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Sample records for ongoing brain damage

  1. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  2. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  3. Neuronal damage in brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Orhan; Ullrich, Oliver; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to traditional textbook paradigms, recent studies indicate neuronal damage in classic neuroinflammatory diseases of the brain, such as multiple sclerosis or meningitis. In these cases, immune cells invade the central nervous system compartments, accompanied by a massive breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and typical changes of the cerebrospinal fluid. On the other hand, inflammation within the central nervous system is a common phenomenon even in classic noninflammatory brain diseases that are characterized by degeneration or trauma of neuronal structures, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, or stroke. In these cases, inflammation is a frequent occurrence but displays different, more subtle, patterns compared with, for example, multiple sclerosis. Concepts for directly protecting neurons and axons in neuroinflammatory diseases may improve the outcome of the patients. In parallel, epidemiological and animal experimental evidences, as well as first clinical trials indicate the benefit of immunomodulatory therapies for classic noninflammatory brain diseases. We review the evidence for inflammatory neuronal damage and its clinical impact in the context of these diseases. PMID:17296833

  4. A Brain-Damage Advantage for Lefties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, B.

    1985-01-01

    Reports that people who are predominantly left-handed apparently are able to withstand moderate brain damage with relatively few of the motor problems observed in right-handed victims of brain damage. Other brain-related differences between left- and right-handed individuals are also noted. (JN)

  5. Air pollution and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Azzarelli, Biagio; Acuna, Hilda; Garcia, Raquel; Gambling, Todd M; Osnaya, Norma; Monroy, Sylvia; DEL Tizapantzi, Maria Rosario; Carson, Johnny L; Villarreal-Calderon, Anna; Rewcastle, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of air pollutants produces inflammation in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Because the nasal cavity is a common portal of entry, respiratory and olfactory epithelia are vulnerable targets for toxicological damage. This study has evaluated, by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosae, olfactory bulb, and cortical and subcortical structures from 32 healthy mongrel canine residents in Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), a highly polluted urban region. Findings were compared to those in 8 dogs from Tlaxcala, a less polluted, control city. In SWMMC dogs, expression of nuclear neuronal NF-kappaB and iNOS in cortical endothelial cells occurred at ages 2 and 4 weeks; subsequent damage included alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), degenerating cortical neurons, apoptotic glial white matter cells, deposition of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-positive lipid droplets in smooth muscle cells and pericytes, nonneuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Persistent pulmonary inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the neuropathology observed in the brains of these highly exposed canines. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's may begin early in life with air pollutants playing a crucial role.

  6. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  7. Brain Damage in Deaf Vocational Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Marc; Vernon, McCay

    1986-01-01

    Screening of 54 deaf vocational clients by the Bender-Gestalt and other tests indicated the likely presence of significantly more brain damage than among the hearing population with a particularly high correlation between low IQ and brain damage in the deaf population. (DB)

  8. Biochemical markers of ongoing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis - current and future applications, limitations and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease associated with potentially debilitating joint inflammation, as well as altered skeletal bone metabolism and co-morbid conditions. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to control disease activity offers the highest likelihood of preserving function and preventing disability. Joint inflammation is characterized by synovitis, osteitis, and/or peri-articular osteopenia, often accompanied by development of subchondral bone erosions, as well as progressive joint space narrowing. Biochemical markers of joint cartilage and bone degradation may enable timely detection and assessment of ongoing joint damage, and their use in facilitating treatment strategies is under investigation. Early detection of joint damage may be assisted by the characterization of biochemical markers that identify patients whose joint damage is progressing rapidly and who are thus most in need of aggressive treatment, and that, alone or in combination, identify those individuals who are likely to respond best to a potential treatment, both in terms of limiting joint damage and relieving symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe currently available biochemical markers of joint metabolism in relation to the pathobiology of joint damage and systemic bone loss in RA; to assess the limitations of, and need for additional, novel biochemical markers in RA and other rheumatic diseases, and the strategies used for assay development; and to examine the feasibility of advancement of personalized health care using biochemical markers to select therapeutic agents to which a patient is most likely to respond. PMID:21539724

  9. Mechanisms and prevention of secondary brain damage during intensive care.

    PubMed

    Dearden, N M

    1998-01-01

    know that secondary insults promote excitotoxic secondary brain damage there is currently no pharmacological intervention with proven efficacy and, therefore, detection and correction of secondary insults appear to offer the best therapeutic strategy. After brain trauma, systemic hypotension, compromised CPP, raised ICP, elevated temperature, hypoxemia, and jugular bulb venous desaturation are associated with poor prognosis. Clinical trials of moderate hypothermia following brain trauma are ongoing. Following adult brain trauma maintenance of CPP above at least 65 mmHg (probably > 40 mmHg in children below 8 years) seems important to improve outcome indicating the need for continuous ICP monitoring during intensive care of brain-injured patients. PMID:9707338

  10. [Work after brain damage: unpredictability of outcomes].

    PubMed

    Bouchet-Nokri, Hélène; Afaska, Isabelle; Onnaïnty, Isabelle; Soriano, Véronique; Coste, Emmanuelle

    2013-09-01

    The Unit for Evaluation, Re-Education and Socio-Professional Orientation (UEROS) is a bridge between the hospital environment and professional life. It assists brain-damaged patients with their social and professional reintegration while taking into account their specific needs. PMID:24218924

  11. Neuroimaging in alcoholism: ethanol and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Mann, K; Agartz, I; Harper, C; Shoaf, S; Rawlings, R R; Momenan, R; Hommer, D W; Pfefferbaum, A; Sullivan, E V; Anton, R F; Drobes, D J; George, M S; Bares, R; Machulla, H J; Mundle, G; Reimold, M; Heinz, A

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The co-chairs were Karl Mann and Ingrid Agartz. The presentations were (1) Neuropathological changes in alcohol-related brain damage, by Clive Harper; (2) Regional brain volumes including the hippocampus and monoamine metabolites in alcohol dependence, by Ingrid Agartz, Susan Shoaf, Robert R, Rawlings, Reza Momenan, and Daniel W Hommer; (3) Diffusion tensor abnormalities in imaging of white matter alcoholism, by Adolf Pfefferbaum and Edith V. Sullivan; (4) Use of functional MRI to evaluate brain activity during alcohol cue exposure in alcoholics: Relationship to craving, by Raymond F. Anton, David J. Drobes, and Mark S. George; and (5) mu-Opiate receptor availability in alcoholism: First results from a positron emission tomography study, by Karl Mann, Roland Bares, Hans-Juergen Machulla, Goetz Mundle, Matthias Reimold, and Andreas Heinz.

  12. Medical Perspectives on Brain Damage and Development. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Marcia Q.

    The author describes damage and normal development of the brain, as well as assessment and intervention with brain-damaged children. After a brief introduction on the complex and delicate process of brain development and a review of incidence, aspects of etiology such as genetic and postnatal causes are discussed. Brain development is examined…

  13. Zika Virus Can Damage Fetal Brain Late in Pregnancy: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161451.html Zika Virus Can Damage Fetal Brain Late in Pregnancy: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may harm a baby's brain even if ...

  14. BRAIN DAMAGE AND BEHAVIOR, A CLINICAL-EXPERIMENTAL STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHULMAN, JEROME L.; AND OTHERS

    THIS MONOGRAPH RELATES RESULTS OF A STUDY WHICH WAS UNDERTAKEN TO ATTEMPT TO ANSWER THREE QUESTIONS--TO WHAT EXTENT DO EIGHT TECHNIQUES COMMONLY USED TO DIAGNOSE BRAIN DAMAGE CO-VARY, TO WHAT EXTENT DO THE VARIOUS BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMS THAT OCCUR WITH BRAIN DAMAGE CO-VARY, AND TO WHAT EXTENT DO THE DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES, SINGLY OR IN GROUPS, PREDICT…

  15. BRAIN DAMAGE IN CHILDREN, THE BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BIRCH, HERBERT G., ED.

    PAPERS AND DISCUSSION SUMMARIES ARE PRESENTED FROM A CONFERENCE ON THE BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF CHILDHOOD BRAIN DAMAGE, HELD AT THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER 1962. A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES IS REPRESENTED, AND THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE CONSIDERED--(1) "THE PROBLEM OF 'BRAIN DAMAGE' IN CHILDREN" BY HERBERT G. BIRCH, (2)…

  16. Glibenclamide reduces secondary brain damage after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zweckberger, K; Hackenberg, K; Jung, C S; Hertle, D N; Kiening, K L; Unterberg, A W; Sakowitz, O W

    2014-07-11

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI) SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP (SUR1/TRPM4) channels are transcriptionally up-regulated in ischemic astrocytes, neurons, and capillaries. ATP depletion results in depolarization and opening of the channel leading to cytotoxic edema. Glibenclamide is an inhibitor of SUR-1 and, thus, might prevent cytotoxic edema and secondary brain damage following TBI. Anesthetized adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent parietal craniotomy and were subjected to controlled cortical impact injury (CCI). Glibenclamide was administered as a bolus injection 15min after CCI injury and continuously via osmotic pumps throughout 7days. In an acute trial (180min) mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, intracranial pressure, encephalographic activity, and cerebral metabolism were monitored. Brain water content was assessed gravimetrically 24h after CCI injury and contusion volumes were measured by MRI scanning technique at 8h, 24h, 72h, and 7d post injury. Throughout the entire time of observation neurological function was quantified using the "beam-walking" test. Glibenclamide-treated animals showed a significant reduction in the development of brain tissue water content(80.47%±0.37% (glibenclamide) vs. 80.83%±0.44% (control); p<0.05; n=14). Contusion sizes increased continuously within 72h following CCI injury, but glibenclamide-treated animals had significantly smaller volumes at any time-points, like 172.53±38.74mm(3) (glibenclamide) vs. 299.20±64.02mm(3) (control) (p<0.01; n=10; 24h) or 211.10±41.03mm(3) (glibenclamide) vs. 309.76±19.45mm(3) (control) (p<0.05; n=10; 72h), respectively. An effect on acute parameters, however, could not be detected, most likely because of the up-regulation of the channel within 3-6h after injury. Furthermore, there was no significant effect on motor function assessed by the beam-walking test throughout 7days. In accordance to these results and the available literature, glibenclamide seems to have promising potency in

  17. Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity in the Adult Damaged Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Abigail L.; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Jones, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral experience is at work modifying the structure and function of the brain throughout the lifespan, but it has a particularly dramatic influence after brain injury. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of experience in reorganizing the adult damaged brain, with a focus on findings from rodent stroke models of chronic upper…

  18. Tool use disorders after left brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Baumard, Josselin; Osiurak, François; Lesourd, Mathieu; Le Gall, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review studies that investigated tool use disorders in left-brain damaged (LBD) patients over the last 30 years. Four tasks are classically used in the field of apraxia: Pantomime of tool use, single tool use, real tool use and mechanical problem solving. Our aim was to address two issues, namely, (1) the role of mechanical knowledge in real tool use and (2) the cognitive mechanisms underlying pantomime of tool use, a task widely employed by clinicians and researchers. To do so, we extracted data from 36 papers and computed the difference between healthy subjects and LBD patients. On the whole, pantomime of tool use is the most difficult task and real tool use is the easiest one. Moreover, associations seem to appear between pantomime of tool use, real tool use and mechanical problem solving. These results suggest that the loss of mechanical knowledge is critical in LBD patients, even if all of those tasks (and particularly pantomime of tool use) might put differential demands on semantic memory and working memory. PMID:24904487

  19. Rehabilitation of damage to the visual brain.

    PubMed

    Ajina, S; Kennard, C

    2012-10-01

    Homonymous visual field loss is a common consequence of stroke and traumatic brain injury. It is associated with an adverse functional prognosis and has implications on day-to-day activities such as driving, reading, and safe navigation. Early recovery is expected in around half of cases, and may be associated with a return in V1 activity. In stable disease, recovery is unlikely beyond 3 and certainly 6 months. Rehabilitative approaches generally target three main areas, encompassing a range of techniques with variable success: visual aids aim to expand or relocate the affected visual field; eye movement training builds upon compensatory strategies to improve explorative saccades; visual field restitution aims to improve visual processing within the damaged field itself. All these approaches seem to offer modest improvements with repeated practice, with none clearly superior to the rest. However, a number of areas are demonstrating particular promise currently, including simple web-based training initiatives, and work on neuroimaging and learning. The research interest in this area is encouraging, and it is to be hoped that future trials can better untangle and control for the number of complicated confounds, so that we will be in a much better position to evaluate and select the most appropriate therapy for patients. PMID:22981268

  20. Ongoing brain activity fluctuations directly account for intertrial and indirectly for intersubject variability in Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Coste, Clio P; Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Friston, Karl J; Kleinschmidt, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have established a relation between ongoing brain activity fluctuations and intertrial variability in evoked neural responses, perception, and motor performance. Here, we extended these investigations into the domain of cognitive control. Using functional neuroimaging and a sparse event-related design (with long and unpredictable intervals), we measured ongoing activity fluctuations and evoked responses in volunteers performing a Stroop task with color-word interference. Across trials, prestimulus activity of several regions predicted subsequent response speed and across subjects this effect scaled with the Stroop effect size, being significant only in subjects manifesting behavioral interference. These effects occurred only in task relevant as the dorsal anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex as well as ventral visual areas sensitive to color and visual words. Crucially, in subjects showing a Stroop effect, reaction times were faster when prestimulus activity was higher in task-relevant (color) regions and slower when activity was higher in irrelevant (word form) regions. These findings suggest that intrinsic brain activity fluctuations modulate neural mechanisms underpinning selective voluntary attention and cognitive control. Rephrased in terms of predictive coding models, ongoing activity can hence be considered a proxy of the precision (gain) with which prediction error signals are transmitted upon sensory stimulation.

