L; Lipton, Mary S; McCue, Lee-Ann; Monroe, Matthew; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Purvine, Samuel; Serres, Margrethe H; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A; Zhu, Wenhong; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank W; Lawrence, Charles E; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank R; Yates, John R; Smith, Richard D; Giometti, Carol S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M

    2005-02-01

    The gamma-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a metabolically versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organic compounds, metal ions, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximately 40% of the predicted ORFs in the S. oneidensis genome were annotated as uncharacterized "hypothetical" genes. We implemented an integrative approach by using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into gene function. Global expression profiles were determined for cells after UV irradiation and under aerobic and suboxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 hypothetical genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all predicted hypothetical proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and the expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored by using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We were able to identify homologs for nearly all of these hypothetical proteins (97%), but could confidently assign exact biochemical functions for only 16 proteins (category 1; 3%). Altogether, computational and experimental evidence provided functional assignments or insights for 240 more genes (categories 2-5; 45%). These functional annotations advance our understanding of genes involved in vital cellular processes, including energy conversion, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. We propose that this integrative approach offers a valuable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of hypothetical proteins with each newly sequenced genome. PMID:15684069

  4. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations

    SciTech Connect

    Picone, Alex F.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Romine, Margaret; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S.; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alexander S; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A.; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Land, Miriam L; Lipton, Mary S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Monroe, Matthew; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Purvine, Samuel; Serres, Margrethe H.; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Zhu, Wenguang; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank W; Lawrence, Charles E.; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank; YatesIII, John R.; Smith, Richard D.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The gamma-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a metabolically versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organic compounds, metal ions, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximate to40% of the predicted ORFs in the S. oneidensis genome were annotated as uncharacterized "hypothetical" genes. We implemented an integrative approach by using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into gene function. Global expression profiles were determined for cells after UV irradiation and under aerobic and suboxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 hypothetical genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all predicted hypothetical proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and the expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored by using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We were able to identify homologs for nearly all of these hypothetical proteins (97%), but could confidently assign exact biochemical functions for only 16 proteins (category 1; 3%). Altogether, computational and experimental evidence provided functional assignments or insights for 240 more genes (categories 2-5; 45%). These functional annotations advance our understanding of genes involved in vital cellular processes, including energy conversion, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. We propose that this integrative approach offers a valuable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of hypothetical proteins with each newly sequenced genome.

  5. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  6. Aggrandizing power output from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 microbial fuel cells using calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Petersen, Emily R; Gross, Benjamin J; Soto, Carissa M; Ringeisen, Bradley R; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Biffinger, Justin C

    2012-01-15

    There are several interconnected metabolic pathways in bacteria essential for the conversion of carbon electron sources directly into electrical currents using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study establishes a direct exogenous method to increase power output from a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 containing MFC by adding calcium chloride to the culture medium. The current output from each CaCl(2) concentration tested revealed that the addition of CaCl(2) to 1400 μM increased the current density by >80% (0.95-1.76 μA/cm(2)) using sodium lactate as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, polarization curves showed that the maximum power output could be increased from 157 to 330 μW with the addition of 2080 μM CaCl(2). Since the conductivity of the culture medium did not change after the addition of CaCl(2) (confirmed by EIS and bulk conductivity measurements), this increase in power was primarily biological and not based on ionic effects. Thus, controlling the concentration of CaCl(2) is a pathway to increase the efficiency and performance of S. oneidensis MR-1 MFCs.

  7. A Ferrous Iron Exporter Mediates Iron Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brittany D; Brutinel, Evan D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium frequently found in aquatic sediments. In the absence of oxygen, S. oneidensis can respire extracellular, insoluble oxidized metals, such as iron (hydr)oxides, making it intimately involved in environmental metal and nutrient cycling. The reduction of ferric iron (Fe(3+)) results in the production of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) ions, which remain soluble under certain conditions and are toxic to cells at higher concentrations. We have identified an inner membrane protein in S. oneidensis, encoded by the gene SO_4475 and here called FeoE, which is important for survival during anaerobic iron respiration. FeoE, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family, functions to export excess Fe(2+) from the MR-1 cytoplasm. Mutants lacking feoE exhibit an increased sensitivity to Fe(2+). The export function of FeoE is specific for Fe(2+), as an feoE mutant is equally sensitive to other metal ions known to be substrates of other CDF proteins (Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), or Zn(2+)). The substrate specificity of FeoE differs from that of FieF, the Escherichia coli homolog of FeoE, which has been reported to be a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) or Fe(2+)/Zn(2+) exporter. A complemented feoE mutant has an increased growth rate in the presence of excess Fe(2+) compared to that of the ΔfeoE mutant complemented with fieF. It is possible that FeoE has evolved to become an efficient and specific Fe(2+) exporter in response to the high levels of iron often present in the types of environmental niches in which Shewanella species can be found.

  8. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozawa, K.; Tsapin, A. I.; Nealson, K. H.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Akutsu, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  9. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III) Reduction in Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA), an integral outer-membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB), and an outer-membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC). Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer-membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three) and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III) citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC/mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations) are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA/MtrE/OmcA is able to reduce iron(III) citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications toward the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production. PMID:22363330

  10. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, Charles E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Poppy, Tara E.; Maloney, Andrea; Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  11. Identification of Mobile Elements and Pseudogenes in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Carlson, Timothy; Norbeck, Angela D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the first of 22 different Shewanella spp. whose genomes have been or are being sequenced and thus serves as the model organism for studying the functional repertoire of the Shewanella genus. The original MR-1 genome annotation revealed a large number of transposase genes and pseudogenes, indicating that many of the genome’s functions may be decaying. Comparative analyses of the sequenced Shewanella strains suggest that 209 genes in MR-1 have in-frame stop codons, frameshifts, or interruptions and/or are truncated and that 65 of the original pseudogene predictions were erroneous. Among the decaying functions are that of one of three chemotaxis clusters, type I pilus production, starch utilization, and nitrite respiration. Many of the mutations could be attributed to members of 41 different types of insertion sequence (IS) elements and three types of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements identified here for the first time. The high copy numbers of individual mobile elements (up to 71) are expected to promote large-scale genome recombination events, as evidenced by the displacement of the algA promoter. The ability of MR-1 to acquire foreign genes via reactions catalyzed by both the integron integrase and the ISSod25-encoded integrases is suggested by the presence of attC sites and genes whose sequences are characteristic of other species downstream of each site. This large number of mobile elements and multiple potential sites for integrasemediated acquisition of foreign DNA indicate that the MR-1 genome is exceptionally dynamic, with many functions and regulatory control points in the process of decay or reinvention.

  12. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  13. Redox and pH Microenvironments within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms Reveal an Electron Transfer Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to quantify the variations in redox potential and pH in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms respiring on electrodes. We grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on a graphite electrode, which was used to accept electrons for microbial respiration. We modified well-known redox and pH microelectrodes with a built-in reference electrode so that they could operate near polarized surfaces and quantified the redox potential and pH profiles in these biofilms. In addition, we used a ferri-/ferrocyanide redox system in which electrons were only transferred by mediated electron transfer to explain the observed redox potential profiles in biofilms. We found that regardless of the polarization potential of the biofilm electrode, the redox potential decreased toward the bottom of the biofilm. In a fully redox-mediated control system (ferri-/ferrocyanide redox system), the redox potential increased toward the bottom when the electrode was the electron acceptor. The opposite behavior of redox profiles in biofilms and the redox-controlled system is explained by S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms not being redox-controlled when they respire on electrodes. The lack of a significant variation in pH implies that there is no proton transfer limitation in S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and that redox potential profiles are not caused by pH. PMID:21648431

  14. Decolorization and detoxification of a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye aniline blue by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongmin; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Cancan; Cao, Danming; Du, Daolin

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the extracellular decolorization of aniline blue, a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye, by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was confirmed. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a high capacity for decolorizing aniline blue even at a concentration of up to 1,000 mg/l under anaerobic conditions. Maximum decolorization efficiency appeared at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Lactate was a better candidate of electron donor for the decolorization of aniline blue. The addition of nitrate, hydrous ferric oxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide all could cause a significant decline of decolorization efficiency. The Mtr respiratory pathway was found to be involved into the decolorization of aniline blue by S. oneidensis MR-1. The toxicity evaluation through phytotoxicity and genotoxicity showed that S. oneidensis MR-1 could decrease the toxicity of aniline blue during the decolorization process. Thus, this work may facilitate a better understanding on the degradation mechanisms of the triphenylmethane dyes by Shewanella and is beneficial to their application in bioremediation.

  15. Mutants Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Effective in Generating Bioelectricity in Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikova, T. A.; Emelyanova, L. K.; Novikova, L. M.; Shakulov, R. S.; Sidoruk, K. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Ilyin, V. K.; Soldatov, P. E.; Tyurin-Kuz'min, A. Y.; Smolenskaya, T. S.; Debabov, V. G.

    2013-02-01

    The capability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants FRS1 and FRB1, characterized by a high reducing activity, to generate electricity was measured in microbial fuel cells (MFC) of different types. The reducing activity of these mutants was previously identified with respect to the rate of discoloration (reduction) of methylene blueё, a dye that served as an electron transfer mediator. The present study demonstrated that the rate of MB discoloration was in direct correlation with the level of voltage in MFC of the above strains. In case when the mutants were used, the parameter in MFC proved to be 30-40% greater than in the case of the parent strain. In the course of this investigation MFC characteristics were identified, optimal electrode materials and ion-selective membranes selected, and MFC laboratory mockups manufactured.

  16. Shewregdb: Database and visualization environment for experimental and predicted regulatory information in Shewanella oneidensis mr-1

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Leuze, Mike; Kora, Guruprasad; Romine, Margaret F.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2009-10-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an important model organism for environmental research as it has an exceptional metabolic and respiratory versatility regulated by a complex regulatory network. We have developed a database to collect experimental and computational data relating to regulation of gene and protein expression and a visualization environment that enables integration of these data types. The regulatory information in the database was collected from the published literature and different Internet resources. It includes predictions of DNA regulator binding sites, sigma factor binding sites, transcription units, operons, promoters, and RNA regulators including non-coding RNAs, riboswitches, and different types of terminators. A visualization environment based on GBrowser was developed for accessing the collected information and for its overlaying with experimental data (experimental results from studies employing microarrays, proteomics, and/or gene mutagenesis) and other genome annotations.

  17. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution. PMID:16849424

  18. Comparison of uranium(VI) removal by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in flow and batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Sani, Rajesh K; Peyton, Brent M; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2008-06-01

    To better understand the interactions among metal contaminants, nutrients, and microorganisms in subsurface fracture-flow systems, biofilms of pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were grown in six fracture-flow reactors (FFRs) of different geometries. The spatial and temporal distribution of uranium and bacteria were examined using a tracer dye (brilliant blue FCF) and microscopy. The results showed that plugging by bacterial cells was dependent on the geometry of the reactor and that biofilms grown in FFRs had a limited U(VI)-reduction capacity. To quantify the U(VI)-reduction capacity of biofilms, batch experiments for U(VI) reduction were performed with repetitive U(VI) additions. U(VI)-reduction rates of stationary phase cultures decreased after each U(VI) addition. After the fourth U(VI) addition, stationary phase cultures treated with U(VI) with and without spent medium yielded gray and black precipitates, respectively. These gray and black U precipitates were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Data for randomly selected areas of black precipitates showed that reduced U particles (3-6 nm) were crystalline, whereas gray precipitates were a mixture of crystalline and amorphous solids. Results obtained in this study, including a dramatic limitation of S. oneidensis MR-1 and its biofilms to reduce U(VI) and plugging of FFRs, suggest that alternative organisms should be targeted for stimulation for metal immobilization in subsurface fracture-flow systems. PMID:18468655

  19. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2006-03-21

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in "extracellular respiration" to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427-SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound.

  20. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  1. Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Wei, Wei; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2008-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon.

  2. Substrate-level phosphorylation is the primary source of energy conservation during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kristopher A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Naranjo, Belén; Shikhare, Indraneel D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that respiratory organisms use proton motive force to produce ATP via F-type ATP synthase aerobically and that this process may reverse during anaerobiosis to produce proton motive force. Here, we show that Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a nonfermentative, facultative anaerobe known to respire exogenous electron acceptors, generates ATP primarily from substrate-level phosphorylation under anaerobic conditions. Mutant strains lacking ackA (SO2915) and pta (SO2916), genes required for acetate production and a significant portion of substrate-level ATP produced anaerobically, were tested for growth. These mutant strains were unable to grow anaerobically with lactate and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with substrate-level phosphorylation yielding a significant amount of ATP. Mutant strains lacking ackA and pta were also shown to grow slowly using N-acetylglucosamine as the carbon source and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with some ATP generation deriving from the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with this substrate. A deletion strain lacking the sole F-type ATP synthase (SO4746 to SO4754) demonstrated enhanced growth on N-acetylglucosamine and a minor defect with lactate under anaerobic conditions. ATP synthase mutants grown anaerobically on lactate while expressing proteorhodopsin, a light-dependent proton pump, exhibited restored growth when exposed to light, consistent with a proton-pumping role for ATP synthase under anaerobic conditions. Although S. oneidensis requires external electron acceptors to balance redox reactions and is not fermentative, we find that substrate-level phosphorylation is its primary anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic characterization of an ackA deletion in Shewanella sp. strain MR-4 and genomic analysis of other sequenced strains suggest that this strategy is a common feature of Shewanella.

  3. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  4. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  5. Synthetic and Evolutionary Construction of a Chlorate-Reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Iain C.; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Carlson, Hans K.; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite evidence for the prevalence of horizontal gene transfer of respiratory genes, little is known about how pathways functionally integrate within new hosts. One example of a mobile respiratory metabolism is bacterial chlorate reduction, which is frequently encoded on composite transposons. This implies that the essential components of the metabolism are encoded on these mobile elements. To test this, we heterologously expressed genes for chlorate reduction from Shewanella algae ACDC in the non-chlorate-reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The construct that ultimately endowed robust growth on chlorate included cld, a cytochrome c gene, clrABDC, and two genes of unknown function. Although strain MR-1 was unable to grow on chlorate after initial insertion of these genes into the chromosome, 11 derived strains capable of chlorate respiration were obtained through adaptive evolution. Genome resequencing indicated that all of the evolved chlorate-reducing strains replicated a large genomic region containing chlorate reduction genes. Contraction in copy number and loss of the ability to reduce chlorate were also observed, indicating that this phenomenon was extremely dynamic. Although most strains contained more than six copies of the replicated region, a single strain with less duplication also grew rapidly. This strain contained three additional mutations that we hypothesized compensated for the low copy number. We remade the mutations combinatorially in the unevolved strain and determined that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of cld enabled growth on chlorate and was epistatic to a second base pair change in the NarP binding sequence between narQP and nrfA that enhanced growth. PMID:25991681

  6. The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

  7. Validation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Small Proteins by AMT Tag-based Proteome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Fang, Ruihua; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-09-01

    Using stringent criteria for protein identification by accurate mass and time (AMT) tag mass spectrometric methodology, we detected 36 proteins <101 amino acids in length, including 10 that were annotated as hypothetical proteins, in 172 global tryptic digests of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 proteins analyzed. Peptides that map to the conserved, but functionally uncharacterized proteins SO4134 and SO2787, were the most frequently detected small proteins in these samples, while hypotheticals SO2669 and SO2063, conserved hypotheticals SO0335 and SO2176, and the SlyX protein (SO1063) were observed at frequencies similar to small expected abundant ribosomal proteins and translation initiation factor IF-1 and consequently, likely to encode important cellular functions. In addition, 30 proteins including three of the small proteins that map to genes predicted to encode frameshifts, point mutations, or recoding signals were detected. Of these 30 genes, peptides that map to positions beyond internal stop codons were detected in 13 genes (SO0101, SO0419, SO0590, SO0738, SO1113, SO1211, SO3079, SO3130, SO3240, SO4231, SO4328, SO4422, and SO4657). While expression of the full-length formate dehydrogenase encoded by SO0101 can be explained by incorporation of selenocysteine at the internal stop codon, the mechanism of translating downstream sequences in the remaining genes remains unknown.

  8. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  9. Structure of Biogenic Uraninite Produced By Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, E.J.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J.O.; Suvorova, E.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Mehta, A.; Stahlman, J.; Webb, S.M.; Clark, D.L.; Conradson, S.D.; Ilton, E.S.; Bargar, J.R.

    2009-05-27

    The stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is seminal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for remediation of subsurface U(VI) contamination. The properties and hence stability of uraninite are dependent on its size, structure, and composition. In this study, the local-, intermediate-, and long-range molecular-scale structure of nanoscale uraninite produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 was investigated using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The uraninite products were found to be structurally homologous with stoichiometric UO{sub 2} under all conditions considered. Significantly, there was no evidence for lattice strain of the biogenic uraninite nanoparticles. The fresh nanoparticles were found to exhibit a well-ordered interior core of diameter ca. 1.3 nm and an outer region of thickness ca {approx}0.6 nm in which the structure is locally distorted. The lack of nanoparticle strain and structural homology with stoichiometric UO{sub 2} suggests that established thermodynamic parameters for the latter material are an appropriate starting point to model the behavior of nanobiogenic uraninite. The detailed structural analysis in this study provides an essential foundation for subsequent investigations of environmental samples.

  10. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  11. Reduction of jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and secondary mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingjie, Ouyang; Xiancai, Lu; Huan, Liu; Juan, Li; Tingting, Zhu; Xiangyu, Zhu; Jianjun, Lu; Rucheng, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Jarosite is a common mineral in a variety of environments formed by the oxidation of iron sulfide normally accompanying with the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) in mining areas or acid rock drainages (ARD) in many localities. Decomposition of jarosite by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) influences the mobility of many heavy metals generally accommodated in natural jarosite. This study examined the anaerobic reduction of synthesized jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a typical facultative bacteria. The release of ferrous and ferric ion, as well as sulfate and potassium, in the inoculated experimental group lasting 80 days is much higher than that in abiotic control groups. The detection of bicarbonate and acetate in experimental solution further confirms the mechanism of microbial reduction of jarosite, in which lactate acts as the electron donor. The produced ferrous iron stimulates the subsequent secondary mineralization, leading to precipitation and transformation of various iron-containing minerals. Green rust and goethite are the intermediate minerals of the microbial reduction process under anoxic conditions, and the end products include magnetite and siderite. In aerobic environments, goethite, magnetite and siderite were also detected, but the contents were relatively lower. While in abiotic experiments, only goethite has been detected as a product. Thus, the microbial reduction and subsequent mineral transformation can remarkably influence the geochemical cycling of iron and sulfur in supergene environments, as well as the mobility of heavy metals commonly accommodated in jarosite.

  12. A biochemical approach to study the role of the terminal oxidases in aerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes for three terminal oxidases: a bd-type quinol oxidase and two heme-copper oxidases, a A-type cytochrome c oxidase and a cbb 3-type oxidase. In this study, we used a biochemical approach and directly measured oxidase activities coupled to mass-spectrometry analysis to investigate the physiological role of the three terminal oxidases under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that the cbb 3-type oxidase is the major terminal oxidase under aerobic conditions while both cbb 3-type and bd-type oxidases are involved in respiration at low-O2 tensions. On the contrary, the low O2-affinity A-type cytochrome c oxidase was not detected in our experimental conditions even under aerobic conditions and would therefore not be required for aerobic respiration in S. oneidensis MR-1. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that the A-type cytochrome c oxidase is a ccaa 3-type oxidase since an uncommon extra-C terminal domain contains two c-type heme binding motifs. The particularity of the aerobic respiratory pathway and the physiological implication of the presence of a ccaa 3-type oxidase in S. oneidensis MR-1 are discussed.

  13. Anaerobic Central Metabolic Pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Reinterpreted in the Light of Isotopic Metabolite Labeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic or oxygen-limited conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes, in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine to form serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate and glycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine its use of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, we grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source, with either trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor. Analysis of cellular metabolites indicated that a large percentage (>70%) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate or pyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other key metabolites indicate that under anaerobic conditions, although glyoxylate synthesized from the isocitrate lyase reaction can be converted to glycine, a complete serine-isocitrate pathway is not present and serine/glycine is, in fact, oxidized via a highly reversible degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significant activity in the anapleurotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observed to be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of a complete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under certain anaerobic conditions, e.g., TMAO-reducing conditions. PMID:17114268

  14. Carbon Nanotubes-Mediated Reduction of Hematite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, K.; Xu, S.; Wang, L.; Yang, Y.; Patel, A.

    2015-12-01

    The worldwide carbon nanotubes (CNTs) industry is rapidly expanding with production capacity exceeding several thousand tons per year. After the service lives, CNTs will be ultimately released into the environment with their concentrations in soils increasing by 0.4-147 ng/kg/year and the consequent environmental impacts have received more and more attentions. Effects of CNTs on the redox reactions of Fe have not been studied, although the CNT-bound quinone functional groups can potentially act as an electron shuttle. In this study, we investigated the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the reduction of hematite by metal-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results showed that the presence of MWCNT with concentration ranging from 0.05 to 1 g/L inhibited the reduction of hematite (Fe2O3) by up to 35%, likely due to the toxicity effects of MWCNTs. However, the microbially-reduced MWCNTs (0.1 g/L) stimulated the reduction of Fe(III) by 3.6 times, indicating the potential role of MWCNTs as an electron shuttle. These results suggest MWCNTs play a dual role in regulating the microbial reduction of hematite through both toxicity effects and electron shuttle. We plan to further explore the mechanism for the impact of MWCNTs on the redox reactions of iron by studying the influences of carboxyl functionalized MWCNTs, analyzing the impact of MWCNTs on bacterial growth and characterizing the quinone functional groups in MWCNTs. Potential results will provide a novel perception for the impact of CNTs on the biogeochemical cycles of iron.The worldwide carbon nanotubes (CNTs) industry is rapidly expanding with production capacity exceeding several thousand tons per year. After the service lives, CNTs will be ultimately released into the environment with their concentrations in soils increasing by 0.4-147 ng/kg/year and the consequent environmental impacts have received more and more attentions. Effects of CNTs on the redox reactions of Fe have not

  15. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. PMID:25411412

  16. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. PMID:25411412

  17. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  18. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  19. Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-03-30

    EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

  20. Effects of the anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO(3)·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes.

  1. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kasai, Takuya; Hirose, Atsumi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer (EET) pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the EET processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extracellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological basis for MFCs. PMID:26136738

  2. Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles enhance survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under ultraviolet light (UV) exposure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Sahu, Manoranjan; Biswas, Pratim; Tang, Yinjie J

    2011-10-01

    It has been shown that photocatalytic TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as an efficient anti-microbial agent under UV light due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal-reducing bacterium highly susceptible to UV radiation. Interestingly, we found that the presence of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs in the cultural medium dramatically increased the survival rates (based on colony-forming unit) of strain MR-1 by over 10,000-fold (incubation without shaking) and ~200 fold (incubation with shaking) after a 2-h exposure to UV light. Gene expression results (via qPCR measurement) indicated that the DNA repair gene recA in MR-1 was significantly induced by UV exposure (indicating cellular damage under UV stress), but the influence of NPs on recA expression was not statistically evident. Plausible explanations to NP attenuation of UV stresses are: 1. TiO(2) based NPs are capable of scattering and absorbing UV light and thus create a shading effect to protect MR-1 from UV radiation; 2. more importantly, Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs can co-agglomerate with MR-1 to form large flocs that improves cells' survival against the environmental stresses. This study improves our understanding of NP ecological impacts under natural solar radiation and provides useful insights to application of photocatalytic-NPs for bacterial disinfection. PMID:21855961

  3. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  4. Constraint-Based Model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Metabolism: A Tool for Data Analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Eric A.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; De Ingeniis, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaolin; Osterman, Andrei; Scott, James H.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Konopka, Allan E.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox) stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i) used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii) developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations), (iii) classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv) predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v) used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a systems

  5. Constraint-Based Model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Metabolism: a Tool for Data Analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; De Ingeniis, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaolin; Osterman, Andrei; Scott, James H.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2010-06-24

    Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox) stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and flexibility of the electron transfer networks as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism pathways. To understand the factors contributing to the ecophysiological success of Shewanellae, the metabolic network of S. oneidensis MR-1 was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i) used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii) developed an approach to identify futile cycles, (iii) classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv) predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v) used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism

  6. Enhanced performance of hexavalent chromium reducing cathodes in the presence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and lactate.

    PubMed

    Xafenias, Nikolaos; Zhang, Yue; Banks, Charles J

    2013-05-01

    Biocathodes for the reduction of the highly toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) were investigated using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) as a biocatalyst and performance was assessed in terms of current production and Cr(VI) reduction. Potentiostatically controlled experiments (-500 mV vs Ag/AgCl) showed that a mediatorless MR-1 biocathode started up under aerated conditions in the presence of lactate, received 5.5 and 1.7 times more electrons for Cr(VI) reduction over a 4 h operating period than controls without lactate and with lactate but without MR-1, respectively. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, with a decrease in concentration over the 4 h operating period of 9 mg/L Cr(VI), compared to only 1 and 3 mg/L, respectively, in the controls. Riboflavin, an electron shuttle mediator naturally produced by MR-1, was also found to have a positive impact in potentiostatically controlled cathodes. Additionally, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with MR-1 and lactate present in both anode and cathode produced a maximum current density of 32.5 mA/m(2) (1000 Ω external load) after receiving a 10 mg/L Cr(VI) addition in the cathode, and cathodic efficiency increased steadily over an 8 day operation period with successive Cr(VI) additions. In conclusion, effective and continuous Cr(VI) reduction with associated current production were achieved when MR-1 and lactate were both present in the biocathodes. PMID:23517384

  7. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  8. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  9. Estimating the dual-enzyme kinetic parameters for Cr (VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 from soil column experiments.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akram; Alam, Mahbub; Yonge, David R

    2005-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) contamination of soil and groundwater is considered a major environmental concern. Bioreduction of Cr (VI) to trivalent chromium (Cr (III)) can be considered an effective technology in remediating Cr (VI) contaminated sites. Among the Cr (VI) reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) is relatively effective. Reduction of Cr (VI) by MR-1 is defined by the dual-enzyme kinetic model. The feasibility of bioreduction of Cr (VI) is usually evaluated by performing batch experiments which may not accurately represent the subsurface environment. The objective of this paper is to present a rational approach to determine the dual-enzyme reaction kinetics of Cr (VI) reduction by MR-1 from continuous flow soil column experiments which more accurately simulate the subsurface environment. Kinetic parameters obtained from soil column data were found to be much smaller than that obtained from batch data. The stable enzyme induced reaction rate was found to be 127th and the average deactivating enzyme induced reaction rate was 117th of the corresponding values obtained from batch reactor data as reported in literature.

  10. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  11. Iron reduction in the DAMO/Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 coculture system and the fate of Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Li, Shan-Wei; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation processes play important roles in the global iron and carbon cycle, respectively. This study explored the ferrihydrite reduction process with methane as a carbon source in a coculture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microbes enriched in laboratory and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and then characterized the reduced products. Ferrihydrite reduction was also studied in the DAMO and Shewanella systems alone. The ferrihydrite was reduced slightly (<13.3%) in the separate systems, but greatly (42.0-88.3%) in the coculture system. Isotope experiment of (13)CH4 addition revealed that DAMO microbes coupled to S. oneidensis MR-1 in a ferric iron reduction process with (13)CH4 consumption and (13)CO2 production. Compared with ferrihydrite, the reduced products showed increased crystallinity (from amorphous state to crystallinity 77.1%) and magnetism (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic). The produced ferrous iron was formed into minerals primarily composed of siderite with a small amount vivianite and magnetite. A portion of products covered the cell surface and hindered further reactions. The results presented herein widen the current understanding of iron metabolism and mineralization in the ocean, and show that the coculture systems of DAMO microbes and Shewanella have the potential to be globally important to iron reduction and methane oxidation.

  12. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  13. Involvement of cytochrome c CymA in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a cyclic nitramine explosive commonly used for military applications that is responsible for severe soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was shown to efficiently degrade RDX anaerobically (3.5 µmol·h(-1)·(g protein)(-1)) via two initial routes: (1) sequential N-NO(2) reductions to the corresponding nitroso (N-NO) derivatives (94% of initial RDX degradation) and (2) denitration followed by ring cleavage. To identify genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX, a library of ~2500 mutants of MR-1 was constructed by random transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with a reduced ability to degrade RDX compared with the wild type. An RDX-defective mutant (C9) was isolated that had the transposon inserted in the c-type cytochrome gene cymA. C9 transformed RDX at ~10% of the wild-type rate, with degradation occurring mostly via early ring cleavage caused by initial denitration leading to the formation of methylenedinitramine, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, formaldehyde, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Genetic complementation of mutant C9 restored the wild-type phenotype, providing evidence that electron transport components have a role in the anaerobic reduction of RDX by MR-1.

  14. Recombinant engineering of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella oneidensis is known to respire with extracellular solid metal oxides (i.e., iron, manganese, uranium) as a terminal electron acceptor. It has become the focus of intensive research not only due to its important bioremediation features, but also as a potential organism for biological elec...

  15. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  16. Hydrogenase- and Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochrome-Facilitated Reduction of Technetium(VII) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Reed, Samantha B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Simonson, Cody J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-15

    Pertechnetate, 99Tc(VII)O4-, is a highly mobile radionuclide contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy sites that can be enzymatically reduced by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble Tc(IV)O2(s). In other microorganisms, Tc(VII)O4- reduction is generally considered to be catalyzed by hydrogenase. Here, we provide evidence that although the NiFe hydrogenase of MR-1 was involved in the H2-driven reduction of Tc(VII)O4- (presumably through a direct coupling of H2 oxidation and Tc(VII) reduction), the deletion of both hydrogenase genes did not completely eliminate the ability of MR-1 to reduce Tc(VII). With lactate as the electron donor, mutants lacking the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA or the proteins required for the maturation of c-type cytochromes were defective in reducing Tc(VII) to nanoparticulate TcO2·nH2O(s) relative to MR-1 or a NiFe hydrogenase mutant. In addition, reduced MtrC and OmcA were oxidized by Tc(VII)O4-, confirming the capacity for direct electron transfer from these OMCs to TcO4-. c-Type cytochrome-catalyzed Tc(VII) reduction could be a potentially important mechanism in environments where organic electron donor concentrations are sufficient to allow this reaction to dominate.

  17. Roles of 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide in regulating extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Yu, Sheng-Song; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is critically involved in many pollutant conversion processes in both natural environment and engineered bioelectrochemical systems (BES), but typically with limited efficiency and poor controllability. In this study, we discover an important role of uncouplers in affecting the microbial energy metabolism and EET. Dose of lower-concentration 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) in the anolyte promoted the current generation and substrate degradation of an MFC inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, higher TCS dosage caused obvious microbial inhibition. Our results suggest a previously unknown role of uncouplers in regulating the microbial EET. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of such processes are investigated. This work broadens our view about the EET behaviors of microorganisms in real water environment where uncouplers are usually present, and suggests a possible new approach to regulate microbial EET in BES. PMID:25612888

  18. Roles of 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide in regulating extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Yu, Sheng-Song; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-23

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is critically involved in many pollutant conversion processes in both natural environment and engineered bioelectrochemical systems (BES), but typically with limited efficiency and poor controllability. In this study, we discover an important role of uncouplers in affecting the microbial energy metabolism and EET. Dose of lower-concentration 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) in the anolyte promoted the current generation and substrate degradation of an MFC inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, higher TCS dosage caused obvious microbial inhibition. Our results suggest a previously unknown role of uncouplers in regulating the microbial EET. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of such processes are investigated. This work broadens our view about the EET behaviors of microorganisms in real water environment where uncouplers are usually present, and suggests a possible new approach to regulate microbial EET in BES.

  19. Use of SWATH mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomic investigation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms grown on graphite cloth electrodes.

    PubMed

    Grobbler, Christy; Virdis, Bernardino; Nouwens, Amanda; Harnisch, Falk; Rabaey, Korneel; Bond, Philip L

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative proteomics from low biomass, biofilm samples is not well documented. In this study we show successful use of SWATH-MS for quantitative proteomic analysis of a microbial electrochemically active biofilm. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown on carbon cloth electrodes under continuous anodic electrochemical polarizations in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). Using lactate as the electron donor, anodes serving as terminal microbial electron acceptors were operated at three different electrode potentials (+0.71 V, +0.21 V & -0.19 V vs. SHE) and the development of catalytic activity was monitored by measuring the current traces over time. Once maximum current was reached (usually within 21-29 h) the electrochemical systems were shut off and biofilm proteins were extracted from the electrodes for proteomic assessment. SWATH-MS analysis identified 704 proteins, and quantitative comparison was made of those associated with tricarboxcylic acid (TCA) cycle. Metabolic differences detected between the biofilms suggested a branching of the S. oneidensis TCA cycle when grown at the different electrode potentials. In addition, the higher abundance of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle at higher potential indicates an increase in metabolic activity, which is expected given the assumed higher energy gains. This study demonstrates high numbers of identifications on BES biofilm samples can be achieved in comparison to what is currently reported. This is most likely due to the minimal preparation steps required for SWATH-MS.

  20. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  2. Role of outer-membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the biomineralization of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Reardon, C L; Dohnalkova, A C; Nachimuthu, P; Kennedy, D W; Saffarini, D A; Arey, B W; Shi, L; Wang, Z; Moore, D; McLean, J S; Moyles, D; Marshall, M J; Zachara, J M; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer-membrane cytochromes (OMCs), MtrC and OmcA, were characterized for the ability to reduce ferrihydrite (FH) using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemical techniques. Analysis of purified recombinant proteins demonstrated that both cytochromes undergo rapid electron exchange with FH in vitro with MtrC displaying faster transfer rates than OmcA. Immunomicroscopy with cytochrome-specific antibodies revealed that MtrC co-localizes with iron solids on the cell surface while OmcA exhibits a more diffuse distribution over the cell surface. After 3-day incubation of MR-1 with FH, pronounced reductive transformation mineral products were visible by electron microscopy. Upon further incubation, the predominant phases identified were ferrous phosphates including vivianite [Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x8H(2)O] and a switzerite-like phase [Mn(3),Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x7H(2)O] that were heavily colonized by MR-1 cells with surface-exposed outer-membrane cytochromes. In the absence of both MtrC and OmcA, the cells ability to reduce FH was significantly hindered and no mineral transformation products were detected. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of the outer-membrane cytochromes in the reductive transformation of FH and support a role for direct electron transfer from the OMCs at the cell surface to the mineral.

  3. Immobilization of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in diffusive gradients in thin films for determining metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul W; Högstrand, Christer; Lead, Jamie; Pickup, Roger W; Zhang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Assessing metal bioavailability in soil is important in modeling the effects of metal toxicity on the surrounding ecosystem. Current methods based on diffusive gradient thin films (DGTs) and Gel-Integrated Microelectrode are limited in their availability and sensitivity. To address this, Shewanella oneidensis, an anaerobic iron reducing bacterium, was incorporated into a thin layer of agarose to replace the polyacrylamide gel that is normally present in DGT to form biologically mobilizing DGT (BMDGT). Viability analysis revealed that 16-35% of the cells remained viable within the BMDGTs depending on the culturing conditions over a 20 h period with/without metals. Deployment of BMDGTs in standardized metal solutions showed significant differences to cell-free BMDGTs when cells grown in Luria Broth (LB) were incorporated into BMDGTs and deployed under anaerobic conditions. Deployment of these BMDGTs in hematite revealed no significant differences between BMDGTs and BMDGTs containing heat killed cells. Whether heat killed cells retain the ability to affect bioavailability is uncertain. This is the first study to investigate how a microorganism that was incorporated into a DGT device such as the metal reducing bacteria, S. oneidensis, may affect the mobility of metals.