  1. Neural Stability, Sparing, and Behavioral Recovery Following Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeVere, T. E.

    1975-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that behavioral recovery following brain damage is not dependent on the functional reorganization of neural tissue but is rather the result of the continued normal operation of spared neural mechanisms. (Editor)

  2. Childhood Aphasia and Brain Damage: Volume II, Differential Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Sheldon R., Ed.

    Addressing itself to factors leading to the misdiagnosis of the brain damaged child and the aphasic child, the Pathway School's Second Annual Institute considered the differences between the following: the aphasic and the aphasoid child; the sensory aphasic and the deaf child; the psychotic and the psychotic aphasic child; childhood brain damage…

  3. Tracking ongoing cognition in individuals using brief, whole-brain functional connectivity patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Hoy, Colin W.; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Robinson, Meghan E.; Buchanan, Laura C.; Saad, Ziad S.; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) patterns in functional MRI exhibit dynamic behavior on the scale of seconds, with rich spatiotemporal structure and limited sets of whole-brain, quasi-stable FC configurations (FC states) recurring across time and subjects. Based on previous evidence linking various aspects of cognition to group-level, minute-to-minute FC changes in localized connections, we hypothesized that whole-brain FC states may reflect the global, orchestrated dynamics of cognitive processing on the scale of seconds. To test this hypothesis, subjects were continuously scanned as they engaged in and transitioned between mental states dictated by tasks. FC states computed within windows as short as 22.5 s permitted robust tracking of cognition in single subjects with near perfect accuracy. Accuracy dropped markedly for subjects with the lowest task performance. Spatially restricting FC information decreased accuracy at short time scales, emphasizing the distributed nature of whole-brain FC dynamics, beyond univariate magnitude changes, as valuable markers of cognition. PMID:26124112

  4. Ongoing transitions: the impact of a malignant brain tumour on patient and family.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Yasmin

    2007-01-01

    Although primary malignant brain tumours represent only 1.4% of all cancers, it is considered one of the most devastating types of cancers in adults. From the time of diagnosis, the patient and family embark on a "roller coaster" ride of uncertainty, fear and hope. Despite improved medical outcomes, patients often experience severe functional impairment, as well as behavioural and cognitive dysfunction. Subsequently, they suffer from greater dependency and hopelessness than other cancer patients. The family caregivers are faced with multiple demands such as taking on new roles within the family and caring for their loved one while grieving the loss of the person they knew. The role of the nurse is to support the patient and the family throughout the illness trajectory, identify and promote their strengths and mobilize the necessary resources to facilitate patient and family coping. The purpose of this paper is to present, via a detailed case study, the impact of a malignant brain tumour on the patient and the family. The nursing strategies used to help them make the necessary transitions throughout the illness trajectory are discussed. PMID:17682686

  5. Investigating ongoing brain oscillations and their influence on conscious perception – network states and the window to consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Hauswald, Anne; Weisz, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    In cognitive neuroscience, prerequisites of consciousness are of high interest. Within recent years it has become more commonly understood that ongoing brain activity, mainly measured with electrophysiology, can predict whether an upcoming stimulus is consciously perceived. One approach to investigate the relationship between ongoing brain activity and conscious perception is to conduct near-threshold (NT) experiments and focus on the pre-stimulus period. The current review will, in the first part, summarize main findings of pre-stimulus research from NT experiments, mainly focusing on the alpha band (8–14 Hz). It is probable that the most prominent finding is that local (mostly sensory) areas show enhanced excitatory states prior to detection of upcoming NT stimuli, as putatively reflected by decreased alpha band power. However, the view of a solely local excitability change seems to be too narrow. In a recent paper, using a somatosensory NT task, Weisz et al. (2014) replicated the common alpha finding and, furthermore, conceptually embedded this finding into a more global framework called “Windows to Consciousness” (Win2Con). In this review, we want to further elaborate on the crucial assumption of “open windows” to conscious perception, determined by pre-established pathways connecting sensory and higher order areas. Methodologically, connectivity and graph theoretical analyses are applied to source-imaging magnetoencephalographic data to uncover brain regions with strong network integration as well as their connection patterns. Sensory regions with stronger network integration will more likely distribute information when confronted with weak NT stimuli, favoring its subsequent conscious perception. First experimental evidence confirms our aforementioned “open window” hypothesis. We therefore emphasize that future research on prerequisites of consciousness needs to move on from investigating solely local excitability to a more global view of

  6. Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K.; Stanford Univ., CA . Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA )

    1989-07-01

    We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Measuring consciousness in severely damaged brains.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, Olivia; Di, Haibo; Laureys, Steven; Boly, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the behavioral assessment and clinical management of disorders of consciousness (DOC). In addition, functional neuroimaging paradigms are now available to help assess consciousness levels in this challenging patient population. The success of these neuroimaging approaches as diagnostic markers is, however, intrinsically linked to understanding the relationships between consciousness and the brain. In this context, a combined theoretical approach to neuroimaging studies is needed. The promise of such theoretically based markers is illustrated by recent findings that used a perturbational approach to assess the levels of consciousness. Further research on the contents of consciousness in DOC is also needed.

  8. Reduplicative paramnesia in patients with focal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Murai, T; Toichi, M; Sengoku, A; Miyoshi, K; Morimune, S

    1997-07-01

    Reduplicative paramnesia (RP) has drawn attention as a distinct behavioral syndrome caused by focal brain damage. To elucidate the pathogenesis of RP, we assessed its prevalence among patients with focal brain damage and followed those patients with typical RP. Seventy-seven patients with focal brain damage (47 with left hemispheric, 21 with right hemispheric, and 9 with bilateral damage) were assessed for the presence of RP using a questionnaire intended to elucidate this condition. Two patients showed typical RP for place, and four patients showed atypical RP (three for place and one for person); altogether, these six patients constituted 7.8% of the sample. In three patients, the lesions were situated in the right hemisphere; in two, the lesions were bilateral (right dominant); and in one, the lesions were in the left hemisphere, indicating the relative importance of right hemispheric damage and a possible contributory role of additional left hemispheric damage in RP. The case studies of patients with typical RP suggest the heterogeneity of the underlying cognitive factors in RP.

  9. Acquired agraphia caused by focal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S W; Saver, J; Tranel, D; Damasio, H

    1993-03-01

    Motor and linguistic aspects of writing were evaluated in 31 subjects with focal damage in 1 of 3 regions of the left hemisphere: (1) dorsolateral frontal lobe sparing primary motor cortex (group FL), (2) parietal lobe (group PL), or (3) temporal lobe (group TL). A standard procedure was used to evaluate writing for grapheme formation, spatial arrangement, spelling, word selection, grammar, and perseveration. It was predicted that agraphia would be observed in all 3 groups, and that the most severe impairments would be associated with frontal lobe damage, particularly in aspects of writing dependent on sequencing (grapheme formation, spelling, and grammar). It was found that agraphia was common in all groups, particularly in the acute epoch, and that all groups showed considerable recovery of writing by the chronic epoch. Few differences were found between groups. However, the FL group was impaired on spelling and grammar relative to the PL group in the acute epoch and impaired on grammar relative to the TL group in the chronic epoch. The findings are consistent with the notion that writing relies on a distributed neuroanatomical network, which acts in concert to link fragments of visuomotor activity with component linguistic elements.

  10. Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca's, Wernicke's, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients' aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine - SVM) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. PMID:26465238

  11. [Neuroendocrine dysfunction and brain damage. A consensus statement].

    PubMed

    Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Rincón, María Dolores; Domingo, Manel Puig

    2009-01-01

    This consensus statement aims to enhance awareness of the incidence and risks of hypopituitarism in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or brain hemorrhages among physicians treating patients with brain damage. The importance of this problem is related not only to the frequency of TBI but also to its prevalence in younger populations. The consequences of TBI are characterized by a series of symptoms that depend on the type of sequels related to neuroendocrine dysfunction. The signs and symptoms of hypopituitarism are often confused with those of other sequels of TBI. Consequently, patients with posttraumatic hypopituitarism may receive suboptimal rehabilitation unless the underlying hormone deficiency is identified and treated. This consensus is based on the recommendation supported by expert opinion that patients with a TBI and/or brain hemorrhage should undergo endocrine evaluation in order to assess pituitary function and, if deficiency is detected, should receive hormone replacement therapy.

  12. Hyperschematia after right brain damage: a meaningful entity?

    PubMed Central

    Rode, Gilles; Ronchi, Roberta; Revol, Patrice; Rossetti, Yves; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Rossi, Irene; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In recent years we reported three right-brain-damaged patients, who exhibited a left-sided disprortionate expansion of drawings, both by copying and from memory, contralateral to the side of the hemispheric lesion (Neurology, 67: 1801, 2006, Neurocase 14: 369, 2008). We proposed the term “hyperschematia” for such an expansion, with reference to an interpretation in terms of a lateral leftward distortion of the representation of extra-personal space, with a leftward anisometric expansion (relaxation) of the spatial medium. The symptom-complex shown by right-brain-damaged patients with “hyperschematia” includes: (1) a disproportionate leftward expansion of drawings (with possible addition of details), by copy and from memory (also in clay modeling, in one patient); (2) an overestimation of left lateral extent, when a leftward movement is required, associated in some patients with a perceptual underestimation; (3) unawareness of the disorder; (4) no unilateral spatial neglect. In most right-brain-damaged patients, left “hyperschematia” involves extra-personal space. In one patient the deficit was confined to a body part (left half-face: personal “hyperschematia”). The neural underpinnings of the disorder include damage to the fronto-temporo-parietal cortices, and subcortical structures in the right cerebral hemisphere, in the vascular territory of the middle cerebral artery. Here, four novel additional patients are reported. Finally, “hypeschematia” is reconsidered, in its clinical components, the underlying pathological mechanisms, as well as its neural underpinnings. PMID:24478674

  13. Hyperschematia after right brain damage: a meaningful entity?

    PubMed

    Rode, Gilles; Ronchi, Roberta; Revol, Patrice; Rossetti, Yves; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Rossi, Irene; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In recent years we reported three right-brain-damaged patients, who exhibited a left-sided disprortionate expansion of drawings, both by copying and from memory, contralateral to the side of the hemispheric lesion (Neurology, 67: 1801, 2006, Neurocase 14: 369, 2008). We proposed the term "hyperschematia" for such an expansion, with reference to an interpretation in terms of a lateral leftward distortion of the representation of extra-personal space, with a leftward anisometric expansion (relaxation) of the spatial medium. The symptom-complex shown by right-brain-damaged patients with "hyperschematia" includes: (1) a disproportionate leftward expansion of drawings (with possible addition of details), by copy and from memory (also in clay modeling, in one patient); (2) an overestimation of left lateral extent, when a leftward movement is required, associated in some patients with a perceptual underestimation; (3) unawareness of the disorder; (4) no unilateral spatial neglect. In most right-brain-damaged patients, left "hyperschematia" involves extra-personal space. In one patient the deficit was confined to a body part (left half-face: personal "hyperschematia"). The neural underpinnings of the disorder include damage to the fronto-temporo-parietal cortices, and subcortical structures in the right cerebral hemisphere, in the vascular territory of the middle cerebral artery. Here, four novel additional patients are reported. Finally, "hypeschematia" is reconsidered, in its clinical components, the underlying pathological mechanisms, as well as its neural underpinnings. PMID:24478674

  14. Avermectin induced inflammation damage in king pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Qu, Jian Ping; Xu, Shiwen; Li, Shu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effect of Avermectin (AVM) on inflammation damage in king pigeon brain, eighty two-month-old American king pigeons were randomly divided into four groups, and were fed with either commercial diet or AVM-supplemented diet containing 20 mg kg(-1)diet, 40 mg kg(-1)diet, and 60 mg kg(-1)diet AVM for 30, 60 and 90 d, respectively. Then, the expression level of inflammatory factors (iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB), histological damage, and ultra-structural damage were examined. It showed that AVM caused higher expressions (P<0.05) of iNOS, PTGEs, NF-κB with disorganized histological and ultra-structural structures in cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. Meanwhile, inflammatory and histopathological damage were induced by AVM in king pigeon brains. In addition, the main targeted organelle in nervous system was mitochondria, which indicated that mitochondria may be relevant to the process of inflammation induced by AVM. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to study the toxic effect of AVM on inflammatory damage in king pigeon. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study.

  15. Brain Damage and the Moral Significance of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    kahane, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged patients diagnosed as in the vegetative state suggest that the patients might be conscious. This might seem to raise no new ethical questions given that in related disputes both sides agree that evidence for consciousness gives strong reason to preserve life. We question this assumption. We clarify the widely held but obscure principle that consciousness is morally significant. It is hard to apply this principle to difficult cases given that philosophers of mind distinguish between a range of notions of consciousness and that is unclear which of these is assumed by the principle. We suggest that the morally relevant notion is that of phenomenal consciousness and then use our analysis to interpret cases of brain damage. We argue that enjoyment of consciousness might actually give stronger moral reasons not to preserve a patient's life and, indeed, that these might be stronger when patients retain significant cognitive function. PMID:19193694

  16. Epileptic Encephalopathy in Children with Risk Factors for Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; Harmony, Thalía; Porras-Kattz, Eneida; Colmenero-Batallán, Miguel J.; Barrera-Reséndiz, Jesús E.; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Cruz-Rivero, Erika

    2012-01-01

    In the study of 887 new born infants with prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage, 11 children with West syndrome that progressed into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and another 4 children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome that had not been preceded by West syndrome were found. In this study we present the main findings of these 15 subjects. In all infants multifactor antecedents were detected. The most frequent risk factors were prematurity and severe asphyxia; however placenta disorders, sepsis, and hyperbilirubinemia were also frequent. In all infants MRI direct or secondary features of periventricular leukomalacia were observed. Followup of all infants showed moderate to severe neurodevelopmental delay as well as cerebral palsy. It is concluded that prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage are very important antecedents that should be taken into account to follow up those infants from an early age in order to detect and treat as early as possible an epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:22957240

  17. Gender differences in alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2013-09-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that women are more vulnerable than men to the toxic effects of alcohol, although the results as to whether gender differences exist in ethanol-induced brain damage are contradictory. We have reported that ethanol, by activating the neuroimmune system and Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4), can cause neuroinflammation and brain injury. However, whether there are gender differences in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain injury are currently controversial. Using the brains of TLR4(+/+) and TLR4(-/-) (TLR4-KO) mice, we report that chronic ethanol treatment induces inflammatory mediators (iNOS and COX-2), cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α), gliosis processes, caspase-3 activation and neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex of both female and male mice. Conversely, the levels of these parameters tend to be higher in female than in male mice. Using an in vivo imaging technique, our results further evidence that ethanol treatment triggers higher GFAP levels and lower MAP-2 levels in female than in male mice, suggesting a greater effect of ethanol-induced astrogliosis and less MAP-2(+) neurons in female than in male mice. Our results further confirm the pivotal role of TLR4 in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation and brain damage since the elimination of TLR4 protects the brain of males and females against the deleterious effects of ethanol. In short, the present findings demonstrate that, during the same period of ethanol treatment, females are more vulnerable than males to the neurotoxic/neuroinflammatory effects of ethanol, thus supporting the view that women are more susceptible than men to the medical consequences of alcohol abuse.

  18. Resveratrol Protects the Brain of Obese Mice from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Shraddha D.; Kumar, Sruthi; Wilson, David N.; Tamura, Leslie; Geetha, Thangiah; Mathews, Suresh T.; Huggins, Kevin W.; Broderick, Tom L.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a polyphenolic phytoalexin that exerts cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antioxidant effects. Recently it has been shown that obesity is associated with an increase in cerebral oxidative stress levels, which may enhance neurodegeneration. The present study evaluates the neuroprotective action of resveratrol in brain of obese (ob/ob) mice. Resveratrol was administered orally at the dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight daily for three weeks to lean and obese mice. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in obese mice. Lipid peroxides were significantly increased in brain of obese mice. The enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and nonenzymatic antioxidants tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and glutathione were decreased in obese mice brain. Administration of resveratrol decreased lipid peroxide levels and upregulated the antioxidant activities in obese mice brain. Our findings indicate a neuroprotective effect of resveratrol by preventing oxidative damage in brain tissue of obese mice. PMID:24163719

  19. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Runfa; Hou, Zonggang; Hao, Shuyu; Wu, Weichuan; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaogang; Lu, Te; Liu, Baiyun

    2016-04-15

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are the two major causes of apoptosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most previous studies of the neuroprotective effects of hydrogen-rich water on TBI primarily focused on antioxidant effects. The present study investigated whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) could attenuate brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats. A TBI model was induced using a controlled cortical impact injury. HRW or distilled water was injected intraperitoneally daily following surgery. We measured survival rate, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neurological dysfunction in all animals. Changes in inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells and Cho/Cr metabolites in brain tissues were also detected. Our results demonstrated that TBI-challenged rats exhibited significant brain injuries that were characterized by decreased survival rate and increased BBB permeability, brain edema, and neurological dysfunction, while HRW treatment ameliorated the consequences of TBI. HRW treatment also decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and HMGB1), inflammatory cell number (Iba1) and inflammatory metabolites (Cho) and increased the levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the brain tissues of TBI-challenged rats. In conclusion, HRW could exert a neuroprotective effect against TBI and attenuate inflammation, which suggests HRW as an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI patients. PMID:26826009

  20. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  1. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  2. Vasoparalysis associated with brain damage in asphyxiated term infants

    SciTech Connect

    Pryds, O.; Greisen, G.; Lou, H.; Friis-Hansen, B. )

    1990-07-01

    The relationship of cerebral blood flow to acute changes in arterial carbon dioxide and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was determined during the first day of life in 19 severely asphyxiated term infants supported by mechanical ventilation. For comparison, 12 infants without perinatal asphyxia were also investigated. Global cerebral blood flow (CBF infinity) was determined by xenon 133 clearance two or three times within approximately 2 hours. During the cerebral blood flow measurement, the amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram and visual-evoked potential were recorded. Changes in arterial carbon dioxide pressure followed adjustments of the ventilator settings, whereas MABP fluctuated spontaneously. Arterial oxygen pressure and blood glucose concentration were in the normal range. Five of the asphyxiated infants had isoelectric electroencephalograms and died subsequently with severe brain damage. They had a high CBF infinity (mean 30.6 ml/100 gm/min) and abolished carbon dioxide and MABP reactivity. Lower CBF infinity (mean 14.7 ml/100 gm/min) and abolished MABP reactivity were found in another five asphyxiated infants with burst-suppression electroencephalograms in whom computed tomographic or clinical signs of brain lesions developed. The carbon dioxide reactivity was preserved in these infants. In the remaining nine asphyxiated infants without signs of central nervous system abnormality, carbon dioxide and MABP reactivity were preserved, as was also the case in the control group. We conclude that abolished autoregulation is associated with cerebral damage in asphyxiated infants and that the combination of isoelectric electroencephalograms and cerebral hyperperfusion is an early indicator of very severe brain damage.

  3. Areas of Brain Damage Underlying Increased Reports of Behavioral Disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristine M; Dal Monte, Olga; Schintu, Selene; Wassermann, Eric M; Raymont, Vanessa; Grafman, Jordan; Krueger, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition, the inability to inhibit inappropriate behavior, is seen in frontal-temporal degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. Behavioral disinhibition leads to social and emotional impairments, including impulsive behavior and disregard for social conventions. The authors investigated the effects of lesions on behavioral disinhibition measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory in 177 veterans with traumatic brain injuries. The authors performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping using MEDx. Damage in the frontal and temporal lobes, gyrus rectus, and insula was associated with greater behavioral disinhibition, providing further evidence of the frontal lobe's involvement in behavioral inhibition and suggesting that these regions are necessary to inhibit improper behavior. PMID:25959040

  4. Areas of Brain Damage Underlying Increased Reports of Behavioral Disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristine M; Dal Monte, Olga; Schintu, Selene; Wassermann, Eric M; Raymont, Vanessa; Grafman, Jordan; Krueger, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition, the inability to inhibit inappropriate behavior, is seen in frontal-temporal degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. Behavioral disinhibition leads to social and emotional impairments, including impulsive behavior and disregard for social conventions. The authors investigated the effects of lesions on behavioral disinhibition measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory in 177 veterans with traumatic brain injuries. The authors performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping using MEDx. Damage in the frontal and temporal lobes, gyrus rectus, and insula was associated with greater behavioral disinhibition, providing further evidence of the frontal lobe's involvement in behavioral inhibition and suggesting that these regions are necessary to inhibit improper behavior.

  5. Interdependence of priming performance and brain-damage.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Härting, C

    1996-04-01

    Basically, two hospitalized patient groups were a variety of different learning situations which are subdividable into conventional and experimental tests and which covered so-called implicit and explicit memory tests. Furthermore, data from other cases were used for comparison and for support of the proposed hypotheses. The main sample consisted of 15 focal brain-damaged patients (group N) and 15 patients after surgical interventions outside the nervous system (group O). Aside from affective behavior and intelligence, memory tests were used. These included the WMS-r, picture and face recognition tests, the Tower of Hanoi, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), a Concept Comprehensive Test, and word and picture priming tests. A number of significant differences were obtained between the two age, sex, and education matched groups. Above all, intelligence and memory were reduced in parallel in the cortically damaged compared to the well-matched orthopedic group, while attention and concentration did not differ. Even performance in tests such as the Tower of Hanoi and the WCST differed, perhaps explainable by the proportion of frontal lobe damaged patients and the overall decrease in intelligence in group N. Verbal priming was found to a similar degree in both groups. On the other hand, priming of incomplete pictures was significantly poorer in group N than in group O; furthermore, results from MQ- and IQ-based group splitting (independent of their previous N or O affiliations) suggested a direct relation between mnemonic and other cognitive abilities and success in priming. As perceptual, but not verbal priming differed between groups, and explanation of group N results, based primarily on explicit memory processing, is unlikely. It is concluded that non-brain damaged patients in general are able to use a wider repertoire of information encoding strategies which at least in part is memory and intelligence correlated. PMID:8734566

  6. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  7. Reversing brain damage in former NFL players: implications for traumatic brain injury and substance abuse rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Amen, Daniel G; Wu, Joseph C; Taylor, Derek; Willeumier, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Brain injuries are common in professional American football players. Finding effective rehabilitation strategies can have widespread implications not only for retired players but also for patients with traumatic brain injury and substance abuse problems. An open label pragmatic clinical intervention was conducted in an outpatient neuropsychiatric clinic with 30 retired NFL players who demonstrated brain damage and cognitive impairment. The study included weight loss (if appropriate); fish oil (5.6 grams a day); a high-potency multiple vitamin; and a formulated brain enhancement supplement that included nutrients to enhance blood flow (ginkgo and vinpocetine), acetylcholine (acetyl-l-carnitine and huperzine A), and antioxidant activity (alpha-lipoic acid and n-acetyl-cysteine). The trial average was six months. Outcome measures were Microcog Assessment of Cognitive Functioning and brain SPECT imaging. In the retest situation, corrected for practice effect, there were statistically significant increases in scores of attention, memory, reasoning, information processing speed and accuracy on the Microcog. The brain SPECT scans, as a group, showed increased brain perfusion, especially in the prefrontal cortex, parietal lobes, occipital lobes, anterior cingulate gyrus and cerebellum. This study demonstrates that cognitive and cerebral blood flow improvements are possible in this group with multiple interventions.