  4. Trace Element Speciation and Distribution Study at Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilm/Mineral/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelabert, A.; Wang, Y.; Gescher, J.; Ha, J.; Cordova, C. D.; Singer, D. M.; Spormann, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; Eng, P. J.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides are among the most reactive mineral surfaces contacted by surface and ground waters, and thus they constitute important sorbents for heavy metal and metalloid ions. As microbial biofilms may be present as coatings on these minerals, they are likely to induce major changes in surface charges and sorption capacities for metal(loid) ions compared to biofilm-free mineral surfaces. In addition, the micro- environments in biofilms can be quite different from those in bulk solutions, which can enhance (or inhibit) metal adsorption on mineral surfaces and produce biominerals that are not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics based on the bulk solution values. In order to provide a more quantitative understanding of these effects, we have carried out a study of the interaction of Zn(II), Pb(II), and As(V) with Shewanella oneidensis (wild type, EPS-deficient mutant, and ppx- and ppk-deficient mutants) grown on highly polished and oriented single crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). This gram-negative bacterium commonly found in soil and sediments can use a wide range of electron donors and terminal electron acceptors including Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. In-situ ATR-FTIR analyses and potentiometric titrations of S. oneidensis biofilm collected from a glass bead-filled column inoculated with S. oneidensis were conducted in order to determine the nature of functional groups present on the bacterial surfaces, to quantify the site densities and protonation constants for these groups, and to determine the electrostatic parameters for S. oneidensis surfaces. GI-XAFS analyses performed on BL 11-2 at SSRL, together with macroscopic metal adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2 to 6.5), metal concentration (10-3 to 10-7 M), and ionic strength (10-1 to 10-3 M), were used to determine ion speciation and local coordination environments in the biofilm and to develop a surface complexation model describing

  5. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI)reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughputmini-bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-16

    The growth and Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensisMR-1 was examined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlymonitors and controls pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature for each ofits 24, 10-mL reactors. Independent monitoring and control of eachreactor in the cassette allows the exploration of a matrix ofenvironmental conditions known to influence S. oneidensis chromiumreduction. S. oneidensis MR-1 grew in minimal medium without amino acidor vitamin supplementation under aerobic conditions but required serineand glycine supplementation under anaerobic conditions. Growth wasinhibited by dissolved oxygen concentrations>80 percent. Lactatetransformation to acetate was enhanced by low concentration of dissolvedoxygen during the logarithmic growth phase. Between 11 and 35oC, thegrowth rate obeyed the Arrhenius reaction rate-temperature relationship,with a maximum growth rate occurring at 35oC. S. oneidensis MR-1 was ableto grow over a wide range of pH (6-9). At neutral pH and temperaturesranging from 30-35oC, S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced 100 mu M Cr(VI) toCr(III) within 20 minutes in the exponential growth phase, and the growthrate was not affected by the addition of chromate; it reduced chromateeven faster at temperatures between 35 and 39oC. At low temperatures(<25oC), acidic (pH<6.5), or alkaline (pH>8.5) conditions, 100mu M Cr(VI) strongly inhibited growth and chromate reduction. Themini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid determination of theseparameters reproducibly and easily by performing very few experiments.Besides its use for examining parameters of interest to environmentalremediation, the device will also allow one to quickly assess parametersfor optimal production of recombinant proteins or secondarymetabolites

  6. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Boily, Jean F.; Lower, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Antibody-recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells during anaerobic growth, when Fe(III) served as the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface with hematite, while MtrC was more uniformly displayed on the bacterium’s exterior cell surface. Both cytochromes were also found associated with extracellular material.

  7. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  8. Systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kipf, Elena; Koch, Julia; Geiger, Bettina; Erben, Johannes; Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2013-10-01

    We present a systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Under anoxic conditions nanoporous activated carbon cloth is a superior anode material in terms of current density normalized to the projected anode area and anode volume (24.0±0.3 μA cm(-2) and 482±7 μA cm(-3) at -0.2 vs. SCE, respectively). The good performance can be attributed to the high specific surface area of the material, which is available for mediated electron transfer through self-secreted flavins. Under aerated conditions no influence of the specific surface area is observed, which we attribute to a shift from primary indirect electron transfer by mediators to direct electron transfer via adherent cells. Furthermore, we show that an aerated initial growth phase enhances the current density under subsequent anoxic conditions fivefold when compared to a similar experiment that was conducted under permanently anoxic conditions.

  9. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  10. ArcS, the cognate sensor kinase in an atypical Arc system of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Jürgen; Henche, Anna-Lena; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M

    2010-05-01

    The availability of oxygen is a major environmental factor for many microbes, in particular for bacteria such as Shewanella species, which thrive in redox-stratified environments. One of the best-studied systems involved in mediating the response to changes in environmental oxygen levels is the Arc two-component system of Escherichia coli, consisting of the sensor kinase ArcB and the cognate response regulator ArcA. An ArcA ortholog was previously identified in Shewanella, and as in Escherichia coli, Shewanella ArcA is involved in regulating the response to shifts in oxygen levels. Here, we identified the hybrid sensor kinase SO_0577, now designated ArcS, as the previously elusive cognate sensor kinase of the Arc system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Phenotypic mutant characterization, transcriptomic analysis, protein-protein interaction, and phosphotransfer studies revealed that the Shewanella Arc system consists of the sensor kinase ArcS, the single phosphotransfer domain protein HptA, and the response regulator ArcA. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that HptA might be a relict of ArcB. Conversely, ArcS is substantially different with respect to overall sequence homologies and domain organizations. Thus, we speculate that ArcS might have adopted the role of ArcB after a loss of the original sensor kinase, perhaps as a consequence of regulatory adaptation to a redox-stratified environment.

  11. Fate of Fe and Cd upon microbial reduction of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenchen; Yi, Xiaoyun; Dang, Zhi; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Polyferric sulphate has been widely used for emergent control on incidental release of heavy metals such as Cd to surface water, causing precipitation of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs to the sediment. To date, little is known about whether the dissolution of the flocs in the presence of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) can occur and how the dissolution influences the fate of Fe and Cd in the sediment. Here, we demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, as representative DIRB, has the ability to reduce the flocs, resulting in the release of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) to the solution. Batch experiment results showed that the concentrations of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+)reached the maximum values at 48 h and then decreased over the remaining incubation time. The characterizations on the solid phase by the scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technologies revealed the formation of iron minerals such as goethite and magnetite as a consequence of microbial Fe(III) reduction. The newly formed iron minerals played a significant role in re-immobilizing Cd by sorption. These results imply that microbial reduction of polyferric flocs is an important contributor to the transport and transformation of metals in the sediment-water interface.

  12. Antibacterial activity of graphene-modified anode on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Deng, Feng; Hu, Yongyou; Sun, Jian; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-09-01

    To clearly illustrate the antibacterial activity of graphene on anodic exoelectrogen, the growth of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm on graphene-modified anodes (GMAs) and bare graphite anodes (BGs) were compared. The GMAs with different amounts of graphene were obtained by the cyclic voltammetric electrodeposition of 5, 20 and 40 potential cycles (5-G, 20-G and 40-G). Confocal scanning laser microscopy and cyclic voltammetry results demonstrated that graphene exhibited an obvious antibacterial effect for initial Shewanella MR biofilm growth. After 5 h of inoculation, 40-G, 20-G and 5-G had 6.3, 8.8 and 13.9% lower levels of biofilm viability, respectively, compared to BG, and all three exhibited approximately 70% lower electrochemical activity compared to BG. However, 18 h later, the biofilm on the GMAs exhibited much higher viability than that of the BG, and the electrochemical activity increased to a similar level. This study revealed the dual effect of graphene, including the antibacterial activity on biofilms and the enhancement of bacterial attachment and electron transfer.

  13. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  14. Ferrous Phosphate Surface Precipitates Resulting from the Reduction of Intragrain 6-line Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3) and phosphate (P) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. In the intragrain ferrihydrite suspensions, 200-300 µmol L-1 dissolved Fe(III) was released during the initial stages of incubation; no Fe(III)aq was detected in the free ferrihydrite suspensions. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Distinctive surface precipitates of Fe(II) phosphates with spherical morphology were observed on porous silica when P was present. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and fragments of extracellular materials at the end of incubation.

  15. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  16. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1interpreted in the light of isotopic metabolite labeling, enzymeactivities and genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-06-27

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  17. Viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO2 stress: implications for ecological effects of CO2 leakage from geologic CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Zhipeng; Hu, Yandi; Tang, Yinjie J; Jun, Young-Shin

    2010-12-01

    To study potential ecological impacts of CO(2) leakage to shallow groundwater and soil/sediments from geologic CO(2) sequestration (GCS) sites, this work investigated the viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO(2) stress. While MR-1 could grow under high-pressure nitrogen gas (500 psi), the mix of 1% CO(2) with N(2) at total pressures of 15 or 150 psi significantly suppressed the growth of MR-1, compared to the N(2) control. When CO(2) partial pressures were over 15 psi, the growth of MR-1 stopped. The reduced bacterial viability was consistent with the pH decrease and cellular membrane damage under high pressure CO(2). After exposure to 150 psi CO(2) for 5 h, no viable cells survived, the cellular contents were released, and microscopy images confirmed significant cell structure deformation. However, after a relatively short exposure (25 min) to 150 psi CO(2), MR-1 could fully recover their growth within 24 h after the stress was removed, and the reduction of MnO(2) by MR-1 was observed right after the stress was removed. Furthermore, MR-1 survived better if the cells were aggregated rather than suspended, or if pH buffering minerals, such as calcite, were present. To predict the cell viability under different CO(2) pressures and exposure times, a two-parameter mathematical model was developed.

  18. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  19. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mónica N; Neto, Sónia E; Alves, Alexandra S; Fonseca, Bruno M; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M; Soares, Cláudio M; Louro, Ricardo O

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  20. Ferrous phosphate surface precipitates resulting from the reduction of intragrain 6-line ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3), phosphate (P), and an electron shuttle (AQDS) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Irrespective of buffer and AQDS addition, rosettes of Fe(II) phosphate of approximate 20-30 μm size were observed on porous silica when P was present. The rosettes grew not only on the silica surface but also within it, forming a coherent spherical structure. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and contained extracellular materials at the end of incubation. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances may have adsorbed Fe(II) promoting Fe(II) phosphate nucleation with subsequent crystal growth proceeding in different directions from a common center.

  1. Iron Triggers λSo Prophage Induction and Release of Extracellular DNA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Binnenkade, Lucas; Teichmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Prophages are ubiquitous elements within bacterial chromosomes and affect host physiology and ecology in multiple ways. We have previously demonstrated that phage-induced lysis is required for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release and normal biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of prophage λSo spatiotemporal induction in biofilms. To this end, we used a functional fluorescence fusion to monitor λSo activation in various mutant backgrounds and in response to different physiological conditions. λSo induction occurred mainly in a subpopulation of filamentous cells in a strictly RecA-dependent manner, implicating oxidative stress-induced DNA damage as the major trigger. Accordingly, mutants affected in the oxidative stress response (ΔoxyR) or iron homeostasis (Δfur) displayed drastically increased levels of phage induction and abnormal biofilm formation, while planktonic cells were not or only marginally affected. To further investigate the role of oxidative stress, we performed a mutant screen and identified two independent amino acid substitutions in OxyR (T104N and L197P) that suppress induction of λSo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, λSo induction was not suppressed in biofilms formed by both mutants, suggesting a minor role of intracellular H2O2 in this process. In contrast, addition of iron to biofilms strongly enhanced λSo induction and eDNA release, while both processes were significantly suppressed at low iron levels, strongly indicating that iron is the limiting factor. We conclude that uptake of iron during biofilm formation triggers λSo-mediated lysis of a subpopulation of cells, likely by an increase in iron-mediated DNA damage sensed by RecA. PMID:24951794

  2. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  3. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants selected for their inability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes are unable to respire Fe(III) as anaerobic electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morris E; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J; Taillefert, Martial

    2010-04-01

    Recent voltammetric analyses indicate that Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 produces soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes during anaerobic respiration of sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. Results of the present study expand the range of Shewanella species capable of producing soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes to include Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Soluble organic-Fe(III) was produced by S. oneidensis cultures incubated anaerobically with Fe(III) oxides, or with Fe(III) oxides and the alternate electron acceptor fumarate, but not in the presence of O(2), nitrate or trimethylamine-N-oxide. Chemical mutagenesis procedures were combined with a novel MicroElectrode Screening Array (MESA) to identify four (designated Sol) mutants with impaired ability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) during anaerobic respiration of Fe(III) oxides. Two of the Sol mutants were deficient in anaerobic growth on both soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) oxide, yet retained the ability to grow on a suite of seven alternate electron acceptors. The rates of soluble organic-Fe(III) production were proportional to the rates of iron reduction by the S. oneidensis wild-type and Sol mutant strains, and all four Sol mutants retained wild-type siderophore production capability. Results of this study indicate that the production of soluble organic-Fe(III) may be an important intermediate step in the anaerobic respiration of both soluble and sparingly soluble forms of Fe(III) by S. oneidensis.

  4. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Steven D. Brown; Robert L. Hettich; Nathan VerBerkmoes; Jizhong Zhou

    2004-03-17

    The mediation of metal reduction by microorganisms has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives; however, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE field sites. Chromium(VI), for example, is one of several risk-driving contaminants at DOE sites and has been targeted by the DOE for bioremediation research. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can potentially be used to immobilize chromium, a toxic and mutagenic metal, by reducing soluble Cr(VI) to the insoluble and less bioavailable form of Cr(III), thus facilitating its removal from contained-storage and natural sites. The overall goal of this study is to integrate targeted biochemical and proteomic analyses with genome-wide gene expression profiling to examine the molecular basis and regulation of chromium(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Towards this goal, we will (1) isolate and identify the terminal chromium(VI) reductase and the gene(s) encoding this activity using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques; (2) verify the function of the gene(s) encoding the terminal Cr(VI) reductase and compare whole transcriptome data with whole proteome data in order to understand the regulation of chromium reduction; and (3) investigate the molecular stress response and adaptation of S. oneidensis to toxic levels of soluble Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. This research will provide important information on the functional components and regulatory mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, which should prove valuable in developing effective assessment strategies for in situ bioremediation and genetically engineering desired bacteria for enhanced bioremediation.

  5. ShewRegDB: a Visualization Environment for Integration of Experimental and In Silico Derived Regulatory Information in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa H; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Leuze, Michael Rex; Kora, Guruprasad H; Romine, Margaret; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an important model organism for environmental research as it has an exceptional metabolic and respiratory versatility regulated by a complex regulatory network. We have developed a database to collect experimental and computational data relating to regulation of gene and protein expression, and, a visualization environment that enables integration of these data types. The regulatory information in the database includes predictions of DNA regulator binding sites, sigma factor binding sites, transcription units, operons, promoters, and RNA regulators including non-coding RNAs, riboswitches, and different types of terminators.

  6. Rapid precipitation of amorphous silica in experimental systems with nontronite (NAu-1) and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; O'Reilly, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer-size (<50 nm) precipitates of amorphous silica globules were observed in laboratory systems containing nontronite NAu-1, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, and lean aqueous media. Their formation was attributed to the release of polysilicic acids at the expense of dissolving NAu-1, and subsequent polymerization and stabilization mediated by biomolecules. Rapid (<24 h) silica globule formation was confirmed in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances in all experimental systems that contained bacteria, whether the bacteria were respiring dissolved O 2 or Fe(III) originating from NAu-1, and whether the bacteria were viable or heat-killed. Silica globules were not observed in bacteria- and biomolecule-free systems. Thermodynamic calculations using disilicic acid, rather than monomeric silica, as the primary aqueous silica species suggest that the systems may have been supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica even though they appeared to be undersaturated if all aqueous silica was assumed to be monomeric H 4SiO 4. The predominant aqueous silica species in the experimental systems was likely polysilicic acids because aqueous silica was continuously supplied from the concurrent dissolution of aluminosilicate. Further polymerization and globule formation may have been driven by the presence of polyamines, a group of biologically produced compounds that are known to drive amorphous silica precipitation in diatom frustules. Globules were likely to be positively charged in our systems due to chemisorption of organic polycations onto silica surfaces that would have been otherwise negatively charged. We propose the following steps for the formation of nanometer-size silica globules in our experimental systems: (i) continuous supply of polysilicic acids due to NAu-1 dissolution; (ii) polysilicic acid polymerization to form <50 nm silica globules and subsequent stabilization mediated by microbially produced polyamines

  7. Global Molecular and Morphological Effects of 24-Hour Chromium(VI)Exposure on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Brown, Steven D; Shah, Manesh B; Zhou, Jizhong; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Thompson, Dorothea K

    2006-01-01

    The biological impact of 24-h ("chronic") chromium(VI) [Cr(VI) or chromate] exposure on ShewanellaoneidensisMR-1 was assessed by analyzing cellular morphology as well as genome-wide differential gene and protein expression profiles. Cells challenged aerobically with an initial chromate concentration of 0.3 mM in complex growth medium were compared to untreated control cells grown in the absence of chromate. At the 24-h time point at which cells were harvested for transcriptome and proteome analyses, no residual Cr(VI) was detected in the culture supernatant, thus suggesting the complete uptake and/or reduction of this metal by cells. In contrast to the untreated control cells, Cr(VI)-exposed cells formed apparently aseptate, nonmotile filaments that tended to aggregate. Transcriptome profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic charac terization revealed that the principal molecular response to 24-h Cr(VI) exposure was the induction of prophage-related genes and their encoded products as well as a number of functionally undefined hypothetical genes that were located within the integrated phage regions of the MR-1 genome. In addition, genes with annotated functions in DNA metabolism, cell division, biosynthesis and degradation of the murein (pepti doglycan) sacculus, membrane response, and general environmental stress protection were upregulated, while genes encoding chemotaxis, motility, and transport/binding proteins were largely repressed under conditions of 24-h chromate treatment.

  8. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  9. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  10. 13C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H. Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and 13C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the 13C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that 13C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms. PMID:26868848

  11. ¹³C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; Nealson, Kenneth H; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-02-12

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and (13)C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the (13)C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that (13)C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L.

    2012-05-24

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A ° , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A ° .

  14. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  15. Identifying the role of cytochromes upon the attachment, growth and detachment of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on hematite during dissimilatory iron reduction under natural- flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    Current understanding of bacterial respiration by dissimilatory iron (Fe) reduction is based primarily on studies of closed systems using soluble Fe(III). However, natural environments likely to support Fe reduction are typically open systems and contain Fe(III) primarily in the form of crystalline (hydr)oxides. Mechanisms by which electrons are transported between bacteria and mineral terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) under open system conditions are still poorly understood. However, a number of cytochromes have been identified as potentially playing a critical role in the electron transport system of some Fe reducing bacteria. Experiments were performed using (i) omcA, (ii) mtrC, or (iii) omcA and mtrC cytochrome deficient mutants of the Fe-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, in transparent-window flow- reactors containing hematite as the only TEA. These were operated under defined hydrodynamic and anaerobic conditions. Cells expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp), allowing real time measurement of cells at the mineral surface by epifluorescence microscopy. Cytochromes which play a critical role in the anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis by Fe reduction under open system natural-flow conditions could then be identified. Differences in the accumulation, maximum density, detachment and total production of surface-associated cells growing on hematite surfaces were apparent between the mutants, and between the mutants and the wild-type. Mutants deficient in cytochromes grew to a lower max density by up to 2 orders of magnitude than the wild-type, and exhibited no reduced Fe in the reactor effluent or at the surface of the hematite at the conclusion of the experiment, as revealed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Therefore omcA and / or mtrC cytochromes appear critical for electron shuttling and anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis on hematite under natural-flow conditions.

  16. Evidence-Based Annotation of Gene Function in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Genome-Wide Fitness Profiling across 121 Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Shao, Wenjun; Baumohl, Jason K.; Xu, Zhuchen; Nguyen, Michelle; Tamse, Raquel; Davis, Ronald W.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    Most genes in bacteria are experimentally uncharacterized and cannot be annotated with a specific function. Given the great diversity of bacteria and the ease of genome sequencing, high-throughput approaches to identify gene function experimentally are needed. Here, we use pools of tagged transposon mutants in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to probe the mutant fitness of 3,355 genes in 121 diverse conditions including different growth substrates, alternative electron acceptors, stresses, and motility. We find that 2,350 genes have a pattern of fitness that is significantly different from random and 1,230 of these genes (37% of our total assayed genes) have enough signal to show strong biological correlations. We find that genes in all functional categories have phenotypes, including hundreds of hypotheticals, and that potentially redundant genes (over 50% amino acid identity to another gene in the genome) are also likely to have distinct phenotypes. Using fitness patterns, we were able to propose specific molecular functions for 40 genes or operons that lacked specific annotations or had incomplete annotations. In one example, we demonstrate that the previously hypothetical gene SO_3749 encodes a functional acetylornithine deacetylase, thus filling a missing step in S. oneidensis metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate that the orphan histidine kinase SO_2742 and orphan response regulator SO_2648 form a signal transduction pathway that activates expression of acetyl-CoA synthase and is required for S. oneidensis to grow on acetate as a carbon source. Lastly, we demonstrate that gene expression and mutant fitness are poorly correlated and that mutant fitness generates more confident predictions of gene function than does gene expression. The approach described here can be applied generally to create large-scale gene-phenotype maps for evidence-based annotation of gene function in prokaryotes. PMID:22125499

  17. Comparative proteomics reveal the impact of OmcA/MtrC deletion on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to hexavalent chromium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Juan; Hu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Ji-Yun; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Zhao, Feng

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a priority pollutant causing serious environmental issues. Microbial reduction provides an alternative strategy for Cr(VI) remediation. The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was employed to study Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity in this work. To understand the effect of membrane cytochromes on Cr(VI) response, a comparative protein profile analysis from S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant of deleting OmcA and MtrC (△omcA/mtrC) was conducted using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) technology. The 2-DE patterns were compared, and the proteins with abundant changes of up to twofold in the Cr(VI) treatment were detected. Using mass spectrometry, 38 and 45 differentially abundant proteins were identified in the wild type and the mutant, respectively. Among them, 25 proteins were shared by the two strains. The biological functions of these identified proteins were analyzed. Results showed that Cr(VI) exposure decreased the abundance of proteins involved in transcription, translation, pyruvate metabolism, energy production, and function of cellular membrane in both strains. There were also significant differences in protein expressions between the two strains under Cr(VI) treatment. Our results suggest that OmcA/MtrC deletion might result in the Cr(VI) toxicity to outer membrane and decrease assimilation of lactate, vitamin B12, and cystine. When carbohydrate metabolism was inhibited by Cr(VI), leucine and sulfur metabolism may act as the important compensatory mechanisms in the mutant. Furthermore, the mutant may regulate electron transfer in the inner membrane and periplasm to compensate for the deletion of OmcA and MtrC in Cr(VI) reduction.

  18. The conjugated oligoelectrolyte DSSN+ enables exceptional coulombic efficiency via direct electron transfer for anode-respiring Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kirchhofer, Nathan D; Chen, Xiaofen; Marsili, Enrico; Sumner, James J; Dahlquist, Frederick W; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2014-10-14

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was cultivated on lactate with poised graphite electrode acceptors (E = +0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl) in order to explore the basis for sustained increases in anodic current output following the addition of the lipid-intercalating conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), 4,4'-bis(4'-(N,N-bis(6''-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl)amino)-styryl)stilbene tetraiodide (DSSN+). Microbial cultures, which were spiked with DSSN+, exhibit a ∼2.2-fold increase in charge collected, a ∼3.1-fold increase in electrode colonization by S. oneidensis, and a ∼1.7-fold increase in coulombic efficiency from 51 ± 10% to an exceptional 84 ± 7% without obvious toxicity effects. Direct microbial biofilm voltammetry reveals that DSSN+ rapidly and sustainably increases cytochrome-based direct electron transfer and subsequently increases flavin-based mediated electron transfer. Control experiments indicate that DSSN+ does not contribute to the current in the absence of bacteria. PMID:25171764

  19. Chromate/Nitrite Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1: Evidence for Multiple Cr(VI) Reduction Mechanisms Dependent on Physiological Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William Arnold; Viamajala, S.; Peyton, Brent Michael; Petersen, J. N.

    2002-06-01

    Inhibition of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction due to nitrate and nitrite was observed during tests with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (previously named Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 and henceforth referred to as MR-1). Initial Cr(VI) reduction rates were measured at various nitrite concentrations, and a mixed inhibition kinetic model was used to determine the kinetic parameters-maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate and inhibition constant [V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI))]. Values of V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) obtained with MR-1 cultures grown under denitrifying conditions were observed to be significantly different from the values obtained when the cultures were grown with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. It was also observed that a single V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) did not adequately describe the inhibition kinetics of either nitrate-grown or fumarate-grown cultures. The inhibition patterns indicate that Cr(VI) reduction in MR-1 is likely not limited to a single pathway, but occurs via different mechanisms some of which are dependent on growth conditions. Inhibition of nitrite reduction due to the presence of Cr(VI) was also studied, and the kinetic parameters V(max,NO2) and K(i,NO2) were determined. It was observed that these coefficients also differed significantly between MR-1 grown under denitrifying conditions and fumarate reducing conditions. The inhibition studies suggest the involvement of nitrite reductase in Cr(VI) reduction. Because nitrite reduction is part of the anaerobic respiration process, inhibition due to Cr(VI) might be a result of interaction with the components of the anaerobic respiration pathway such as nitrite reductase. Also, differences in the degree of inhibition of nitrite reduction activity by chromate at different growth conditions suggest that the toxicity mechanism of Cr(VI) might also be dependent on the conditions of growth. Cr(VI) reduction has been shown to occur via different pathways, but to our knowledge, multiple

  20. Generation and Validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Clone Set for Protein Expression and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohu; Petrosino, Joseph; Hemphill, Lisa; Wan, Xiufeng; Leaphart, Adam B.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway) cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85%) have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST- tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray) and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis), and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18714347

  1. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. Results The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. Conclusions The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft

  2. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  3. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  4. Mapping the iron binding site(s) on the small tetraheme cytochrome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yufeng; Paquete, Catarina M; Louro, Ricardo O; Ross, Daniel E; Labelle, Edward; Bond, Daniel R; Tien, Ming

    2011-07-19

    In the model microbe Shewanella oneidensis, multi-heme proteins are utilized for respiratory metabolism where metals serve as the terminal electron acceptor. Among those is the periplasm-localized small tetraheme cytochrome (STC). STC has been extensively characterized structurally and electrochemically to which electron flow in and out of the protein has been modeled. However, until the present work, no kinetic studies have been performed to probe the route of electron flow or to determine the iron-binding site on STC. Using iron chelated by EDTA, NTA, or citrate, we have used chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis along with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and stopped-flow measurements to identify the iron binding site of STC. Chemical modifications of STC revealed that carboxyl groups on STC are involved in binding of EDTA-Fe(3+). Scanning mutagenesis was performed on Asp and Glu to probe the putative iron-binding site on STC. Two STC mutants (D21N; D80N) showed ∼70% decrease in observed electron transfer rate constant with EDTA-Fe(3+) from transient-state kinetic measurements. The impaired reactivity of STC (D80N/D21N) with EDTA-Fe(3+) was further confirmed by a significant decrease (>10-fold) in iron binding affinity.

  5. Deciphering the aggregation mechanism of bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis MR1) in the presence of polyethyleneimine: Effects of the exopolymeric superstructure and polymer molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Marie-Eve M; Lartiges, Bruno; Merlin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation tests between bacteria and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) of low (600g/mol) and high (750,000g/mol) molecular weight were performed in order to address the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the interactions between cationic polymer and bacterial membranes. The selected strain, Schewanella oneidensis MR-1, produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of various lengths depending on the growth conditions. Optical density, bioaggregate size, electrophoretic mobility measurements, TEM and AFM observations, and cell lysis tests (crystal violet release), were collected to describe the PEI-mediated aggregation of LPS-O-antigen-free and LPS-O-antigen-decorated bacteria. The results show that PEI of low molecular weight (600g/mol) fails to aggregate bacteria, whereas PEIs of higher molecular weight (60,000 and 750,000g/mol) lead to flocculation at low polymer concentrations. In addition, the LPS-O antigen bacterial superstructure is shown to act as a protective barrier, thus delaying the harmful effects of the cationic polymer. Despite this protection, the interaction of bacterial membranes with increasing concentrations of PEI leads to a series of deleterious processes including biosurface modification (peeling, membrane permeabilization and/or lysis), aggregation of bacterial cells, and complexation of PEI with both released biosurface fragments and cytoplasmic residues issued from lysis. PMID:26774052

  6. Deciphering the aggregation mechanism of bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis MR1) in the presence of polyethyleneimine: Effects of the exopolymeric superstructure and polymer molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Marie-Eve M; Lartiges, Bruno; Merlin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation tests between bacteria and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) of low (600g/mol) and high (750,000g/mol) molecular weight were performed in order to address the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the interactions between cationic polymer and bacterial membranes. The selected strain, Schewanella oneidensis MR-1, produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of various lengths depending on the growth conditions. Optical density, bioaggregate size, electrophoretic mobility measurements, TEM and AFM observations, and cell lysis tests (crystal violet release), were collected to describe the PEI-mediated aggregation of LPS-O-antigen-free and LPS-O-antigen-decorated bacteria. The results show that PEI of low molecular weight (600g/mol) fails to aggregate bacteria, whereas PEIs of higher molecular weight (60,000 and 750,000g/mol) lead to flocculation at low polymer concentrations. In addition, the LPS-O antigen bacterial superstructure is shown to act as a protective barrier, thus delaying the harmful effects of the cationic polymer. Despite this protection, the interaction of bacterial membranes with increasing concentrations of PEI leads to a series of deleterious processes including biosurface modification (peeling, membrane permeabilization and/or lysis), aggregation of bacterial cells, and complexation of PEI with both released biosurface fragments and cytoplasmic residues issued from lysis.

  7. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  8. Uranium reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of NaHCO3 concentration: surface complexation control of reduction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Fein, Jeremy B

    2014-04-01

    It is crucial to determine the controls on the kinetics of U(VI) bioreduction in order to understand and model the fate and mobility of U in groundwater systems and also to enhance the effectiveness of U bioremediation strategies. In this study, we measured the rate of U(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as function of NaHCO3 concentration. The experiments demonstrate that increasing concentrations of NaHCO3 in the system lead to slower U(VI) reduction kinetics. The NaHCO3 concentration also strongly affects the speciation of U(VI) on the bacterial cell envelope. We used a thermodynamic surface complexation modeling approach to determine the speciation and concentration of U(VI) adsorbed onto the bacteria as a function of the NaHCO3 concentration in the experimental systems. We observed a strong positive correlation between the measured U(VI) reduction rates and the calculated total concentration of U(VI) surface complexes formed on the bacterial cell envelope. This positive correlation indicates that the speciation and concentration of U(VI) adsorbed on the bacterial cell envelope control the kinetics of U(VI) bioreduction under the experimental conditions. The results of this study serve as a basis for developing speciation-based kinetic rate laws for enzymatic reduction of U(VI) by bacteria. PMID:24576101

  9. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  10. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  11. Kinetic Characterization of OmcA and MtrC, Terminal Reductases Involved in Respiratory Electron Transfer for Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Daniel E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2009-01-01

    We have used scaling kinetics and the concept of kinetic competence to elucidate the role of hemeproteins OmcA and MtrC in iron reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Second-order rate constants for OmcA and MtrC were determined by single-turnover experiments. For soluble iron species, a stopped-flow apparatus was used, and for the less reactive iron oxide goethite, a conventional spectrophotometer was used to measure rates. Steady-state experiments were performed to obtain molecular rate constants by quantifying the OmcA and MtrC contents of membrane fractions and whole cells by Western blot analysis. For reduction of soluble iron, rates determined from transient-state experiments were able to account for rates obtained from steady-state experiments. However, this was not true with goethite; rate constants determined from transient-state experiments were 100 to 1,000 times slower than those calculated from steady-state experiments with membrane fractions and whole cells. In contrast, addition of flavins to the goethite experiments resulted in rates that were consistent with both transient- and steady-state experiments. Kinetic simulations of steady-state results with kinetic constants obtained from transient-state experiments supported flavin involvement. Therefore, we show for the first time that OmcA and MtrC are kinetically competent to account for catalysis of soluble iron reduction in whole Shewanella cells but are not responsible for electron transfer via direct contact alone with insoluble iron-containing minerals. This work supports the hypothesis that electron shuttles are important participants in the reduction of solid Fe phases by this organism. PMID:19542342

  12. Effects of Incubation Conditions on Cr(VI) Reduction by c-type Cytochromes in Intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rui; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Wu, Yundang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) of metal-reducing bacteria play a key role in microbial metal reduction processes. However, the in situ redox status of OM c-Cyts during microbial metal reduction processes remain poorly understood. In this study, diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy is used to investigate the in situ spectral reaction of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts in intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells under different incubation conditions. The reduced c-Cyts decreased transiently at the beginning and then recovered gradually over time. The Cr(VI) reduction rates decreased with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentrations, and Cr(III) was identified as a reduced product. The presence of Cr(III) substantially inhibited Cr(VI) reduction and the recovery of reduced c-Cyts, indicating that Cr(III) might inhibit cell growth. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing cell density. The highest Cr(VI) reduction rate and fastest recovery of c-Cyts were obtained at pH 7.0 and 30°C, with sodium lactate serving as an electron donor. The presence of O2 strongly inhibited Cr(VI) reduction, suggesting that O2 might compete with Cr(VI) as an electron acceptor in cells. This study provides a case of directly examining in vivo reaction properties of an outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under non-invasive physiological conditions. PMID:27242759

  13. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  14. Isolation of a High-Affinity Functional Protein Complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two Outer Membrane Decaheme c-type Cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A.; Ni, Shuisong; Lower, Brian H.; Kennedy, David W.; Wunschel, David S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium that is capable of using insoluble oxidized metals, such as manganese [Mn(III, IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] oxides and oxyhydroxides, as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to reduce oxidized Mn and/or Fe has previously been linked to OmcA and MtrC: two decaheme c-type cytochromes that are localized to the outer membrane. To investigate how the electron transport proteins OmcA and MtrC are organized, we expressed and purified recombinant OmcA and MtrC from wild type S. oneidensis MR-1 as well as a mutant that lacked OmcA and MtrC (ΔomcA/mtrC). After purification to the nearly electrophoretic homogeneity from the ΔomcA/mtrC mutant, the recombinant OmcA and MtrC exhibited the characteristics of c-type cytochromes, and each of their polypeptides was confirmed to contain 10 hemes. When purified from wild type cells, endogenous MtrC or OmcA was always co-purified with recombinant OmcA or MtrC, respectively. Fluorescence polarization experiment showed that recombinant OmcA bound to the FlAsH-labeled MtrC with a dissociation constant of 7 ×10-7 M. The purified recombinant OmcA or MtrC alone displayed intrinsic ferric reductase activity with NADH used as an electron donor. Ferric reductase specific activity increased by 35 to 41% when nearly equimolar concentrations of OmcA and MtrC were assayed relative to the two proteins assayed independently. These results demonstrate that OmcA and MtrC directly interact with each other to form a stable complex with high ferric reductase activity.

  15. Transcriptional analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an electrode compared to Fe(III)citrate or oxygen as terminal electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research efforts in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially in regards to the respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. Here, we took a global approach ...