  8. Stimulation of functional vision in children with perinatal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Alimović, Sonja; Mejaski-Bosnjak, Vlatka

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is one of the most common causes of bilateral visual loss, which frequently occurs due to perinatal brain injury. Vision in early life has great impact on acquisition of basic comprehensions which are fundamental for further development. Therefore, early detection of visual problems and early intervention is necessary. The aim of the present study is to determine specific visual functioning of children with perinatal brain damage and the influence of visual stimulation on development of functional vision at early age of life. We initially assessed 30 children with perinatal brain damage up to 3 years of age, who were reffered to our pediatric low vision cabinet in "Little house" from child neurologists, ophthalmologists Type and degree of visual impairment was determined according to functional vision assessment of each child. On the bases of those assessments different kind of visual stimulations were carried out with children who have been identified to have a certain visual impairment. Through visual stimulation program some of the children were stimulated with light stimulus, some with different materials under the ultraviolet (UV) light, and some with bright color and high contrast materials. Children were also involved in program of early stimulation of overall sensory motor development. Goals and methods of therapy were determined individually, based on observation of child's possibilities and need. After one year of program, reassessment was done. Results for visual functions and functional vision were compared to evaluate the improvement of the vision development. These results have shown that there was significant improvement in functional vision, especially in visual attention and visual communication.

  9. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN MICROGLIA AND DAMAGES NEURONS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) damages biological targets through oxidative stress (OS) pathways. Several reports indicate that the brain is one of those targets. Since microglia (brain macrophage) are critical to OS-mediated neurodegeneration, their response to concentrated amb...

  10. Point localisation in patients with unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, A; Benton, A L; Cocito, L; Bino, G; Favale, E

    1981-01-01

    The ability to reproduce the position of points in a plane was examined by a copying test in a control group and in unilaterally brain damaged patients. The procedure was designed to minimise the influence of visual field defects and of spatial hemi-inattention on performance. Accuracy of of localisation and direction of errors were studied in each half of the plane. Analysis showed a greater impairment of localisation ability in the patients with right hemisphere disease; however, the performance of both hemispheric groups was characterised by a reduction of accuracy in half of the plane contralateral to the side of the lesion. Both hemispheric groups showed an abnormal direction of errors in the left half of the plane, but the two groups presented a different pattern of errors. PMID:7310411

  11. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  12. Using autopsy brain tissue to study alcohol-related brain damage in the genomic age.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia, is one of the few human brain banks dedicated to the study of the effects of chronic alcoholism. The bank was affiliated in 1994 as a member of the National Network of Brain Banks and also focuses on schizophrenia and healthy control tissue. Alcohol abuse is a major problem worldwide, manifesting in such conditions as fetal alcohol syndrome, adolescent binge drinking, alcohol dependency, and alcoholic neurodegeneration. The latter is also referred to as alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD). The study of postmortem brain tissue is ideally suited to determining the effects of long-term alcohol abuse, but it also makes an important contribution to understanding pathogenesis across the spectrum of alcohol misuse disorders and potentially other neurodegenerative diseases. Tissue from the bank has contributed to 330 peer-reviewed journal articles including 120 related to alcohol research. Using the results of these articles, this review chronicles advances in alcohol-related brain research since 2003, the so-called genomic age. In particular, it concentrates on transcriptomic approaches to the pathogenesis of ARBD and builds on earlier reviews of structural changes (Harper et al. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2003;27:951) and proteomics (Matsumoto et al. Expert Rev Proteomics 2007;4:539).

  13. Interhemispheric and Intrahemispheric Control of Emotion: A Focus on Unilateral Brain Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borod, Joan C.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses neocortical contributions to emotional processing. Examines parameters critical to neuropsychological study of emotion: interhemispheric and intrahemispheric factors, processing mode, and communication channel. Describes neuropsychological theories of emotion. Reviews studies of right-brain-damaged, left-brain-damaged, and normal adults,…

  14. Changes in Connectivity after Visual Cortical Brain Damage Underlie Altered Visual Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Holly; Thomas, Owen; Jbabdi, Saad; Cowey, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The full extent of the brain's ability to compensate for damage or changed experience is yet to be established. One question particularly important for evaluating and understanding rehabilitation following brain damage is whether recovery involves new and aberrant neural connections or whether any change in function is due to the functional…

  15. Immediate, but Not Delayed, Microsurgical Skull Reconstruction Exacerbates Brain Damage in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tsz; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2012-01-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in malformations to the skull. Aesthetic surgical maneuvers may offer normalized skull structure, but inconsistent surgical closure of the skull area accompanies TBI. We examined whether wound closure by replacement of skull flap and bone wax would allow aesthetic reconstruction of the TBI-induced skull damage without causing any detrimental effects to the cortical tissue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to TBI using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model. Immediately after the TBI surgery, animals were randomly assigned to skull flap replacement with or without bone wax or no bone reconstruction, then were euthanized at five days post-TBI for pathological analyses. The skull reconstruction provided normalized gross bone architecture, but 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride and hematoxylin and eosin staining results revealed larger cortical damage in these animals compared to those that underwent no surgical maneuver at all. Brain swelling accompanied TBI, especially the severe model, that could have relieved the intracranial pressure in those animals with no skull reconstruction. In contrast, the immediate skull reconstruction produced an upregulation of the edema marker aquaporin-4 staining, which likely prevented the therapeutic benefits of brain swelling and resulted in larger cortical infarcts. Interestingly, TBI animals introduced to a delay in skull reconstruction (i.e., 2 days post-TBI) showed significantly reduced edema and infarcts compared to those exposed to immediate skull reconstruction. That immediate, but not delayed, skull reconstruction may exacerbate TBI-induced cortical tissue damage warrants a careful consideration of aesthetic repair of the skull in TBI. PMID:22438975

  16. DNA damage-processing in E. coli: on-going protein synthesis is required for fixation of UV-induced lethality and mutation.

    PubMed

    Burger, Amanda; Raymer, Jenny; Bockrath, R

    2002-10-01

    UV irradiation of E. coli produces photoproducts in the DNA genome. In consequence, some bacteria lose viability (colony-forming ability) or remain viable as mutant cells. However, the end-points of viability inactivation (lethality) or mutation are determined by cellular processes that act on the UV-damaged DNA. We have investigated the in vivo time course for processes that deal with cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which can be specifically removed by photoreactivation (PR). At different times during post-UV incubation, samples were challenged with PR and assayed for viability or mutation. We used excision-defective E. coli B/r cells and worked under yellow light to avoid background PR. During post-UV incubation (0-100min) in fully supplemented defined medium, inactivation and mutation were initially significantly reversed by PR but the extent of this reversal decreased during continued incubation defining "fixation" of lethality or mutation, respectively. In contrast, if protein synthesis was restricted during the post-UV incubation, no fixation developed. When chloramphenicol was added to inhibit protein synthesis after 30min of supplemented post-UV incubation, at a time sufficient for expression of UV-induced protein(s), fixation of lethality or mutation was still annulled (no change in the effectiveness of PR developed). Lethality fixation did progress when protein synthesis was restricted and the cells were incubated in the presence of puromycin or were either clpP or clpX defective. We discuss these and related results to suggest (1) on-going protein synthesis is required in the fixation process for lethality and mutation to sustain an effective level of a hypothetical protein sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis and (2) this protein plays a critical role in the process leading to exchange between Pol III activity and alternative polymerase activities required as each cell deals with damage in template DNA.

  17. Death rates reflect accumulating brain damage in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Duane B; Brancato, Carolina L; Prior, Andrew E; Shelton, Peter M.J; Sheehy, Matt R.J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of the first quantitative, whole-lifespan study of the relationship between age-specific neurolipofuscin concentration and natural mortality rate in any organism. In a convenient laboratory animal, the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, we find an unusual delayed-onset neurolipofuscin accumulation pattern that is highly correlated with exponentially accelerating age-specific Gompertz–Makeham death rates in both males (r=0.93, p=0.0064) and females (r=0.97, p=0.0052). We then test the conservation of this association by aggregating the locust results with available population-specific data for a range of other terrestrial, freshwater, marine, tropical and temperate arthropods whose longevities span three orders of magnitude. This synthesis shows that the strong association between neurolipofuscin deposition and natural mortality is a phylogenetically and environmentally widespread phenomenon (r=0.96, p<0.0001). These results highlight neurolipofuscin as a unique and outstanding integral biomarker of ageing. They also offer compelling evidence for the proposal that, in vital organs like the brain, either the accumulation of toxic garbage in the form of lipofuscin itself, or the particular molecular reactions underlying lipofuscinogenesis, including free-radical damage, are the primary events in senescence. PMID:16191601

  18. Death rates reflect accumulating brain damage in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Duane B; Brancato, Carolina L; Prior, Andrew E; Shelton, Peter M J; Sheehy, Matt R J

    2005-09-22

    We present the results of the first quantitative, whole-lifespan study of the relationship between age-specific neurolipofuscin concentration and natural mortality rate in any organism. In a convenient laboratory animal, the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, we find an unusual delayed-onset neurolipofuscin accumulation pattern that is highly correlated with exponentially accelerating age-specific Gompertz-Makeham death rates in both males (r=0.93, p=0.0064) and females (r=0.97, p=0.0052). We then test the conservation of this association by aggregating the locust results with available population-specific data for a range of other terrestrial, freshwater, marine, tropical and temperate arthropods whose longevities span three orders of magnitude. This synthesis shows that the strong association between neurolipofuscin deposition and natural mortality is a phylogenetically and environmentally widespread phenomenon (r=0.96, p < 0.0001). These results highlight neurolipofuscin as a unique and outstanding integral biomarker of ageing. They also offer compelling evidence for the proposal that, in vital organs like the brain, either the accumulation of toxic garbage in the form of lipofuscin itself, or the particular molecular reactions underlying lipofuscinogenesis, including free-radical damage, are the primary events in senescence.

  19. [Effects of total saponins of semen ziziphi Spinosae on brain damages and brain biochemical parameters under cerebral ischemia of rats].

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Huang, Z; Mo, Z; Pan, H; Ding, H

    1996-02-01

    Total saponins of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (ZS) can reduce the contents of water and MDA in ischemic rat's brain tissues, elevate the activity of SOD, CK and LDH, cut down the content of lactate and alleviate the damages of nerve cells in brain. The study shows that ZS possesses protective effects on cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:8758767

  20. Magnetoencephalography Slow-Wave Detection in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Ongoing Symptoms Correlated with Long-Term Neuropsychological Outcome.

    PubMed

    Robb Swan, Ashley; Nichols, Sharon; Drake, Angela; Angeles, AnneMarie; Diwakar, Mithun; Song, Tao; Lee, Roland R; Huang, Ming-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in the United States, accounting for as many as 75-80% of all TBIs. It is recognized as a significant public health concern, but there are ongoing controversies regarding the etiology of persistent symptoms post-mTBI. This constellation of nonspecific symptoms is referred to as postconcussive syndrome (PCS). The present study combined results from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and cognitive assessment to examine group differences and relationships between brain activity and cognitive performance in 31 military and civilian individuals with a history of mTBI+PCS and 33 matched healthy control subjects. An operator-free analysis was used for MEG data to increase reliability of the technique. Subjects completed a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, and measures of abnormal slow-wave activity from MEG were collected. Results demonstrated significant group differences on measures of executive functioning and processing speed. In addition, significant correlations between slow-wave activity on MEG and patterns of cognitive functioning were found in cortical areas, consistent with cognitive impairments on exams. Results provide more objective evidence that there may be subtle changes to the neurobiological integrity of the brain that can be detected by MEG. Further, these findings suggest that these abnormalities are associated with cognitive outcomes and may account, at least in part, for long-term PCS in those who have sustained an mTBI.

  1. Systemic autoimmunity in TAM triple knockout mice causes inflammatory brain damage and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingjun; Lu, Huayi; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) triply knockout (TKO) mice exhibit systemic autoimmune diseases, with characteristics of increased proinflammatory cytokine production, autoantibody deposition and autoreactive lymphocyte infiltration into a variety of tissues. Here we show that TKO mice produce high level of serum TNF-α and specific autoantibodies deposited onto brain blood vessels. The brain-blood barrier (BBB) in mutant brains exhibited increased permeability for Evans blue and fluorescent-dextran, suggesting a breakdown of the BBB in the mutant brains. Impaired BBB integrity facilitated autoreactive T cells infiltrating into all regions of the mutant brains. Brain autoimmune disorder caused accumulation of the ubiquitin-reactive aggregates in the mutant hippocampus, and early formation of autofluorescent lipofuscins in the neurons throughout the entire brains. Chronic neuroinflammation caused damage of the hippocampal mossy fibers and neuronal apoptotic death. This study shows that chronic systemic inflammation and autoimmune disorders in the TKO mice cause neuronal damage and death.

  2. Categorization skills and recall in brain damaged children: a multiple case study.

    PubMed

    Mello, Claudia Berlim de; Muszkat, Mauro; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo

    2009-09-01

    During development, children become capable of categorically associating stimuli and of using these relationships for memory recall. Brain damage in childhood can interfere with this development. This study investigated categorical association of stimuli and recall in four children with brain damages. The etiology, topography and timing of the lesions were diverse. Tasks included naming and immediate recall of 30 perceptually and semantically related figures, free sorting, delayed recall, and cued recall of the same material. Traditional neuropsychological tests were also employed. Two children with brain damage sustained in middle childhood relied on perceptual rather than on categorical associations in making associations between figures and showed deficits in delayed or cued recall, in contrast to those with perinatal lesions. One child exhibited normal performance in recall despite categorical association deficits. The present results suggest that brain damaged children show deficits in categorization and recall that are not usually identified in traditional neuropsychological tests. PMID:19722038

  3. PGF(2alpha) FP receptor contributes to brain damage following transient focal brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sofiyan; Ahmad, Abdullah Shafique; Maruyama, Takayuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Although some of the COX-2 metabolites and prostaglandins have been implicated in stroke and excitotoxicity, the role of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and its FP receptor have not been elucidated in the pathogenesis of ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) brain injury. Here we investigated the FP receptor's contribution in a unilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model of focal cerebral ischemia in mice. The MCA in wild type (WT) and FP knockout (FP(-/-)) C57BL/6 male mice was transiently occluded with a monofilament for 90 min. After 96 h of reperfusion, the FP(-/-) mice had 25.3% less neurological deficit (P < 0.05) and 34.4% smaller infarct volumes (P < 0.05) than those of the WT mice. In a separate cohort, physiological parameters were monitored before, during, and after ischemia, and the results revealed no differences between the groups. Because excitotoxicity is an acute mediator of stroke outcome, the effect of acute NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was also tested. Forty-eight hours after unilateral intrastriatal NMDA injection, excitotoxic brain damage was 20.8% less extensive in the FP(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) than in the WT counterparts, further supporting the toxic contribution of the FP receptor in I/R injury. Additionally, we investigated the effect of post-treatment with the FP agonist latanoprost in mice subjected to MCA occlusion; such treatment resulted in an increase in neurological deficit and infarct size in WT mice (P < 0.05), though no effects were observed in the latanoprost-treated FP(-/-) mice. Together, the results suggest that the PGF(2alpha) FP receptor significantly enhances cerebral ischemic and excitotoxic brain injury and that these results are of importance when planning for potential development of therapeutic drugs to treat stroke and its acute and/or long term consequences.

  4. Brain damage in a new hemorrhagic shock model in the rat using long-term recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Y.; Kato, H.; Kogure, K. )

    1990-03-01

    A new shock model in the rat using hemorrhagic hypotension for production of brain damage is described. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by lowering arterial blood pressure with bleeding. The MABP was maintained at approximately 25 mm Hg, accompanied by isoelectric EEG, and then shed blood was retransfused. At 1 week of recovery, morphological and 45Ca autoradiographic changes were examined. No brain damage was observed in rats after 1 min of isoelectric EEG. Mild neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was seen in some animals after 2 min of isoelectric EEG. Severe and consistent neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was recognized after 3 min of isoelectric EEG. Additional damage was also seen in the dentate hilus and the thalamus in some animals. This model can be used to study the pathophysiology of postshock brain damage and to assess new therapies following shock.

  5. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  6. Organophosphate-induced brain damage: mechanisms, neuropsychiatric and neurological consequences, and potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-induced brain damage is defined as progressive damage to the brain, resulting from the cholinergic neuronal excitotoxicity and dysfunction induced by OP-induced irreversible AChE inhibition. This delayed secondary neuronal damage that occurs mainly in the cholinergic regions of the brain that contain dense accumulations of cholinergic neurons and the majority of cholinergic projection, might be largely responsible for persistent profound neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments (memory, cognitive, mental, emotional, motor and sensory deficits) in the victims of OP poisoning. Neuroprotective strategies for attenuating OP-induced brain damage should target different development stages of OP-induced brain damage, and may include but not limited to: (1) Antidote therapies with atropine and related efficient anticholinergic drugs; (2) Anti-excitotoxic therapies targeting attenuation of cerebral edema and inflammatory reaction, blockage of calcium influx, inhibition of apoptosis program, and the control of seizures; (3) Neuroprotective strategies using cytokines, antioxidants and NMDAR antagonists (a single drug or a combination of drugs) to slow down the process of secondary neuronal damage; and (4) Therapies targeting individual symptoms or clusters of chronic neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms. These neuroprotective strategies may help limit or prevent secondary neuronal damage at the early stage of OP poisoning and attenuate the subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments, thus reducing the long-term disability caused by exposure to OPs. PMID:22498093

  7. Unilateral Brain Damage Effects on Processing Homonymous and Polysemous Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepousniotou, E.; Baum, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Using an auditory semantic priming paradigm, the present study investigated the abilities of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) non-fluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD) and normal control individuals to access, out of context, the multiple meanings of three types of ambiguous words, namely homonyms (e.g., ''punch''), metonymies (e.g.,…

  8. Differentiation of Brain Damage Among Low IQ Subjects with Three Projective Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Edwin E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Rorschach, Hand, and Bender-Gestalt tests discriminated slightly between low IQ subjects classified as brain damaged or not. Substantial discrimination was observed between the same subjects classified by intelligence level. Brain impairment may underlie most or all retardation. The efficacy of projective techniques for diagnosing organicity…

  9. Inferencing Processes after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Effects of Contextual Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Comprehension deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) have been attributed to an inability to use context, but there is little direct evidence to support the claim. This study evaluated the effect of varying contextual bias on predictive inferencing by adults with RHD. Method: Fourteen adults with no brain damage…

  10. The Involvement of Secondary Neuronal Damage in the Development of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Following Brain Insults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Garcia, Gregory E.; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and affect the health of billions of people. Previous publications have demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders can cause histomorphological damage in particular regions of the brain. By using a clinical symptom-comparing approach, 55 neuropsychiatric signs or symptoms related usually to 14 types of acute and chronic brain insults were identified and categorized in the present study. Forty percent of the 55 neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms have been found to be commonly shared by the 14 brain insults. A meta-analysis supports existence of the same neuropsychiatric signs or symptoms in all brain insults. The results suggest that neuronal damage might be occurring in the same or similar regions or structures of the brain. Neuronal cell death, neural loss, and axonal degeneration in some parts of the brain (the limbic system, basal ganglia system, brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex) might be the histomorphological basis that is responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptom clusters. These morphological alterations may be the result of secondary neuronal damage (a cascade of progressive neural injury and neuronal cell death that is triggered by the initial insult). Secondary neuronal damage causes neuronal cell death and neural injury in not only the initial injured site but also remote brain regions. It may be a major contributor to subsequent neuropsychiatric disorders following brain insults. PMID:24653712

  11. The Use of Computers and Video Games in Brain Damage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorimer, David

    The use of computer assisted therapy (CAT) in the rehabilitation of individuals with brain damage is examined. Hardware considerations are explored, and the variety of software programs available for brain injury rehabilitation is discussed. Structured testing and treatment programs in time measurement, memory, and direction finding are described,…

  12. Expression Profile of DNA Damage Signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    Exposure of living systems to radiation results in a wide assortment of lesions, the most signif-icant of is damage to genomic DNA which induce several cellular functions such as cell cycle arrest, repair, apoptosis etc. The radiation induced DNA damage investigation is one of the im-portant area in biology, but still the information available regarding the effects of proton is very limited. In this report, we investigated the differential gene expression pattern of DNA damage signaling genes particularly, damaged DNA binding, repair, cell cycle arrest, checkpoints and apoptosis using quantitative real-time RT-PCR array in proton exposed mouse brain tissues. The expression profiles showed significant changes in DNA damage related genes in 2Gy proton exposed mouse brain tissues as compared with control brain tissues. Furthermore, we also show that significantly increased levels of apoptotic related genes, caspase-3 and 8 activities in these cells, suggesting that in addition to differential expression of DNA damage genes, the alteration of apoptosis related genes may also contribute to the radiation induced DNA damage followed by programmed cell death. In summary, our findings suggest that proton exposed brain tissue undergo severe DNA damage which in turn destabilize the chromatin stability.

  13. A clinical study on closing-in in focal brain-damaged individuals.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Natascia; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-04-15

    In visuo-constructional assessment, brain-damaged individuals may copy figures near to or superimposed on the model, showing the Closing-in (CI). CI has been largely investigated in dementia, and often ascribed to impairments of the attention/executive abilities ("Attraction hypothesis"). Only a few dated studies investigated frequency of CI in brain-damaged individuals, without clarifying the genesis of the phenomenon. We aimed at testing the "Attraction hypothesis" in 27 individuals with focal frontal cortical or sub-cortical brain lesions by a dual-task experimental paradigm. The participants underwent a neuropsychological battery and a copying task to be performed alone (single task condition), or concurrently with a simple or a complex verbal secondary task (dual-task conditions). CI was found in 66% of frontal-damaged individuals, who scored significantly lower than healthy adults on all neuropsychological measures; brain-damaged individuals showing CI performed worse than frontal-damaged individuals without CI on frontal and visuo-constructional measures. In the dual-task condition with the complex secondary task CI was significantly enhanced, with a weaker tendency to self-correction, in individuals with CI compared to individuals without CI. These findings would confirm that the CI in brain-damaged individuals is related to reduction of attentional resources, consistently with the "Attraction hypothesis". PMID:27000246

  14. Systems approach to the study of brain damage in the very preterm newborn

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Gressens, Pierre; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Dammann, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: A systems approach to the study of brain damage in very preterm newborns has been lacking. Methods: In this perspective piece, we offer encephalopathy of prematurity as an example of the complexity and interrelatedness of brain-damaging molecular processes that can be initiated inflammatory phenomena. Results: Using three transcription factors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), Notch-1, and nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (NRF2), we show the inter-connectedness of signaling pathways activated by some antecedents of encephalopathy of prematurity. Conclusions: We hope that as biomarkers of exposures and processes leading to brain damage in the most immature newborns become more readily available, those who apply a systems approach to the study of neuroscience can be persuaded to study the pathogenesis of brain disorders in the very preterm newborn. PMID:25926780

  15. "Neuropeptides in the brain defense against distant organ damage".

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Mike Yoshio; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Cunha, Débora Maria Gomes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2016-01-15

    Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common manifestation in diseases that originate outside the central nervous system, affecting 30-40% of elderly hospitalized patients and up to 80% of the critically ill, even though it remains unclear if severe systemic inflammation is able or not to induce cellular disturbances and immune activation in the brain. Neuropeptides are pleotropic molecules heterogeneously distributed throughout the brain and possess a wide spectrum of functions, including regulation of the inflammatory response, so we hypothesized that they would be the major alarm system in the brain before overt microglia activation. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we induced acute pancreatitis in 8-10week old rats and collected brain tissue, 12 and 24h following pancreatic injury, to measure neuropeptide and cytokine tissue levels. We found significantly higher levels of β-endorphin, orexin and oxytocin in the brain of rats submitted to pancreatic injury, when compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, these differences were not associated with increased local cytokine levels, putting in evidence that neuropeptide release occurred independently of microglia activation and may be a pivotal alarm system to initiate neurologic reactions to distant inflammatory non-infectious aggression.