  16. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  17. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Shi, Liang

    2008-09-12

    Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 possesses up to 42 c-type cytochromes with heme content varying between 1 to as many as 37. Among them, the outer-membrane cytochromes, particularly MtrC and OmcA, are suspected to function as terminal reductases and are responsible for its enzymatic catalysis capability. So far, the mechanisms of metal reduction by these outer-membrane cytochromes are unknown. In this work, we report the study of reduction kinetics of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, NTA and EDTA by abiotically reduced MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods within the framework of the electron transfer theory of Marcus and speciation calculations based on the current thermodynamic database. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction was very fast and appeared to proceed in two stages, a fast stage that completes in much less than a second and a slower stage afterwards. For a given complex, the reaction is faster by reduction with MtrC than OmcA, while for a given protein, the reaction completes in the decreasing order of Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. All the stopped-flow kinetic curves could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 µM-1s-1 for the fast reaction between MtrC with Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 µM-1s-1 for the slow reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate complex. Speciation calculations indicated that at both metal:ligand ratios, 1:1.5 and 1:10, a single dominant ferric complex was responsible for the observed reaction for each ligand and, therefore, the observed dual-reaction pathways was attributed to the differences in the reduction behavior among various heme groups within each protein. The results of redox potential calculations with known thermodynamic data show only small differences on the scale of a few millivolts among the three complexes, suggested that

  18. Transcriptional Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an Electrode Compared to Fe(III)Citrate or Oxygen as Terminal Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A.; Bar, Haim Y.; Beg, Qasim K.; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially with regard to respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. The physiological activity of S. oneidensis to respire at electrodes is of great interest, but the growth conditions in thin-layer biofilms make physiological analyses experimentally challenging. Here, we took a global approach to evaluate physiological activity with an electrode as terminal electron acceptor for the generation of electric current. We performed expression analysis with DNA microarrays to compare the overall gene expression with an electrode to that with soluble iron(III) or oxygen as the electron acceptor and applied new hierarchical model-based statistics for the differential expression analysis. We confirmed the differential expression of many genes that have previously been reported to be involved in electrode respiration, such as the entire mtr operon. We also formulate hypotheses on other possible gene involvements in electrode respiration, for example, a role of ScyA in inter-protein electron transfer and a regulatory role of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase under anaerobic conditions. Further, we hypothesize that electrode respiration imposes a significant stress on S. oneidensis, resulting in higher energetic costs for electrode respiration than for soluble iron(III) respiration, which fosters a higher metabolic turnover to cover energy needs. Our hypotheses now require experimental verification, but this expression analysis provides a fundamental platform for further studies into the molecular mechanisms of S. oneidensis electron transfer and the physiologically special situation of growth on a poised-potential surface. PMID:22319591

  19. Global Molecular Characterization of the Chromate Stress Response in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Identification of a Putative DNA-Binding Response Regulator and Azoreductase Involved in Cr(VI) Detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R.; Brown, Steven D.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Effective bioremediation of Cr-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work is focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Previous transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1. Here we describe a detailed functional analysis of SO2426 and SO3585 in order to begin to understand the role of these proteins in the cellular response to chromate. The protein products encoded by genes so2426 and so3585 were expressed and detected only in chromate-shocked samples as determined by multidimensional high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Both genes were also highly induced (>46-fold) in MR-1 cells actively reducing chromate based on whole-genome microarray analysis. We have created in-frame deletions of the so2426 and so3585 loci in the MR-1 chromosome and have characterized the phenotype of the resulting mutants in the presence of varying concentrations of Cr, Cu, Co, Sr, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under aerobic respiratory conditions. Growth studies indicated that the so2426 deletion mutant was more sensitive to heavy metals compared to the WT reference, and chromate reduction by the so2426 mutant was impaired significantly. The growth response of the mutant to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was similar to that of MR-1. To gain insight into the regulon of this response regulator, MR-1 microarrays were used to

  20. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Uses Overlapping Pathways for Iron Reduction at a Distance and by Direct Contact under Conditions Relevant for Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Douglas P.; Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Mielke, Randall E.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method to measure iron reduction at a distance based on depositing Fe(III) (hydr)oxide within nanoporous glass beads. In this “Fe-bead” system, Shewanella oneidensis reduces at least 86.5% of the iron in the absence of direct contact. Biofilm formation accompanies Fe-bead reduction and is observable both macro- and microscopically. Fe-bead reduction is catalyzed by live cells adapted to anaerobic conditions, and maximal reduction rates require sustained protein synthesis. The amount of reactive ferric iron in the Fe-bead system is available in excess such that the rate of Fe-bead reduction is directly proportional to cell density; i.e., it is diffusion limited. Addition of either lysates prepared from anaerobic cells or exogenous electron shuttles stimulates Fe-bead reduction by S. oneidensis, but iron chelators or additional Fe(II) do not. Neither dissolved Fe(III) nor electron shuttling activity was detected in culture supernatants, implying that the mediator is retained within the biofilm matrix. Strains with mutations in omcB or mtrB show about 50% of the wild-type levels of reduction, while a cymA mutant shows less than 20% of the wild-type levels of reduction and a menF mutant shows insignificant reduction. The Fe-bead reduction defect of the menF mutant can be restored by addition of menaquinone, but menaquinone itself cannot stimulate Fe-bead reduction. Because the menF gene encodes the first committed step of menaquinone biosynthesis, no intermediates of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway are used as diffusible mediators by this organism to promote iron reduction at a distance. CymA and menaquinone are required for both direct and indirect mineral reduction, whereas MtrB and OmcB contribute to but are not absolutely required for iron reduction at a distance. PMID:16085832

  2. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  3. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H(2).

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Hill, Eric A; Moran, James J; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Yang, Hui; Hegg, Eric L

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here, we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organisms, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of natural-abundance stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  4. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hill, Eric A.; Moran, James J.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Hui, Yang; Hegg, Eric L.

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organism, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  5. High-syn conformation of uridine and asymmetry of the hexameric molecule revealed in the high-resolution structures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase in the free form and in complex with uridine.

    PubMed

    Safonova, Tatyana N; Mikhailov, Sergey N; Veiko, Vladimir P; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N; Manuvera, Valentin A; Alekseev, Cyril S; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V; Popov, Vladimir O; Polyakov, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. Expression of UP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was performed in Escherichia coli. The high-resolution X-ray structure of SoUP was solved in the free form and in complex with uridine. A crystal of SoUP in the free form was grown under microgravity and diffracted to ultrahigh resolution. Both forms of SoUP contained sulfate instead of phosphate in the active site owing to the presence of ammonium sulfate in the crystallization solution. The latter can be considered as a good mimic of phosphate. In the complex, uridine adopts a high-syn conformation with a nearly planar ribose ring and is present only in one subunit of the hexamer. A comparison of the structures of SoUP in the free form and in complex with the natural substrate uridine showed that the subunits of the hexamer are not identical, with the active sites having either an open or a closed conformation. In the monomers with the closed conformation, the active sites in which uridine is absent contain a glycerol molecule mimicking the ribose moiety of uridine.

  6. Concerted action of two subunits of the functional dimer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase derived from a comparison of the C212S mutant and the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Safonova, T N; Mordkovich, N N; Veiko, V P; Okorokova, N A; Manuvera, V A; Dorovatovskii, P V; Popov, V O; Polyakov, K M

    2016-02-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The structure of the C212S mutant of uridine phosphorylase from the facultatively aerobic Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was determined at 1.68 Å resolution. A comparison of the structures of the mutant and the wild-type enzyme showed that one dimer in the mutant hexamer differs from all other dimers in the mutant and wild-type SoUP (both in the free form and in complex with uridine). The key difference is the `maximum open' state of one of the subunits comprising this dimer, which has not been observed previously for uridine phosphorylases. Some conformational features of the SoUP dimer that provide access of the substrate into the active site are revealed. The binding of the substrate was shown to require the concerted action of two subunits of the dimer. The changes in the three-dimensional structure induced by the C212S mutation account for the lower affinity of the mutant for inorganic phosphate, while the affinity for uridine remains unchanged.

  7. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth's near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  8. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  9. MR1 discovery.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2016-08-01

    The moment of MR1 discovery is described. The MR1 gene is the first and the last reported human MHC-related gene intentionally isolated from the human genome composed of three billion base pairs. Evolutionary considerations formed the basis of its isolation. Some details surrounding the moment and some retrospective descriptions with various kinds of encounters are also included.

  10. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  11. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments. PMID:26632613

  12. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  13. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  14. The tetraheme cytochrome CymA is required for anaerobic respiration with dimethyl sulfoxide and nitrite in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Carsten; Chapman, Stephen K; Reid, Graeme A

    2003-08-12

    The tetraheme c-type cytochrome, CymA, from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has previously been shown to be required for respiration with Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate [Myers, C. R., and Myers, J. M. (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 1143-1152]. It is located in the cytoplasmic membrane where the bulk of the protein is exposed to the periplasm, enabling it to transfer electrons to a series of redox partners. We have expressed and purified a soluble derivative of CymA (CymA(sol)) that lacks the N-terminal membrane anchor. We show here, by direct measurements of electron transfer between the purified proteins, that CymA(sol) efficiently reduces S. oneidensis fumarate reductase. This indicates that no further proteins are required for electron transfer between the quinone pool and fumarate if we assume direct reduction of CymA by quinols. By expressing CymA(sol) in a mutant lacking CymA, we have shown that this soluble form of the protein can complement the defect in fumarate respiration. We also demonstrate that CymA is essential for growth with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and for reduction of nitrite, implicating CymA in at least five different electron transfer pathways in Shewanella.

  15. Programming the quorum sensing-based AND gate in Shewanella oneidensis for logic gated-microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yidan; Yang, Yun; Katz, Evgeny; Song, Hao

    2015-03-11

    An AND logic gate based on a synthetic quorum-sensing (QS) module was constructed in a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mtrA knockout mutant. The presence of two input signals activated the expression of a periplasmic decaheme cytochrome MtrA to regenerate the extracellular electron transfer conduit, enabling the construction of AND-gated microbial fuel cells.

  16. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  17. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  18. Effects of bio-Au nanoparticles on electrochemical activity of Shewanella oneidensis wild type and ΔomcA/mtrC mutant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-22

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming Au(III) into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to Au(III) but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of Au(III), but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  19. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  20. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  1. Final Summary of "Interdisciplinary Study of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1's Metabolism & Metal Reduction"

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, Eugene

    2007-06-26

    Our project focused primarily on analysis of different types of data produced by global high-throughput technologies, data integration of gene annotation, and gene and protein expression information, as well as on getting a better functional annotation of Shewanella genes. Specifically, four of our numerous major activities and achievements include the development of: statistical models for identification and expression proteomics, superior to currently available approaches (including our own earlier ones); approaches to improve gene annotations on the whole-organism scale; standards for annotation, transcriptomics and proteomics approaches; and generalized approaches for data integration of gene annotation, gene and protein expression information.

  2. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  3. AMT Tag Approach to Proteomic Characterization of Deinococcus Radiodurans and Shewanella Oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Hixson, Kim K.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Tolic, Nikola; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-09-01

    Biology is transitioning from a largely qualitative, mostly descriptive science to a quantitative and ultimately predictive science. Advances in high throughput DNA sequencing have made increasing numbers of genome sequences available and enabled a “systems” level analysis of complex biological organisms. The ability to quantitatively measure the array of proteins, also termed the proteome, in prokaryotic cells and communities of cells is key to understanding microbial systems. This chapter focuses on the utility of the AMT tag mass spectrometric approach used to characterize the proteomes of two microbes, Deinococcus radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  4. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  5. Physiological and Transcriptomic Analyses to Characterize the Function of Fur and Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Wu, Liyou; Parsons, Andrea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining iron homeostasis is a key metabolic challenge for most organisms. In many bacterial species, regulation of iron homeostasis is carried out by the global transcriptional regulator Fur. Physiological examination showed that Shewanella oneidensis harboring a fur deletion mutation had deficiencies in both growth and acid tolerance response. However, the fur mutant better tolerated iron-limited environments than the wild-type strain MR-1. Transcriptomic studies comparing the fur mutant and MR-1 confirmed previous findings that iron acquisition systems were highly induced by Fur inactivation. In addition, the temporal gene expression profiling of the fur mutant in response to iron depletion and repletion suggested that a number of genes involved in energy transport were iron-responsive but Fur-independent. Further identification of Fur-independent genes was obtained by generating a gene co-expression network from temporal gene expression profiles. A group of genes is involved in heat shock and has an rpoH-binding site at their promoters, and genes related to anaerobic energy transport has a highly conserved Crp binding site at the promoters. Together, this work provides useful information for the characterization of the function of Fur and the iron response in S. oneidensis.

  6. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  7. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  8. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M.; Monty, Chelsea N.

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  9. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  10. Disruption of Putrescine Biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis Enhances Biofilm Cohesiveness and Performance in Cr(VI) Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui

    2014-01-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O72−), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms. PMID:24362428

  11. Biofabrication of discrete spherical gold nanoparticles using the metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Broich, Michael L; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystallites have garnered substantial interest due to their varying applications including catalysis. Consequently important aspects related to control of shape/size and syntheses through economical and non-hazardous means are desirable. Highly efficient bioreduction based natural fabrication approaches that utilize microbes and or -plant extracts are poised to meet these needs. Here we show that the gamma- proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, can reduce tetrachloro aurate (III) ions, producing discrete extracellular spherical gold nanocrystallites. The particles were homogeneous with multiple size distributions and produced under ambient conditions at high yield, 88% of theoretical maximum. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 2-50 nm, with an average of 12 5 nm. The nanoparticles were hydrophilic, biocompatible, and resisted aggregation even after several months. The particles are likely capped by a detachable protein/peptide coat. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectra and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirmed the formation as well the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of these gold nanoparticles was assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Toxicity assessments divulged that the particles were neither toxic nor inhibitory to any of these bacteria.

  12. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  13. Adoptive T Cell Therapy Targeting CD1 and MR1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingxi; Chamoto, Kenji; Hirano, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential. PMID:26052329

  14. Electrochemical selection and characterization of a high current-generating Shewanella oneidensis mutant with altered cell-surface morphology and biofilm-related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits extracellular electron transfer (EET) activity that is influenced by various cellular components, including outer-membrane cytochromes, cell-surface polysaccharides (CPS), and regulatory proteins. Here, a random transposon-insertion mutant library of S. oneidensis MR-1 was screened after extended cultivation in electrochemical cells (ECs) with a working electrode poised at +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to isolate mutants that adapted to electrode-respiring conditions and identify as-yet-unknown EET-related factors. Results Several mutants isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited rough morphology and extraordinarily large colonies on agar plates compared to wild-type MR-1. One of the isolated mutants, designated strain EC-2, produced 90% higher electric current than wild-type MR-1 in ECs and was found to have a transposon inserted in the SO_1860 (uvrY) gene, which encodes a DNA-binding response regulator of the BarA/UvrY two-component regulatory system. However, an in-frame deletion mutant of SO_1860 (∆SO_1860) did not exhibit a similar level of current generation as that of EC-2, suggesting that the enhanced current-generating capability of EC-2 was not simply due to the disruption of SO_1860. In both EC-2 and ∆SO_1860, the transcription of genes related to CPS synthesis was decreased compared to wild-type MR-1, suggesting that CPS negatively affects current generation. In addition, transcriptome analyses revealed that a number of genes, including those involved in biofilm formation, were differentially expressed in EC-2 compared to those in ∆SO_1860. Conclusions The present results indicate that the altered expression of the genes related to CPS biosynthesis and biofilm formation is associated with the distinct morphotype and high current-generating capability of strain EC-2, suggesting an important role of these genes in determining the EET activity of S. oneidensis. PMID:25028134

  15. Silver nanocrystallites: biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David C; Phelps, Tommy J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver-based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, upon incubation with aqueous silver nitrate solution. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the 2-11 nm size range (average of 4 +/- 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) is compared to chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (colloidal-Ag and oleate capped silver nanoparticles, oleate-Ag) and assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Relative toxicity was based on the diameter of inhibition zone in disk diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, live/dead assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, strain-dependent inhibition depended on the synthesis procedure and the surface coat. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity compared to colloidal-Ag for all three strains tested, whereas E. coli and S. oneidensis were found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, oleate-Ag was not toxic to any of the bacteria. These findings have implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  16. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Le Laz, Sébastien; kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  17. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  18. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Characterization of the Fur Modulon in the Metal-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiu-Feng; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; McCue, Lee Ann; Stanek, Dawn; Connelly, Heather; Hauser, Loren J.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tingfen; Leaphart, Adam; Hettich, Robert L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has permitted a comprehensive characterization of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) modulon in this dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. We have employed targeted gene mutagenesis, DNA microarrays, proteomic analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and computational motif discovery tools to define the S. oneidensis Fur regulon. Using this integrated approach, we identified nine probable operons (containing 24 genes) and 15 individual open reading frames (ORFs), either with unknown functions or encoding products annotated as transport or binding proteins, that are predicted to be direct targets of Fur-mediated repression. This study suggested, for the first time, possible roles for four operons and eight ORFs with unknown functions in iron metabolism or iron transport-related functions. Proteomic analysis clearly identified a number of transporters, binding proteins, and receptors related to iron uptake that were up-regulated in response to a fur deletion and verified the expression of nine genes originally annotated as pseudogenes. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data revealed strong correlation for genes shown to be undergoing large changes at the transcript level. A number of genes encoding components of the electron transport system were also differentially expressed in a fur deletion mutant. The gene omcA (SO1779), which encodes a decaheme cytochrome c, exhibited significant decreases in both mRNA and protein abundance in the fur mutant and possessed a strong candidate Fur-binding site in its upstream region, thus suggesting that omcA may be a direct target of Fur activation. PMID:15576789

  19. Identification of 42 possible cytochrome C genes in the Shewanella oneidensis genome and characterization of six soluble cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terry E; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Vandenberghe, Isabel; de Smet, Lina; Frishman, Dmitrij; Nealson, Kenneth H; Cusanovich, Michael A; van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2004-01-01

    Through pattern matching of the cytochrome c heme-binding site (CXXCH) against the genome sequence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, we identified 42 possible cytochrome c genes (27 of which should be soluble) out of a total of 4758. However, we found only six soluble cytochromes c in extracts of S. oneidensis grown under several different conditions: (1) a small tetraheme cytochrome c, (2) a tetraheme flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase, (3) a diheme cytochrome c4, (4) a monoheme cytochrome c5, (5) a monoheme cytochrome c', and (6) a diheme bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. These cytochromes were identified either through N-terminal or complete amino acid sequence determination combined with mass spectroscopy. All six cytochromes were about 10-fold more abundant when cells were grown at low than at high aeration, whereas the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase was specifically induced by anaerobic growth on fumarate. When adjusted for the different heme content, the monoheme cytochrome c5 is as abundant as are the small tetraheme cytochrome and the tetraheme fumarate reductase. Published results on regulation of cytochromes from DNA microarrays and 2D-PAGE differ somewhat from our results, emphasizing the importance of multifaceted analyses in proteomics.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Intracellular Bioreduction of Chromate in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Sandeep P.; Henne, Kristene L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This proposed research aims to use novel nanoparticle sensors and spectroscopic tools constituting surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging (FLIM) to study intracellular chemical activities within single bioremediating microorganism. The grand challenge is to develop a mechanistic understanding of chromate reduction and localization by the remediating bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by chemical and lifetime imaging. MR-1 has attracted wide interest from the research community because of its potential in reducing multiple chemical and metallic electron acceptors. While several biomolecular approaches to decode microbial reduction mechanisms exist, there is a considerable gap in the availability of sensor platforms to advance research from population-based studies to the single cell level. This study is one of the first attempts to incorporate SERS imaging to address this gap. First, we demonstrate that chromate-decorated nanoparticles can be taken up by cells using TEM and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging to confirm the internalization of gold nanoprobes. Second, we demonstrate the utility of a Raman chemical imaging platform to monitor chromate reduction and localization within single cells. Distinctive differences in Raman signatures of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) enabled their spatial identification within single cells from the Raman images. A comprehensive evaluation of toxicity and cellular interference experiments conducted revealed the inert nature of these probes and that they are non-toxic. Our results strongly suggest the existence of internal reductive machinery and that reduction occurs at specific sites within cells instead of at disperse reductive sites throughout the cell as previously reported. While chromate-decorated gold nanosensors used in this study provide an improved means for the tracking of specific chromate interactions within the cell and on the cell surface, we expect our single cell imaging tools to be

  1. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  2. The Influence of Cultivation Methods on Shewanella oneidensis Physiology and Proteome Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2008-04-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell metabolic variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research.

  3. Molecular Underpinnings of Nitrite Effect on CymA-Dependent Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Miao; Fu, Huihui; Yin, Jianhua; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs). In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass. PMID:27493647

  4. The molecular basis for Mucosal-Associated Invariant T cell recognition of MR1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Dulberger, Charles L.; Crooks, James E.; Parks, Chelsea D.; Luoma, Adrienne M.; McFedries, Amanda; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Saghatelian, Alan; Adams, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an evolutionarily conserved αβ T-cell lineage that express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) restricted to the MHC related-1 (MR1) protein. MAIT cells are dependent upon MR1 expression and exposure to microbes for their development and stimulation, yet these cells can exhibit microbial-independent stimulation when responding to MR1 from different species. We have used this microbial-independent, cross-species reactivity of MAIT cells to define the molecular basis of MAIT-TCR/MR1 engagement and present here a 2.85 Å complex structure of a human MAIT-TCR bound to bovine MR1. The MR1 binding groove is similar in backbone structure to classical peptide-presenting MHC class I molecules (MHCp), yet is partially occluded by large aromatic residues that form cavities suitable for small ligand presentation. The docking of the MAIT-TCR on MR1 is perpendicular to the MR1 surface and straddles the MR1 α1 and α2 helices, similar to classical αβ TCR engagement of MHCp. However, the MAIT-TCR contacts are dominated by the α-chain, focused on the MR1 α2 helix. TCR β-chain contacts are mostly through the variable CDR3β loop that is positioned proximal to the CDR3α loop directly over the MR1 open groove. The elucidation of the MAIT TCR/MR1 complex structure explains how the semi-invariant MAIT-TCR engages the nonpolymorphic MR1 protein, and sheds light onto ligand discrimination by this cell type. Importantly, this structure also provides a critical link in our understanding of the evolution of αβ T-cell recognition of MHC and MHC-like ligands. PMID:23613577

  5. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  6. Surface display of roGFP for monitoring redox status of extracellular microenvironments in Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cheng, Hsin-I; Zhang, Yingdan; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are the most ubiquitous and resilient form of microbial life on earth. One most important feature of a biofilm is the presence of a self-produced matrix, which creates highly heterogeneous and dynamic microenvironments within biofilms. Redox status in biofilm microenvironments plays a critical role in biofilm development and function. However, there is a lack of non-intrusive tools to quantify extracellular redox status of microenvironments within a biofilm matrix. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism, we demonstrated a novel approach to monitor extracellular redox status in biofilm microenvironments. Specifically, we displayed a redox sensitive fluorescence protein roGFP onto the cell surface of S. oneidensis by fusing it to the C-terminus of BpfA, a large surface protein, and used the surface displayed roGFP as a sensor to quantify the extracellular redox status in the matrix of S. oneidensis biofilms. The fusion of roGFP into BpfA has no negative impacts on cell growth and biofilm formation. Upon exposure to oxidizing agents such as H2 O2 , Ag(+) , and SeO3 (2-) , S. oneidensis BpfA-roGFP cells exhibited a characteristic fluorescence of roGFP. Proteinase treatment assay and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy confirmed the surface localization of BpfA-roGFP. We further used the surface displayed roGFP monitored the extracellular redox status in the matrix at different depths of a biofilm exposed to H2 O2 . This study provides a novel approach to non-invasively monitor extracellular redox status in microenvironments within biofilms, which can be used to understand redox responses of biofilms to environmental perturbations.

  7. Systematic Assessment of the Benefits and Caveats in Mining Microbial Post-Translational Modifications from Shotgun Proteomic Data; Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromate Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Microbes are known to regulate both gene expression and protein activity through the use of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Common PTMs involved in cellular signaling and gene control include methylations, acetylations, and phosphorylations; whereas oxidations have been implicated as an indicator for stress. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative bacterium that demonstrates both respiratory versatility and the ability to sense and adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The dataset used in this study consisted of tandem mass spectra derived from mid-log phase aerobic cultures of S. oneidensis shocked either with or without 1 mM chromate [Cr(VI)]. In this study, three algorithms (DBDigger, Sequest, and InsPecT) were evaluated for their ability to scrutinize shotgun proteomic data for evidence of PTMs. The use of conservative scoring filters for peptides or proteins versus creating a sub-database first from a non-modification search was evaluated with DBDigger. The use of higher scoring filters for peptide identifications was found to result in optimal identifications of PTM peptides with a 2% false discovery rate (FDR) for the total dataset using the DBDigger algorithm. However, the FDR climbs to about 50% when considering PTM peptides only. Sequest was evaluated as a method for confirming PTM peptides putatively identified using DBDigger; however, there was a low identification rate (~25%) for the searched spectra. InsPecT was found to have a lower FDR (~9%) than DBDigger for PTM peptides. Comparisons between InsPecT and DBDigger were made with respect to both the FDR and PTM peptide identifications. As a demonstration of this approach, a number of S. oneidensis chemotaxis proteins as well as low-abundance signal transduction proteins were identified as being post-translationally modified in response to chromate challenge.

  8. Single-Molecule Methods for the Large-Scale Characterization of Expression Levels and Protein-Protein Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2008-10-01

    This project has demonstrated a new approach to localize binding sites of proteins regulating gene expression (also known as transcription factors) on the genome of bacteria. Knowledge of the precise binding site(s) of a specific transcription factor helps determining its role in the cell cycle and by extension provides further understanding of the mechanisms at play in the organism. The approach entails labeling transcription factors (or any other DNA-binding protein of interest) with quantum dots, a new class of very bright fluorescent probes, which allow detection of individual molecules with a simple microscope. Detection is then followed with very accurate localization of the probe (with nanometer resolution) with respect to specific parts of the DNA or other proteins bound to the DNA. We have confirmed the precision of our measurement using another technique based on atomic force microscopy, which provides a nanometer-resolution topographic picture of a sample. Quantum dots and DNA are readily observable (and distinguishable) in the atomic force microscope, and can be simultaneously observed by fluorescence microscopy, allowing a direct comparison of the two methods. Precise nanometer-localization of protein binding sites using fluorescent quantum dots is thus a direct and visual method for physical mapping of transcription factor binding sites on whole genomes.

  9. MHC class I-related molecule, MR1, and mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Salou, Marion; Legoux, Francois; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yue; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The MHC-related 1, MR1, molecule presents a new class of microbial antigens (derivatives of the riboflavin [Vitamin B2] biosynthesis pathway) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. This raises many questions regarding antigens loading and intracellular trafficking of the MR1/ligand complexes. The MR1/MAIT field is also important because MAIT cells are very abundant in humans and their frequency is modified in many infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both MR1 and the invariant TCRα chain expressed by MAIT cells are strikingly conserved among species, indicating important functions. Riboflavin is synthesized by plants and most bacteria and yeasts but not animals, and its precursor derivatives activating MAIT cells are short-lived unless bound to MR1. The recognition of MR1 loaded with these compounds is therefore an exquisite manner to detect invasive bacteria. Herein, we provide an historical perspective of the field before describing the main characteristics of MR1, its ligands, and the few available data regarding its cellular biology. We then summarize the current knowledge of MAIT cell differentiation and discuss the definition of MAIT cells in comparison to related subsets. Finally, we describe the phenotype and effector activities of MAIT cells. PMID:27319347

  10. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Wenjian; Chen, Haiyang; Jiang, Jiandong; Kong, Weijia; Wang, Yiguang

    2010-01-15

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-{alpha}, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  11. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth

    2016-06-30

    Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer-membrane (OM) cytochromes c. Free-shuttle and bound-redox cofactor mechanisms were proposed to explain this enhancement, but recent electrochemical reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one-electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at the multiheme OM cytochrome OmcA, we explored binding configurations at hemes 2, 5, 7, and 10. Subsequently, on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energies and redox potential shifts upon RF binding for the Ox/Sq and Sq/Hq reductions were analyzed. Our results demonstrated an upshift in the Ox/Sq and a downshift in the Sq/Hq redox potentials, consistent with a bound RF-OmcA model. Furthermore, binding free energy MD simulations indicated an RF binding preference at heme 7. MD simulations of the OmcA-MtrC complex interfacing at hemes 5 revealed a small interprotein redox potential difference with an electron transfer rate of 10(7)-10(8)/s. PMID:27266856

  12. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  13. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  14. Integrative analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Shewanella oneidensis: missing value imputation using temporal datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-García, Wandaliz; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Roger; Zhang, Weiwen; Runger, George; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in recent years, proteomic datasets currently available still suffer large number of missing values. Integrative analyses based upon incomplete proteomic and transcriptomic da-tasets could seriously bias the biological interpretation. In this study, we applied a non-linear data-driven stochastic gradient boosted trees (GBT) model to impute missing proteomic values for proteins experi-mentally undetected, using a temporal transcriptomic and proteomic dataset of Shewanella oneidensis. In this dataset, genes expression was measured after the cells were exposed to 1 mM potassium chromate for 5-, 30-, 60-, and 90-min, while protein abundance was measured only for 45- and 90-min samples. With the goal of elucidating the relationship between temporal gene expression and protein abundance data, and then using it to impute missing proteomic values for samples of 45-min (which does not have cognate transcriptomic data) and 90-min, we initially used nonlinear Smoothing Splines Curve Fitting (SSCF) to identify temporal relationships among transcriptomic data at different time points and then imputed missing gene expression measurements for the sample at 45-min. After the imputation was validated by biological constrains (i.e. operons), we used a data-driven Gradient Boosted Trees (GBT) model to uncover possible non-linear relationships between temporal transcriptomic and proteomic data, and to impute protein abundance for the proteins experimentally undetected in the 45- and 90-min sam-ples, based on relevant predictors such as temporal mRNA gene expression data, cellular roles, molecular weight, sequence length, protein length, guanine-cytosine (GC) content and triple codon counts. The imputed protein values were validated using biological constraints such as operon, regulon and pathway information. Finally, we demonstrated that such missing value imputation improved characterization of the temporal response of S. oneidensis to chromate.

  15. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in Continuously-fed Bioelectrochemical Systems for Power and Hydrogen Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, iron(III) reduction, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell. The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerab...

  16. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  17. Convection-enhanced Delivery of Free Gadolinium with the Recombinant Immunotoxin MR1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Kanaly, Charles W; Bigner, Darrell D; Cummings, Thomas J; Herndon, James E; Pastan, Ira; Raghavan, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A major obstacle in glioblastoma (GBM) therapy is the restrictive nature of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a novel method of drug administration which allows direct parenchymal infusion of therapeutics, bypassing the BBB. MR1-1 is a novel recombinant immunotoxin that targets the GBM tumor-specific antigen EGFRvIII and can be delivered via CED infusion. However, drug distribution via CED varies dramatically, which necessitates active monitoring. Gadolinium conjugated to diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) is a commonly used MRI contrast agent which can be co-infused with therapies using CED and may be useful in monitoring infusion leak and early distribution. Experimental design Forty immunocompetent rats were implanted with intracerebral cannulas that were connected to osmotic pumps and subsequently randomized into four groups that each received 0.2% human serum albumin (HSA) mixed with a different experimental infusion: 1) 25 ng/mL MR1-1; 2) 7 μmol/mL Gd-DTPA; 3) 25 ng/mL MR1-1 and 7 μmol/mL Gd-DTPA; 4) 250 ng/mL MR1-1 and 7μmol/mL Gd-DTPA. The rats were monitored clinically for six weeks then necropsied and histologically assessed for CNS toxicity. Results All rats survived the entirety of the study without clinical or histological toxicity attributable to the study drugs. There was no statistically significant difference in weight change over time among groups (p>0.999). Conclusion MR1-1 co-infused with Gd-DTPA via CED is safe in the long-term setting in a pre-clinical animal model. Our data supports the use of Gd-DTPA, as a surrogate tracer, co-infused with MR1-1 for drug distribution monitoring in patients with GBM. PMID:19898744

  18. Engineering of Isogenic Cells Deficient for MR1 with a CRISPR/Cas9 Lentiviral System: Tools To Study Microbial Antigen Processing and Presentation to Human MR1-Restricted T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Angharad; Meermeier, Erin W.; Crowther, Michael D.; Connor, Thomas R.; Dolton, Garry; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Gold, Marielle C.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The nonclassical HLA molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1) presents metabolites of the vitamin B synthesis pathways to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and other MR1-restricted T cells. This new class of Ags represents a variation on the classical paradigm of self/non-self discrimination because these T cells are activated through their TCR by small organic compounds generated during microbial vitamin B2 synthesis. Beyond the fundamental significance, the invariant nature of MR1 across the human population is a tantalizing feature for the potential development of universal immune therapeutic and diagnostic tools. However, many aspects of MR1 Ag presentation and MR1-restricted T cell biology remain unknown, and the ubiquitous expression of MR1 across tissues and cell lines can be a confounding factor for experimental purposes. In this study, we report the development of a novel CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing lentiviral system and its use to efficiently disrupt MR1 expression in A459, THP-1, and K562 cell lines. We generated isogenic MR1−/− clonal derivatives of the A549 lung carcinoma and THP-1 monocytic cell lines and used these to study T cell responses to intracellular pathogens. We confirmed that MAIT cell clones were unable to respond to MR1−/− clones infected with bacteria whereas Ag presentation by classical and other nonclassical HLAs was unaffected. This system represents a robust and efficient method to disrupt the expression of MR1 and should facilitate investigations into the processing and presentation of MR1 Ags as well as into the biology of MAIT cells. PMID:27307560

  19. Engineering of Isogenic Cells Deficient for MR1 with a CRISPR/Cas9 Lentiviral System: Tools To Study Microbial Antigen Processing and Presentation to Human MR1-Restricted T Cells.

    PubMed

    Laugel, Bruno; Lloyd, Angharad; Meermeier, Erin W; Crowther, Michael D; Connor, Thomas R; Dolton, Garry; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; Gold, Marielle C; Lewinsohn, David M; Sewell, Andrew K

    2016-08-01

    The nonclassical HLA molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1) presents metabolites of the vitamin B synthesis pathways to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and other MR1-restricted T cells. This new class of Ags represents a variation on the classical paradigm of self/non-self discrimination because these T cells are activated through their TCR by small organic compounds generated during microbial vitamin B2 synthesis. Beyond the fundamental significance, the invariant nature of MR1 across the human population is a tantalizing feature for the potential development of universal immune therapeutic and diagnostic tools. However, many aspects of MR1 Ag presentation and MR1-restricted T cell biology remain unknown, and the ubiquitous expression of MR1 across tissues and cell lines can be a confounding factor for experimental purposes. In this study, we report the development of a novel CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing lentiviral system and its use to efficiently disrupt MR1 expression in A459, THP-1, and K562 cell lines. We generated isogenic MR1(-/-) clonal derivatives of the A549 lung carcinoma and THP-1 monocytic cell lines and used these to study T cell responses to intracellular pathogens. We confirmed that MAIT cell clones were unable to respond to MR1(-/-) clones infected with bacteria whereas Ag presentation by classical and other nonclassical HLAs was unaffected. This system represents a robust and efficient method to disrupt the expression of MR1 and should facilitate investigations into the processing and presentation of MR1 Ags as well as into the biology of MAIT cells.

  20. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells.

  1. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells. PMID:27448212

  2. Validating Annotations for Uncharacterized Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Brenton; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Higdon, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Proteins of unknown function are a barrier to our understanding of molecular biology. Assigning function to these “uncharacterized” proteins is imperative, but challenging. The usual approach is similarity searches using annotation databases, which are useful for predicting function. However, since the performance of these databases on uncharacterized proteins is basically unknown, the accuracy of their predictions is suspect, making annotation difficult. To address this challenge, we developed a benchmark annotation dataset of 30 proteins in Shewanella oneidensis. The proteins in the dataset were originally uncharacterized after the initial annotation of the S. oneidensis proteome in 2002. In the intervening 5 years, the accumulation of new experimental evidence has enabled specific functions to be predicted. We utilized this benchmark dataset to evaluate several commonly utilized annotation databases. According to our criteria, six annotation databases accurately predicted functions for at least 60% of proteins in our dataset. Two of these six even had a “conditional accuracy” of 90%. Conditional accuracy is another evaluation metric we developed which excludes results from databases where no function was predicted. Also, 27 of the 30 proteins' functions were correctly predicted by at least one database. These represent one of the first performance evaluations of annotation databases on uncharacterized proteins. Our evaluation indicates that these databases readily incorporate new information and are accurate in predicting functions for uncharacterized proteins, provided that experimental function evidence exists. PMID:18687039

  3. Endosomal MR1 Trafficking Plays a Key Role in Presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ligands to MAIT Cells.