  16. Visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related brain changes and ischemic brain damage in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Jeong, Sae Im; Kim, Minsuk; Yoon, Joo Chun; Kim, Hee-Sun; Park, Eun-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Visceral adipose tissue is accumulated with aging. An increase in visceral fat accompanied by low-grade inflammation is associated with several adult-onset diseases. However, the effects of visceral adipose tissue inflammation on the normal and ischemic brains of aged are not clearly defined. To examine the role of visceral adipose tissue inflammation, we evaluated inflammatory cytokines in the serum, visceral adipose tissue, and brain as well as blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in aged male mice (20 months) underwent sham or visceral fat removal surgery compared with the young mice (2.5 months). Additionally, ischemic brain injury was compared in young and aged mice with sham and visceral fat removal surgery. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in examined organs were increased in aged mice compared with the young mice, and these levels were reduced in the mice with visceral fat removal. Increased BBB permeability with reduced expression of tight junction proteins in aged sham mice were also decreased in mice with visceral fat removal. After focal ischemic injury, aged mice with visceral fat removal showed a reduction in infarct volumes, BBB permeability, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the ischemic brain compared with sham mice, although the neurological outcomes were not significantly improved. In addition, further upregulated visceral adipose tissue inflammation in response to ischemic brain injury was attenuated in mice with visceral fat removal. These results suggest that visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related changes in the brain and contributes to the ischemic brain damage in the aged mice. We suggest that visceral adiposity should be considered as a factor affecting brain health and ischemic brain damage in the aged population.

  17. Computed tomography of the brain in children with minimal brain damage: a preliminary study of 46 children.

    PubMed

    Bergström, K; Bille, B

    1978-11-01

    Forty-six children aged 4 to 15 years with minimal brain damage (MBD) underwent computed cranial tomography (CT). The criteria used for a diagnosis of MDB was the presence of clinical features of a developmental disturbance of the central nervous system causing incoordination. CT revealed abnormalities in 15 cases (32.6%), consisting in cerebral atrophy, asymmetry or an anomaly.

  18. Relationship of plasma S100B and MBP with brain damage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Wei; Qu, Liu-Hong; Tang, Juan; Chen, Shan; Rong, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationships of MBP and S100B with PVH-IVH and PVL in preterm infants. 385 cases of preterm infants, whose gestational age was less than 34 weeks, were enrolled in the study. The plasma levels of S100B and MBP were detected within 24 hours and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th day after birth. Cranial ultrasound was preformed 2-3 d, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks after birth. They also received Cranial MRI examination before discharge or when the correct gestational age reached 40 weeks. According to the exclusion standard, 73 cases were excluded. The included 312 cases were divided into 3 groups (no brain damage group, PVH-IVH group and PVL group) according to the result of cranial ultrasound and MRI. The differences of plasma levels of S100B and MBP among groups were compared, and the relationships of the plasma levels of S100B and MBP with gestational age in no brain damage group were analyzed. The results of cranial ultrasound and/or MRI showed: 204 cases had no brain damage (enrolled in no brain damage group); 69 cases had PVH-IVH (enrolled in PVH-IVH group); 27 cases had PVL and 12 cases had PVL and PVH-IVH (both enrolled in PVL group). The plasma level of S100B: within 24 h and on the 3rd d after birth, the serum levels of S100B in PVH-IVH group were significantly higher than those in no brain damage group (P < 0.05); and the plasma levels of S100B in PVL group were significantly higher than those in no brain damage group and PVH-IVH group (all P < 0.05). On 7th d and 14th d after birth, there were no significant differences between PVH-IVH group and no brain damage group (P > 0.05); and the plasma levels of S100B in PVL group were still significantly higher than those in no brain damage group and PVH-IVH group (all P < 0.05). The plasma levels of MBP: within 24 h and on the 3rd d, 7th d and 14th d after birth, there were no significant differences between PVH-IVH group and no brain damage group (all P > 0.05); and the plasma levels of MBP in PVL

  19. SUSPECTED EARLY MINIMAL BRAIN DAMAGE AND SEVERE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN ADOLESCENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POLLACK, MAX

    A GROUP OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT HOSPITALIZED PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS (10 MALES AND TWO FEMALES) PREVIOUSLY DIAGNOSED AS HAVING SCHIZOPHRENIC OR PERSONALITY DISORDERS WERE REDIAGNOSED AS HAVING CHRONIC BRAIN SYNDROME. DEVELOPMENTAL DEVIANCY, BEHAVIOR DISORDERS STARTING IN CHILDHOOD, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST PERFORMANCES WERE COMPATIBLE WITH AN…

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  1. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population.

  2. Laterality of mental imagery generation and operation: tests with brain-damaged patients and normal adults.

    PubMed

    Hatta, T; Koike, M; Langman, P

    1994-08-01

    The relationships between hemispheric function and components of the imagery process were examined in patients with unilateral right and left brain damage and in intact adult subjects. In the image generation condition, subjects were required to mentally generate Katakana letters corresponding to Hiragana letters displayed on a CRT. The results for the intact adults suggested a left hemisphere superiority, but the unilaterally brain-damaged subjects showed no hemispheric difference in this task. In the imagery operation task (transformation or lateral translation), subjects were asked to find a genuine Kanji among distractors (pseudo-Kanji) that were constructed from two Kanji radicals (themselves real Kanji) that were either displayed in reverse order or shifted apart. The results for both intact adults and patients with unilateral brain damage suggest the superiority of the right hemisphere. PMID:7525640

  3. Primary gonadal damage following treatment of brain tumors in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.R.; Shalet, S.M.; Campbell, R.H.; Deakin, D.P.

    1983-10-01

    Gonadal function was studied in two groups of children previously treated for medulloblastoma with surgery followed by postoperative craniospinal irradiation. In group 1 but not in group 2, the children also received adjuvant chemotherapy for one to two years. All children in group 1 received a nitrosourea (BCNU or CCNU), plus vincristine in four and procarbazine in three patients. The nine children in group 1 showed clinical and biochemical evidence of gonadal damage with elevated serum FSH concentrations and, in the boys, small testes for their stage of pubertal development. In group 2 (n . 8), each child had completed pubertal development normally, the boys had adult sized testes and the girls regular menses. Gonadotropin values were normal in all eight children. We conclude that nitrosoureas were responsible for the gonadal damage in the children in group 1, with procarbazine also contributing to the damage in the three children who received this drug. In view of the limited proved value of adjuvant chemotherapy with nitrosoureas in the treatment of medulloblastoma, recognition of this serious complication of cytotoxic drug therapy may necessitate reassessing in which subgroups of children with medulloblastoma the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy outweigh the complications.

  4. Concreteness/abstractness of stimulus-words and semantic clustering in right brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Villardita, C; Grioli, S; Quattropani, M C

    1988-12-01

    Fifteen right brain-damaged patients and 15 normal controls were tested for learning, delayed recall and semantic clustering abilities using two lists of two/three-syllable words. The first list consisted of 12 familiar, concrete, high-imageability nouns belonging to three semantic categories and the second of 12 abstract, low-imageability, familiar nouns also belonging to three semantic categories. The right brain-damaged patients proved to have a learning and semantic clustering deficit for concrete but not for abstract words. This was interpreted as evidence for a selective right hemisphere capability for processing concrete, high-imageability words.

  5. Acetyl-L-carnitine protects neuronal function from alcohol-induced oxidative damage in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rump, Travis J.; Muneer, P.M. Abdul; Szlachetka, Adam M.; Lamb, Allyson; Haorei, Catherine; Alikunju, Saleena; Xiong, Huangui; Keblesh, James; Liu, Jianuo; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Jones, Jocelyn; Donohue, Terrence M.; Persidsky, Yuri; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    The studies presented here demonstrate the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) against alcohol-induced oxidative neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, and impaired neurotransmission. Our findings reveal the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of alcohol-induced oxidative damage in various types of brain cells. Chronic ethanol administration to mice caused an increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation in frontal cortical neurons but not in astrocytes from brains of these animals. Interestingly, alcohol administration caused a rather selective activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which, in turn, enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-hydroxynonenal, but these were predominantly localized in astrocytes and microglia. Oxidative damage in glial cells was accompanied by their pronounced activation (astrogliosis) and coincident neuronal loss, suggesting that inflammation in glial cells caused neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that alcohol consumption induced different oxidative mediators in different brain cell types. Thus, nitric oxide was mostly detected in iNOS-expressing neurons, whereas ROS were predominantly generated in NOX-expressing glial cells after alcohol ingestion. Assessment of neuronal activity in ex vivo frontal cortical brain tissue slices from ethanol-fed mice showed a reduction in long-term potentiation synaptic transmission compared with slices from controls. Coadministration of ALC with alcohol showed a significant reduction in oxidative damage and neuronal loss and a restoration of synaptic neurotransmission in this brain region, suggesting that ALC protects brain cells from ethanol-induced oxidative injury. These findings suggest the potential clinical utility of ALC as a neuroprotective agent that prevents alcohol-induced brain damage and development of neurological disorders. PMID:20708681

  6. Differential oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat brain regions and blood following chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mishra, D; Flora, S J S

    2008-05-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning caused by contaminated drinking water is a wide spread and worldwide problem particularly in India and Bangladesh. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for arsenic toxicity is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The present study was planned 1) to evaluate if chronic exposure to arsenic leads to oxidative stress in blood and brain - parts of male Wistar rats and 2) to evaluate which brain region of the exposed animals was more sensitive to oxidative injury. Male Wistar rats were exposed to arsenic (50A ppm sodium arsenite in drinking water) for 10A months. The brain was dissected into five major parts, pons medulla, corpus striatum, cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. A number of biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress were studied in blood and different brain regions. Single-strand DNA damage using comet assay was also assessed in lymphocytes. We observed a significant increase in blood and brain ROS levels accompanied by the depletion of GSH/GSSG ratio and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in different brain regions of arsenic-exposed rats. Chronic arsenic exposure also caused significant single-strand DNA damage in lymphocytes as depicted by comet with a tail in arsenic-exposed cells compared with the control cells. On the basis of results, we concluded that the cortex region of the brain was more sensitive to oxidative injury compared with the other regions studied. The present study, thus, leads us to suggest that arsenic induces differential oxidative stress in brain regions with cortex followed by hippocampus and causes single-strand DNA damage in lymphocytes.

  7. Oxidative brain damage in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Della Ragione, Floriana; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Ciccoli, Lucia; Scalabrì, Francesco; Marracino, Federico; Madonna, Michele; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Laura; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Guy, Jacky; Filosa, Stefania; Hayek, Joussef; D'Esposito, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females, caused in the overwhelming majority of the cases by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). High circulating levels of oxidative stress (OS) markers in patients suggest the involvement of OS in the RTT pathogenesis. To investigate the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in Mecp2 mutant mouse models, several OS markers were evaluated in whole brains of Mecp2-null (pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and rescued) and Mecp2-308 mutated (pre-symptomatic and symptomatic) mice, and compared to those of wild type littermates. Selected OS markers included non-protein-bound iron, isoprostanes (F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein adducts. Our findings indicate that oxidative brain damage 1) occurs in both Mecp2-null (both -/y and stop/y) and Mecp2-308 (both 308/y males and 308/+ females) mouse models of RTT; 2) precedes the onset of symptoms in both Mecp2-null and Mecp2-308 models; and 3) is rescued by Mecp2 brain specific gene reactivation. Our data provide direct evidence of the link between Mecp2 deficiency, oxidative stress and RTT pathology, as demonstrated by the rescue of the brain oxidative homeostasis following brain-specifically Mecp2-reactivated mice. The present study indicates that oxidative brain damage is a previously unrecognized hallmark feature of murine RTT, and suggests that Mecp2 is involved in the protection of the brain from oxidative stress.

  8. Use of EPO as an adjuvant in PDT of brain tumors to reduce damage to normal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    In order to reduce damage to surrounding normal brain in the treatment of brain tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT), we have investigated the use of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) to exploit its well-established role as a neuroprotective agent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that EPO does not confer protection from PDT to rat glioma cells. In vivo testing of the possibility of EPO protecting normal brain tissue was carried out. The normal brains of Lewis rats were treated with Photofrin mediated PDT (6.25 mg/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and the outcome of the treatment compared between animals that received EPO (5000 U/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and controls. This comparison was made based on the volume of necrosis, as measured with the viability stain 2,3,5- Triphenyl tetrazoium chloride (TTC), and incidence of apoptosis, as measured with in situ end labeling assay (ISEL). Western blotting showed that EPO reaches the normal brain and activates the anti-apoptotic protein PKB/AKT1 within the brain cortex. The comparison based on volume of necrosis showed no statistical significance between the two groups. No clear difference was observed in the ISEL staining between the groups. A possible lack of responsivity in the assays that give rise to these results is discussed and future corrections are described.

  9. The role of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors for secondary brain damage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Trabold, Raimund; Erös, Christian; Zweckberger, Klaus; Relton, Jane; Beck, Heike; Nussberger, Juerg; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Bader, Michael; Whalley, Eric; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms are known to contribute to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since bradykinin is one of the first mediators activated during inflammation, we investigated the role of bradykinin and its receptors in posttraumatic secondary brain damage. We subjected wild-type (WT), B1-, and B2-receptor-knockout mice to controlled cortical impact (CCI) and analyzed tissue bradykinin as well as kinin receptor mRNA and protein expression up to 48 h thereafter. Brain edema, contusion volume, and functional outcome were assessed 24 h and 7 days after CCI. Tissue bradykinin was maximally increased 2 h after trauma (P<0.01 versus sham). Kinin B1 receptor mRNA was upregulated up to four-fold 24 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry showed that B1 and B2 receptors were expressed in the brain and were significantly upregulated in the traumatic penumbra 1 to 24 h after CCI. B2R−/− mice had significantly less brain edema (−51% versus WT, 24 h; P<0.001), smaller contusion volumes (∼50% versus WT 24 h and 7 d after CCI; P<0.05), and better functional outcome 7 days after TBI as compared with WT mice (P<0.05). The present results show that bradykinin and its B2 receptors play a causal role for brain edema formation and cell death after TBI. PMID:19773800

  10. Computer-Assisted Video Instruction in Training Paraprofessionals to Teach Brain-Damaged Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glang, Ann; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of computer-assisted video instruction (CAVI) on three paraprofessionals' implementation of the firming strategy (which presents new material in alternation with previously learned material) with three severely brain-damaged young men. Results indicated CAVI effectiveness with proficient strategy implementation,…

  11. Perception of Lexical Stress by Brain-Damaged Individuals: Effects on Lexical-Semantic Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Amee P.; Baum, Shari R.

    2006-01-01

    A semantic priming, lexical-decision study was conducted to examine the ability of left- and right-brain damaged individuals to perceive lexical-stress cues and map them onto lexical-semantic representations. Correctly and incorrectly stressed primes were paired with related and unrelated target words to tap implicit processing of lexical prosody.…

  12. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Communication Treatments for Individuals with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Frymark, Tobi; Venedictov, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and summarize the research evidence related to the treatment of individuals with right hemisphere communication disorders. Method: A comprehensive search of the literature using key words related to right hemisphere brain damage and communication treatment was conducted in 27 databases (e.g.,…

  13. Principles of Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity: Implications for Rehabilitation after Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleim, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reviews 10 principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity and considerations in applying them to the damaged brain. Method: Neuroscience research using a variety of models of learning, neurological disease, and trauma are reviewed from the perspective of basic neuroscientists but in a manner intended to be useful for the…

  14. Perspectives on Treatment for Communication Deficits Associated with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the current treatment research for communication (prosodic, discourse, and pragmatic) deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage and to provide suggestions for treatment selection given the paucity of evidence specifically for this population. Method: The discussion covers (a) clinical decision processes and…

  15. Case studies on remediating memory deficits in brain-damaged individuals.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, R E; Zeiss, R A; Barrera, M; Lewinsohn, P M

    1977-10-01

    Two case reports illustrate the application of mnemonic techniques for the remediation of memory problems common to brain-damaged patients. A clinical paradigm for such work that includes general and specific assessment; laboratory evaluation of intervention strategies, and finally in-vitro application is described.

  16. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  17. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia.

  18. MLKL inhibition attenuates hypoxia-ischemia induced neuronal damage in developing brain.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yi; Shi, Jing; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Fengyan; Li, Shiping; Meng, Junjie; Tang, Jun; Lin, Xuemei; Peng, Xiaodong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-05-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a critical molecule mediating cell necroptosis. However, its role in brain injury remains obscure. We first investigated the functions and mechanisms of MLKL in mediating neuronal damage in developing brain after hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal necroptosis was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) plus caspase inhibitor zVAD treatment (OGD/zVAD). We found that two important necroptosis related proteins, receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1, RIP3) were upregulated. Furthermore, the interaction of RIP1-RIP3 with MLKL increased. Inhibition of MLKL through siRNA diminished RIP1-RIP3-MLKL interaction and attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD/zVAD. The translocation of oligomerized MLKL to the neuronal membrane leading to the injury of cellular membrane is the possible new mechanism of neuronal necroptosis. Animal experiment with neonatal rats further proved that MLKL inhibition attenuated brain damage induced by hypoxia-ischemia. These findings suggest that MLKL is a target to attenuate brain damage in developing brain.

  19. Nerve cell damage in mammalian brain after exposure to microwaves from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Salford, Leif G; Brun, Arne E; Eberhardt, Jacob L; Malmgren, Lars; Persson, Bertil R R

    2003-06-01

    The possible risks of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for the human body is a growing concern for our society. We have previously shown that weak pulsed microwaves give rise to a significant leakage of albumin through the blood-brain barrier. In this study we investigated whether a pathologic leakage across the blood-brain barrier might be combined with damage to the neurons. Three groups each of eight rats were exposed for 2 hr to Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) mobile phone electromagnetic fields of different strengths. We found highly significant (p< 0.002) evidence for neuronal damage in the cortex, hippocampus, and basal ganglia in the brains of exposed rats.

  20. Calcium-dependent neuroepithelial contractions expel damaged cells from the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrgen, Leah; Voss, Oliver P.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Both developing and adult organisms need efficient strategies for wound repair. In adult mammals, wounding triggers an inflammatory response that can exacerbate tissue injury and lead to scarring. In contrast, embryonic wounds heal quickly and with minimal inflammation, but how this is achieved remains incompletely understood. Using in vivo imaging in the developing brain of Xenopus laevis, we show that ATP release from damaged cells and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors induce long-range calcium waves in neural progenitor cells. Cytoskeletal reorganization, and activation of the actomyosin contractile machinery in a Rho kinase-dependent manner, then lead to rapid and pronounced apical-basal contractions of the neuroepithelium. These contractions drive the expulsion of damaged cells into the brain ventricle within seconds. Successful cell expulsion prevents the death of nearby cells and an exacerbation of the injury. Cell expulsion through neuroepithelial contraction represents a novel mechanism for rapid wound healing in the developing brain. PMID:25468753

  1. Calcium-dependent neuroepithelial contractions expel damaged cells from the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Herrgen, Leah; Voss, Oliver P; Akerman, Colin J

    2014-12-01

    Both developing and adult organisms need efficient strategies for wound repair. In adult mammals, wounding triggers an inflammatory response that can exacerbate tissue injury and lead to scarring. In contrast, embryonic wounds heal quickly and with minimal inflammation, but how this is achieved remains incompletely understood. Using in vivo imaging in the developing brain of Xenopus laevis, we show that ATP release from damaged cells and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors induce long-range calcium waves in neural progenitor cells. Cytoskeletal reorganization and activation of the actomyosin contractile machinery in a Rho kinase-dependent manner then lead to rapid and pronounced apical-basal contractions of the neuroepithelium. These contractions drive the expulsion of damaged cells into the brain ventricle within seconds. Successful cell expulsion prevents the death of nearby cells and an exacerbation of the injury. Cell expulsion through neuroepithelial contraction represents a mechanism for rapid wound healing in the developing brain. PMID:25468753

  2. Brain Injury in Chronically Ventilated Preterm Neonates: Collateral Damage Related to Ventilation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Albertine, Kurt H.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Brain injury is a frequent co-morbidity in chronically ventilated preterm infants. However, the molecular basis of the brain injury remains incompletely understood. The focus of this paper is the subtler (diffuse) form of brain injury that has white matter and gray matter lesions, without germinal matrix hemorrhage-intraventricular hemorrhage, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, or cystic periventricular leukomalacia. The purpose of this review is to synthesize data that suggest diffuse lesions to white matter and gray matter are collateral damage related to ventilator strategy. Evidence is introduced from the two large-animal, physiological models of evolving neonatal chronic lung disease that suggest an epigenetic mechanism may underlie the collateral damage. PMID:22954278

  3. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Genes and Oxidative Damage in Brain Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda; Duchnowska, Renata; Reed, L. Tiffany; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yongzhen; Badve, Sunil; Sledge, George; Gril, Brunilde; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing; Flores, Natasha M.; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Biernat, Wojciech; Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Mandat, Tomasz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Och, Waldemar; Czartoryska-Arlukowicz, Bogumiła; Jassem, Jacek; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the brain, colonizing a neuro-inflammatory microenvironment. The molecular pathways facilitating this colonization remain poorly understood. Methods Expression profiling of 23 matched sets of human resected brain metastases and primary breast tumors by two-sided paired t test was performed to identify brain metastasis–specific genes. The implicated DNA repair genes BARD1 and RAD51 were modulated in human (MDA-MB-231-BR) and murine (4T1-BR) brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines by lentiviral transduction of cDNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) coding sequences. Their functional contribution to brain metastasis development was evaluated in mouse xenograft models (n = 10 mice per group). Results Human brain metastases overexpressed BARD1 and RAD51 compared with either matched primary tumors (1.74-fold, P < .001; 1.46-fold, P < .001, respectively) or unlinked systemic metastases (1.49-fold, P = .01; 1.44-fold, P = .008, respectively). Overexpression of either gene in MDA-MB-231-BR cells increased brain metastases by threefold to fourfold after intracardiac injections, but not lung metastases upon tail-vein injections. In 4T1-BR cells, shRNA-mediated RAD51 knockdown reduced brain metastases by 2.5-fold without affecting lung metastasis development. In vitro, BARD1- and RAD51-overexpressing cells showed reduced genomic instability but only exhibited growth and colonization phenotypes upon DNA damage induction. Reactive oxygen species were present in tumor cells and elevated in the metastatic neuro-inflammatory microenvironment and could provide an endogenous source of genotoxic stress. Tempol, a brain-permeable oxygen radical scavenger suppressed brain metastasis promotion induced by BARD1 and RAD51 overexpression. Conclusions BARD1 and RAD51 are frequently overexpressed in brain metastases from breast cancer and may constitute a mechanism to overcome reactive oxygen species–mediated genotoxic stress in the metastatic

  4. Processing of Basic Speech Acts Following Localized Brain Damage: A New Light on the Neuroanatomy of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soroker, N.; Kasher, A.; Giora, R.; Batori, G.; Corn, C.; Gil, M.; Zaidel, E.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effect of localized brain lesions on processing of the basic speech acts (BSAs) of question, assertion, request, and command. Both left and right cerebral damage produced significant deficits relative to normal controls, and left brain damaged patients performed worse than patients with right-sided lesions. This finding argues…

  5. Suppression and Facilitation of Pragmatic Performance: Effects of Emotional Content on Discourse Following Right and Left Brain Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Ronald L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effect of emotional content on the verbal pragmatic aspects of discourse production in right-brain-damaged (RBD), left-brain-damaged (LBD), and normal control adults. In the nonemotional conditions, LBDs were particularly impaired in pragmatics, whereas in the emotional condition, RBDs demonstrated pragmatic deficits.…

  6. [Neuropathological and morphometrical investigations on the localization of the perinatal hypoxic brain damage (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Goertchen, R

    1981-01-01

    The localization and extent of nerve cell damage caused by perinatal hypoxia has been examined in 83 cases. In 54% of the cases nerve cell damage was localized in the medulla oblongata, in 40% the thalamus and in one third the substantia grisea centralis was affected by nerve cell necroses. In contrast to the phylogenetically older structures of CNS, nerve cell lesions occurred in our material only in 30% in the cerebral cortex and in 18% of our observation the cerebellar cortex. The results show, that the brain stem is especially vulnerable to perinatal hypoxia, this is at variance with hitherto existing conceptions. In a fourth part of the material, nerve cell damage was found in the medulla spinalis, especially in the columna anterior, After prolonged hypoxia the neuron-glia index in the lamina tecti deviates by 0.0491 from that following peracute anoxia. This caused by loss of nerve cells in the brain stem due to perinatal continuous hypoxia.