    PubMed

    Harriff, Melanie J; Karamooz, Elham; Burr, Ansen; Grant, Wilmon F; Canfield, Elizabeth T; Sorensen, Michelle L; Moita, Luis F; Lewinsohn, David M

    2016-03-01

    Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells, present in high frequency in airway and other mucosal tissues, have Th1 effector capacity positioning them to play a critical role in the early immune response to intracellular pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MR1 is a highly conserved Class I-like molecule that presents vitamin B metabolites to MAIT cells. The mechanisms for loading these ubiquitous small molecules are likely to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate MAIT cell activation. To define the intracellular localization of MR1, we analyzed the distribution of an MR1-GFP fusion protein in antigen presenting cells. We found that MR1 localized to endosomes and was translocated to the cell surface upon addition of 6-formyl pterin (6-FP). To understand the mechanisms by which MR1 antigens are presented, we used a lentiviral shRNA screen to identify trafficking molecules that are required for the presentation of Mtb antigen to HLA-diverse T cells. We identified Stx18, VAMP4, and Rab6 as trafficking molecules regulating MR1-dependent MAIT cell recognition of Mtb-infected cells. Stx18 but not VAMP4 or Rab6 knockdown also resulted in decreased 6-FP-dependent surface translocation of MR1 suggesting distinct pathways for loading of exogenous ligands and intracellular mycobacterially-derived ligands. We postulate that endosome-mediated trafficking of MR1 allows for selective sampling of the intracellular environment. PMID:27031111

  4. Endosomal MR1 Trafficking Plays a Key Role in Presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ligands to MAIT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Ansen; Grant, Wilmon F.; Canfield, Elizabeth T.; Sorensen, Michelle L.; Moita, Luis F.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells, present in high frequency in airway and other mucosal tissues, have Th1 effector capacity positioning them to play a critical role in the early immune response to intracellular pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MR1 is a highly conserved Class I-like molecule that presents vitamin B metabolites to MAIT cells. The mechanisms for loading these ubiquitous small molecules are likely to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate MAIT cell activation. To define the intracellular localization of MR1, we analyzed the distribution of an MR1-GFP fusion protein in antigen presenting cells. We found that MR1 localized to endosomes and was translocated to the cell surface upon addition of 6-formyl pterin (6-FP). To understand the mechanisms by which MR1 antigens are presented, we used a lentiviral shRNA screen to identify trafficking molecules that are required for the presentation of Mtb antigen to HLA-diverse T cells. We identified Stx18, VAMP4, and Rab6 as trafficking molecules regulating MR1-dependent MAIT cell recognition of Mtb-infected cells. Stx18 but not VAMP4 or Rab6 knockdown also resulted in decreased 6-FP-dependent surface translocation of MR1 suggesting distinct pathways for loading of exogenous ligands and intracellular mycobacterially-derived ligands. We postulate that endosome-mediated trafficking of MR1 allows for selective sampling of the intracellular environment. PMID:27031111

  5. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  6. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  7. Biochemical and Physiological Characterization: Development & Apply Optical Methods for Charaterizing Biochemical Protein-Protein Interactions in MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon

    2006-08-30

    The objectives of this report are to: Develop novel site-specific protein labeling chemistries for assaying protein-protein interactions in MR-1; and development of a novel optical acquisition and data analysis method for characterizing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 model systems. Our work on analyzing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 is divided in four areas: (1) expression and labeling of MR-1 proteins; (2) general scheme for site-specific fluorescent labeling of expressed proteins; (3) methodology development for monitoring protein-protein interactions; and (4) study of protein-protein interactions in MR-1. In this final report, we give an account for our advances in all areas.

  8. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  9. Involvement and specificity of Shewanella oneidensis outer membrane cytochromes in the reduction of soluble and solid-phase terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Bücking, Clemens; Popp, Felix; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The formation of outer membrane (OM) cytochromes seems to be a key step in the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. They are believed to be the endpoints of an extended respiratory chain to the surface of the cell that establishes the connection to insoluble electron acceptors such as iron or manganese oxides. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains the genetic information for five putative OM cytochromes. In this study, the role and specificity of these proteins were investigated. All experiments were conducted using a markerless deletion mutant in all five OM cytochromes that was complemented via the expression of single, plasmid-encoded genes. MtrC and MtrF were shown to be potent reductases of chelated ferric iron, birnessite, and a carbon anode in a microbial fuel cell. OmcA-producing cells were unable to catalyze iron and electrode reduction, although the protein was correctly produced and oriented. However, OmcA production resulted in a higher birnessite reduction rate compared with the mutant. The presence of the decaheme cytochrome SO_2931 as well as the diheme cytochrome SO_1659 did not rescue the phenotype of the deletion mutant.

  10. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  11. MR1-Restricted Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells and Their Activation during Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Howson, Lauren J.; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    MR1-restricted mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells recognize vitamin B metabolites, which are generated by a broad range of bacteria, from Escherichia coli to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and BCG. MAIT cells have been described as innate sensors of infection as they accumulate early in infected tissues. MAIT cells maintain an activated phenotype throughout the course of infections, secrete inflammatory cytokines, and have the potential to directly kill infected cells, playing an important role in shaping the host response. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms that underline MAIT cells activation in sterile and non-sterile inflammatory conditions. PMID:26136743

  12. CD1d- and MR1-Restricted T Cells in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Peter A.; Anantha, Ram V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; McCormick, John K.; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to infection, such as those encountered in sepsis, can be catastrophic. Sepsis is typically triggered by an overwhelming systemic response to an infectious agent(s) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality even under optimal critical care. Recent studies have implicated unconventional, innate-like T lymphocytes, including CD1d- and MR1-restricted T cells as effectors and/or regulators of inflammatory responses during sepsis. These cell types are typified by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, variant NKT (vNKT) cells, and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. iNKT and vNKT cells are CD1d-restricted, lipid-reactive cells with remarkable immunoregulatory properties. MAIT cells participate in antimicrobial defense, and are restricted by major histocompatibility complex-related protein 1 (MR1), which displays microbe-derived vitamin B metabolites. Importantly, NKT and MAIT cells are rapid and potent producers of immunomodulatory cytokines. Therefore, they may be considered attractive targets during the early hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis when immediate interventions are urgently needed, and also in later phases when adjuvant immunotherapies could potentially reverse the dangerous state of immunosuppression. We will highlight recent findings that point to the significance or the therapeutic potentials of NKT and MAIT cells in sepsis and will also discuss what lies ahead in research in this area. PMID:26322041

  13. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  14. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in continuously fed bioelectrochemical systems for power and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerably enhanced to a maximum current density of 0.45 A/m(2) or 80.3 A/m(3) (mean: 0.34 A/m(2), 57.2 A/m(3)) compared to anaerobically grown cultures. Biocatalyzed hydrogen production rates with aerated S. oneidensis were studied within the applied potential range of 0.3-0.9 V and were highest at 0.9 V with 0.3 m(3) H(2)/m(3) day, which has been reported for mixed cultures, but is approximately 10 times higher than reported for an anaerobic culture of S. oneidensis. Aerated MFC experiments produced a maximum power density of 3.56 W/m(3) at a 200-Omega external resistor. The main reasons for enhanced electrochemical performance are higher levels of active biomass and more efficient substrate utilization under aerobic conditions. Coulombic efficiencies, however, were greatly reduced due to losses of reducing equivalents to aerobic respiration in the anode chamber. The next challenge will be to optimize the aeration rate of the bacterial culture to balance between maximization of bacterial activation and minimization of aerobic respiration in the culture.

  15. Direct Involvement of Type II Secretion System in Extracellular Translocation of Shewanella Oneidensis Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Deng, Shuang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-08-01

    Outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are extracellular lipoproteins important for dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides during anaerobic respiration. To investigate the roles of type II secretion system (T2S) in translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane, we measured the effects of deleting two T2S genes, gspD and gspG, on the secretion of MtrC and OmcA when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. Deletion of gspD or gspG resulted in slightly yellowish supernatants, different from the pink supernatant of wild type (wt). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that, although MtrC, OmcA and NrfA, a periplasmic nitrite reductase, were present the supernatants of wt and ΔgspD mutant, their peptides counts were much lower in ΔgspD than in wt. Subsequent analyses with heme-staining and Western blot not only confirmed that deletion of gspD or gspG reduced the abundances of MtrC and OmcA in the supernatants, but also revealed that the deletions consequently increased their abundances inside the cells. Complementation of ΔgspG mutant with functional GspG could reverse the effects of deleting gspG on the colors of the supernatants and the abundances of MtrC and OmcA. In contrast, Western results showed that the abundance of NrfA was reduced in the supernatant and the cells of ΔgspD mutant, suggesting that reduced NrfA in the periplasm, where MtrC and OmcA were accumulated, contributed to its reduction in the supernatant. Thus, our results demonstrate at the first time that T2S facilitates translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane.

  16. Silver nanocrystallites: Facile biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Wang, Wei; Pelletier, Dale A; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the -proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, upon incubation with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the size range 2 11 nm (with an average of 4 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) are compared to similar chemically synthesized nanoparticles (colloidal silver [colloidal-Ag] and oleate capped silver [oleate-Ag]). The determination of the bactericidal effect of these different silver nanoparticles was assessed using both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria and based on the diameter of the inhibition zone in disc diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, Live/Dead staining assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, a clear synthesis procedure, and a surface coat- and strain-dependent inhibition were observed for silver nanoparticles. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity when compared to colloidal-Ag for both E. coli and B. subtilis. E. coli was found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, Oleate-Ag was not toxic to either of the bacteria. These findings have important implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  17. Highly efficient in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1 and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Yujun; Zhou, Rongying; Ye, Xiujuan; Gao, Shanshan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in diverse fields due to their superior properties. Currently the biosynthesis of AgNPs is in the limelight of modern nanotechnology because of its green properties. However, relatively low yield and inefficiency diminish the prospect of applying these biosynthesized AgNPs. In this work, a rapid mass AgNP biosynthesis method using the cell-free extract of a novel bacterial strain, Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1, which has been isolated from a chemical fertilizer plant, is reported. In addition, the optimum synthesis conditions of AgNPs were investigated. The optimum pH, temperature, dosage, and reaction time were 12, 70 °C, 20 mM AgNO3, and 75 min, respectively. Finally, AgNPs were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, zeta potential and size distribution analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that these biosynthesized AgNPs were bimolecular covered, stable, well-dispersed face centered cubic (fcc) spherical crystalline particles with diameters in the range 5-20 nm. The advantages of this approach are its simplicity, high efficiency, and eco-friendly and cost-effective features.

  18. Human TRAV1-2-negative MR1-restricted T cells detect S. pyogenes and alternatives to MAIT riboflavin-based antigens

    PubMed Central

    Meermeier, Erin W.; Laugel, Bruno F.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Corbett, Alexandra J.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Harriff, Melanie J.; Franks, Tamera; Gold, Marielle C.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are thought to detect microbial antigens presented by the HLA-Ib molecule MR1 through the exclusive use of a TRAV1-2-containing TCRα. Here we use MR1 tetramer staining and ex vivo analysis with mycobacteria-infected MR1-deficient cells to demonstrate the presence of functional human MR1-restricted T cells that lack TRAV1-2. We characterize an MR1-restricted clone that expresses the TRAV12-2 TCRα, which lacks residues previously shown to be critical for MR1-antigen recognition. In contrast to TRAV1-2+ MAIT cells, this TRAV12-2-expressing clone displays a distinct pattern of microbial recognition by detecting infection with the riboflavin auxotroph Streptococcus pyogenes. As known MAIT antigens are derived from riboflavin metabolites, this suggests that TRAV12-2+ clone recognizes unique antigens. Thus, MR1-restricted T cells can discriminate between microbes in a TCR-dependent manner. We postulate that additional MR1-restricted T-cell subsets may play a unique role in defence against infection by broadening the recognition of microbial metabolites. PMID:27527800

  19. Receptor-like protein kinase HvLysMR1 of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is induced during leaf senescence and heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Ouelhadj, Akli; Kaminski, Marc; Mittag, Maria; Humbeck, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The Hordeum vulgare cDNA clone HvLysMR1 that encodes a putative receptor-like protein kinase was identified by restriction fragment differential display-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) comparing cDNA populations derived from mRNAs of primary leaves stressed with chromium for 48 h with controls. The full-length sequence codes for a protein with 622 amino acids which includes characteristic domains of lysine motif receptor-like kinases: an N-terminal signal peptide, two lysine motifs, a transmembrane region, and a serine/threonine kinase domain at the C-terminal end. The expression of HvLysMR1 is induced during exposure to different heavy metals and its transcript accumulates during leaf senescence. Addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 induces HvLysMR1 expression, indicating the involvement of Ca2+ in the regulation of HvLysMR1. In vitro phosphorylation of HvLysMR1 was analysed with [32P]ATP. Using the overexpressed and purified HvLysMR1-kinase domain, the phosphorylation of HvLysMR1 could be confirmed by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) with neutral loss-triggered MS-MS-MS spectra at amino acids localized at the juxtamembrane region. The involvement of HvLysMR1 during heavy metal stress and leaf senescence is discussed. PMID:17322551

  20. Human TRAV1-2-negative MR1-restricted T cells detect S. pyogenes and alternatives to MAIT riboflavin-based antigens.

    PubMed

    Meermeier, Erin W; Laugel, Bruno F; Sewell, Andrew K; Corbett, Alexandra J; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Harriff, Melanie J; Franks, Tamera; Gold, Marielle C; Lewinsohn, David M

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are thought to detect microbial antigens presented by the HLA-Ib molecule MR1 through the exclusive use of a TRAV1-2-containing TCRα. Here we use MR1 tetramer staining and ex vivo analysis with mycobacteria-infected MR1-deficient cells to demonstrate the presence of functional human MR1-restricted T cells that lack TRAV1-2. We characterize an MR1-restricted clone that expresses the TRAV12-2 TCRα, which lacks residues previously shown to be critical for MR1-antigen recognition. In contrast to TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells, this TRAV12-2-expressing clone displays a distinct pattern of microbial recognition by detecting infection with the riboflavin auxotroph Streptococcus pyogenes. As known MAIT antigens are derived from riboflavin metabolites, this suggests that TRAV12-2(+) clone recognizes unique antigens. Thus, MR1-restricted T cells can discriminate between microbes in a TCR-dependent manner. We postulate that additional MR1-restricted T-cell subsets may play a unique role in defence against infection by broadening the recognition of microbial metabolites. PMID:27527800

  1. Crp-dependent cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Chen, Haijiang; Wang, Jixuan; Zhou, Guangqi; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is able to respire on a variety of organic and inorganic substrates, including nitrate and nitrite. Conversion of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonium is catalysed by periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases (NAP and NRF) respectively. Global regulator Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) is essential for growth of S. oneidensis on both nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we discovered that crp mutants are not only severely deficient in nitrate or nitrite respiration, but are also hypersensitive to nitrite. This hypersusceptibility phenotype is independent of nitrite respiration. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we obtained 73 Δcrp suppressor strains resistant to nitrite. Transposon insertion sites in 24 suppressor strains were exclusively mapped in the region upstream of the cyd operon encoding a cytochrome bd oxidase, resulting in expression of the operon now driven by a Crp-independent promoter. Further investigation indicated that the promoter in suppressor strains comes from the transposon. Mutational analysis of the cydB gene (encoding the essential subunit II of the bd oxidase) confirmed that the cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to S. oneidensis.

  2. A Crp-Dependent Two-Component System Regulates Nitrate and Nitrite Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangyang; Wang, Jixuan; Fu, Huihui; Zhou, Guangqi; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2012-01-01

    We have previously illustrated the nitrate/nitrite respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis, which is renowned for its remarkable versatility in respiration. Here we investigated the systems regulating the pathway with a reliable approach which enables characterization of mutants impaired in nitrate/nitrite respiration by guaranteeing biomass. The S. oneidensis genome encodes an Escherichia coli NarQ/NarX homolog SO3981 and two E. coli NarP/NarL homologs SO1860 and SO3982. Results of physiological characterization and mutational analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis possesses a single two-component system (TCS) for regulation of nitrate/nitrite respiration, consisting of the sensor kinase SO3981(NarQ) and the response regulator SO3982(NarP). The TCS directly controls the transcription of nap and nrfA (genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, respectively) but regulates the former less tightly than the latter. Additionally, phosphorylation at residue 57 of SO3982 is essential for its DNA-binding capacity. At the global control level, Crp is found to regulate expression of narQP as well as nap and nrfA. In contrast to NarP-NarQ, Crp is more essential for nap rather than nrfA. PMID:23240049

  3. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to <1% at 10

  4. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  5. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals.

    PubMed

    White, Gaye F; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A

    2013-04-16

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 10(3) times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 10(3) times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  6. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  7. Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome CymA in Anaerobic Electron Transport in Cells of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 with Normal Levels of Menaquinone

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 possesses a complex electron transport system which facilitates its ability to use a diverse array of compounds as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. A previous report described a mutant strain (CMTn-1) deficient in CymA, a tetraheme cytochrome c. However, the interpretation of the electron transport role of CymA was complicated by the fact that CMTn-1 was also markedly deficient in menaquinones. This report demonstrates that the depressed menaquinone levels were the result of the rifampin resistance phenotype of the parent of CMTn-1 and not the interruption of the cymA gene. This is the first report of rifampin resistance leading to decreased menaquinone levels, indicating that rifampin-resistant strains should be used with caution when analyzing electron transport processes. A site-directed gene replacement approach was used to isolate a cymA knockout strain (MR1-CYMA) directly from MR-1. While MR1-CYMA retained menaquinone levels comparable to those of MR-1, it lost the ability to reduce iron(III), manganese(IV), and nitrate and to grow by using fumarate as an electron acceptor. All of these functions were restored to wild-type efficacy, and the presence of the cymA transcript and CymA protein was also restored, by complementation of MR1-CYMA with the cymA gene. The requirement for CymA in anaerobic electron transport to iron(III), fumarate, nitrate, and manganese(IV) is therefore not dependent on the levels of menaquinone in these cells. This represents the first successful use of a suicide vector for directed gene replacement in MR-1. PMID:10613864

  8. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  9. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Shewanella and description of Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Moser, D. P.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Lies, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.; MacGregor, B. J.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Nishijima, M.; Sano, H.; Burghardt, J.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  10. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  11. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c‐type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Summary Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c‐type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c‐type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr ‐1, 36 in‐frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c‐type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c‐type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well‐studied c‐type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr ‐1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c‐type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. PMID:21255343

  12. Identification and characterization of a HEPN-MNT family type II toxin-antitoxin in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Fei; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-11-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. However, related studies in the ecologically and bioelectrochemically important strain Shewanella oneidensis are limited. Here, we show that SO_3166, a member of the higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding (HEPN) superfamily, strongly inhibited cell growth in S. oneidensis and Escherichia coli. SO_3165, a putative minimal nucleotidyltransferase (MNT), neutralized the toxicity of SO_3166. Gene SO_3165 lies upstream of SO_3166, and they are co-transcribed. Moreover, the SO_3165 and SO_3166 proteins interact with each other directly in vivo, and antitoxin SO_3165 bound to the promoter of the TA operon and repressed its activity. Finally, the conserved Rx4-6H domain in HEPN family was identified in SO_3166. Mutating either the R or H abolished SO_3166 toxicity, confirming that Rx4-6H domain is critical for SO_3166 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SO_3166 and SO_3165 in S. oneidensis form a typical type II TA pair. This TA pair plays a critical role in regulating bacterial functions because its disruption led to impaired cell motility in S. oneidensis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that HEPN-MNT can function as a TA system, thereby providing important insights into the understanding of the function and regulation of HEPNs and MNTs in prokaryotes.

  13. Identification and characterization of a HEPN-MNT family type II toxin–antitoxin in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Fei; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. However, related studies in the ecologically and bioelectrochemically important strain Shewanella oneidensis are limited. Here, we show that SO_3166, a member of the higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding (HEPN) superfamily, strongly inhibited cell growth in S. oneidensis and Escherichia coli. SO_3165, a putative minimal nucleotidyltransferase (MNT), neutralized the toxicity of SO_3166. Gene SO_3165 lies upstream of SO_3166, and they are co-transcribed. Moreover, the SO_3165 and SO_3166 proteins interact with each other directly in vivo, and antitoxin SO_3165 bound to the promoter of the TA operon and repressed its activity. Finally, the conserved Rx4-6H domain in HEPN family was identified in SO_3166. Mutating either the R or H abolished SO_3166 toxicity, confirming that Rx4-6H domain is critical for SO_3166 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SO_3166 and SO_3165 in S. oneidensis form a typical type II TA pair. This TA pair plays a critical role in regulating bacterial functions because its disruption led to impaired cell motility in S. oneidensis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that HEPN-MNT can function as a TA system, thereby providing important insights into the understanding of the function and regulation of HEPNs and MNTs in prokaryotes. PMID:26112399

  14. An essential role for UshA in processing of extracellular flavin electron shuttles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth D; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Kotloski, Nicholas J; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis can reduce a number of insoluble extracellular metals. Direct adsorption of cells to the metal surface is not necessary, and it has been shown that S. oneidensis releases low concentrations flavins, including riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), into the surrounding medium to act as extracellular electron shuttles. However, the mechanism of flavin release by Shewanella remains unknown. We have conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen to identify mutants deficient in extracellular flavin accumulation. Mutations in ushA, encoding a predicted 5'-nucleotidase, resulted in accumulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in culture supernatants, with a corresponding decrease in FMN and riboflavin. Cellular extracts of S. oneidensis convert FAD to FMN, whereas extracts of ushA mutants do not, and fractionation experiments show that UshA activity is periplasmic. We hypothesize that S. oneidensis secretes FAD into the periplasmic space, where it is hydrolysed by UshA to FMN and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). FMN diffuses through outer membrane porins where it accelerates extracellular electron transfer, and AMP is dephosphorylated by UshA and reassimilated by the cell. We predict that transport of FAD into the periplasm also satisfies the cofactor requirement of the unusual periplasmic fumarate reductase found in Shewanella.

  15. An arsenic-specific biosensor with genetically engineered Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Webster, Dylan P; TerAvest, Michaela A; Doud, Devin F R; Chakravorty, Arun; Holmes, Eric C; Radens, Caleb M; Sureka, Swati; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-12-15

    Genetically engineered microbial biosensors have yet to realize commercial success in environmental applications due, in part, to difficulties associated with transducing and transmitting traditional bioluminescent information. Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) output a direct electric signal that can be incorporated into devices for remote environmental monitoring. Here, we describe a BES-based biosensor with genetically encoded specificity for a toxic metal. By placing an essential component of the metal reduction (Mtr) pathway of Shewanella oneidensis under the control of an arsenic-sensitive promoter, we have genetically engineered a strain that produces increased current in response to arsenic when inoculated into a BES. Our BES-based biosensor has a detection limit of ~40 μM arsenite with a linear range up to 100 μM arsenite. Because our transcriptional circuit relies on the activation of a single promoter, similar sensing systems may be developed to detect other analytes by the swap of a single genetic part.

  16. Monodispersed biocompatible silver sulfide nanoparticles: Facile extracellular biosynthesis using the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Moon, Ji Won; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size- and shape-dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs has become a priority. In the present article we report for the first time on the efficient generation of extracellular silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are reasonably monodispersed and homogeneously shaped. They are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85% theoretical maximum. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical and surface properties, purity and crystallinity of the synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres with a mean diameter of 9 {+-} 3.5 nm, and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these biogenic Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles on Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) bacterial systems, as well as eukaryotic cell lines including mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells, showed that the particles were non-inhibitory and non-cytotoxic to any of these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles. These particles are dispersible and biocompatible, thus providing excellent potential for use in optical imaging, electronic devices and solar cell applications.

  17. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  18. Laue Crystal Structure of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase from a High-yield Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, is reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein “Small Tetra-heme c” replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated ~20 mg crude ccNiR/L culture, compared with 0.5–1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for E. coli ccNiR, and is stable for over two weeks in pH 7 solution at 4° C. UV/Vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified 5 independent 1-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the 5 reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed amongst the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good quality crystals, with which the 2.59 Å resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein). PMID:22382353

  19. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  20. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  1. Unraveling the Mechanism for the Viability Deficiency of Shewanella oneidensis oxyR Null Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stresses triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage various cellular components are unavoidable for virtually all living organisms. In defense, microorganisms have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, respond to, and battle against ROS. Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, employs OxyR to mediate the response to H2O2 by derepressing the production of the major H2O2 scavenger KatB as a major means toward these goals. Surprisingly, despite enhanced H2O2 degradation, the oxyR mutant carries a viability deficiency phenotype (plating defect), which can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous iron species. Experiments showed that the defect was not due to iron starvation. Rather, multiple lines of evidence suggested that H2O2 generated abiotically in lysogeny broth (LB) is responsible for the defect by quickly killing mutant cells. We then showed that the iron species suppressed the plating defect by two distinct mechanisms, either as an H2O2 scavenger without involving living cells or as an environmental cue to stimulate an OxyR-independent response to help cells cope with oxidative stress. Based on the suppression of the plating defect by overproduction of H2O2 scavengers in vivo, we propose that cellular components that are vulnerable to H2O2 and responsible for the defect may reside outside the cytoplasm. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling the cellular response to H2O2. The loss of OxyR results in reduced viability in many species, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed in S. oneidensis that this defect was due to H2O2 generated abiotically in LB. We then showed that this defect could be corrected by the addition of Fe2+ or catalase to the LB or increased intracellular production of catalase. Further analyses revealed that Fe2+ was able not only to decompose H2O2 directly but also to stimulate the activity of OxyR-independent H2O2

  2. Distinct Roles of Major Peptidoglycan Recycling Enzymes in β-Lactamase Production in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Mao, Yinting; Ju, Lili; Jin, Miao; Sun, Yiyang; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics were the earliest discovered and are the most widely used group of antibiotics that work by inactivating penicillin-binding proteins to inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As one of the most efficient defense strategies, many bacteria produce β-lactam-degrading enzymes, β-lactamases, whose biochemical functions and regulation have been extensively studied. A signal transduction pathway for β-lactamase induction by β-lactam antibiotics, consisting of the major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes and the LysR-type transcriptional regulator, AmpR, has been recently unveiled in some bacteria. Because inactivation of some of these proteins, especially the permease AmpG and the β-hexosaminidase NagZ, results in substantially elevated susceptibility to the antibiotics, these have been recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Here, we show a contrasting scenario in Shewanella oneidensis, in which the homologue of AmpR is absent. Loss of AmpG or NagZ enhances β-lactam resistance drastically, whereas other identified major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes are dispensable. Moreover, our data indicate that there exists a parallel signal transduction pathway for β-lactamase induction, which is independent of either AmpG or NagZ. PMID:25136029

  3. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, Nicholas S; Rosso, Kevin M; Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F

    2007-02-01

    In this report, we describe the characterization of two outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC purified from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). OmcA and MtrC were solubilized with a common detergent and irreversibly bound to Au (111) substrates as self-assembled cytochrome films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified that OmcA and MtrC were covalently bound to the Au surface via thiol bonds to cysteine residues. Initial STM images show that a layer of detergent covers and protects the cytochrome films. Temporary application of high bias voltage causes the detergent film to reorganize around the tip, opening a window for direct STM imaging of the cytochrome layer underneath. The STM apparent sizes of both OmcA and MtrC are 58 nanometers in diameter consistent with expectations from their molecular masses. Current-voltage TS over individual cytochromes showed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate the tunneling current, reflecting differences in their electronic structures. The data suggest that the two cytochromes could have different roles in the electron transport chain during metal reduction.

  4. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å−1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  5. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å-1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  6. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  7. Cell growth and protein expression of Shewanella oneidensis in biofilms and hydrogel-entrapped cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingdan; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    The performance of biofilm-based bioprocesses is difficult to predict and control because of the intrinsic heterogeneous and dynamic properties of microbial biofilms. Biofilm mimics, such as microbial cells entrapped in polymeric scaffolds that are permeable for nutrients, have been proposed to replace real biofilms to achieve long-term robust performance in engineering applications. However, the physiological differences between cells that are physically entrapped in a synthetic polymeric matrix and biofilm cells that are encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix remain unknown. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism and alginate hydrogel as a model synthetic matrix, we compared the cell growth and protein expression in entrapped cultures and biofilms. The hydrogel-entrapped cultures were found to exhibit a growth rate comparable with biofilms. There was no substantial difference in cell viability, surface charge, as well as hydrophobicity between the cells grown in alginate hydrogel and those grown in biofilms. However, the gel-entrapped cultures were found to be physiologically different from biofilms. The gel-entrapped cultures had a higher demand for metabolic energy. The siderophore-mediated iron uptake was repressed in the gel-entrapped cells. The presence of the hydrogel matrix decreased the expression of proteins involved in biofilm formation, while inducing the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the gel-entrapped cultures. These results advance the fundamental understanding of the physiology of hydrogel-entrapped cells, which can lead to more efficient biofilm mimic-based applications.

  8. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis cytochromome : a first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    SciTech Connect

    Londer, Y. Y.; Giuliani, S.; Peppler, T.; Collart, F.; Biosciences Division

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain--are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  9. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å‑1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  10. Graphene oxide as nanogold carrier for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of Shewanella oneidensis with silver enhancement strategy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong

    2014-02-15

    The genus Shewanella is ubiquitous in environment and has been extensively studied for their applications in bioremediation. A novel immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of Shewanella oneidensis was presented based on graphene oxide (GO) as nanogold carrier with silver enhancement strategy. The enhanced sensitivity was achieved by employing conjugate-featuring gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and antibodies (Ab) assembled on bovine serum albumin (BSA)-modified GO (Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO). After a sandwich-type antigen-antibody reaction, Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO conjugate binding on the target analyte produced an enhanced immune-recognition response by the reduction of silver ion in the present of hydroquinone. The deposited silver metal was dissolved with nitric acid and subsequently quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry. The high AuNPs loading capacity of GO and the obvious signal amplification by gold-catalyzed silver deposition offer an excellent detection method with a wide range of linear relationship between 7.0 × 10(1) and 7.0 × 10(7)cfu/mL. Furthermore, the immunoassay developed in this work exhibited high sensitivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility. This simple and sensitive assay method has promising application in various fields for rapid detection of bacteria, protein and DNA.

  11. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence of interactions across the dimeric interface.

    PubMed

    Judd, Evan T; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A Andrew; Elliott, Sean J

    2012-12-21

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, conducts the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by "boosts" and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to the properties of ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed; e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA [Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 23374-23381]. Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which has previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively, these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer.

  12. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Genfu; Li, Ning; Mao, Yinting; Zhou, Guangqi; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive. PMID:25972854

  13. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth's deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å(-1) corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  14. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  15. The effect of metal loading on Cd adsorption onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cell envelopes: The role of sulfhydryl sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Cd onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells with and without blocking of sulfhydryl sites was measured in order to determine the effect of metal loading and to understand the role of sulfhydryl sites in the adsorption reactions. The observed adsorption/desorption behaviors display strong dependence on metal loading. Under a high loading of 40 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, blocking the sulfhydryl sites within the cell envelope by exposure of the biomass to monobromo(trimethylammonio)bimane bromide (qBBr) does not significantly affect the extent of Cd adsorption, and we observed fully reversible adsorption under this condition. In contrast, under a low metal loading of 1.3 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, the extent of Cd adsorption onto sulfhydryl-blocked S. oneidensis cells was significantly lower than that onto untreated cells, and only approximately 50-60% of the adsorbed Cd desorbed from the cells upon acidification. In conjunction with previous EXAFS results, our findings demonstrate that Cd adsorption onto S. oneidensis under low metal loading conditions is dominated by sulfhydryl binding, and thus is controlled by a distinct adsorption mechanism from the non-sulfhydryl site binding which controls Cd adsorption under high metal loading conditions. We use the data to develop a surface complexation model that constrains the values of the stability constants for individual Cd-sulfhydryl and Cd-non-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes, and we use this approach to account for the Cd adsorption behavior as a function of both pH and metal loading. This approach is crucial in order to predict metal adsorption onto bacteria under environmentally relevant metal loading conditions where sulfhydryl binding sites can dominate the adsorption reaction.

  16. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I.; Russell, Jonathan S.; Dominy, Stephen S.; Patel, Kunjal; McKenna, Matt; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU). Methods In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT), Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT), oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD). Covariates for oral health parameters were examined using zero-inflated negative binomial regression and ordinal logistic regression models. Results Eleven sites enrolled 209 PHIV and 126 PHEU. Higher DT scores were observed in participants who were PHIV [Adjusted Mean Ratio (aMR) = 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5)], female [aMR = 1.4 (1.0–1.9)], had no source of regular dental care [aMR = 2.3 (1.5–3.4)], and had a high frequency of meals/snacks [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.9 (1.1–3.1)] and juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.6 (1.1–2.4)]. Higher DMFT scores were observed in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2–2.9)], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0–1.3)], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1–1.7)] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6–1.0)]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health outcomes after adjustment. Conclusions Oral health was poor in PHIV and PHEU youth. This was dismaying since most HIV infected children in the U.S. are carefully followed at medical health care clinics. This data underscore the need for regular dental care. As PHIV youth were at higher risk for cavities, it will be important to better understand this relationship in order to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27299992

  17. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence for interactions across the dimeric interface

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Evan T.; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A. Andrew; Elliott, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, carries out the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by ‘boosts’ and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed, e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA (Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) Protein film voltammetry reveals distinctive fingerprints of nitrite and hydroxylamine reduction by a cytochrome C nitrite reductase, J Biol Chem 277, 23374-23381). Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which have previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer. PMID:23210513

  18. Conduction-band edge dependence of carbon-coated hematite stimulated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Tang, Jiahuan; Yuan, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria-based bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are promising technologies used for alternative energy generation, wastewater treatment, and environmental monitoring. However, their practical application is limited by the bioelectrode performance, mainly resulting from low extracellular electron transfer (EET) efficiency. In this study, a carbon-coated hematite (C/Hematite) electrode was successfully obtained by a green and solvent-free route, that is, heat treatment in an oxygen-rich environment using solid ferrocene as the precursor. The as-prepared C/Hematite electrode was evaluated as a high-performance electrode material in a Shewanella oneidensis-inoculated BES. The maximum biocurrent density of the Shewanella-attached C/Hematite electrode reached 0.22 ± 0.01 mA cm(-2), which is nearly 6-times higher than that of a bare carbon cloth (CC) electrode (0.036 ± 0.005 mA cm(-2)). Electrochemical measurements revealed that the enhanced conductivity and better energy matching between the outer membrane c-type cytochromes of S. oneidensis and the electrode contributed to the improved EET efficiency. The results of this study demonstrated that the semiconductive properties of iron oxides play important roles for the involved bacterial extracellular respiration activities.

  19. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the GenusShewanellaand Description ofShewanellaoneidensis sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, K.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA--DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  20. Shewanella oneidensis FabB: A β-ketoacyl-ACP Synthase That Works with C16:1-ACP

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qixia; Li, Meng; Fu, Huihui; Meng, Qiu; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    It is established that Escherichia coli β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) I (encoded by EcfabB) is the primary, if not exclusive, factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (C10:1-ACP) but not effective with C16:1- or longer-chain-ACPs. To test the extent to which these features apply to KAS I proteins in other species, in this study, we examined the physiological role of FabB in Shewanella oneidensis, an excellent model for researching type II fatty acid synthetic (FAS) system and its regulation. We showed that the loss of either FabA (the enzyme that introduces double bond) or FabB, in the absence of DesA which desaturizes C16 and C18 to generate respective C16:1 and C18:1, leads to a UFA auxotroph. However, fatty acid profiles of membrane phospholipid of the fabA and fabB mutants are significantly different, suggesting that FabB participates in steps beyond elongation of C10:1-ACP. Further analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis FabB differs from EcFabB in that (i) it is not the only enzyme capable of catalyzing elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA, (ii) it plays a critical role in elongation of C16:1- and longer-chain-ACPs, and (iii) its overproduction is detrimental. PMID:27014246

  1. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  2. Protection from oxidative stress relies mainly on derepression of OxyR-dependent KatB and Dps in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaoming; Dong, Yangyang; Luo, Qixia; Li, Ning; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella thrives in redox-stratified environments where accumulation of H2O2 becomes inevitable because of the chemical oxidation of reduced metals, sulfur species, or organic molecules. As a research model, the representative species Shewanella oneidensis has been extensively studied for its response to various stresses. However, little progress has been made toward an understanding of the physiological and genetic responses of this bacterium to oxidative stress, which is critically relevant to its application as a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In this study, we systematically investigated the mechanism underlying the response to H2O2 at cellular, genomic, and molecular levels. Using transcriptional profiling, we found that S. oneidensis is hypersensitive to H2O2 in comparison with Escherichia coli, and well-conserved defense genes such as ahpCF, katB, katG, and dps appear to form the first line of defense, whereas iron-sulfur-protecting proteins may not play a significant role. Subsequent identification and characterization of an analogue of the E. coli oxyR gene revealed that S. oneidensis OxyR is the master regulator that mediates the bacterial response to H2O2-induced oxidative stress by directly repressing or activating the defense genes. The sensitivity of S. oneidensis to H2O2 is likely attributable to the lack of an inducible manganese import mechanism during stress. To cope with stress, major strategies that S. oneidensis adopts include rapid removal of the oxidant and restriction of intracellular iron concentrations, both of which are achieved predominantly by derepression of the katB and dps genes.

  3. Protection from Oxidative Stress Relies Mainly on Derepression of OxyR-Dependent KatB and Dps in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yaoming; Dong, Yangyang; Luo, Qixia; Li, Ning; Wu, Genfu

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella thrives in redox-stratified environments where accumulation of H2O2 becomes inevitable because of the chemical oxidation of reduced metals, sulfur species, or organic molecules. As a research model, the representative species Shewanella oneidensis has been extensively studied for its response to various stresses. However, little progress has been made toward an understanding of the physiological and genetic responses of this bacterium to oxidative stress, which is critically relevant to its application as a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In this study, we systematically investigated the mechanism underlying the response to H2O2 at cellular, genomic, and molecular levels. Using transcriptional profiling, we found that S. oneidensis is hypersensitive to H2O2 in comparison with Escherichia coli, and well-conserved defense genes such as ahpCF, katB, katG, and dps appear to form the first line of defense, whereas iron-sulfur-protecting proteins may not play a significant role. Subsequent identification and characterization of an analogue of the E. coli oxyR gene revealed that S. oneidensis OxyR is the master regulator that mediates the bacterial response to H2O2-induced oxidative stress by directly repressing or activating the defense genes. The sensitivity of S. oneidensis to H2O2 is likely attributable to the lack of an inducible manganese import mechanism during stress. To cope with stress, major strategies that S. oneidensis adopts include rapid removal of the oxidant and restriction of intracellular iron concentrations, both of which are achieved predominantly by derepression of the katB and dps genes. PMID:24214945

  4. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  5. The influence of cultivation methods on Shewanella oneidensis physiology and proteome expression

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been largely overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research. PMID:18030449

  6. A Matter of Timing: Contrasting Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide on Oxidative Stress Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Genfu; Wan, Fen; Fu, Huihui; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), well known for its toxic properties, has recently become a research focus in bacteria, in part because it has been found to prevent oxidative stress caused by treatment with some antibiotics. H2S has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus preventing oxidative stress, but it is also toxic, leading to conflicting reports of its effects in different organisms. Here, with Shewanella oneidensis as a model, we report that the effects of H2S on the response to oxidative stress are time dependent. When added simultaneously with H2O2, H2S promoted H2O2 toxicity by inactivating catalase, KatB, a heme-containing enzyme involved in H2O2 degradation. Such an inhibitory effect may apply to other heme-containing proteins, such as cytochrome cbb3 oxidase. When H2O2 was supplied 20 min or later after the addition of H2S, the oxidative-stress-responding regulator OxyR was activated, resulting in increased resistance to H2O2. The activation of OxyR was likely triggered by the influx of iron, a response to lowered intracellular iron due to the iron-sequestering property of H2S. Given that Shewanella bacteria thrive in redox-stratified environments that have abundant sulfur and iron species, our results imply that H2S is more important for bacterial survival in such environmental niches than previously believed. IMPORTANCE Previous studies have demonstrated that H2S is either detrimental or beneficial to bacterial cells. While it can act as a growth-inhibiting molecule by damaging DNA and denaturing proteins, it helps cells to combat oxidative stress. Here we report that H2S indeed has these contrasting biological functions and that its effects are time dependent. Immediately after H2S treatment, there is growth inhibition due to damage of heme-containing proteins, at least to catalase and cytochrome c oxidase. In contrast, when added a certain time later, H2S confers an enhanced ability to combat oxidative stress by activating the

  7. MAIT, MR1, microbes and riboflavin: a paradigm for the co-evolution of invariant TCRs and restricting MHCI-like molecules?

    PubMed

    Mondot, Stanislas; Boudinot, Pierre; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    MAIT cells express an invariant TCR that recognizes non-peptidic microbial antigens presented by the non-polymorphic MHCI-like molecule, MR1. We briefly describe how the antigens recognized by MAIT cells are generated from an unstable precursor of the riboflavin (Vitamin B2) biosynthesis pathway, as well as the main features of MAIT cells in comparison with other related T cell subsets. In silico analysis of bacterial genomes shows that the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway is highly prevalent in all groups of Prokaryotes with, however, notable exceptions. We discuss the putative functions and the evolution of the MAIT/MR1 couple: it appeared in the ancestors of mammals and is highly conserved across this group, but was independently lost in three orders. We describe the four instances of known invariant TCR and MHC-I-like molecules encountered in Vertebrates. Both T cells bearing semi-invariant TCR and the associated, evolutionarily conserved MHC-I related molecules have been found in mammals or in amphibians, which suggests that other MHC1-like/invariant TCR couples might be present in other classes of Vertebrates to detect generic microbial compounds. This allows us to discuss how the recognition of riboflavin precursor derivatives by the MAIT TCR may be a way to detect invasive microbes in specific organs, and may epitomize other invariant T cell systems across vertebrates. PMID:27393664

  8. Depositional style of mass-flow lobes in Ulleung Basin (East Sea, Korea) interpreted from MR1 sonar image, chirp profiles, and piston cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Jung, W.; Bahk, J.; Gardner, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    A detailed analysis of MR1 sonar and chirp (2-7 kHz) seismic data with 5 (2.9-9.4 m long) piston cores and 17 AMS 14C ages reveals spatial and temporal variations in depositional style of mass-flow lobes in the Ulleung Basin. On MR1 sonar image, eight mass-flow lobes are identified in the western basin plain (>2100 m). They are covered by ca. 2-m thick Holocene pelagic sediments, and show the northward flow direction. Lobes 1-4 have large dimensions (>27 km long and 15-25 km wide) and occupy in the lower stratigraphic position. On the other hand, lobes 5-8, deposited in the more proximal area, have small dimensions (8.8-31.5 km long and 1.2-12 km wide) and occur in the upper stratigraphic position. Lobes 1-4 deposited retrogressively. Lobes 1 and 2 are characterized by relatively strong back-scattering intensity with smooth surfaces on MR1 image, and show flat, sharp bottom echo and several distinct to diffuse internal reflectors in chirp profiles. Sediments near their edges consist of fine-grained turbidites (laminated sand/mud and homogeneous mud) with minor massive clay-rich sand. However, they change to mud-matrix disorganized gravel and massive sand with the overlying fine-grained turbidites toward the proximal part. Lobes 1 and 2 deposited between ca. 20 and 18 cal. ka B.P. Lobes 3 and 4, overlying lobe 2, show weak to medium back-scattering intensity on MR1 image with slightly irregular to hummocky surfaces corresponding to small-scale (<100 m wide and <5 m high) hyperbolic bottom echoes in chirp profiles. Upper surfaces of the lobes are nearly flat to convex-up in cross section. Lobes 5-8 deposited on the upper surfaces of lobes 3 and 4. Their widths abruptly decrease to the proximal part, forming a bottle-neck morphology. They generally show weak to medium back-scattering intensity with relatively strong back-scattering intensity along the margins on MR1 image. They exhibit convex-up upper surfaces with distinct lateral margins in chirp profiles as their

  9. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  10. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Alex S; Thompson, Dorothea K; Khare, Tripti; Lim, Hanjo; Brandt, Craig C; Li, Guangshan; Murray, Alison E; Heidelberg, John F; Giometti, Carol S; Yates, John; Nealson, Kenneth H; Tiedje, James M; Zhoui, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c552, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data. PMID:11881834

  11. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem ‘modules’ similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV–visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  12. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  13. Monodispersed biocompatible Ag2S nanoparticles: Facile extracellular bio-fabrication using the gamma-proteobacterium, S. oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Retterer, Scott T; Allison, David P; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size and or shape dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs have become a priority. In the present illustration we report for the first time the efficient generation of extracellular Ag2S nanoparticles by the metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are nearly monodispersed with homogeneous shape distributions and are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85 % theoretical maximum. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical properties, purity, and crystallinity of the as-synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 1-22 nm, with an average size of 9 3 nm and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these silver sulfide nanoparticles on Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacterial systems as well as eukaryotic; mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells showed that the particles were non-inhibitory or non-cytotoxic to both these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag2S nanoparticles which are dispersible and biocompatible; thus providing excellent potential for their uses in optical imaging and electronic devices, and solar cell applications.

  14. Mutation Analysis of MR-1, SLC2A1, and CLCN1 in 28 PRRT2-negative Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Hong-Fu; Liu, Gong-Lu; Wen, Xiao-Dan; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is the most common subtype of paroxysmal dyskinesias and is caused by mutations in PRRT2 gene. The majority of familial PKD was identified to harbor PRRT2 mutations. However, over two-third of sporadic PKD patients did not carry any PRRT2 mutation, suggesting an existence of additional genetic mutations or possible misdiagnosis due to clinical overlap. Methods: A cohort of 28 Chinese patients clinically diagnosed with sporadic PKD and excluded PRRT2 mutations were recruited. Clinical features were evaluated, and all subjects were screened for MR-1, SLC2A1, and CLCN1 genes, which are the causative genes of paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD), paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia, and myotonia congenita (MC), respectively. In addition, 200 genetically matched healthy individuals were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 16 genetic variants including 4 in MR-1 gene, 8 in SLC2A1 gene, and 4 in CLCN1 gene were detected. Among them, SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was detected in one case, and CLCN1 c.1205C>T mutation was detected in other two cases. Neither of them was found in 200 controls as well as 1000 Genomes database and ExAC database. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by SIFT and PolyPhen2. The SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was novel. Conclusions: The phenotypic overlap may lead to the difficulty in distinguishing PKD from PNKD and MC. For those PRRT2- negative PKD cases, screening of SLC2A1 and CLCN1 genes are useful in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:27098784

  15. Metabolite-enabled mutualistic interaction between Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli in a co-culture using an electrode as electron acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Cao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions in planktonic microbial communities have been extensively studied. However, our understanding on mutualistic communities consisting of co-existing planktonic cells and biofilms is limited. Here, we report a planktonic cells-biofilm mutualistic system established by the fermentative bacterium Escherichia coli and the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical device, where planktonic cells in the anode media interact with the biofilms on the electrode. Our results show that the transfer of formate is the key mechanism in this mutualistic system. More importantly, we demonstrate that the relative distribution of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the liquid media and biofilm is likely driven by their metabolic functions towards an optimum communal metabolism in the bioelectrochemical device. RNA sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses of the interacting organisms in the mutualistic system potentially reveal differential expression of genes involved in extracellular electron transfer pathways in both species in the planktonic cultures and biofilms. PMID:26061569

  16. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-12-28

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  17. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  18. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A; Bar, Haim Y; Beg, Qasim K; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2011-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, little is known about the interactions between different microbial species in a community: sugar fermenting bacteria can interact with current producing microbes in a fashion that is either neutral, positively enhancing, or even negatively affecting. Here, we compare the bioelectrochemical performance of Shewanella oneidensis in a pure-culture and in a co-culture with the homolactic acid fermenter Lactococcus lactis at conditions that are pertinent to conventional BES operation. While S. oneidensis alone can only use lactate as electron donor for current production, the co-culture is able to convert glucose into current with a comparable coulombic efficiency of ∼17%. With (electro)-chemical analysis and transcription profiling, we found that the BES performance and S. oneidensis physiology were not significantly different whether grown as a pure- or co-culture. Thus, the microbes worked together in a purely substrate based (neutral) relationship. These co-culture experiments represent an important step in understanding microbial interactions in BES communities with the goal to design complex microbial communities, which specifically convert target substrates into electricity. PMID:21036604

  19. Transcription factors FabR and FadR regulate both aerobic and anaerobic pathways for unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qixia; Shi, Miaomiao; Ren, Yedan; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    As genes for type II fatty acid synthesis are essential to the growth of Escherichia coli, its sole (anaerobic) pathway has significant potential as a target for novel antibacterial drug, and has been extensively studied. Despite this, we still know surprisingly little about fatty acid synthesis in bacteria because this anaerobic pathway in fact is not widely distributed. In this study, we show a novel model of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthesis in Shewanella, emerging human pathogens in addition to well-known metal reducers. We identify both anaerobic and aerobic UFA biosynthesis pathways in the representative species, S. oneidensis. Uniquely, the bacterium also contains two regulators FabR and FadR, whose counterparts in other bacteria control the anaerobic pathway. However, we show that in S. oneidensis these two regulators are involved in regulation of both pathways, in either direct or indirect manner. Overall, our results indicate that the UFA biosynthesis and its regulation are far more complex than previously expected, and S. oneidensis serves as a good research model for further work. PMID:25566241

  20. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  1. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  2. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  3. Two residues predominantly dictate functional difference in motility between Shewanella oneidensis flagellins FlaA and FlaB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Shi, Miaomiao; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Haichun

    2014-05-23

    Nearly half of flagellated microorganisms possess a multiple-flagellin system. Although a functional filament can be formed from one of multiple flagellins alone in many bacteria, it is more common that one flagellin is the major constituent and others contribute. Underlying mechanisms proposed for such scenarios cover flagellin regulation of various levels, including transcription, translation, post-translational modification, secretion, and filament assembly. In Shewanella oneidensis, the flagellar filament is composed of FlaA and FlaB flagellins; the latter is the major one in terms of motility. In this study, we showed that regulation of all levels except for filament assembly is indistinguishable between these two flagellins. Further analyses revealed that two amino acid residues predominantly dictated functional difference with respect to motility. Given that Shewanella prefer a solid surface-associated life style, of which filaments consisting of either FlaA or FlaB are equally supportive, we envision that roles of flagella in surface adhesion and formation of bacterial communities are particularly important for their survival and proliferation in these specific niches.

  4. Regulation of nitrite resistance of the cytochrome cbb3 oxidase by cytochrome c ScyA in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Jin, Miao; Zhang, Haiyan; Ju, Lili; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome c proteins, as enzymes to exchange electrons with substrates or as pure electron carriers to shuttle electrons, play vital roles in bacterial respiration and photosynthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for the respiratory diversity, at least 42 c-type cytochromes are predicted to be encoded in the genome and are regarded to be the foundation of its highly branched electron transport pathways. However, only a small number of c-type cytochromes have been extensively studied. In this study, we identify soluble cytochrome c ScyA as an important factor influencing the nitrite resistance of a strain devoid of the bd oxidase by utilizing a newly developed transposon mutagenesis vector, which enables overexpression of the gene(s) downstream of the insertion site. We show that when in overabundance ScyA facilitates growth against nitrite inhibition by enhancing nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase. Based on the data presented in this study, we suggest two possible mechanisms underlying the observed effect of ScyA: (1) ScyA increases electron flow to the cbb3 oxidase; (2) ScyA promotes nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase, possibly by direct interaction.

  5. Investigation into FlhFG reveals distinct features of FlhF in regulating flagellum polarity in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Shi, Miaomiao; Ju, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2015-10-01

    Rod-shaped bacterial cells are polarized, with many organelles confined to a polar cellular site. In polar flagellates, FlhF and FlhG, a multiple-domain (B-N-G) GTPase and a MinD-like ATPase respectively, function as a cognate pair to regulate flagellar localization and number as revealed in Vibrio and Pseudomonas species. In this study, we show that FlhFG of Shewanella oneidensis (SoFlhFG), a monotrichous γ-proteobacterium renowned for respiratory diversity, also play an important role in the flagellar polar placement and number control. Despite this, SoFlhFG exhibit distinct features that are not observed in the characterized counterparts. Most strikingly, the G domain of SoFlhF determines the polar placement, contrasting the N domain of the Vibrio cholerae FlhF. The SoFlhF N domain in fact counteracts the function of the G domain with respect to the terminal targeting in the absence of the B domain. We further show that GTPase activity of SoFlhF is essential for motility but not positioning. Overall, our results suggest that mechanisms underlying the polar placement of organelles appear to be diverse, even for evolutionally relatively conserved flagellum.

  6. Two Residues Predominantly Dictate Functional Difference in Motility between Shewanella oneidensis Flagellins FlaA and FlaB*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Shi, Miaomiao; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    Nearly half of flagellated microorganisms possess a multiple-flagellin system. Although a functional filament can be formed from one of multiple flagellins alone in many bacteria, it is more common that one flagellin is the major constituent and others contribute. Underlying mechanisms proposed for such scenarios cover flagellin regulation of various levels, including transcription, translation, post-translational modification, secretion, and filament assembly. In Shewanella oneidensis, the flagellar filament is composed of FlaA and FlaB flagellins; the latter is the major one in terms of motility. In this study, we showed that regulation of all levels except for filament assembly is indistinguishable between these two flagellins. Further analyses revealed that two amino acid residues predominantly dictated functional difference with respect to motility. Given that Shewanella prefer a solid surface-associated life style, of which filaments consisting of either FlaA or FlaB are equally supportive, we envision that roles of flagella in surface adhesion and formation of bacterial communities are particularly important for their survival and proliferation in these specific niches. PMID:24733391

  7. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  8. The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA reveals new insight at the microbe-mineral interface

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Baiden, Nanakow; Johs, Alexander; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Liang, Liyuan; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2014-05-21

    The x-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA, an extracellular decaheme cytochrome involved in mineral reduction, was solved to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The four OmcA molecules in the asymmetric unit were arranged so the distance between heme-5 on adjacent OmcA monomers was less than 1 nm, indicative of a transient OmcA dimer capable of intermolecular electron transfer. A previously identified hematite binding motif was identified near heme 10, forming a hydroxylated surface that would bring a heme-10 electron egress site to ~ 1 nm of mineral surface.

  9. The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA reveals new insight at the microbe-mineral interface.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marcus J; Baiden, Nanakow A; Johs, Alexander; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Liang, Liyuan; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Gates, Andrew J; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A

    2014-05-21

    The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA, an extracellular decaheme cytochrome involved in mineral reduction, was solved to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The four OmcA molecules in the asymmetric unit are arranged so the minimum distance between heme 5 on adjacent OmcA monomers is 9 Å, indicative of a transient OmcA dimer capable of intermolecular electron transfer. A previously identified hematite binding motif was identified near heme 10, forming a hydroxylated surface that would bring a heme 10 electron egress site to ∼10 Å of a mineral surface.

  10. Charge-associated effects of fullerene derivatives on microbialstructural integrity and central metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Chen, Ding; Min, Guangwei; Kim, Chul; Murkhejee, Bipasha; Larabell, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D.; Chen,Fanqing Frank

    2007-01-23

    The effects of four types of fullerene compounds (C60,C60-OH, C60-COOH, C60-NH2) were examined on two model microorganisms(Escherichia coli W3110 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1). Positivelycharged C60-NH2 at concentrations as low as 10 mg/L inhibited growth andreduced substrate uptake for both microorganisms. Scanning ElectronMicroscopy (SEM) revealed damage to cellular structures.Neutrally-charged C60 and C60-OH had mild negative effects on S.oneidensis MR-1, whereas the negatively-charged C60-COOH did not affecteither microorganism s growth. The effect of fullerene compounds onglobal metabolism was further investigated using [3-13C]L-lactateisotopic labeling, which tracks perturbations to metabolic reaction ratesin bacteria by examining the change in the isotopic labeling pattern inthe resulting metabolites (often amino acids).1-3 The 13C isotopomeranalysis from all fullerene-exposed cultures revealed no significantdifferences in isotopomer distributions from unstressed cells. Thisresult indicates that microbial central metabolism is robust toenvironmental stress inflicted by fullerene nanoparticles. In addition,although C60-NH2 compounds caused mechanical stress on the cell wall ormembrane, both S. oneidensis MR-1 and E. coli W3110 can efficientlyalleviate such stress by cell aggregation and precipitation of the toxicnanoparticles. The results presented here favor the hypothesis thatfullerenes cause more membrane stress4, 5, 6 than perturbation to energymetabolism7

  11. Reduction of Nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-04-23

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  12. The Origin of 8-Amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic Acid (Kdo8N) in the Lipopolysaccharide of Shewanella oneidensis*

    PubMed Central

    Gattis, Samuel G.; Chung, Hak Suk; Trent, M. Stephen; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is an essential component of the outer monolayer of nearly all Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is composed of a hydrophobic anchor, known as lipid A, an inner core oligosaccharide, and a repeating O-antigen polysaccharide. In nearly all species, the first sugar bridging the hydrophobic lipid A and the polysaccharide domain is 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), and thus it is critically important for LPS biosynthesis. Modifications to lipid A have been shown to be important for resistance to antimicrobial peptides as well as modulating recognition by the mammalian innate immune system. Therefore, lipid A derivatives have been used for development of vaccine strains and vaccine adjuvants. One derivative that has yet to be studied is 8-amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo8N), which is found exclusively in marine bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Using bioinformatics, a candidate gene cluster for Kdo8N biosynthesis was identified in Shewanella oneidensis. Expression of these genes recombinantly in Escherichia coli resulted in lipid A containing Kdo8N, and in vitro assays confirmed their proposed enzymatic function. Both the in vivo and in vitro data were consistent with direct conversion of Kdo to Kdo8N prior to its incorporation into the Kdo8N-lipid A domain of LPS by a metal-dependent oxidase followed by a glutamate-dependent aminotransferase. To our knowledge, this oxidase is the first enzyme shown to oxidize an alcohol using a metal and molecular oxygen, not NAD(P)+. Creation of an S. oneidensis in-frame deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin as well as bile salts, suggesting a role in outer membrane integrity. PMID:23413030

  13. Digital Image Processing Techniques for Enhancement and Classification of MR1 Side Scan Sonar Imagery and Preliminary Results of Manganese Nodule Occurrence between the Clarion and Clipperton Fracture Zones, NE Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Park, C.; Park, J.; Kim, K.

    2004-12-01

    The recent growth in the production rate of digital side scan sonar images, coupled with the rapid expansion of systematic seafloor exploration programs, has created a need for fast and quantitative means of processing seafloor imagery. A number of numerical techniques used to enhance and classify imagery produced by long range side scan sonar (MR1) in the Clarion and Clippertion Fracture Zones, NE equatorial Pacific. Side scan sonar imagery is traditionally interpreted visually and qualitatively by experts. Textural Analysis enables a more objective approach, supplementing the interpreter with reliable quantitative results. Grey-level co-occurrence matrices describe numerically textual information and detect subtle details invisible to the human eyes. The area between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones (NE equatorial Pacific) is one of the highest manganese nodule abundance in the world oceans. A detailed analysis of MR1 sonar images and ground truth - free-fall grab (FFG) data in the area, reveals a close relationship between sonar characters of seafloor and manganese nodule occurrence. The close relationship between distribution of sonar imagery and manganese nodule abundance implies that seafloor topography and sediment thickness are important controlling factors for occurrence of manganese nodules.

  14. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  15. High-and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Boyanov, M.; Bunker, B. A.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with pK{sub a} values of 3.3 {+-} 0.2, 4.8 {+-} 0.2, 6.7 {+-} 0.4, and 9.4 {+-} 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -5}, 1.3({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -4}, 5.9({+-}3.3) x 10{sup -5}, and 1.1({+-}0.6) x 10{sup -4} moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low

  16. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  17. Functional expression of Carassius auratus cytochrome P4501A in a novel Shewanella oneidensis expression system and application for the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ziwei; Lu, Ming; Shon, Kwang-Jae; Park, Jang-Su

    2014-06-10

    Cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) in fish has attracted an increasing interest because of its important roles in the metabolic activation of certain xenobiotics such as aromatic hydrocarbons. CYPs are reported to be expressed in yeast, insect cells and Escherichia coli, but are critical for high-level expression. Besides, this study found that the purification of recombinant goldfish CYP1A would result in a loss of enzyme activity. Because large quantities of functional CYP1A are required, it is necessary to find a suitable host with high-level expression. In the present study, a novel expression system using Shewanella oneidensis was established successfully for the production of goldfish CYP1A. A signal peptide in the expression vector leads to the high-level expression in the periplasmic space of Shewanella. The recombinant CYP1A in Shewanella reached up to 1μmol per liter of culture, and showed the typical P450 hemoprotein spectra. An ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay revealed the amount of functional proteins in Shewanella to be almost ten times more than those in other expression systems. Furthermore, the CYP1A-mediated degradation of benzo[a]pyrene was also observed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. These results indicate the possible application of periplasmic fractions to obtain sufficient quantities of functional CYP1A for further studies.

  18. EXPOSE-R on Mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Kloss, Maria; Reitz, Guenther

    Currently EXPOSE-R is on mission! This astrobiological exposure facility was accommodated at the universal workplace URM-D Zenith payload site, located outside the Russian Svezda Module of the International Space Station (ISS) by extravehicular activity (EVA) on March 10th 2009. It contains 3 trays accommodating 12 sample compartments with sample carriers in three levels either open to space vacuum or kept in a defined gas environment. In its 8 experiments of biological and chemical content, more than 1200 individual samples are exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiations, vacuum, cosmic rays or extreme temperature variations. In their different experiments the involved scientists are studying the question of life's origin on Earth and the results of their experiments are contributing to different aspects of the evolution and distribution of life in the Universe. Additionally integrated into the EXPOSE-R facility are several dosimeters monitoring the ionising and the solar UV-radiation during the mission to deliver useful information to complement the sample analysis. In close cooperation with the DLR and the Technical University Munich (TUM), the Rheinisch -Westfülische Technischen Hochschule Aachen (RWTH Aachen) operates the experiment "Spores". a This is one of the 6 astrobiological experiments of the ROSE-Consortium" (Response of Or-ganisms to Space Environment) of the EXPOSE-R mission. In these experiments spores of bacteria, fungi and ferns are being over layered or mixed with meteorite material. The analysis of the effect of the space parameters on different biological endpoints of the spores of the mi-croorganism Bacillus subtilis will be performed after the retrieval of the experiment scheduled for the end of 2010. Parallel to the space mission an identical set of samples was accommodated into EXPOSE-R trays identical in construction to perform the Mission Ground Reference (MGR) Test. Currently this MGR Test is carried out in the Planetary and Space

  19. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  20. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  1. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Balchik, Sara M.; Fridrickson, Jim; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant ΔmtrC or mutant ΔomcA > double mutant (ΔomcA-ΔmtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes. PMID:23249294

  2. Correlations between the Electronic Properties of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase (ccNiR) and Its Structure: Effects of Heme Oxidation State and Active Site Ligation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Natalia; Love, Daniel; Judd, Evan T; Elliott, Sean J; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2015-06-23

    The electrochemical properties of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), a homodimer that contains five hemes per protomer, were investigated by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectropotentiometries. Global analysis of the UV-vis spectropotentiometric results yielded highly reproducible values for the heme midpoint potentials. These midpoint potential values were then assigned to specific hemes in each protomer (as defined in previous X-ray diffraction studies) by comparing the EPR and UV-vis spectropotentiometric results, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of EPR spectra to the structural microenvironment of paramagnetic centers. Addition of the strong-field ligand cyanide led to a 70 mV positive shift of the active site's midpoint potential, as the cyanide bound to the initially five-coordinate high-spin heme and triggered a high-spin to low-spin transition. With cyanide present, three of the remaining hemes gave rise to distinctive and readily assignable EPR spectral changes upon reduction, while a fourth was EPR-silent. At high applied potentials, interpretation of the EPR spectra in the absence of cyanide was complicated by a magnetic interaction that appears to involve three of five hemes in each protomer. At lower applied potentials, the spectra recorded in the presence and absence of cyanide were similar, which aided global assignment of the signals. The midpoint potential of the EPR-silent heme could be assigned by default, but the assignment was also confirmed by UV-vis spectropotentiometric analysis of the H268M mutant of ccNiR, in which one of the EPR-silent heme's histidine axial ligands was replaced with a methionine.

  3. PBP1a/LpoA but not PBP1b/LpoB are involved in regulation of the major β-lactamase gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Mao, Yinting; Jin, Miao; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamase production is one of the most important strategies for Gram-negative bacteria to combat β-lactam antibiotics. Studies of the regulation of β-lactamase expression have largely been focused on the class C β-lactamase AmpC, whose induction by β-lactams requires LysR-type regulator AmpR and permease AmpG-dependent peptidoglycan recycling intermediates. In Shewanella, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance, production of the class D β-lactamase BlaA confers bacteria with natural resistance to many β-lactams. Expression of the blaA gene in the genus representative Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the AmpC paradigm because of the lack of an AmpR homologue and the presence of an additional AmpG-independent regulatory pathway. In this study, using transposon mutagenesis, we identify proteins that are involved in blaA regulation. Inactivation of mrcA and lpoA, which encode penicillin binding protein 1a (PBP1a) and its lipoprotein cofactor, LpoA, respectively, drastically enhances blaA expression in the absence of β-lactams. Although PBP1b and its cognate, LpoB, also exist in S. oneidensis, their roles in blaA induction are dispensable. We further show that the mrcA-mediated blaA expression is independent of AmpG.

  4. Brucellosis in Occupationally Exposed Groups

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Annapurna G.; Mohite, Shivajirao T.; Gajul, Shivali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In India, high incidence of human brucellosis may be expected, as the conditions conducive for human brucellosis exist. Limited studies have been undertaken on human brucellosis especially in occupationally-exposed groups. Aim To estimate prevalence of anti-brucellar antibodies, evaluate the clinical manifestations, risk factors and Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) levels about brucellosis among occupationally exposed groups. Materials and Methods Blood samples were collected from 2337 occupationally exposed individuals. The serum samples were screened for the presence of anti-brucellar antibodies by Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT), Serum Agglutination Test (SAT) and 2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME). Clinical manifestations, risk factors and KAP levels were evaluated by personal interview using a structured questionnaire. Results Seroprevalence of brucellosis by RBPT, SAT and 2-ME test was 9.46%, 4.45% and 3.64 % respectively. Clinical symptoms resembling brucellosis were seen in 91 subjects. The major risk factors were animal exposure in veterinarians and abattoirs, both animal exposure and raw milk ingestion in farmers and shepherds, exposure to raw milk and its ingestion in dairy workers and exposure to Brucella culture in laboratory workers. Except laboratory workers, few veterinarians and dairy workers none had heard about brucellosis. KAP levels regarding brucellosis were too poor in all the groups except laboratory workers. Conclusion Brucellosis most of the times was missed or misdiagnosed. Regular screenings for brucellosis and awareness programmes to increase KAP levels are necessary to control brucellosis in occupationally exposed groups. PMID:27190804

  5. Structures of KdnB and KdnA from Shewanella oneidensis: Key Enzymes in the Formation of 8-Amino-3,8-Dideoxy-d-Manno-Octulosonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zachman-Brockmeyer, Trevor R; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2016-08-16

    8-Amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo8N) is a unique amino sugar that has thus far only been observed on the lipopolysaccharides of marine bacteria belonging to the genus Shewanella. Although its biological function is still unclear, it is thought that the sugar is important for the integrity of the bacterial cell outer membrane. A three-gene cluster required for the biosynthesis of Kdo8N was first identified in Shewanella oneidensis. Here we describe the three-dimensional structures of two of the enzymes required for Kdo8N biosynthesis in S. oneidensis, namely, KdnB and KdnA. The structure of KdnB was solved to 1.85-Å resolution, and its overall three-dimensional architecture places it into the Group III alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. A previous study suggested that KdnB did not require NAD(P) for activity. Strikingly, although the protein was crystallized in the absence of any cofactors, the electron density map clearly revealed the presence of a tightly bound NAD(H). In addition, a bound metal was observed, which was shown via X-ray fluorescence to be a zinc ion. Unlike other members of the Group III alcohol dehydrogenases, the dinucleotide cofactor in KdnB is tightly bound and cannot be removed without leading to protein precipitation. With respect to KdnA, it is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate or (PLP)-dependent aminotransferase. For this analysis, the structure of KdnA, trapped in the presence of the external aldimine with PLP and glutamate, was determined to 2.15-Å resolution. The model of KdnA represents the first structure of a sugar aminotransferase that functions on an 8-oxo sugar. Taken together the results reported herein provide new molecular insight into the biosynthesis of Kdo8N.

  6. Advances in treating exposed fractures.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Giglio, Pedro; Fogaça Cristante, Alexandre; Ricardo Pécora, José; Partezani Helito, Camilo; Lei Munhoz Lima, Ana Lucia; Dos Santos Silva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The management of exposed fractures has been discussed since ancient times and remains of great interest to present-day orthopedics and traumatology. These injuries are still a challenge. Infection and nonunion are feared complications. Aspects of the diagnosis, classification and initial management are discussed here. Early administration of antibiotics, surgical cleaning and meticulous debridement are essential. The systemic conditions of patients with multiple trauma and the local conditions of the limb affected need to be taken into consideration. Early skeletal stabilization is necessary. Definitive fixation should be considered when possible and provisional fixation methods should be used when necessary. Early closure should be the aim, and flaps can be used for this purpose. PMID:26229904

  7. The "AMINO" experiment on expose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, B.; Coll, P.; Cottin, H.; Leach, S.; Maurel, M.-C.; Raulin, F.; Tepfer, D.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    The "AMINO" experiment will take place, end of 2004, in the "EXPOSE" ESA device on the Columbus module outside the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of the "AMINO" experiment is mainly to study space chemistry in the solar system in relationship to the origin of life. The main goal is to support the hypothesis that extraterrestrial life-related compounds, ranging from bioorganic precursors to biological macromolecules, might have been delivered to the primitive Earth when associated with comets, meteorites or micrometeorites. Another aspect of organic chemistry in the solar system that one associated to Titan's environment. This domain is of primary interest for exobiology, due to the rich organic chemistry that occurs on Titan. The last interesting chemistry domain in the solar system concerns comets. Some cometary analogues and related compounds will be also studied.

  8. Advances in treating exposed fractures☆

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira Giglio, Pedro; Fogaça Cristante, Alexandre; Ricardo Pécora, José; Partezani Helito, Camilo; Lei Munhoz Lima, Ana Lucia; dos Santos Silva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The management of exposed fractures has been discussed since ancient times and remains of great interest to present-day orthopedics and traumatology. These injuries are still a challenge. Infection and nonunion are feared complications. Aspects of the diagnosis, classification and initial management are discussed here. Early administration of antibiotics, surgical cleaning and meticulous debridement are essential. The systemic conditions of patients with multiple trauma and the local conditions of the limb affected need to be taken into consideration. Early skeletal stabilization is necessary. Definitive fixation should be considered when possible and provisional fixation methods should be used when necessary. Early closure should be the aim, and flaps can be used for this purpose. PMID:26229904

  9. Advances in treating exposed fractures.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Giglio, Pedro; Fogaça Cristante, Alexandre; Ricardo Pécora, José; Partezani Helito, Camilo; Lei Munhoz Lima, Ana Lucia; Dos Santos Silva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The management of exposed fractures has been discussed since ancient times and remains of great interest to present-day orthopedics and traumatology. These injuries are still a challenge. Infection and nonunion are feared complications. Aspects of the diagnosis, classification and initial management are discussed here. Early administration of antibiotics, surgical cleaning and meticulous debridement are essential. The systemic conditions of patients with multiple trauma and the local conditions of the limb affected need to be taken into consideration. Early skeletal stabilization is necessary. Definitive fixation should be considered when possible and provisional fixation methods should be used when necessary. Early closure should be the aim, and flaps can be used for this purpose.

  10. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  11. The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-08-01

    As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

  12. Relationship between surface chemistry, biofilm structure, and electron transfer in Shewanella anodes.

    PubMed

    Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea K; Babanova, Sofia; Santoro, Carlo; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-03-05

    A better understanding of how anode surface properties affect growth, development, and activity of electrogenic biofilms has great potential to improve the performance of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells. The aim of this paper was to determine how anodes with specific exposed functional groups (-N(CH3)3 (+), -COOH, -OH, and -CH3), created using ω-substituted alkanethiolates self-assembled monolayers attached to gold, affect the surface properties and functional performance of electrogenic Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms. A combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques was used to evaluate how electrode surface chemistry influences morphological, chemical, and functional properties of S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms, in an effort to develop improved electrode materials and structures. Positively charged, highly functionalized, hydrophilic surfaces were beneficial for growth of uniform biofilms with the smallest cluster sizes and intercluster diffusion distances, and yielding the most efficient electron transfer. The authors derived these parameters based on 3D morphological features of biofilms that were directly linked to functional properties of the biofilm during growth and that, during polarization, were directly connected to the efficiency of electron transfer to the anode. Our results indicate that substratum chemistry affects not only primary attachment, but subsequent biofilm development and bacterial physiology.

  13. [Drug Exposed Infants and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This bulletin issue addresses the theme of drug-exposed infants and the services required by these infants and their families. "Cocaine-Exposed Infants: Myths and Misunderstandings" (Barbara J. Myers and others) comments on the negative accounts of drug-exposed babies presented by mass media and reviews the mix of positive and negative findings…

  14. Layers Exposed at Polar Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color subframe of an image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the north polar layered deposits at top and darker materials at bottom, exposed in a scarp at the head of Chasma Boreale, a large canyon eroded into the layered deposits.

    The polar layered deposits appear red because of dust mixed within them, but are ice-rich as indicated by previous observations. Water ice in the layered deposits is probably responsible for the pattern of fractures seen near the top of the scarp. The darker material below the layered deposits may have been deposited as sand dunes, as indicated by the crossbedding (truncation of curved lines) seen near the middle of the scarp. It appears that brighter, ice-rich layers were deposited between the dark dunes in places. Exposures such as these are useful in understanding recent climate variations that are likely recorded in the polar layered deposits.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  15. Heat loss in exposed volunteers.

    PubMed

    English, M J; Farmer, C; Scott, W A

    1990-04-01

    Hypothermia is a common complication of major surgery and trauma. We studied this problem using Heat Flux Transducers to directly measure heat exchange between seven exposed volunteers and the environment. Heat exchange by radiation and convection was measured from the anterior chest wall and by conduction, between the back and a thermal mattress (CSZ, Blanketrol II). We determined the coefficients for: radiation = 6.6; convection = 8.3 square root of v; combined radiation and convection = 9.7; conductance = 41, all expressed in W/m2.degrees C. The clinical significance of these results is that heat loss, by radiation and convection alone, is 10 W/m2.degrees C. However, heat production under anaesthesia is only 40 W/m2, so a temperature gradient of greater than 4 degrees C between the skin and environment will cause more heat to be lost than is produced. The thermal mattress can supply 41 W/m2.degrees C, effectively doubling heat production.

  16. Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, R. Louise; Sobell, Mark; Velasquez, Mary M.; Ingersoll, Karen; Nettleman, Mary; Sobell, Linda; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Ceperich, Sherry; von Sternberg, Kirk; Bolton, Burt; Skarpness, Bradley; Nagaraja, Jyothi

    2010-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure is a leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities in the United States. Design A randomized controlled trial (2002–2005; data analyzed 2005–2006) of a brief motivational intervention to reduce the risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP) in preconceptional women by focusing on both risk drinking and ineffective contraception use. Setting/Participants A total of 830 nonpregnant women, aged 18–44 years, and currently at risk for an AEP were recruited in six diverse settings in Florida, Texas, and Virginia. Combined settings had higher proportions of women at risk for AEP (12.5% overall) than in the general population (2%). Interventions Participants were randomized to receive information plus a brief motivational intervention (n=416) or to receive information only (n=414). The brief motivational intervention consisted of four counseling sessions and one contraception consultation and services visit. Main Outcome Measures Women consuming more than five drinks on any day or more than eight drinks per week on average, were considered risk drinkers; women who had intercourse without effective contraception were considered at risk of pregnancy. Reversing either or both risk conditions resulted in reduced risk of an AEP. Results Across the follow-up period, the odds ratios (ORs) of being at reduced risk for AEP were twofold greater in the intervention group: 3 months, 2.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.69–3.20); 6 months, 2.15 (CI=1.52–3.06); 9 months, 2.11 (CI=1.47–3.03). Between-groups differences by time phase were 18.0%, 17.0%, and 14. 8%, respectively. Conclusions A brief motivational intervention can reduce the risk of an AEP. PMID:17218187

  17. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  18. Silent Victims: Children Exposed to Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Kathryn R.; Davey, Debrynda

    2007-01-01

    Annually an estimated 3 million or more children are exposed to acts of domestic violence between adults in their homes. These children are at risk for abuse themselves as well as other immediate and long-term problems, especially if they have been exposed to repeated episodes of domestic violence. Multiple behavioral manifestations, including…

  19. 3 EXPOSE Missions - overview and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, E.; Willnekcer, R.; Reitz, G.; Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Cman, C.

    2011-10-01

    The International Space Station ISS provides a variety of external research platforms for experiments aiming at the utilization of space parameters like vacuum, temperature oscillation and in particular extraterrestrial short wavelength UV and ionizing radiation which cannot be simulated accurately in the laboratory. Three Missions, two past and one upcoming, will be presented. A family of astrobiological experimental ESA facilities called "EXPOSE" were and will be accommodated on these outside exposure platforms: on one of the external balconies of the European Columbus Module (EXPOSE-E) and on the URM-D platform on the Russian Zvezda Module (EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-R2). Exobiological and radiation experiments, exposing chemical, biological and dosimetric samples to the harsh space environment are - and will be - accommodated on these facilities to increase our knowledge on the origin, evolution and distribution of life, on Earth and possibly beyond. The biological experiments investigate resistance and adaptation of organisms like bacteria, Achaea, fungi, lichens, plant seeds and small animals like mosquito larvae to extreme environmental conditions and underlying mechanisms like DNA repair. The organic chemical experiments analyse chemical reactions triggered by the extraterrestrial environment, especially short wavelength UV radiation, to better understand prebiotic chemistry. The facility is optimized to allow exposure of biological specimen and material samples under a variety of conditions, using optical filter systems. Environmental parameters like temperature and radiation are regularly recorded and down linked by telemetry. Two long term missions named according to their facility - EXPOSE-E and EXPOSE-R - are completed and a third mission is planned and currently prepared. Operations of all three missions including sample accommodation are performed by DLR. An overview of the two completed missions will be given including lessons learned as well as an outlook

  20. Eryptosis in lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Dorado, Itzel-Citlalli; Hernández, Gerardo; Quintanar-Escorza, Martha-Angelica; Maldonado-Vega, María; Rosas-Flores, Margarita; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor

    2014-12-01

    Eryptosis is a physiological phenomenon in which old and damaged erythrocytes are removed from circulation. Erythrocytes incubated with lead have exhibited major eryptosis. In the present work we found evidence of high levels of eryptosis in lead exposed workers possibly via oxidation. Blood samples were taken from 40 male workers exposed to lead (mean blood lead concentration 64.8 μg/dl) and non-exposed workers (4.2 μg/dl). The exposure to lead produced an intoxication characterized by 88.3% less δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δALAD) activity in lead exposed workers with respect to non-lead exposed workers. An increment of oxidation in lead exposed workers was characterized by 2.4 times higher thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) concentration and 32.8% lower reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes of lead exposed workers is expressed in 192% higher free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and 1.6 times higher μ-calpain activity with respect to non-lead exposed workers. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration was not significantly different between the two worker groups. No externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) was found in non-lead exposed workers (< 0.1%), but lead exposed workers showed 2.82% externalization. Lead intoxication induces eryptosis possibly through a molecular pathway that includes oxidation, depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), increment of [Ca{sup 2+}], μ-calpain activation and externalization of PS in erythrocytes. Identifying molecular signals that induce eryptosis in lead intoxication is necessary to understand its physiopathology and chronic complications. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. (A) Blood lead concentration (PbB) and (B) phosphatidylserine externalization on erythrocyte membranes of non-lead exposed (□) and lead exposed workers (■). Values are mean ± SD. *Significantly different (P < 0.001). - Highlights: • Erythrocytes of lead exposed workers

  1. Assessment of low ABSPI among arsenic exposed and non-exposed populations: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Manzurul Haque; Sarkar, Sudipta; Khan, Nasreen; Sarwar, A F M; Ahmad, S Akhtar

    2010-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out to assess and compare Ankle Brachial Systolic Pressure Index (ABSPI) amongst 120 arsenic exposed and 120 non-exposed populations of Samta village in Bangladesh. Abnormal ABSPI was more prevalent in arsenic exposed (13.3%) than in non-exposed (2.5%) group. The prevalence of abnormal ABSPI for respondents when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, blood pressure status and diabetic status, the prevalence remain significantly different. The findings suggest that those exposed to arsenic have increased chance of having abnormal ABSP and hence increased chance of peripheral arterial disease in Bangladesh.

  2. Helping Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... withdrawal Depression or anxiety Loss of interest in school, friends or other things they enjoyed in the past Children and adolescents exposed to domestic violence should be evaluated by a trained mental health ...

  3. The astrobiological mission EXPOSE-R on board of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Parpart, Andre; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Burfeindt, Jürgen; Molter, Ferdinand; Jaramillo, Esther; Pereira, Carlos; Weiß, Peter; Willnecker, Rainer; Demets, René; Dettmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    EXPOSE-R flew as the second of the European Space Agency (ESA) EXPOSE multi-user facilities on the International Space Station. During the mission on the external URM-D platform of the Zvezda service module, samples of eight international astrobiology experiments selected by ESA and one Russian guest experiment were exposed to low Earth orbit space parameters from March 10th, 2009 to January 21st, 2011. EXPOSE-R accommodated a total of 1220 samples for exposure to selected space conditions and combinations, including space vacuum, temperature cycles through 273 K, cosmic radiation, solar electromagnetic radiation at >110, >170 or >200 nm at various fluences up to GJ m-2. Samples ranged from chemical compounds via unicellular organisms and multicellular mosquito larvae and seeds to passive radiation dosimeters. Additionally, one active radiation measurement instrument was accommodated on EXPOSE-R and commanded from ground in accordance with the facility itself. Data on ultraviolet radiation, cosmic radiation and temperature were measured every 10 s and downlinked by telemetry and data carrier every few months. The EXPOSE-R trays and samples returned to Earth on March 9th, 2011 with Shuttle flight, Space Transportation System (STS)-133/ULF 5, Discovery, after successful total mission duration of 27 months in space. The samples were analysed in the individual investigators laboratories. A parallel Mission Ground Reference experiment was performed on ground with a parallel set of hardware and samples under simulated space conditions following to the data transmitted from the flight mission.

  4. Hormonal Perturbations in Occupationally Exposed Nickel Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Shaheen, Weam; Shahy, Eman M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel exposure is recognized as an endocrine disruptor because of its adverse effects on reproduction. AIM: This study was designed to investigate the possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations on workers occupationally exposed to nickel and to assess its effects on human male sexual function. METHODS: Cross-sectional comparative study, comprising 105 electroplating male non-smoker, non-alcoholic workers exposed to soluble nickel and 60 controls was done. Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone levels and urinary nickel concentrations were determined for the studied groups. RESULTS: Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, urinary nickel and the simultaneous incidence of more than one sexual disorder were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to controls. The occurrence of various types of sexual disorders (decreased libido, impotence and premature ejaculation) in the exposed workers was 9.5, 5.1 and 4.4 folds respectively than the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to nickel produces possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations in those exposed workers. PMID:27335607

  5. Developmental trajectories of cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed and non-cocaine-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C; Cicchetti, Domenic; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Zhang, Heping

    2003-10-01

    Few data are available concerning the trajectories of mental and motor development across time for cocaine-exposed children compared with others. Findings are presented from individual group curve analyses of the mental and motor development measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) on repeated visits from 3 through 36 months of a group of prenatally cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed children (n = 265) compared with those exposed to no drugs (n = 129) or no-cocaine-but-other-drugs (n = 66), including alcohol and/or tobacco. Across time, there was a general decline in motor performance but cocaine-exposed-infants showed a trend toward a greater decrease than children in the other two comparison groups. For mental performance, there was also a decline across age but only through 24 months and no differences in the trajectory of the cocaine-exposed group compared to the other two. And, across all assessment ages, cocaine-exposed-infants showed lower BSID-II mental performance compared to both non-drug and non-cocaine-exposed children. Results suggest that prenatally cocaine-exposed children show delayed developmental indices, particularly in their mental performance, but their trajectories across time are similar to those from impoverished, non-cocaine-exposed groups. PMID:14578693

  6. The Expose-R2 mission: astrobiology and astrochemistry in low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, René

    EXPOSE is an exposure platform developed by ESA which permits scientists to install test samples for 1 to 2 years at the outer surface of the ISS. In that way, the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical sample materials can be explored. This environment, featuring full-spectrum solar light, near-vacuum, cosmic radiation, wide temperature variations and near-weightlessness, is impossible to reproduce in its entirety in the lab. As such, EXPOSE offers astrochemists and astrobiologists a chance to acquire novel scientific data. Astrochemists are interested in Low Earth Orbit conditions due to the fact that photochemistry in space is quite different from photochemistry on Earth, where the high-energy UV compounds of the solar spectrum are filtered away by our atmosphere. As for the astro biologists, EXPOSE offers an attractive opportunity to expand earlier results obtained during short-duration LEO flights, which have shown that particular microbes and, amazingly, even some multi-cellular macroscopic organisms were able to cope with a two-week exposure to space. The open space environment, often described as harsh and hostile, can apparently be tolerated by some robust inhabitants of our Earth - unprotected, in the absence of a space suit! The first mission of EXPOSE, as an external payload on the European Columbus module, happened during 2008-2009 with the test samples provided by five separate research teams. Three additional teams were involved in the monitoring of space environment. The results were published collectively in 2012 in a special issue of the monthly journal Astrobiology. Several organisms survived, having spent 1.5 years in space. The second mission was called EXPOSE-R, the R referring to ‘Russian segment’, the location where the EXPOSE instrument was installed this time. The EXPOSE-R mission took place in 2009-2011, ten science teams were involved. The publication of the results, again as a collection, is currently in

  7. Interviews with Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Maria; Nasman, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how research practices may simultaneously follow principles of children's citizenship rights to participation and principles of protection and support when children exposed to violence are informants. The article focuses upon organisation of interview processes and interactions between adult researchers and child…

  8. Exposing the Mathematical Wizard: Approximating Trigonometric Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2011-01-01

    For almost all students, what happens when they push buttons on their calculators is essentially magic, and the techniques used are seemingly pure wizardry. In this article, the author draws back the curtain to expose some of the mathematics behind computational wizardry and introduces some fundamental ideas that are accessible to precalculus…

  9. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  10. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  11. Electroencephalographic findings in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Kellerová, V

    1985-01-01

    Preventive EEG examination was carried out in 40 workers significantly exposed to benzene. The EEG findings were compared with those of a control group of 48 healthy persons, a group of 110 workers significantly exposed to toluene and xylene and a group of 236 workers exposed to vinyl chloride. The individuals exposed to benzene exhibited 22.5% of abnormal and 45% threshold findings, the abnormalities being episodic, diffuse or a combination of the two. The effect of benzene entailed a frequent (32.5%) occurrence of a characteristic frequency lability. Sleep phenomena were found in a total of 60% cases (37.5% cases reached stage 1 B3 while 15% reached stage 2 according to Roth [14]). The rapid onset of deeper sleep stages (in 30% cases) is considered typical for benzene exposure. The photic driving response often had an extended frequency range (a total of 61.1%, to beta frequencies only in 30.55%, to both beta and theta frequencies also in 30.55% of cases). The different EEG features characteristic of the neurotoxic action of various types of organic solvents make possible a more efficient diagnostics of the effects of these chemicals on the CNS. PMID:4086812

  12. Expose Mechanical Engineering Students to Biomechanics Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Hui

    2011-01-01

    To adapt the focus of engineering education to emerging new industries and technologies nationwide and in the local area, a biomechanics module has been developed and incorporated into a mechanical engineering technical elective course to expose mechanical engineering students at ONU (Ohio Northern University) to the biomedical engineering topics.…

  13. Piezo-adapted 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase of the obligate piezophile Shewanella benthica DB21MT-2 isolated from the 11,000-m depth of the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Ryota; Sato, Takako; Tamegai, Hideyuki; Kato, Chiaki

    2009-11-01

    3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH)-encoding leuB genes were obtained from the obligate piezophile Shewanella benthica DB21MT-2 and non-piezophile Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified using His-tag. The estimated kinetic parameters of these enzymes indicated that IPMDH of S. benthica DB21MT-2 is more tolerant of high pressure than that of S. oneidensis MR-1. Thus such an adaptation is one of the mechanisms bacteria utilize for survival at high pressures. PMID:19897891

  14. Surface contamination on LDEF exposed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, Carol S.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to study the surface composition and chemistry of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) exposed materials including silvered Teflon (Ag/FEP), Kapton, S13GLO paint, quartz crystal monitors (QCM's), carbon fiber/organic matrix composites, and carbon fiber/Al Alloy composites. In each set of samples, silicones were the major contributors to the molecular film accumulated on the LDEF exposed surfaces. All surfaces analyzed have been contaminated with Si, O, and C; most have low levels (less than 1 atom percent) of N, S, and F. Occasionally observed contaminants included Cl, Na, K, P, and various metals. Orange/brown discoloration observed near vent slots in some Ag/FEP blankets were higher in carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen relative to other contamination types. The source of contamination has not been identified, but amine/amide functionalities were detected. It is probable that this same source of contamination account for the low levels of sulfur and nitrogen observed on most LDEF exposed surfaces. XPS, which probes 50 to 100 A in depth, detected the major sample components underneath the contaminant film in every analysis. This probably indicates that the contaminant overlayer is patchy, with significant areas covered by less that 100 A of molecular film. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of LDEF exposed surfaces during secondary electron microscopy (SEM) of the samples confirmed contamination of the surfaces with Si and O. In general, particulates were not observed to develop from the contaminant overlayer on the exposed LDEF material surfaces. However, many SiO2 submicron particles were seen on a masked edge of an Ag/FEP blanket. In some cases such as the carbon fiber/organic matrix composites, interpretation of the contamination data was hindered by the lack of good laboratory controls. Examination of laboratory controls for the carbon fiber/Al alloy composites showed that preflight contamination was

  15. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  16. The EXPOSE-R Experiment ROSE-3 SPORES in artificial meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Reitz, G.

    2011-10-01

    In the conducted experiment, spores of bacteria, fungi and ferns, especially adapted to survive extreme conditions, were either solely or embedded in artificial meteorites exposed to space environment in the ESA facility EXPOSE-R for 22 months (10.03.2009-21.02.2011). The experiment will provide experimental clues to the question whether meteorite material offers enough protection against the harsh environment of space for spores to survive a long-term stay in space. This question has received increased attention since the discovery of Martian meteorites has provided evidence that rocks can be transported from one planet to another in our solar

  17. CT assessment of silicosis in exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Bégin, R; Bergeron, D; Samson, L; Boctor, M; Cantin, A

    1987-03-01

    For evaluation of the clinical usefulness of CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica, 58 workers with long-term exposure to silica in the granite and foundry industries of the Eastern Townships of Quebec were examined. CT scans were compared with standard posteroanterior chest radiographs by using the International Labour Office 1980 grading system for silicosis. Six areas of the lung in each patient were assessed by both techniques for profusion (number) of opacities (small nodules), coalescence, and the presence of large opacities. CT scans and chest radiographs yielded similar average scores for detection of opacities. CT identified significantly more coalescence and large opacities in patients with simple silicosis. In patients with complicated silicosis, CT results were comparable with those of chest radiographs. CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica does not identify more patients with minimal parenchymal disease, but it does detect earlier changes of coalescence.

  18. Children exposed to war/terrorism.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jon A

    2003-12-01

    This paper reviews the prevalence of psychological morbidities in children who have been exposed to war-related traumas or terrorism as well as the diversity of war-related casualties and their associated psychological responses. The psychological responses to war-related stressors are categorized as (1) little or no reaction, (2) acute emotional and behavioral effects, and (3) long-term effects. Specific categories of war-related casualties discussed include refugee status, traumatic bereavement, effects of parental absence, and child soldiers. Psychological responses associated with terrorism and bioterrorism are presented. Lastly, mediators of the psychological response to war-related stressors are discussed, to include exposure effects, gender effects, parental, family and social factors, and child-specific factors. Children exposed to war-related stressors experience a spectrum of psychological morbidities including posttraumatic stress symptomatology, mood disorders, externalizing and disruptive behaviors, and somatic symptoms determined by exposure dose effect. Specific questions for future research are identified.

  19. Exposed proteins of the Schistosoma japonicum tegument.

    PubMed

    Mulvenna, Jason; Moertel, Luke; Jones, Malcolm K; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Lovas, Erica M; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Colgrave, Michelle; Jones, Alun; Loukas, Alex; McManus, Donald P

    2010-04-01

    The ability of the mammalian blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum to survive in the inhospitable environment of the mammalian bloodstream can be attributed, at least in part, to its host-exposed outer surface, called the tegument. The tegument is a dynamic organ and is involved in nutrition, immune evasion and modulation, excretion, osmoregulation and signal transduction. Given its importance for parasite survival, proteins exposed to the host at the surface of the tegument are ideal targets for the development of vaccines and drugs. By biotinylating live adult worms and using a combination of OFFGEL electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry 54 proteins were identified as putatively host-exposed in S. japonicum. These included glucose transport proteins, an amino permease, a leucine aminopeptidase and a range of transporters, heat shock proteins and novel immune-active proteins. Members of the tetraspanin protein family and a homologue of Sm 29, a tegument membrane protein from Schistosoma mansoni, both effective vaccine antigens in S. mansoni, were also identified. The fate of labelled surface proteins was monitored over time using electron microscopy and revealed that biotinylated proteins were rapidly internalised from the surface of the tegument and trafficked into the cytoplasmic bridges that connect the distal cytoplasm of the tegument to the underlying cell bodies. The results reported herein dramatically increase the number of S. japonicum proteins known to be exposed to the host and, hence, those of interest as therapeutic targets. The ability of the parasite to rapidly internalise proteins at its surface has implications for the development of vaccines and may explain how these parasites are able to avoid the host immune system for long periods of time. PMID:19853607

  20. Biochemical markers in butadiene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1994-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is used to manufacture a wide range of polymers and copolymers including styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene, and acrylonitrile-butadiene-syrene resins. The carcinogenicity of BD has been determined in life-span inhalation studies in both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. Results suggest a marked species difference in the carcinogenic effects of BD. For example, female mice exposed to as low as 6.25 ppm BD exhibited increased alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms. In contrast, BD was only a weak carcinogen in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were observed to have an increase only in mammary tumors after exposure to 1000 ppm. A biochemical study of highly exposed BD workers and unexposed controls is providing valuable information on BD metabolism in humans, and how this relates to the development of intermediate biologic effects. A group of heavily exposed workers were identified in a BD production facility in China. The purpose of this paper is to report the initial results from the sampling trip in the first quarter of 1994.

  1. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Jørs, Erik; Gonzáles, Ana Rosa; Ascarrunz, Maria Eugenia; Tirado, Noemi; Takahashi, Catharina; Lafuente, Erika; Dos Santos, Raquel A; Bailon, Natalia; Cervantes, Rafael; O, Huici; Bælum, Jesper; Lander., Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Background Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures. Method Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76). Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed. Results Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay. Conclusions Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment. PMID:19662224

  2. Aphid Acceptance of Barley Exposed to Volatile Phytochemicals Differs Between Plants Exposed in Daylight and Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Glinwood, Robert; Gradin, Therese; Karpinska, Barbara; Ahmed, Elham; Jonsson, Llisbeth

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that volatile cues from damaged plants may induce resistance in neighboring plants. Much less is known about the effects of volatile interaction between undamaged plants. In this study, barley plants, Hordeum vulgare cv. Kara, were exposed to volatiles from undamaged plants of barley cv. Alva or thistle Cirsium vulgare, and to the volatile phytochemicals, methyl salicylate or methyl jasmonate. Exposures were made either during natural daylight or darkness. Acceptance of exposed plants by the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi was assessed, as well as the expression of putative marker genes for the different treatments. Aphid acceptance of plants exposed to either barley or C. vulgare was significantly reduced, and an effect of the volatiles from undamaged plants was confirmed by the induction of pathogenesis-related protein, PR1a in exposed plants. However the effect on aphid acceptance was seen only when plants were exposed during darkness, whereas PR1a was induced only after treatment during daylight. Aphid acceptance of plants exposed to either methyl salicylate or methyl jasmonate was significantly reduced, but only when plants were exposed to the chemicals during daylight. AOS2 (allene oxide synthase) was induced by methyl jasmonate and BCI-4 (barley chemical inducible gene-4) by methyl salicylate in both daylight and darkness. It is concluded that (a) the effects on aphids of exposing barley to volatile phytochemicals was influenced by the presence or absence of light and (b) the response of barley to methyl salicylate/methyl jasmonate and to volatiles from undamaged plants differed at the gene and herbivore level. PMID:19516995

  3. Fibrosis biomarkers in workers exposed to MWCNTs.

    PubMed

    Fatkhutdinova, Liliya M; Khaliullin, Timur O; Vasil'yeva, Olga L; Zalyalov, Ramil R; Mustafin, Ilshat G; Kisin, Elena R; Birch, M Eileen; Yanamala, Naveena; Shvedova, Anna A

    2016-05-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with their unique physico-chemical properties offer numerous technological advantages and are projected to drive the next generation of manufacturing growth. As MWCNT have already found utility in different industries including construction, engineering, energy production, space exploration and biomedicine, large quantities of MWCNT may reach the environment and inadvertently lead to human exposure. This necessitates the urgent assessment of their potential health effects in humans. The current study was carried out at NanotechCenter Ltd. Enterprise (Tambov, Russia) where large-scale manufacturing of MWCNT along with relatively high occupational exposure levels was reported. The goal of this small cross-sectional study was to evaluate potential biomarkers during occupational exposure to MWCNT. All air samples were collected at the workplaces from both specific areas and personal breathing zones using filter-based devices to quantitate elemental carbon and perform particle analysis by TEM. Biological fluids of nasal lavage, induced sputum and blood serum were obtained from MWCNT-exposed and non-exposed workers for assessment of inflammatory and fibrotic markers. It was found that exposure to MWCNTs caused significant increase in IL-1β, IL6, TNF-α, inflammatory cytokines and KL-6, a serological biomarker for interstitial lung disease in collected sputum samples. Moreover, the level of TGF-β1 was increased in serum obtained from young exposed workers. Overall, the results from this study revealed accumulation of inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers in biofluids of workers manufacturing MWCNTs. Therefore, the biomarkers analyzed should be considered for the assessment of health effects of occupational exposure to MWCNT in cross-sectional epidemiological studies. PMID:26902652

  4. Physical examinations of workers exposed to trichlorotrifluoroethane.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbus, H. R.; Adkins, C.

    1972-01-01

    A group of 50 workers, exposed for an average of 2.77 years in an environment, samples of which contained from 46 to 4700 ppm of trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), was examined. There were no subjective complaints, other than one case of dryness of the skin, referable to this occupational exposure. At this time, it is our opinion that there is no evidence of adverse effects from exposure to trichlorotrifluoroethane under the conditions encountered by these personnel. We believe that continued, periodic, follow-up examinations of these workers will be helpful in further evaluating any possible long-range effects of this material.

  5. Chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Beckman, G; Beckman, L; Nordenson, I

    1977-08-01

    The occurrence of chromosome aberrations was studied in short-term cultured lymphocytes from nine workers exposed to arsenic at the Rönnskär smeltery in northern Sweden. In the smelter workers, 87 aberrations were found in 819 mitoses. The number of aberrations varied individually from 0 to 25 aberrations per 100 cells. In a control material 13 aberrations were found in 1012 mitoses. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was significantly increased among the smelter workers, but due to the simultaneous exposure to other agents the effect of arsenic per se can not be assessed with certainty.

  6. Hexamitiasis in cadmium-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Exon, J H; Patton, N M; Koller, L D

    1975-09-01

    Mortality was observed in 4- to 5-week-old Swiss Webster mice exposed to 300 or 3 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride in the drinking water. Mice receiving 300 ppm cadium suffered 26% mortality as compared with 7% of those on the low cadmium dose. Death did not occur in control mice. Clinical signs and histopathology established Hexamita muris as the causative agent. Cadmium lesions were not observed. It is suggested that mortality due to hexamitiasis resulted from synergism between cadmium and H muris.

  7. The PUR Experiment on the EXPOSE-R facility: biological dosimetry of solar extraterrestrial UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, A.; Egyeki, M.; Fekete, A.; Horneck, G.; Kovács, G.; Panitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our experiment Phage and Uracil Response was to extend the use of bacteriophage T7 and uracil biological dosimeters for measuring the biologically effective ultraviolet (UV) dose in the harsh extraterrestrial radiation conditions. The biological detectors were exposed in vacuum-tightly cases in the European Space Agency (ESA) astrobiological exposure facility attached to the external platform of Zvezda (EXPOSE-R). EXPOSE-R took off to the International Space Station (ISS) in November 2008 and was installed on the External platform of the Russian module Zvezda of the ISS in March 2009. Our goal was to determine the dose-effect relation for the formation of photoproducts (i.e. damage to phage DNA and uracil, respectively). The extraterrestrial solar UV radiation ranges over the whole spectrum from vacuum-UV (λ<200 nm) to UVA (315 nm<λ<400 nm), which causes photolesions (photoproducts) in the nucleic acids/their components either by photoionization or excitation. However, these wavelengths cause not only photolesions but in a wavelength-dependent efficiency the reversion of some photolesions, too. Our biological detectors measured in situ conditions the resultant of both reactions induced by the extraterrestrial UV radiation. From this aspect the role of the photoreversion in the extension of the biological UV dosimetry are discussed.

  8. Erythrocyte survival in sheep exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.S.; Calabrese, E.J.; Labato, F.J.

    1981-07-01

    Erythrocyte survival studies in the Dorset ewe using chromium 51 were performed. The purpose of the study was to determine if ozone exposure produces decreased cell survival which may be the result of premature erythrocyte aging. This strain of sheep has an erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity that is very low, being comparable to human A-variants with G6PD deficiency. Ozone exposure may produce hemolytic effects in G6PD deficients more readily than in erythrocytes with normal activity. A decrease in hematocrit was observed in the ozone exposed groups. With respect to red cell destruction, ozone does not appear to act immediately, but rather there appears to be a delayed effect. At 0.25 ppM ozone, the group reached the 50% remaining level an average of 1 day sooner than the control group. There was no significant difference between control and exposed groups at the 0.50 ppM and 0.70 ppM levels. Also, the results demonstrate a net decrease in hematocrit which is greater for 0.25 ppM ozone than any other exposure level. (RJC)

  9. Heart disease in workers exposed to dinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.J.; Andjelkovich, D.A.; Kersteter, S.L.; Arp, E.W. Jr.; Balogh, S.A.; Blunden, P.B.; Stanley, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    To determine whether the carcinogenicity of dinitrotoluene (DNT) in rodent bioassays was predictive for humans, we examined the mortality experience of exposed workers at two ammunition plants. Cohorts of 156 and 301 men who had worked a month or more during the 1940s and 1950s at jobs with opportunity for substantial DNT exposure were followed through the end of 1980. Numbers of expected deaths and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed, using mortality rates of US white males as the standard. No evidence of a carcinogenic effect was found, but unsuspected excesses of mortality from ischemic heart disease were noted at both plants (SMRs) 131 and 143; 95% confidence limits 65 to 234 and 107 to 187, respectively). Deaths from ischemic heart disease remained high even when compared with expected numbers derived using mortality rates of the counties in which the plants were located. Additional analyses revealed evidence of a 15-year latent period and suggested a relationship with duration and intensity of exposure. Epidemiologic investigations of other heavily exposed populations are needed to confirm the etiologic significance of the association between DNT and heart disease described here.

  10. Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J.

    2006-12-15

    Micrometer-sized particles adhered to a surface can be released when exposed to plasma. In an experiment with a glass surface coated with lunar-simulant dust, it was found that particle release requires exposure to both plasma and an electron beam. The dust release rate diminishes almost exponentially in time, which is consistent with a random process. As proposed here, charges of particles adhered to the surface fluctuate. These charges experience a fluctuating electric force that occasionally overcomes the adhesive van der Waals force, causing particle release. The release rate increases with plasma density, so that plasma cleaning is feasible at high plasma densities. Applications of this cleaning include controlling particulate contamination in semiconductor manufacturing, dust mitigation in the exploration of the moon and Mars, and dusty plasmas.

  11. Plasma prolactin concentrations in lead exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Govoni, S; Battaini, F; Fernicola, C; Castelletti, L; Trabucchi, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma Prolactin (Prl) Zinc protoporphyrin (Zpp) and blood lead concentrations (PbB) were measured in 76 exposed male workers. All of them were employed in small (not more than 30 persons) pewter factories and were randomly selected from those regularly controlled by the National Health Service, Occupational Health Unit of Brescia (USSL 41). Although all plasma Prl values were within the normal range, the mean value of the subgroup having Zpp and PbB higher than 40 micrograms/dl was significantly higher (+47%) than that observed in the group of workers having Zpp and PbB less than 40 micrograms/dl. The data indicate the possibility of a lead-induced Prl secretion dysfunction, probably mediated by a decrease in dopaminergic inhibitory control.

  12. Plasma prolactin concentrations in lead exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Govoni, S; Battaini, F; Fernicola, C; Castelletti, L; Trabucchi, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma Prolactin (Prl) Zinc protoporphyrin (Zpp) and blood lead concentrations (PbB) were measured in 76 exposed male workers. All of them were employed in small (not more than 30 persons) pewter factories and were randomly selected from those regularly controlled by the National Health Service, Occupational Health Unit of Brescia (USSL 41). Although all plasma Prl values were within the normal range, the mean value of the subgroup having Zpp and PbB higher than 40 micrograms/dl was significantly higher (+47%) than that observed in the group of workers having Zpp and PbB less than 40 micrograms/dl. The data indicate the possibility of a lead-induced Prl secretion dysfunction, probably mediated by a decrease in dopaminergic inhibitory control. PMID:3598878

  13. Exposing calculus students to advanced mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Barry J.; Selcuk Haciomeroglu, Erhan

    2014-07-01

    To ensure the competitiveness of the USA in the global economy, and its role as a leader in science and engineering, it is important to cultivate the next generation of home grown mathematicians. However, while universities across the USA offer calculus classes to thousands of undergraduate students each year, very few of them go on to major in mathematics. This paper posits that one of the main reasons is that the mathematical community does not expose calculus students to the beauty and complexity of upper-level mathematics, and that by doing so before they fully commit to their programme of study, the number of students with a qualification in mathematics can be increased. The results show a significant increase in the number of students planning to add a minor in mathematics, and an increased likelihood among freshmen and sophomores to change their major.

  14. Exposed polyurethane seen as fire hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.

    1982-11-29

    Improperly exposed polyurethane insulation is a fire hazard. Recent fire tragedies underscore the importance of installing approved thermal barriers over the foam. Vendors warn of the need to follow building codes and manufacturer's guidelines, and stress the absence of hazards if this is done. Polyurethane foam requires a high temperature to ignite but, once ignited, flashes intensely. The foam smolders at lower temperatures, however, and gives off combustible gases. The risk is higher in warehouses and other buildings where the foam is often sprayed on the walls and left uncovered and in upholstered furniture. Lawsuits resulted over claims that the material is self-extinguishing. Vendors list commercially available thermal barriers and factors customers should consider before investing in foam. (DCK)

  15. Behavioral changes in fish exposed to phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Rodriguez, Alison C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the behavioral effects of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish, Betta splendens. Adult fish were exposed to a range of concentrations of genistein, equol, beta-sitosterol, and the positive control 17beta-estradiol. The following behaviors were measured: spontaneous swimming activity, latency to respond to a perceived intruder (mirror reflection), intensity of aggressive response toward a perceived intruder, probability of constructing a nest in the presence of a female, and the size of the nest constructed. We found few changes in spontaneous swimming activity, the latency to respond to the mirror, and nest size, and modest changes in the probability of constructing a nest. There were significant decreases, however, in the intensity of aggressive behavior toward the mirror following exposure to several concentrations, including environmentally relevant ones, of 17beta-estradiol, genistein, and equol. This suggests that phytoestrogen contamination has the potential to significantly affect the behavior of free-living fishes.

  16. Adhesive bacterial colonization of exposed traumatized tendon.

    PubMed

    Webb, L X; Hobgood, C D; Meredith, J W; Gristina, A G

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies of compromised or damaged tissues, as well as biomaterials, have shown that they provide a particularly fertile substratum for bacterial colonization. Colonization in these environments is mediated by a process of microbial adhesion to surfaces of the substrata. In this report, we present electron microscopic studies of a portion of damaged and infected tendon. These studies demonstrate colonies of bacteria surrounded by a ruthenium red-staining exopolysaccharide biofilm and adhesion to the surface of the tendon by means of an exopolysaccharide polymer. We suggest that this adhesive form of bacterial colonization may partially explain the resistance of exposed tendon to effective debridement by simple mechanical measures and to coverage with granulation tissue, partial-thickness skin grafts, and vascularized tissue grafts.

  17. Behavioral changes in fish exposed to phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Rodriguez, Alison C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the behavioral effects of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish, Betta splendens. Adult fish were exposed to a range of concentrations of genistein, equol, beta-sitosterol, and the positive control 17beta-estradiol. The following behaviors were measured: spontaneous swimming activity, latency to respond to a perceived intruder (mirror reflection), intensity of aggressive response toward a perceived intruder, probability of constructing a nest in the presence of a female, and the size of the nest constructed. We found few changes in spontaneous swimming activity, the latency to respond to the mirror, and nest size, and modest changes in the probability of constructing a nest. There were significant decreases, however, in the intensity of aggressive behavior toward the mirror following exposure to several concentrations, including environmentally relevant ones, of 17beta-estradiol, genistein, and equol. This suggests that phytoestrogen contamination has the potential to significantly affect the behavior of free-living fishes. PMID:16584819

  18. Mortality of aerospace workers exposed to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R W; Kelsh, M A; Zhao, K; Heringer, S

    1998-07-01

    We measured mortality rates in a cohort of 20,508 aerospace workers who were followed up over the period 1950-1993. A total of 4,733 workers had occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. In addition, trichloroethylene was present in some of the washing and drinking water used at the work site. We developed a job-exposure matrix to classify all jobs by trichloroethylene exposure levels into four categories ranging from "none" to "high" exposure. We calculated standardized mortality ratios for the entire cohort and the trichloroethylene exposed subcohort. In the standardized mortality ratio analyses, we observed a consistent elevation for nonmalignant respiratory disease, which we attribute primarily to the higher background rates of respiratory disease in this region. We also compared trichloroethylene-exposed workers with workers in the "low" and "none" exposure categories. Mortality rate ratios for nonmalignant respiratory disease were near or less than 1.00 for trichloroethylene exposure groups. We observed elevated rare ratios for ovarian cancer among those with peak exposure at medium and high levels] relative risk (RR) = 2.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.84-8.99] and among women with high cumulative exposure (RR = 7.09; 95% CI = 2.14-23.54). Among those with peak exposures at medium and high levels, we observed slightly elevated rate ratios for cancers of the kidney (RR = 1.89; 95% CI = 0.85-4.23), bladder (RR = 1.41; 95% CI = 0.52-3.81), and prostate (RR = 1.47; 95% CI = 0.85-2.55). Our findings do not indicate an association between trichloroethylene exposure and respiratory cancer, liver cancer, leukemia or lymphoma, or all cancers combined. PMID:9647907

  19. Structure of 2C-Methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate Synthase from Shewanella oneidensis at 1.6 angstrom: Identification of Farnesyl pyrophosphate Trapped in a Hydrophobic Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Marsing, Gregory C.; Bussiere, Dirksen E.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-01

    definitive analysis of the identity and mode of binding of the bound molecule. Kishida et al. (2003) reported that no cavity existed in a 1.6Å structure of the SO3437 homolog from Thermus thermophilus, presumably due to tighter packing of the protein from the thermophilic organism. Steinbacher et al. (2002) make no description of a hydrophobic cavity in a lower resolution (2.5-3.2Å) of the Escherichia coli protein. Here, we report a high-resolution (1.6Å) structure of MECDP synthase from Shewanella oneidensis in the absence of substrate in the active site. We provide unambiguous data that confirms the presence of Zn2+ in one of the metal binding sites and observe what appears to be farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) bound in the hydrophobic cavity along the non-crystallographic three-fold symmetry axis of the homotrimer. The high-resolution structure clarifies the mode of binding of the pyrophosphate of FPP in the arginine cluster that caps the hydrophobic cavity.

  20. 9 CFR 78.23 - Brucellosis exposed bison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed bison. 78.23... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.23 Brucellosis exposed bison. Brucellosis exposed bison may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  1. 9 CFR 78.23 - Brucellosis exposed bison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed bison. 78.23... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.23 Brucellosis exposed bison. Brucellosis exposed bison may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  2. 9 CFR 78.23 - Brucellosis exposed bison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed bison. 78.23... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.23 Brucellosis exposed bison. Brucellosis exposed bison may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  3. 9 CFR 78.23 - Brucellosis exposed bison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed bison. 78.23... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.23 Brucellosis exposed bison. Brucellosis exposed bison may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  4. 9 CFR 78.23 - Brucellosis exposed bison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed bison. 78.23... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.23 Brucellosis exposed bison. Brucellosis exposed bison may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  5. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  6. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  7. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  8. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized...

  9. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for...

  10. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for...

  11. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for...

  12. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for...

  13. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction.

  14. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  15. Improved microbial electrocatalysis with osmium polymer modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sunil A; Hasan, Kamrul; Leech, Dónal; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Gorton, Lo

    2012-10-21

    Using the well-known exoelectrogen Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an osmium redox polymer modified anode exhibited ca. 4-fold increase in current generation. Additionally, a significant decrease in the start-up time for electrocatalysis was observed. The findings suggest that the inherent extracellular electron transfer capabilities of electrogens coupled with such polymers could enhance electrocatalysis.

  16. Employing a Flexible and Low-Cost Polypyrrole Nanotube Membrane as an Anode to Enhance Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui-e; Wu, Jiansheng; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Loo, Joachim Say Chey; Zhang, Qichun

    2015-07-01

    The flexible and low-cost polypyrrole nanotube membrane is demonstrated as a promising anode in microbial fuel cells, which significantly enhances the extracellular electron transfer between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the electrode, owing to the large active surface area and high electrical conductivity.

  17. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobactersulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1-and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  18. Single authentication: exposing weighted splining artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciptasari, Rimba W.

    2016-05-01

    A common form of manipulation is to combine parts of the image fragment into another different image either to remove or blend the objects. Inspired by this situation, we propose a single authentication technique for detecting traces of weighted average splining technique. In this paper, we assume that image composite could be created by joining two images so that the edge between them is imperceptible. The weighted average technique is constructed from overlapped images so that it is possible to compute the gray level value of points within a transition zone. This approach works on the assumption that although splining process leaves the transition zone smoothly. They may, nevertheless, alter the underlying statistics of an image. In other words, it introduces specific correlation into the image. The proposed idea dealing with identifying these correlations is to generate an original model of both weighting function, left and right functions, as references to their synthetic models. The overall process of the authentication is divided into two main stages, which are pixel predictive coding and weighting function estimation. In the former stage, the set of intensity pairs {Il,Ir} is computed by exploiting pixel extrapolation technique. The least-squares estimation method is then employed to yield the weighted coefficients. We show the efficacy of the proposed scheme on revealing the splining artifacts. We believe that this is the first work that exposes the image splining artifact as evidence of digital tampering.

  19. Neurotoxicity of Acrylamide in Exposed Workers

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Manuela; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Puglisi, Valentina; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a water-soluble chemical used in different industrial and laboratory processes. ACR monomer is neurotoxic in humans and laboratory animals. Subchronic exposure to this chemical causes neuropathies, hands and feet numbness, gait abnormalities, muscle weakness, ataxia, skin and in some cases, cerebellar alterations. ACR neurotoxicity involves mostly the peripheral but also the central nervous system, because of damage to the nerve terminal through membrane fusion mechanisms and tubulovescicular alterations. Nevertheless, the exact action mechanism is not completely elucidated. In this paper we have reviewed the current literature on its neurotoxicity connected to work-related ACR exposure. We have analyzed not only the different pathogenetic hypotheses focusing on possible neuropathological targets, but also the critical behavior of ACR poisoning. In addition we have evaluated the ACR-exposed workers case studies. Despite all the amount of work which have being carried out on this topic more studies are necessary to fully understand the pathogenetic mechanisms, in order to propose suitable therapies. PMID:23985770

  20. Thyroid hormones in chronic heat exposed men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertner, A.; Israeli, R.; Lev, A.; Cassuto, Y.

    1983-03-01

    Previous reports have indicated that thyroid gland activity, is depressed in the heat. Total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) serum levels in 17 workers of the metal work shop at a plant near the Dead Sea and 8 workers in Beer Sheva, Israel were examined. The metal workshop of the plant near the Dead Sea is part of a large chemical plant. The one in Beer Sheva is part of a large construction company. Maintenance work, as well as metal work projects are performed in both workshops. During the work shifts, the workers of the Dead Sea plant were exposed to temperatures ranging from 30 36°C (May Oct.) and 14 21°C (Dec. Feb). In Beer Sheva the range was 25 32°C (June Sept.) and 10 17°C (Dec. Feb.). Total T4 was measured by competitive protein binding and total T3 by radioimmunoassay in blood drawn before work (0700) in July and January. In summer. T4 was higher and T3 was lower for both groups than in winter. The observed summer T3 decrease may result from depressed extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. We conclude that the regulation of energy metabolism in hot climates may be related to extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3.

  1. The SPORES experiment of the EXPOSE-R mission: Bacillus subtilis spores in artificial meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The experiment SPORES `Spores in artificial meteorites' was part of European Space Agency's EXPOSE-R mission, which exposed chemical and biological samples for nearly 2 years (March 10, 2009 to February 21, 2011) to outer space, when attached to the outside of the Russian Zvezda module of the International Space Station. The overall objective of the SPORES experiment was to address the question whether the meteorite material offers enough protection against the harsh environment of space for spores to survive a long-term journey in space by experimentally mimicking the hypothetical scenario of Lithopanspermia, which assumes interplanetary transfer of life via impact-ejected rocks. For this purpose, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 were exposed to selected parameters of outer space (solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation at λ>110 or >200 nm, space vacuum, galactic cosmic radiation and temperature fluctuations) either as a pure spore monolayer or mixed with different concentrations of artificial meteorite powder. Total fluence of solar UV radiation (100-400 nm) during the mission was 859 MJ m-2. After retrieval the viability of the samples was analysed. A Mission Ground Reference program was performed in parallel to the flight experiment. The results of SPORES demonstrate the high inactivating potential of extraterrestrial UV radiation as one of the most harmful factors of space, especially UV at λ>110 nm. The UV-induced inactivation is mainly caused by photodamaging of the DNA, as documented by the identification of the spore photoproduct 5,6-dihydro-5(α-thyminyl)thymine. The data disclose the limits of Lithopanspermia for spores located in the upper layers of impact-ejected rocks due to access of harmful extraterrestrial solar UV radiation.

  2. Comparative Toxicological Study between Exposed and Non-Exposed Farmers to Organophosphorus Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Taghavian, Fariba; Vaezi, Gholamhassan; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Malekirad, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this work was to compare DNA damage, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, inflammatory markers and clinical symptoms in farmers exposed to organophosphorus pesticides to individuals that had no pesticide exposure. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey with a total of 134 people. The subject group consisted of 67 farmers who were exposed to organophosphorus pesticides. The control group consisted of 67 people without any contact with pesticides matched with the subject group in terms of age, gender, and didactics. Oxidative DNA damage, the activities of AChE, interleukin-6 (IL6), IL10 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum were measured and clinical examinations conducted in order to register all clinical signs. Results Compared with the control group, substantial gains were observed in the farmers’ levels of oxidative DNA damage, IL10 and CRP. There was significantly less AChE activity in farmers exposed to organophosphorus pesticides. The levels of IL6 in both groups did not significantly differ. Conclusion The outcomes show that exposure to organophosphorus pesticides may cause DNA oxidative damage, inhibit AChE activity and increase the serum levels of inflammatory markers. Using biological materials instead of chemical pesticides and encouraging the use of safety equipment by farmers are some solutions to the adverse effects of exposure to organophosphorous pesticides. PMID:27054123

  3. Prolonged grief among traumatically bereaved relatives exposed and not exposed to a tsunami.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Kerstin Bergh; Lundin, Tom; Hultman, Christina M; Fröjd, Thomas; Michel, Per-Olof

    2011-08-01

    Numerous studies on the mental health consequences of traumatic exposure to a disaster compare those exposed to those not exposed. Relatively few focus on the effect of the death of a close relative caused by the disaster-suffering a traumatic bereavement. This study compared the impact on 345 participants who lost a close relative in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but who were themselves not present, to 141 who not only lost a relative, but also were themselves exposed to the tsunami. The focus was on psychological distress assessed during the second year after the sudden bereavement. Findings were that exposure to the tsunami was associated with prolonged grief (B = 3.81) and posttraumatic stress reactions (B = 6.65), and doubled the risk for impaired mental health. Loss of children increased the risk for psychological distress (prolonged grief: B = 6.92; The Impact of Event Scale-Revised: B = 6.10; General Health Questionnaire-12: OR = 2.34). Women had a higher frequency of prolonged grief. For men, loss of children presented a higher risk for prolonged grief in relation to other types of bereavement (B = 6.36 vs. loss of partner). Further long-term follow-up could deepen the understanding of how recovery after traumatic loss is facilitated.

  4. Treadmill exercise alters histone acetylation differently in rats exposed or not exposed to aversive learning context.

    PubMed

    de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Bertoldi, Karine; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Moysés, Felipe dos Santos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Epigenetic modifications have been linked to memory formation after learning context exposure and to exercise effects on memory performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise (20 min/day during 2 weeks) on H3K14 acetylation and H3S10 phosphorylation levels in the hippocampi of 3-month-old Wistar rats exposed and not exposed to aversive learning context. Male Wistar rats aged 2-3 months were assigned to non-exercised (sedentary) and exercised (running daily for 20 min for 2 weeks) groups. Single-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA) conditioning was employed as an aversive memory model. Epigenetic parameters were determined 30 min after the IA test. A decrease in the H3K14 acetylation in the hippocampus 24 h after IA training (30 min after test session) was observed. Exercise reversed the IA effect, and no effect was observed in the non-IA exposed group. Our data support the hypothesis that modulation of H3K14 acetylation levels in the hippocampus might be related, at least in part, to exercise effects on aversive memory.

  5. Comparative genomic hybridization study of arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed urinary transitional cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Pu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Huan, Steven K.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-03-01

    To compare the differences in DNA aberrations between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), we analyzed 19 arsenic-exposed and 29 non-arsenic-exposed urinary TCCs from Chi-Mei Hospital using comparative genomic hybridization. DNA aberrations were detected in 42 TCCs including 19 arsenic-exposed and 23 non-arsenic-exposed TCCs. Arsenic-exposed TCCs had more changes than unexposed TCCs (mean {+-} SD, 6.6 {+-} 2.9 vs. 2.9 {+-} 2.2). Arsenic exposure was significantly associated with the number of DNA aberrations after adjustment for tumor stage, tumor grade and cigarette smoking in multiple regression analysis. The most frequent DNA gains, which were strikingly different between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed TCCs, included those at 1p, 4p, 4q and 8q. A much higher frequency of DNA losses in arsenic-exposed TCCs compared with non-arsenic-exposed TCCs was observed in 10q, 11p and 17p. Chromosomal loss in 17p13 was associated not only with arsenic exposure, but also with tumor stage and grade. The p53 immunohistochemistry staining showed that chromosome 17p13 loss was associated with either p53 no expression (25%) or p53 overexpression (75%). The findings suggest that long-term arsenic exposure may increase the chromosome abnormality in TCC, and 17p loss plays an important role in arsenic-induced urinary carcinogenesis.

  6. Antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor in silica-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Omid; Sharifian, Seyed Akbar; Mehrdad, Ramin; Haghighi, Khosro Sadeghniyat; Mazaheri, Maria

    2009-06-01

    A lot of workers in industries such as foundry, stonecutting, and sandblasting are exposed to higher than permissible levels of crystalline silica. Various alterations in humoral immune function have been reported in silicosis patients and workers exposed to silica dust. The aim of this study was to measure antinuclear antibody (ANA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels in foundry workers exposed to silica and to compare them with a control group without such exposure. ANA and RF were measured in 78 exposed and 73 non-exposed workers, and standard statistical methods were used to compare them. The two groups did not significantly differ in age and smoking. Mean work duration of the exposed and non-exposed workers was (14.9+/-4.72) years and (12.41+/-6.3) years, respectively. Ten exposed workers had silicosis. ANA was negative in all workers in either group. Its mean titer did not differ significantly between the exposed and control workers [(0.39+/-0.15) IU mL(-1) vs. (0.36+/-0.17) IU mL(-1), respectively]. RF was positive in two workers of each group. Other studies have reported an increase in ANA and RF associated with exposure to silica dust and silicosis.In contrast, our study suggests that exposure to silica dust does not increase the level of ANA and RF in exposed workers. PMID:19581212

  7. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; LeMay, J.

    1994-07-11

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cfm HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased from 1.15 inches to 2.85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased from 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cfm air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3{mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  8. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.

    1995-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cmf HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased form 1.15 inches to 2,85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased form 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cmf air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3 {mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  9. Bacterial responses to Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Huang, Rick; Sahu, Manoranjan; Feng, Xueyang; Biswas, Pratim; Tang, Yinjie J

    2010-03-01

    The toxicity of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs, 20nm), synthesized by a flame aerosol reactor, to Mycobacterium smegmatis and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the primary focus of this study. Both doped and non-doped TiO(2) NPs (20nm) tended to agglomerate in the medium solution, and therefore did not penetrate into the cell and damage cellular structures. TiO(2) particles (<100mg/L) did not apparently interfere with the growth of the two species in aqueous cultures. Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs (20mg/L) significantly reduced the M. smegmatis growth rate by three fold, but did not affect S. oneidensis MR-1 growth. The toxicity of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs was driven by the release of Cu(2+) from the parent NPs. Compared to equivalent amounts of Cu(2+), Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs exhibited higher levels of toxicity to M. smegmatis (P-value<0.1). Addition of EDTA in the culture appeared to significantly decrease the anti-mycobacterium activity of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs. S. oneidensis MR-1 produced a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) under NP stress, especially extracellular protein. Therefore, S. oneidensis MR-1 was able to tolerate a much higher concentration of Cu(2+) or Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs. S. oneidensis MR-1 also adsorbed NPs on cell surface and enzymatically reduced ionic copper in culture medium with a remediating rate of 61microg/(liter x OD(600) x hour) during its early exponential growth phase. Since the metal reducing Shewanella species can efficiently "clean" metal-oxide NPs, the activities of such environmentally relevant bacteria may be an important consideration for evaluating the ecological risk of metal-oxide NPs. PMID:19931887

  10. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  11. 31. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS EXPOSED STUD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS EXPOSED STUD WALL THAT SERVES AS DIVIDER TO ROOM 211. EXPOSED TRUSSWORK VISIBLE THROUGH TO NEXT ROOM. WOOD PANELED WALLS ARE PAINTED; FLOORS ARE WOOD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  13. Psychological Functioning of Children Exposed to Cocaine Prenatally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granick, Samuel

    1995-01-01

    A sample of 25 children exposed prenatally to cocaine was compared with a control group of 18 children not exposed to any drugs prenatally. Using the AGS (American Guidance Service) Screening Profile, results indicated that the control group was significantly superior on all subtests except for the Motor Coordination and Speech Articulation…

  14. Animal Cruelty by Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The first objective of this study was to determine if children exposed to domestic violence were significantly more likely to be cruel to animals than children not exposed to violence. The second was to determine if there were significant age and gender differences between children who were and were not cruel to animals. Method: A…

  15. Drug Exposed Infants and Children: Service Needs and Policy Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feig, Laura

    This paper brings together information on the conditions and needs of children who have been exposed to drugs, federal programs that affect the well-being of these children, and policy questions that need resolution. Discussion concerns: (1) characteristics of infants who have been exposed to drugs and their families, including prevalence and…

  16. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine....

  17. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed...

  18. The Psychobiology of Children Exposed to Marital Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltzman, Kasey M.; Holden, George W.; Holahan, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the psychological and physiological functioning of a community sample of children exposed to marital violence, comparing them to a clinical comparison group without marital violence exposure. Results replicated past findings of elevated levels of trauma symptomatology in this population. Further, children exposed to marital violence…

  19. The differences in phenolic content in rivers exposed and non-exposed to anthropogenic contamination.

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Bukowska, Bozena; Duda, Wirgiliusz

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the work was to determine the differences in a kind, number and concentrations of phenol, chlorophenols, chlorocatechols chlorinated methoxyphenols (chloroguaiacols, chlorosyringols) and 3,4,5-trichloroveratrole in the drainage of the Dzierzazna river, the flow non-exposed to anthropogenic contamination and in the Ner river, the flow exposed to anthropogenic pollution. The samples of water were collected in the Dzierzazna river in the Swoboda locality, the inflow of the Dzierzazna river - the Ciosenka river and, also, in the spring situated in Ciosny Sady locality. Water of the Ner river was collected in points near Łódź, Konstantynów, Poddebice and Dabie towns. The compounds were condensed (adsorbed) and eluted with methylene chloride on octadecyl C18 layer in a Baker Separex system. The obtained eluent was separated using the method of gas chromatography and analysed using mass spectrometry technique. In samples collected from the drainage of the Dzierzazna river phenol, chlorophenols, guaiacol, trichloroguaiacol, tetrachloroguaiacol, trichlorosyringol and 3,4,5-trichloroveratole were determined. As no anthropogenic sources are situated within the drainage of the Dzierzazna river, we may suppose that most of the determined compounds are mainly of natural origin. No or trace concentrations of chlorinated methoxyphenols were noted in the water of the Ner river, but a higher number, and concentrations of chlorophenols and additionally chlorocatechols were determined in this flow. It is also apparent that changes in a number and concentrations of phenols in the water of the Ner river did not prove a seasonal character, which was typical of the Dzierzazna drainage waters.

  20. The AMINO experiment: RNA stability under solar radiation studied on the EXPOSE-R facility of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Cottin, Hervé; da Silva, Laura; Brack, André; Chaput, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Careful examination of the present metabolism and in vitro selection of various catalytic RNAs strongly support the RNA world hypothesis as a crucial step of the origins and early life evolution. Small functional RNAs were exposed from 10 March 2009 to 21 January 2011 to space conditions on board the International Space Station in the EXPOSE-R mission. The aim of this study was to investigate the preservation or modification properties such as integrity of RNAs after space exposition. The exposition to the solar radiation has a strong degradation effect on the size distribution of RNA. Moreover, the comparison between the in-flight samples, exposed to the Sun and not exposed, indicates that the solar radiation degrades RNA bases.

  1. Non-disjunction mutations in Drosophila exposed to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levengood, W. C.

    1987-09-01

    The frequency of XO mutations in Drosophila melanogaster was significantly higher than normal in magnetic field exposed, immature males, than in exposed, mature males. Mutation levels increased with magnetic field strength. Intercellular rings of black magnetic particles were formed in the high magnetic flux region of dorsally exposed, early stage pupae and to a lesser degree in the abdomen of young adult females. Orientation of minute, chromosome associated, magnetic domains within the microenvironment of the developing organism was believed to alter oxidative processes within maturing X+ sperm which during fertilization were incompatible with and destructive to an Xw chromosome in the zygote.

  2. Hepatic function in workers occupationally exposed to carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed Central

    Tomenson, J A; Baron, C E; O'Sullivan, J J; Edwards, J C; Stonard, M D; Walker, R J; Fearnley, D M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To identify any differences in hepatic function between workers exposed to carbon tetrachloride and controls, and to identify the best variable with which to examine any effects. METHODS--In a cross sectional study of hepatic function in workers occupationally exposed to carbon tetrachloride, 135 exposed employees were compared with 276 non-exposed controls. The exposed group was taken from three sites in the north west of England and the control group included non-exposed workers from one of these sites and another site located nearby. Demographic and alcohol consumption data were collected from both groups by questionnaire. Each member of the study group was allotted a notional estimated exposure to carbon tetrachloride, calculated from historic personal monitoring data and job category. A fasting sample of blood was taken from all participants and analysed for a variety of biochemical and haematological variables. The techniques of univariate and multivariate analysis of variance were used to investigate the effect on biochemical and haematological indices of a range of factors. RESULTS--Multivariate analysis of variance of four core liver function variables, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase, showed a significant difference between exposed and non-exposed workers. The univariate analyses identified increases in only alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase within the exposed group and these did not show a significant dose-response relation. Univariate analysis of variance did show effects of alcohol and age on several variables. Significant differences between exposed and control groups for three haematological variables, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, and red blood count, were thought not to be due to the effects of exposure. Clinical review of exposed subjects with abnormal results did not show clinically evident disease that could have been associated with exposure to

  3. Detail of upper portion of southeast corner showing exposed rafters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of upper portion of southeast corner showing exposed rafters at eaves; camera facing northwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Epidemiologic study of workers exposed to titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.L.; Fayerweather, W.E.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether workers exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) had significantly higher risks of lung cancer, chronic respiratory disease, pleural thickening/plaques, or pulmonary fibrosis than referent groups. A total of 1,576 employees exposed to TiO/sub 2/ were observed from 1956 through 1985 for cancer and chronic respiratory disease incidence, and from 1935 through 1983 for mortality. A cross-sectional sample of 398 employees was evaluated for chest roentgenogram abnormalities. Cohort analyses suggested that the risks of developing lung cancer and other fatal respiratory diseases were no higher for TiO/sub 2/-exposed employees than for the referent groups. Nested case-control analyses found no statistically significant associations between TiO/sub 2/ exposure and risk of lung cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and chest roentgenogram abnormalities. No cases of pulmonary fibrosis were observed among TiO/sub 2/-exposed employees.

  5. Heart Docs: Never Expose Kids to Cigarette Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160911.html Heart Docs: Never Expose Kids to Cigarette Smoke Secondhand smoke can raise children's risk of ... consider making their children's environment smoke-free because cigarette smoke exposure is harmful to children's long-term ...

  6. 20. DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL WITH PLASTER REMOVED TO EXPOSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL WITH PLASTER REMOVED TO EXPOSE STUDS AND BRICKWORK A. C. Eschete, photographer, July 7, 1977 - Bagatelle Plantation, East River Road (moved to Iberville Parish), Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, LA

  7. 6. Interior view of unoccupied space looking up at exposed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior view of unoccupied space looking up at exposed roof structure; showing HVAC duct work and wood structure; near center of building; view to northeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Warehouse, 789 Twining Street, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  8. Metrics will expose trusts with poor racial equality feedback.

    PubMed

    2014-10-21

    Trusts that fail to take action on race discrimination will be exposed by a set of metrics expected to be introduced next year, England's chief nursing officer told her black and minority ethnic (BME) advisory group's annual conference last week.

  9. Cancer in People Exposed to Nuclear Weapons Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... payment of $100,000. Onsite participants People (including military personnel) who were present onsite during above-ground nuclear ... be entitled to a payment of $75,000. (Military personnel exposed to radiation at Hiroshima or Nagasaki are ...

  10. Interior view of groundfloor porch showing exposed concrete floor slab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of ground-floor porch showing exposed concrete floor slab system, facing west. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  11. Detail view of the exposed polychromatic aggregate ceiling designed and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the exposed polychromatic aggregate ceiling designed and cast by John Joseph Earley for the vehicular entrance portals to the courtyard - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 7. FOUNDATIONS OF FLUME NO. 8, EXPOSED. SCE negative no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FOUNDATIONS OF FLUME NO. 8, EXPOSED. SCE negative no. 3077, January 26, 1916. Photograph by G. Haven Bishop. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Flumes & Tunnels below Sandbox, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 30. WAIALEIA STREAM CROSSING (30") LOOKING UPSTREAM. PIPE IS EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. WAIALEIA STREAM CROSSING (30") LOOKING UPSTREAM. PIPE IS EXPOSED AT LEFT OF CONCRETE STRUCTURE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. 98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING WEST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  15. Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2004-06-01

    The screening of different genera of bacteria for production of soluble Cr(III) complexes has been completed. A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble Cr(III); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. S. oneidensis MR 1 and Cellulomonas sp ES 6 were grown in minimal media, GWM (Ground Water Medium with lactate/fumarate) and SGM (Simulated Groundwater Medium with sucrose), respectively. Other bacteria were screened under non-growth conditions with sucrose, lactate, or glycerol as electron donor. All experiments were carried out for a period of 15-30 days, with different organisms reaching a maximum soluble Cr(III) concentrations at different times: S. oneidensis, 2d; Cellulomonas sp., 8d; Leafsonia, 6d; Rhodococcus, 9d; Ps. putida MK 1, 6d, Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1, 3d; D. vulgaris Hildenborough, 3d; and D. desulfuricans G20, 21d. Initial characterization indicates that the soluble Cr(III) fraction produced by both S. oneidensis MR 1 and Cellulomonas sp. ES 6 passes through a 1-Kd cut off filter.

  16. Risk and resilience factors of persons exposed to accidents

    PubMed Central

    HERTA, DANA – CRISTINA; BRÎNDAS, PAULA; TRIFU, RALUCA; COZMAN, DOINA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Resilience encompasses factors promoting effective functioning in the context of adversity. Data regarding resilience in the wake of accidental trauma is still scarce. The aim of the current study is to comparatively assess adaptive, life – promoting factors in persons exposed to motor vehicle accidents (MVA) vs. persons exposed to other types of accidents, and to identify psychological factors of resilience and vulnerability in this context of trauma exposure. Methods We assessed 93 participants exposed to accidents out of 305 eligible patients from the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital and Cluj County Emergency Hospital. The study used Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) and Life Events Checklist. Scores were comparatively assessed for RFL items, RFL scale and subscales in participants exposed to motor vehicle accidents (MVA) vs. participants exposed to other life – threatening accidents. Results Participants exposed to MVA and those exposed to other accidents had significantly different scores in 7 RFL items. Scores were high in 4 out of 6 RFL subscales for both samples and in most items comprising these subscales, while in the other 2 subscales and in some items comprising them scores were low. Conclusions Low fear of death, physical suffering and social disapproval emerge as risk factors in persons exposed to life – threatening accidents. Love of life, courage in life and hope for the future are important resilience factors after exposure to various types of life – threatening accidents. Survival and active coping beliefs promote resilience especially after motor vehicle accidents. Coping with uncertainty are more likely to foster resilience after other types of life – threatening accidents. Attachment of the accident victim to family promotes resilience mostly after MVA, while perceived attachment of family members to the victim promotes resilience after other types of accidents. PMID:27152078

  17. Ozone exposed epithelial cells modify cocultured natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) causes significant adverse health effects worldwide. Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are among the first sites within the respiratory system to be exposed to inhaled air pollutants. They recruit, activate, and interact with immune cells via soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contacts. Based on our recent observation demonstrating the presence of natural killer (NK) cells in nasal lavages, the goal of this study was to establish a coculture model of NECs and NK cells and examine how exposure to O3 modifies this interaction. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess immunophenotypes of NK cells cocultured with either air- or O3-exposed NECs. Our data show that coculturing NK cells with O3-exposed NECs decreased intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enhanced, albeit not statistically significant, IL-4, and increased CD16 expression on NK cells compared with air controls. Additionally, the cytotoxicity potential of NK cells was reduced after coculturing with O3-exposed NECs. To determine whether soluble mediators released by O3-exposed NECs caused this shift, apical and basolateral supernatants of air- and O3-exposed NECs were used to stimulate NK cells. While the conditioned media of O3-exposed NECs alone did not reduce intracellular IFN-γ, O3 enhanced the expression of NK cell ligands ULBP3 and MICA/B on NECs. Blocking ULBP3 and MICA/B reversed the effects of O3-exposed NECs on IFN-γ production in NK cells. Taken together, these data showed that interactions between NECs and NK cells in the context of O3 exposure changes NK cell activity via direct cell-cell interactions and is dependent on ULBP3/MICA/B expressed on NECs. PMID:23241529

  18. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  19. The AMINO experiment: methane photolysis under Solar VUV irradiation on the EXPOSE-R facility of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Cottin, Hervé; Cloix, Mégane; Jérome, Murielle; Bénilan, Yves; Coll, Patrice; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Raulin, François; Saiagh, Kafila; Chaput, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The scientific aim of the present campaign is to study the whole chain of methane photo-degradation, as initiated by Solar vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation in Titan's atmosphere. For this purpose, the AMINO experiment on the EXPOSE-R mission has loaded closed cells for gas-phase photochemistry in space conditions. Two different gas mixtures have been exposed, named Titan 1 and Titan 2, involving both N2-CH4 gas mixtures, without and with CO2, respectively. CO2 is added as a source of reactive oxygen in the cells. The cell contents were analysed thanks to infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Methane consumption leads to the formation of saturated hydrocarbons, with no detectable influence of CO2. This successful campaign provides a first benchmark for characterizing the whole methane photochemical system in space conditions. A thin film of tholin-like compounds appears to form on the cell walls of the exposed cells.

  20. Neurodevelopmental outcomes in HIV-exposed-uninfected children versus those not exposed to HIV.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Stephen J; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Vibol, Ung; Aurpibul, Linda; Vonthanak, Sophan; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Ratanadilok, Kattiya; Prasitsuebsai, Wasana; Pruksakaew, Kanchana; van der Lugt, Jasper; Paul, Robert; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative children born to HIV-infected mothers may exhibit differences in neurodevelopment (ND) compared to age- and gender-matched controls whose lives have not been affected by HIV. This could occur due to exposure to HIV and antiretroviral agents in utero and perinatally, or differences in the environment in which they grow up. This study assessed neurodevelopmental outcomes in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and HIV-unexposed uninfected (HUU) children enrolled as controls in a multicenter ND study from Thailand and Cambodia. One hundred sixty HEU and 167 HUU children completed a neurodevelopmental assessment using the Beery Visual Motor Integration (VMI) test, Color Trails, Perdue Pegboard, and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Thai children (n = 202) also completed the Wechsler Intelligence Scale (IQ) and Stanford-Binet II memory tests. In analyses adjusted for caregiver education, parent as caregiver, household income, age, and ethnicity, statistically significant lower scores were seen on verbal IQ (VIQ), full-scale IQ (FSIQ), and Binet Bead Memory among HEU compared to HUU. The mean (95% CI) differences were -6.13 (-10.3 to -1.96), p = 0.004; -4.57 (-8.80 to -0.35), p = 0.03; and -3.72 (-6.57 to -0.88), p = 0.01 for VIQ, FSIQ, and Binet Bead Memory, respectively. We observed no significant differences in performance IQ, other Binet memory domains, Color Trail, Perdue Pegboard, Beery VMI, or CBCL test scores. We conclude that HEU children evidence reductions in some neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to HUU; however, these differences are small and it remains unclear to what extent they have immediate and long-term clinical significance. PMID:24878112

  1. Assessment of oxidative stress in Rhamdia quelen exposed to agrichemicals.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daiane; da Motta, Adriana Costa; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Toni, Cândida; Loro, Vânia Lucia; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2010-05-01

    Due to the proximity of crop and fish culture areas, some agrichemicals that could be harmful for fish could enter into fishponds by different ways, such as by leaching through rain. Rhamdia quelen (Teleostei) were exposed to sublethal concentrations of methyl parathion (MP), a glyphosate based herbicide (Gly), and tebuconazole (Teb). The liver of R. quelen exposed to MP and Teb showed enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), higher than in the control fish (56% and 59%, respectively). In contrast, Gly did not alter the TBARS generation. The protein carbonyl content increased only in fish exposed to Teb. Fish exposed to the three agrichemicals showed a significant decrease of catalase activity (52%, 48%, and 67%, respectively) and increased glutathione-S-transferase (57%, 46%, and 160%, respectively) activity. Fish exposed to MP, Gly, and Teb showed higher reduced glutathione (151%, 472%, and 130%, respectively, when compared with the control levels) and ascorbic acid concentrations (121%, 102%, and 184%, respectively),while the non-protein thiol content increased only in R. quelen exposed to tebuconazole. Fish exposed to MP and Teb showed several pathological changes in the liver, including hepatocyte degeneration and bile stagnation. The present work reports for the first time the toxicity of the pesticide MP and the fungicide Teb in R. quelen, and as in other works, suggests the relatively lower liver toxicity of Gly for fish. The data presented herein demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of MP and Teb cause changes in oxidative stress parameters as well as hepatic cell injuries in R. quelen, and that these parameters have the potential to be developed as bioindicators of exposure to these agrichemicals.

  2. Cardiovascular effects in viscose rayon workers exposed to carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kotseva, K; Braeckman, L; De Bacquer, D; Bulat, P; Vanhoorne, M

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the cardiovascular effects in workers currently exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) below the threshold limit value (TLV) of 31 mg/m3 and to determine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) after long-term exposure. 172 men (91 workers exposed to CS2 in a viscose rayon factory and 81 referent workers) were examined using a medical and job history questionnaire, Rose's questionnaire, and electrocardiography at rest, and by measuring blood pressure and serum lipids and lipoproteins. Personal exposures were monitored simultaneously with active sampling and findings were analyzed according to the NIOSH 1600 method. As a result of technical and organizational improvements, personal CS2 exposures were well below the TLV (5.4-13.02 mg/m3). No significant effect of CS2 on blood pressure or lipids (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins AI and B) was found, even after allowance for confounding factors. The prevalence of CHD (ECG abnormalities and chest pain) was higher in the viscose rayon workers than in the workers with no exposure but reached statistical significance for men with exposure histories often years and more only (cumulative CS9 index > or = 150 mg/m3, the most highly exposed group). The findings suggest that the coronary risk is increased in workers previously exposed to high CS2 concentrations but not in those exposed to CS2 levels below the current TLV. PMID:11210016

  3. Effects on LDEF exposed copper film and bulk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Raikar, Ganesh N.

    1991-01-01

    Two forms of copper were exposed to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Mission 1 environment: a copper film, initially 74.2 plus or minus 1.1 nm thick sputter coated on a fused silica flat and a bulk piece of oxygen-free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper. The optical density of the copper film changed from 1.33 to 0.70 where exposed, and the film thickness increased to 106.7 plus or minus 0.5 nm where exposed. The exposed area appears purple by reflection and green by transmission for the thin film and maroon color for the bulk copper piece. The exposed areas increased in thickness, but only increase in the thickness of the thin film sample could be readily measured. The increase in film thickness is consistent with the density changes occurring during conversion of copper to an oxide. However, we have not been able to confirm appreciable conversion to an oxide by x-ray diffraction studies. We have not yet subjected the sample to e-beams or more abusive investigations out of concern that the film might be modified.

  4. Characterization of the phosphatidylserine-exposing subpopulation of sickle cells.

    PubMed

    de Jong, K; Larkin, S K; Styles, L A; Bookchin, R M; Kuypers, F A

    2001-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), exclusively present in the inner monolayer of the normal red blood cell (RBC) membrane, is exposed in subpopulations of sickle cells. PS-exposing RBCs were found predominantly among the densest and the very light sickle cells. Within the light RBC fraction, PS exposure was found on reticulocytes, transferrin receptor-expressing reticulocytes, and mature RBCs. The last subset contained low-density valinomycin-resistant RBCs, previously shown to have high Na(+) and low K(+) content. This subpopulation contained the highest percentage of PS-exposing cells. The PS-exposing sickle cells did not show the sustained high cytosolic Ca(++) levels that have been shown to activate scramblase activity. Data from this study indicate that PS exposure can occur at different stages in the life of the sickle RBC and that it correlates with the loss of aminophospholipid translocase activity, the only common denominator of the PS-exposing cells. The additional requirement of scramblase activation may occur during transient increases in cytosolic Ca(++). (Blood. 2001;98:860-867)

  5. Cardiovascular effects in viscose rayon workers exposed to carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kotseva, K; Braeckman, L; De Bacquer, D; Bulat, P; Vanhoorne, M

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the cardiovascular effects in workers currently exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) below the threshold limit value (TLV) of 31 mg/m3 and to determine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) after long-term exposure. 172 men (91 workers exposed to CS2 in a viscose rayon factory and 81 referent workers) were examined using a medical and job history questionnaire, Rose's questionnaire, and electrocardiography at rest, and by measuring blood pressure and serum lipids and lipoproteins. Personal exposures were monitored simultaneously with active sampling and findings were analyzed according to the NIOSH 1600 method. As a result of technical and organizational improvements, personal CS2 exposures were well below the TLV (5.4-13.02 mg/m3). No significant effect of CS2 on blood pressure or lipids (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins AI and B) was found, even after allowance for confounding factors. The prevalence of CHD (ECG abnormalities and chest pain) was higher in the viscose rayon workers than in the workers with no exposure but reached statistical significance for men with exposure histories often years and more only (cumulative CS9 index > or = 150 mg/m3, the most highly exposed group). The findings suggest that the coronary risk is increased in workers previously exposed to high CS2 concentrations but not in those exposed to CS2 levels below the current TLV.

  6. Factors Influencing the Intended Likelihood of Exposing Sexual Infidelity.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Daniel J; Fisher, Maryanne L; Fitzgerald, Carey J

    2015-08-01

    There is a considerable body of literature on infidelity within romantic relationships. However, there is a gap in the scientific literature on factors influencing the likelihood of uninvolved individuals exposing sexual infidelity. Therefore, we devised an exploratory study examining a wide range of potentially relevant factors. Based in part on evolutionary theory, we anticipated nine potential domains or types of influences on the likelihoods of exposing or protecting cheaters, including kinship, strong social alliances, financial support, previous relationship behaviors (including infidelity and abuse), potential relationship transitions, stronger sexual and emotional aspects of the extra-pair relationship, and disease risk. The pattern of results supported these predictions (N = 159 men, 328 women). In addition, there appeared to be a small positive bias for participants to report infidelity when provided with any additional information about the situation. Overall, this study contributes a broad initial description of factors influencing the predicted likelihood of exposing sexual infidelity and encourages further studies in this area.

  7. Decision support for subjects exposed to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Vardøy, Astrid-Sofie B; Taklo, Maaike M Visser; Austad, Hanne Opsahl

    2013-03-01

    The physiological and activity strain index (PASI) has been developed to improve the online decision support for workers exposed to heat stress. Fire fighters (smoke divers) which are exposed to both heat-stress and high-risk situations have been used as test case. PASI combines a modified version of the relatively well-known physiological strain index (PSI) with activity data from accelerometers. The algorithm has been developed based on tests in a laboratory, and it has been verified in two field tests performed by smoke divers exposed to heat stress. The verification demonstrates that it is possible to distinguish between high- and low-risk situations when data from accelerometers are added to the situation analysis. This indicates that PASI can contribute to an improved risk assessment and online decision support for smoke divers compared to using PSI alone. PMID:24235112

  8. Analysis of a space-exposed thermoplastic resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Davis, Judith R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical characterization of a thermoplastic resin exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for 10 months and for 5.8 years is reported. The resin, processed as a thick film and as a matrix for a graphite fiber reinforced composite, few exposed in the RAM direction on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Differences attributable to environmental exposure were detected in infrared spectra and in various molecular weight parameters of film after 10 months in LEO. Those effects were not as apparent in composites after 5.8 years in LEO. Increased exposure to atomic oxygen toward the end of the LDEF mission probably scrubbed these effects from specimens exposed for 5.8 years. The intent of this study is to increase our fundamental understanding of space environmental effects on polymeric materials and to develop a benchmark for enhancing our methodology for and understanding of the ground-based simulation of space environmental effects.

  9. Medical surveillance of the lead exposed worker. Current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hipkins, K L; Materna, B L; Kosnett, M J; Rogge, J W; Cone, J E

    1998-07-01

    1. The "lead standards" established by OSHA for general industry in 1978 and the construction industry in 1993 require employers and clinicians to follow very specific guidelines for protecting lead exposed workers. Depending on the level of exposure, medical surveillance may be legally required. 2. Lead affects multiple body systems and can cause permanent damage. Low level exposures that in the past were thought safe are now considered hazardous as new information emerges about the toxicity of lead. 3. Lead poisoning, if undetected, often results in misdiagnosis and costly care. Adults are exposed to lead in many different workplace settings. All clinicians caring for lead exposed workers need to be informed about the health effects of lead, employer and physician responsibilities, and worker rights. 4. Occupational and environmental health nurses can help identify workers at risk and prevent lead poisoning by education and early intervention through collaboration with the workers, the employer, the company physician, and other health and safety professionals.

  10. Semen quality in workers exposed to 2-ethoxyethanol.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, J M; Schrader, S M; Clapp, D E; Halperin, W E; Turner, T W; Hornung, R W

    1989-06-01

    To evaluate whether long term exposure to 2-ethoxyethanol (2EE) may affect semen quality, a cross sectional study was conducted among men exposed to 2EE used as a binder slurry in a metal castings process. Full shift breathing zone exposures to 2EE ranged from non-detectable to 24 ppm (geometric mean 6.6 ppm). Because of the potential for substantial absorption of 2EE through skin exposure, urine measurements of the metabolite of 2EE, 2-ethoxyacetic acid (2EAA) were conducted, showing levels of 2EAA ranging from non-detectable to 163 mg 2EAA/g creatinine. Only 37 exposed men (50% participation) and 39 non-exposed comparison (26% participation) from elsewhere in the plant provided a sperm sample. A questionnaire to determine personal habits, and medical and work histories, and a physical examination of the urogenital tract were also administered. The average sperm count per ejaculate among the workers exposed to 2EE was significantly lower than that of the unexposed group (113 v 154 million sperm per ejaculate respectively; p = 0.05) after consideration of abstinence, sample age, subjects' age, tobacco, alcohol and caffeine use, urogenital disorders, fever, and other illnesses. The mean sperm concentrations of the exposed and unexposed groups did not significantly differ from each other (44 and 53 million/ml respectively). No effect of exposure to 2EE on semen volume, sperm viability, motility, velocity, and normal morphology or testicular volume was detected, although some differences in the proportion of abnormal sperm shapes were observed. These data suggest that there may be an effect of 2EE on sperm count among these workers, although the possibility that other factors may be affecting the semen quality in both exposed and unexposed men in this population or that the results reflect bias introduced by the low participation rates cannot be excluded. PMID:2818974

  11. The EXPOSE-E Mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther

    The International Space Station ISS provides a variety of external research platforms for ex-periments aiming at the utilization of space parameters like vacuum, temperature oscillation, extraterrestrial UV and ionizing radiation. For 1.5 years the astrobiological experimental ESA facility EXPOSE-E was accommodated on the EuTEF Platform on one of the external balconies of the Columbus Module with 5 exobio-logical and 3 radiation experiments, exposing the chemical, biological and dosimetric samples to the harsh space environment. The main interest of the experiments was to increase our knowledge on the origin, evolution and distribution of life, on Earth and possibly beyond. The biological experiments investigated resistance and adaptation of organisms like bacteria, Achaea, fungi, lichens and plant seeds to extreme environmental conditions and underlying mechanisms like DNA repair. The organic chemical experiments analyse chemical reactions triggered by the extraterrestrial environment, especially short wavelength UV radiation, to better understand prebiotic chemistry. The facility is optimized to allow exposure of biologi-cal specimen and material samples under a variety of conditions, using optical filter systems. Environmental parameters like temperature and radiation were regularly recorded and down linked by telemetry. The exposure facility EXPOSE-E itself and the accommodated experiments and samples are introduced. A complete Mission overview of this recent long term astrobiological experiment is presented: from the sample preparation and launch to the landing and sample retrieval. Mission data and an assessment of the impacting space parameters during the mission are given. After EXPOSE-E, the sister facility EXPOSE-R was launched and still is in space. A short status information and outlook on this second astrobiological Mission will be included.

  12. Survival of Spores of Trichoderma longibrachiatum in Space: data from the Space Experiment SPORES on EXPOSE-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Katja; Lux-Endrich, Astrid; Panitz, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    In the space experiment `Spores in artificial meteorites' (SPORES), spores of the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum were exposed to low-Earth orbit for nearly 2 years on board the EXPOSE-R facility outside of the International Space Station. The environmental conditions tested in space were: space vacuum at 10-7-10-4 Pa or argon atmosphere at 105 Pa as inert gas atmosphere, solar extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) radiation at λ > 110 nm or λ > 200 nm with fluences up to 5.8 × 108 J m-2, cosmic radiation of a total dose range from 225 to 320 mGy, and temperature fluctuations from -25 to +50°C, applied isolated or in combination. Comparable control experiments were performed on ground. After retrieval, viability of spores was analysed by two methods: (i) ethidium bromide staining and (ii) test of germination capability. About 30% of the spores in vacuum survived the space travel, if shielded against insolation. However, in most cases no significant decrease was observed for spores exposed in addition to the full spectrum of solar UV irradiation. As the spores were exposed in clusters, the outer layers of spores may have shielded the inner part. The results give some information about the likelihood of lithopanspermia, the natural transfer of micro-organisms between planets. In addition to the parameters of outer space, sojourn time in space seems to be one of the limiting parameters.

  13. Lung cancer in rats exposed to fibrogenic dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Wilson, J.S.; Tillery, M.I.; Smith, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Fischer-344 rats were exposed to quartz dusts and to quartz-bearing oil shale dusts in long-term inhalation studies. Aerosol concentrations of 12 mg/m/sup 3/ and 152-176 mg/m/sup 3/ for quartz and shale dusts, respectively, were used in exposure regimens lasting up to two years. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed in most animals surviving beyond 400 days. Adenocarcinomas and epidermoid carcinomas of the lung were observed in animals from all exposure groups, including those exposed to quartz alone. The pulmonary tumors were a late effect, with the earliest lung tumor being observed after 651 days. 13 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Fibrin sealant-assisted revision of the exposed Ahmed tube.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Nikhil S; Neog, Aditya; Latka, Supriya; Srinivasan, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Tube exposure is a known complication of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. Repair of the exposed tube is not easy. A 42-year-old monocular aphakic male had undergone retinal detachment repair with placement of an episcleral-encircling band followed by implantation of AGV. He presented to the clinic on routine review with exposure of the shunt tube. The complication was managed by placing scleral and conjunctival grafts over the exposed tube using a fibrin adhesive (Tisseel kit; Baxter AG, Vienna, Austria). The novel use of the fibrin sealant in the repair of AGV tube exposure was for better graft-integration.

  15. Fibrin Sealant-Assisted Revision of the Exposed Ahmed Tube

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Nikhil S.; Neog, Aditya; Latka, Supriya; Srinivasan, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Tube exposure is a known complication of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. Repair of the exposed tube is not easy. A 42-year-old monocular aphakic male had undergone retinal detachment repair with placement of an episcleral-encircling band followed by implantation of AGV. He presented to the clinic on routine review with exposure of the shunt tube. The complication was managed by placing scleral and conjunctival grafts over the exposed tube using a fibrin adhesive (Tisseel kit; Baxter AG, Vienna, Austria). The novel use of the fibrin sealant in the repair of AGV tube exposure was for better graft-integration. PMID:25624685

  16. Study of indium tin oxide films exposed to atomic axygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Coutts, T. J.; Li, X.

    1989-01-01

    A qualitative simulation of the effects of atomic oxygen has been conducted on indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared by dc sputtering onto room-temperature substrates, by exposing them to an RF-excited oxygen plasma and characterizing the resulting changes in optical, electrical, and structural properties as functions of exposure time with ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, resistivity, and X-ray measurements. While the films thus exposed exhibit reduced resistivity and optical transmission; both of these effects, as well as partial crystallization of the films, may be due to sample heating by the plasma. Film resistivity is found to stabilize after a period of exposure.

  17. Organic samples produced by ion bombardment of ices for the EXPOSE-R2 mission on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, G. A.; Chaput, D.; Cottin, H.; Fernandez Cascales, L.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the preparation and characterization (by UV-vis-IR spectroscopy) of a set of organic samples, stable at room temperature and above, that are part of the experiment "Photochemistry on the Space Station (PSS)" planned to be enclosed in the EXPOSE-R2 mission, which will be conducted on the EXPOSE-R facility. The core facility is placed outside the International Space Station (ISS) on the Universal Platform D (URM-D platform) of the Russian module Zvezda. The organic materials are prepared in the Catania laboratory after 200 keV He+ irradiation of icy mixtures, namely N2:CH4:CO deposited at 16 K on MgF2 windows furnished by the European Space Agency. It is widely accepted that such a kind of materials produced by energetic processing are representative of organic material in some astrophysical environments as comets. Once expelled from comets these materials are exposed to solar radiation during their interplanetary journey before they eventually land on Earth and other planetary objects where they might give a contribution to the chemical and pre-biotical evolution. In particular our residues contain different chemical groups, including triple CN bonds that are considered relevant to pre-biotic chemistry. Therefore the samples will be exposed, for several months, to the solar ultraviolet photons that are a major source of energy to initiate chemical evolution in the solar system. This will allow analysis of their destruction or modification and evaluation of their lifetime in the interplanetary medium. The samples have three different thicknesses that will allow estimation of the depth profile of destruction. This experiment overcomes the limits of ground tests which do not reproduce exactly the space parameters.

  18. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  19. Semen study of papaya workers exposed to ethylene dibromide

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, J.M.; Schrader, S.M.; Steenland, K.; Clapp, D.; Turner, T.

    1984-01-01

    A cross sectional semen and cytogenetic study was performed on male workers exposed to ethylene-dibromide (EDB) in the papaya fumigation industry in Hawaii. Semen analyses were conducted on 46 men in six fumigation facilities with an average length of employment of 5 years and airborne exposures to EDB ranging from 16 to 213 parts per billion. Statistically significant decreases in sperm count per ejaculate and the percentage of viable and motile sperm and increases in the proportion of specific morphological abnormalities were observed among exposed men when compared with controls. Semen volume and sperm concentration were also lower in the exposed group. No effect of exposure to EDB on sperm velocity, the overall proportion of sperm with normal morphology or YFF bodies was noted. The authors conclude that based on the decreases in sperm count, viability and motility and increases in certain types of morphological abnormalities among workers exposed to EDB, EDB may increase the risk of reproductive impairment in workers at exposure levels near the NIOSH recommended limit of 45 parts per billion and far below the current OSHA standard of 20 parts per million.

  20. VIEW OF STATION LEARY FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION LEARY FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT INCLUDING POST 1920 DOORWAY ALTERATIONS, SANDSTONE FLANK-WALLS ARE VISIBLE AT REAR SIDES - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"3, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. VIEW OF STATION SAXTON FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION SAXTON FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANK-WALLS ARE VISIBLE AT REAR SIDES - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"2, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. VIEW OF STATION OSGOOD FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION OSGOOD FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT AND LEFT SIDE OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANKWALL IS VISIBLE AT LEFT REAR - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"5, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. VIEW OF STATION BARLOW SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT AND LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION BARLOW SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT AND LEFT SIDE OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT WITH SANDSTONE FLANK-WALL FRAGMENT, FACING NORTHWEST - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"1, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. VIEW OF STATION BARLOW FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION BARLOW FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANK-WALL FRAGMENT VISIBLE AT LEFT REAR - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"1, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 2. VIEW OF STATION FARLEY FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF STATION FARLEY FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANK-WALLS ARE VISIBLE AT REAR SIDES. - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"6, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. VIEW OF STATION LEARY FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION LEARY FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT AND LEFT SIDE OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANKWALL IS VISIBLE AT LEFT REAR - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"3, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. VIEW OF STATION OSGOOD FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STATION OSGOOD FACING NORTH SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT INCLUDING POST 1920 DOORWAY ALTERATIONS, SANDSTONE FLANK-WALLS ARE VISIBLE AT REAR SIDES - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"5, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 3. VIEW OF STATION PARLEY FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF STATION PARLEY FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING EXPOSED EXTERIOR FRONT AND LEFT SIDE OF THE CONCRETE CONCEALMENT, SANDSTONE FLANKWALL IS VISIBLE AT LEFT REAR. - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"6, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 7 CFR 27.33 - Exposing of samples for classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exposing of samples for classification. 27.33 Section 27.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND...

  10. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priti; Bihari, Vipin; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108) along with asymptomatic controls (n = 148) from a non contaminated reference community. Exposed symptomatic group consisted of 36.8% subjects who were GSTM1 null genotyped as compared to asymptomatic where only 19.4% subjects were null. The exposed subjects with GSTM1 null genotype were more susceptible to dermal adversities in comparison with wild genotyped subjects (OR = 2.42; 95% CI = 1.071–5.451). Age, smoking, gender or duration of residence were not found to have any confounding effect towards this association. Association with other genes was not statistically significant, nonetheless, possible contribution by these genes cannot be ruled out. In conclusion, variation in the polymorphic status of GSTM1 gene may influence dermal outcomes among residents from Cr(VI) contaminated areas. Further studies are therefore, needed to examine these observations among different population groups. PMID:22919465

  11. 29. VIEW WEST TOWARDS KALAWAO OF PIPELINE, EXPOSED AT LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW WEST TOWARDS KALAWAO OF PIPELINE, EXPOSED AT LOWER LEFT. CAT TRACKS, MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION/MAINTENANCE VEHICLES, CAN BE SEEN ALONG BOULDER BEACH - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  12. Profiles of Reactivity in Cocaine-Exposed Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuetze, Pamela; Molnar, Danielle S.; Eiden, Rina D.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the possibility that specific, theoretically consistent profiles of reactivity could be identified in a sample of cocaine-exposed infants and whether these profiles were associated with a range of infant and/or maternal characteristics. Cluster analysis was used to identify distinct groups of infants based on physiological,…

  13. Youth Exposed to Violence: The Role of Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly A. S.; Budge, Stephanie L.; McKay, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of 174 inner-city urban high school students, this study examined the degree to which family and peer support would moderate the negative impact of exposure to violence on academic performance, symptoms of distress, and persistence intentions. Over 94% of the students reported having been exposed to at least one form of community…

  14. Multidimensional Resilience in Urban Children Exposed to Community Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Deborah A.; Schwab-Stone, Mary E.; Muyeed, Adaline Z.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined how parent, school, and peer support differentially affected resilience among urban sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-graders. Findings indicated that both parent and school support factors positively related to resilience in children who had been exposed to community violence; however, peer support negatively related to resilience in…

  15. RESPIRATORY DAMAGE IN CHILDREN EXPOSED TO URBAN POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory


    Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC) children are chronically exposed to complex mixtures of air pollutants. In a cross-sectional arm of our study, we investigated the association between exposure to SWMMC atmosphere and nasal abnormalities, hyperinflation, and intersti...

  16. 18. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. EXPOSED VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. EXPOSED VIEW OF LOWER PULLEYS OF LEFT-HAND MILL. LOWER LEFT IS BAND SAW PULLEY. UPPER LEFT IS TENSION WHEEL. LARGE PULLEY ON RIGHT IS DRIVE WHEEL FROM POWER SOURCE. - Meadow River Lumber Company, Highway 60, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV

  17. 12. A LONG RUN OF EXPOSED TOP SURFACE, NORTH TRAINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. A LONG RUN OF EXPOSED TOP SURFACE, NORTH TRAINING WALL, ABOUT 1,500 FEET EAST OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL MOUTH. VIEW TO WEST, TOWARD SAN FRANCISCO. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  18. Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy among American-Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jamie; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete; Hanson, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Research has determined that the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) must occur preconceptually, either by reducing alcohol intake in women planning pregnancy or at risk for becoming pregnant, or by preventing pregnancy in women drinking at risky levels. One such AEP prevention programme with non-pregnant American-Indian (AI) women is…

  19. Embryo- and fetotoxicity of chromium in pregestationally exposed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Junaid, M.; Murthy, R.C.; Saxena, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Chromium, an essential element in the human body required for proper carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism, is reported to impair gestational development of offspring of workers chronically exposed to this metal in the work place. Workers in chromium based industries can be exposed to concentrations two orders of magnitude higher than the general population. Among the general population, residents living near chromate production sites may be exposed to high levels of chromium (VI) in air or to elevated levels (40 - 50,000 ppm) of chromium in effluents. Shmitova reported afterbirth and puerperal hemorrhages in women industrially exposed to this metal and observed high chromium levels in blood and urine of pregnant women and in fetal and cord blood. Chromium readily passes the placental barrier and reaches the growing fetus. Exposure of mice to chromium during various gestational periods resulted in embryo and fetotoxic effects. This study looks at the role of body chromium accumulated pregestationally on embryo and fetal development and its subsequent transfer to feto-placental sites. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials

    ScienceCinema

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

  1. A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

  2. Cardiovascular response of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that exposure to high-strength electric fields can influence electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns, heart rates, and blood pressures in various species of animals. Our studies were designed to evaluate these reported effects and to help clarify some of the disagreement present in the literature. Various cardiovascular variables were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields at 80 to 100 kV/m for periods up to four months. No significant differences in heart rates, ECG patterns, blood pressures, or vascular reactivity were observed between exposed and sham-exposed rats after 8 hours, 40 hours, 1 month, or 4 months of exposure. Our studies cannot be directly compared to the work of other investigators because of differences in animal species and electric-field characteristics. However, our failure to detect any cardiovascular changes may have been the result of (1) eliminating secondary field effects such as shocks, audible noise, corona, and ozone; (2) minimizing steady-state microcurrents between the mouth of the animal and watering devices; and (3) minimizing electric-field-induced vibration of the electrodes and animal cages.

  3. Urologic cancer risks for veterans exposed to Agent Orange.

    PubMed

    Hoenemeyer, Lori A

    2013-01-01

    Agent Orange, an herbicide widely used during the Vietnam War, has been linked to various health risks, including urologic malignancy. Exposed veterans are at risk for prostate cancer and may be entitled to compensation if diagnosed with prostate cancer. Current research studies are aimed at mitigating prostate dysplasia and prostate cancer PMID:23734554

  4. How Permanent Is Permanent Placement for Substance-Exposed Infants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Jean E.; Lester, Barry M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe a study of families in the Family Drug Treatment Court (FTDC), an effort to promote permanent placement for substance-exposed infants within time requirements mandated by the 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA). The purpose of the study was to evaluate parent functioning after FTDC involvement, infant developmental…

  5. A Care Coordination Program for Substance-Exposed Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Jean E.; Caldwell, Donna; Soave, Rosemary; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) was established as a care coordination program to promote permanency for substance-exposed newborns in the child welfare system. Goals of VIP-RI were to optimize parents' opportunities for reunification and increase the efficacy of social service systems involved with families affected by…

  6. EXPOSED BEAM AND VINYL VENTED SOFFIT MATERIAL IN THE CARPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXPOSED BEAM AND VINYL VENTED SOFFIT MATERIAL IN THE CARPORT ON THE SOUTHEAST SIDE OF THE UNIT - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Single-Family Type 6, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Bladders from Mice Exposed with Sodium Arsenite

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic, an environmental contaminant, has been linked with cancer of the bladder in humans. To study the mode of action of arsenic, female CH3 mice were exposed to 85 ppm sodium arsenite in their drinking water for 30 days. Following the exposure a comparative proteomic analysis...

  8. 18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT CEILING IS PAINTED. FLOOR IS VINYL COMPOSITION TILE. WALLS AND CEILING ARE PAINTED GYPSUM BOARD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. Detail, oblique view to northeast atop building 935 showing exposed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, oblique view to northeast atop building 935 showing exposed roof sections of buildings 934 (center) and 933 (left), 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 3, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  10. Out-of-Home Placement of Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Berkowitz, Steven; Marans, Steven; Murphy, Robert A.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing concern about the increasing number of children in the USA who are exposed to community violence and the need to remove some of them from their families. This study examines risk factors for out-of-home placement among a large pool of children and adolescents who were referred for general clinical assessment following exposure to…

  11. [Lichen ruber only in skin areas exposed to light].

    PubMed

    Lamminger, C; Pagenstecher, A; Schröter, R

    1991-01-01

    In a patient with lichen ruber, skin lesions appeared exclusively on sun-exposed sections of the body. This localization is atypical in Europe. In tropical and subtropical countries lichen ruber actinicus can be observed in up to 30% of the population.

  12. 43. Interior view, east study window from the parlor. Exposed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Interior view, east study window from the parlor. Exposed areas above and to the left of the window show remnants of decorative painting believed to date from early in the nineteenth century. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. The ROSE experiments on the EXPOSE facility of the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, C.; Rettberg, P.; Rabbow, E.; Horneck, G.

    2001-08-01

    EXPOSE is a multi-user facility to be mounted outside of the International Space Station (ISS). The tray-like structure will accomodate among others 6 biological PI-experiments or experiment systems of the ROSE (Responses of Organisms to the Space Environment) consortium. EXPOSE will support long-term in situ studies of microbes in artificial meteorites, as well as of microbial communities from special ecological niches, such as endolithic and evaporitic ecosystems. Each compartment is either vented, i.e. open to space vacuum, or sealed and then provided with a defined gas environment. The experiment pockets will be covered by an optical filter system to control intensity and spectral range of solar UV irradiation. To achieve maximum insolation, EXPOSE is mounted on a coarse pointing device. Control of sun exposure will be achieved by use of shutters. EXPOSE has been selected for the Early Utilisation Period of the ISS and will stay in space for 1.5 years. The results will contribute to our understanding of photobiological processes in simulated radiation climates of planets (e.g. early Earth, early and present Mars, and the role of the ozone layer in protecting the biosphere from harmful UV-B radiation), as well as studies of the probabilities and limitations for life to be distributed beyond its planet of origin.

  14. Obstetric Outcomes of Mothers Previously Exposed to Sexual Violence

    PubMed Central

    Gisladottir, Agnes; Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Harlow, Bernard L.; Gudmundsdottir, Berglind; Jonsdottir, Eyrun; Bjarnadottir, Ragnheidur I.; Hauksdottir, Arna; Aspelund, Thor; Cnattingius, Sven; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data on the association of sexual violence and women's subsequent obstetric outcomes. Our aim was to investigate whether women exposed to sexual violence as teenagers (12–19 years of age) or adults present with different obstetric outcomes than women with no record of such violence. Methods We linked detailed prospectively collected information on women attending a Rape Trauma Service (RTS) to the Icelandic Medical Birth Registry (IBR). Women who attended the RTS in 1993–2010 and delivered (on average 5.8 years later) at least one singleton infant in Iceland through 2012 formed our exposed cohort (n = 1068). For each exposed woman's delivery, nine deliveries by women with no RTS attendance were randomly selected from the IBR (n = 9126) matched on age, parity, and year and season of delivery. Information on smoking and Body mass index (BMI) was available for a sub-sample (n = 792 exposed and n = 1416 non-exposed women). Poisson regression models were used to estimate Relative Risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Compared with non-exposed women, exposed women presented with increased risks of maternal distress during labor and delivery (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.01–2.79), prolonged first stage of labor (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03–1.88), antepartum bleeding (RR 1.95, 95% CI 1.22–3.07) and emergency instrumental delivery (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00–1.34). Slightly higher risks were seen for women assaulted as teenagers. Overall, we did not observe differences between the groups regarding the risk of elective cesarean section (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.61–1.21), except for a reduced risk among those assaulted as teenagers (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.93). Adjusting for maternal smoking and BMI in a sub-sample did not substantially affect point estimates. Conclusion Our prospective data suggest that women with a history of sexual assault, particularly as teenagers, are at increased risks of some adverse obstetric outcomes. PMID:27007230

  15. Exposed Ice in the Northern Mid-Latitudes of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    Ice-Rich Layer: Polygonal features with dimensions of approximately 100 meters, bounded by cracks, are commonly observed on the martian northern plains. These features are generally attributed to thermal cracking of ice-rich sediments, in direct analogy to polygons in terrestrial polar regions. We mapped polygons in the northern mid-latitudes (30 to 65 N) using MOC and HiRISE images. Polygons are scattered across the northern plains, with a particular concentration in western Utopia Planitia. This region largely overlaps the Late Amazonian Astapus Colles unit, characterized by polygonal terrain and nested pits consistent with periglacial and thermokarst origins. Bright and Dark Polygonal Cracks: An examination of all MOC images (1997 through 2003) covering the study area demonstrated that, at latitudes of 55 to 65 N, most of the imaged polygons show bright bounding cracks. We interpret these bright cracks as exposed ice. Between 40 and 55 N, most of the imaged polygons show dark bounding cracks. These are interpreted as polygons from which the exposed ice has been removed by sublimation. The long-term stability limit for exposed ice, even in deep cracks, apparently lies near 55 N. Bright and Dark Spots: Many HiRISE and MOC frames showing polygons in the northern plains also show small numbers of bright and dark spots, particularly in western Utopia Planitia. Many of the spots are closely associated with collapse features suggestive of thermokarst. The spots range from tens to approximately 100 meters in diameter. The bright spots are interpreted as exposed ice, due to their prevalence on terrain mapped as ice rich. The dark spots are interpreted as former bright spots, which have darkened as the exposed ice is lost by sublimation. The bright spots may be the martian equivalents of pingos, ice-cored mounds found in periglacial regions on Earth. Terrestrial pingos from which the ice core has melted often collapse to form depressions similar to the martian dark spots

  16. Immunological studies in cattle exposed to polybrominated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Kateley, John R.; Bazzell, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The intactness of the immune system in cattle exposed to polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) has been investigated by using several immunoassays. Eighty-seven animals have been studied, 35 control animals (not exposed to PBBs) and 52 animals exposed to PBBs (0.02–30 ppm/g fat equivalent). The immunoassays included a complete blood count, identification of peripheral blood T and B