  7. Endotoxin-induced lung alveolar cell injury causes brain cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Ramos-Nuez, Ángela; Martín-Barrasa, José Luis; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Baluja, Aurora; Álvarez, Julián; Rocco, Patricia RM; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the most common cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe lung inflammatory disorder with an elevated morbidity and mortality. Sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome involve the release of inflammatory mediators to the systemic circulation, propagating the cellular and molecular response and affecting distal organs, including the brain. Since it has been reported that sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome contribute to brain dysfunction, we investigated the brain-lung crosstalk using a combined experimental in vitro airway epithelial and brain cell injury model. Conditioned medium collected from an in vitro lipopolysaccharide-induced airway epithelial cell injury model using human A549 alveolar cells was subsequently added at increasing concentrations (no conditioned, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) to a rat mixed brain cell culture containing both astrocytes and neurons. Samples from culture media and cells from mixed brain cultures were collected before treatment, and at 6 and 24 h for analysis. Conditioned medium at 15% significantly increased apoptosis in brain cell cultures 24 h after treatment, whereas 25% and 50% significantly increased both necrosis and apoptosis. Levels of brain damage markers S100 calcium binding protein B and neuron-specific enolase, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased significantly after treating brain cells with ≥2% conditioned medium. Our findings demonstrated that human epithelial pulmonary cells stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide release inflammatory mediators that are able to induce a translational clinically relevant and harmful response in brain cells. These results support a brain-lung crosstalk during sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:25135986

  8. Pathological display of affect in patients with depression and right frontal brain damage. An alternative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ross, E D; Stewart, R S

    1987-03-01

    Two patients are reported with the acute onset of pathological crying following right inferior frontal brain damage. Both had severe endogenous depression and neither had pseudobulbar palsy. These and other cases argue that two organic brain diseases--one structural and the other "physiopharmacological"--may interact to produce pathological display of affect that cannot be accounted for by traditional neurological explanations. A pharmacological mechanism for the rapid amelioration of pathological affect by tricyclic medications and its possible relationship to the newly discovered descending motor systems of the brain that use norepinephrine and serotonin as neurotransmitters is offered. These cases also suggest that pathological affect is a valuable clinical indicator of an underlying major depression in some brain-injured patients. PMID:3819712

  9. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. PMID:27345710

  10. The effects of chronic smoking on the pathology of alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    McCorkindale, A N; Sheedy, D; Kril, J J; Sutherland, G T

    2016-06-01

    Both pathological and neuroimaging studies demonstrate that chronic alcohol abuse causes brain atrophy with widespread white matter loss limited gray matter loss. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that tobacco smoking also causes brain atrophy in both alcoholics and neurologically normal individuals; however, this has not been confirmed pathologically. In this study, the effects of smoking and the potential additive effects of concomitant alcohol and tobacco consumption were investigated in autopsied human brains. A total of 44 cases and controls were divided into four groups: 16 non-smoking controls, nine smoking controls, eight non-smoking alcoholics, and 11 smoking alcoholics. The volumes of 26 gray and white matter regions were measured using an established point-counting technique. The results showed trends for widespread white matter loss in alcoholics (p < 0.007) but no effect on gray matter regions. In contrast, smoking alone had no effect on brain atrophy and the combination of smoking and alcohol showed no additional effect. Neuronal density was analyzed as a more sensitive assay of gray matter integrity. Similar to the volumetric analysis, there was a reduction in neurons (29%) in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics, albeit this was only a trend when adjusted for potential confounders (p < 0.06). There were no smoking or combinatorial effects on neuronal density in any of the three regions examined. These results do not support the hypothesis that smoking exacerbates alcohol-related brain damage. The trends here support previous studies that alcohol-related brain damage is characterized by focal neuronal loss and generalized white matter atrophy. These disparate effects suggest that two different pathogenic mechanisms may be operating in the alcoholic brain. Future studies using ultrastructural or molecular techniques will be required to determine if smoking has more subtle effects on the brain and how chronic alcohol consumption leads to

  11. Cocaine induces DNA damage in distinct brain areas of female rats under different hormonal conditions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marilise F; Gonçales, Tierre A; Steinmetz, Aline; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated levels of neuronal DNA damage after acute or repeated cocaine treatment in different brain areas of female rats after ovariectomy or sham surgery. Rats in the control and acute groups were given saline i.p., whereas in the repeated group were given 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine for 8 days. After a 10 day washout period, the control group was given saline i.p., whereas rats in the acute and repeated groups were given a challenge dose of 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine. After behavioural assessment, rats were killed and the cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and striatum were dissected for the Comet assay. Acute cocaine exposure induced DNA damage in all brain areas. This effect persisted after repeated administration, except in the hypothalamus, where repeated treatment did not cause increased DNA damage. Sexual hormones exhibited a neuroprotective effect, decreasing cocaine-induced DNA damage in cycling rats in all brain areas. PMID:24552452

  12. Taurine release in mouse brain stem slices under cell-damaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Saransaari, P; Oja, S S

    2007-01-01

    Taurine has been thought to be essential for the development and survival of neural cells and to protect them under cell-damaging conditions. In the brain stem taurine regulates many vital functions, including cardiovascular control and arterial blood pressure. We have recently characterized the release of taurine in the adult and developing brain stem under normal conditions. Now we studied the properties of preloaded [3H]taurine release under various cell-damaging conditions (hypoxia, hypoglycemia, ischemia, the presence of metabolic poisons and free radicals) in slices prepared from the mouse brain stem from developing (7-day-old) and young adult (3-month-old) mice, using a superfusion system. Taurine release was greatly enhanced under these cell-damaging conditions, the only exception being the presence of free radicals in both age groups. The ischemia-induced release was characterized to consist of both Ca2+-dependent and -independent components. Moreover, the release was mediated by Na+-, Cl--dependent transporters operating outwards, particularly in the immature brain stem. Cl- channel antagonists reduced the release at both ages, indicating that a part of the release occurs through ion channels, and protein kinase C appeared to be involved. The release was also modulated by cyclic GMP second messenger systems, since inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterases suppressed ischemic taurine release. The inhibition of phospholipases also reduced taurine release at both ages. This ischemia-induced taurine release could constitute an important mechanism against excitotoxicity, protecting the brain stem under cell-damaging conditions.

  13. Decreased myeloperoxidase expressing cells in the aged rat brain after excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Castillo-Ruiz, Maria del Mar; Acarin, Laia; Gonzalez, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Brain aging is associated to several morphological and functional alterations that influence the evolution and outcome of CNS damage. Acute brain injury such as an excitotoxic insult induces initial tissue damage followed by associated inflammation and oxidative stress, partly attributed to neutrophil recruitment and the expression of oxidative enzymes such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), among others. However, to date, very few studies have focused on how age can influence neutrophil infiltration after acute brain damage. Therefore, to evaluate the age-dependent pattern of neutrophil cell infiltration following an excitotoxic injury, intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate was performed in young and aged male Wistar rats. Animals were sacrificed at different times between 12h post-lesion (hpl) to 14 days post-lesion (dpl). Cryostat sections were processed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohistochemistry, and double labeling for either neuronal cells (NeuN), astrocytes (GFAP), perivascular macrophages (ED-2), or microglia/macrophages (tomato lectin histochemistry). Our observations showed that MPO + cells were observed in the injured striatum from 12 hpl (when maximum values were found) until 7 dpl, when cell density was strongly diminished. However, at all survival times analyzed, the overall density of MPO + cells was lower in the aged versus the adult injured striatum. MPO + cells were mainly identified as neutrophils (especially at 12 hpl and 1 dpl), but it should be noted that MPO + neurons and microglia/macrophages were also found. MPO + neurons were most commonly observed at 12 hpl and reduced in the aged. MPO + microglia/macrophages were the main population expressing MPO from 3 dpl, when density was also reduced in aged subjects. These results point to neutrophil infiltration as another important factor contributing to the different responses of the adult and aged brain to damage, highlighting the need of using aged animals for the study of acute age

  14. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on focal cerebral ischemic rats by preventing blood-brain barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yong Jun; Hu, Mei; Li, Fei; Zhu, Dong Ya

    2007-04-30

    Curcumin, a member of the curcuminoid family of compounds, is a yellow colored phenolic pigment obtained from powdered rhizome of C. longa Linn. Recent studies have demonstrated that curcumin has protective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, little is known about its mechanism. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurs after stroke. Protection of the blood-brain barrier has become an important target of stroke interventions in experimental therapeutic. The objective of the present study was to determine whether curcumin prevents cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by protecting blood-brain barrier integrity. We report that a single injection of curcumin (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min after focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats significantly diminished infarct volume, improved neurological deficit, decreased mortality, reduced the water content of the brain and the extravasation of Evans blue dye in ipsilateral hemisphere in a dose-dependent manner. In cultured astrocytes, curcumin significantly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO(x) (Nitrites/nitrates contents) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF(alpha)). Furthermore, curcumin prevented ONOO(-) donor SIN-1-induced cerebral capillaries endothelial cells damage. We concluded that curcumin ameliorates cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by preventing ONOO(-) mediated blood-brain barrier damage. PMID:17303117

  15. Brain oxidative damage restored by Sesbania grandiflora in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thiyagarajan; Sureka, Chandrabose; Bhuvana, Shanmugham; Begum, Vavamohaideen Hazeena

    2015-08-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with high risk of neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, etc., The present study was designed to evaluate the restorative effects of Sesbania grandiflora (S. grandiflora) on oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in the brain of rats. Adult male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 90 days and consecutively treated with S. grandiflora aqueous suspension (SGAS, 1000 mg/kg body weight per day by oral gavage) for a period of 3 weeks. The levels of protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, and activities of cytochrome P450, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were significantly increased, whereas the levels of total thiol, protein thiol, non-protein thiol, nucleic acids, tissue protein and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase were significantly diminished in the brain of rats exposed to cigarette smoke as compared with control rats. Also cigarette smoke exposure resulted in a significant alteration in brain total lipid, total cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids content. Treatment of SGAS is regressed these alterations induced by cigarette smoke. The results of our study suggest that S. grandiflora restores the brain from cigarette smoke induced oxidative damage. S. grandiflora could have rendered protection to the brain by stabilizing their cell membranes and prevented the protein oxidation, probably through its free radical scavenging and anti-peroxidative effect.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment for neonatal ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2012-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies have been proven effective in experimental models of numerous disorders. Treatment of ischemic brain injury by transplantation of MSCs in neonatal animal models has been shown to be effective in reducing lesion volume and improving functional outcome. The beneficial effect of MSC transplantation to treat neonatal brain injury might be explained by the great plasticity of the neonatal brain. The neonatal brain is still in a developmentally active phase, leading to a better efficiency of MSC transplantation than that observed in experiments using adult models of stroke. Enhanced neurogenesis and axonal remodeling likely underlie the improved functional outcome following MSC treatment after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. With respect to the mechanism of repair by MSCs, MSCs do not survive long term and replace damaged tissue themselves. We propose that MSCs react to the needs of the ischemic cerebral environment by secretion of several growth factors, cytokines, and other bioactive molecules to regulate damage and repair processes. Parenchymal cells react to the secretome of the MSCs and contribute to stimulate repair processes. These intrinsic adaptive properties of MSCs make them excellent candidates for a novel therapy to treat the devastating effects of HI encephalopathy in the human neonate. PMID:22430383

  17. Quantitation of heavy ion damage to the mammalian brain - Some preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, A. B.; Kraft, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    For several years, studies have been conducted regarding late effects of particulate radiations in mammalian tissues, taking into account the brains of rodents and lagomorphs. Recently, it has become feasible to quantify pathological damage and morpho-physiologic alterations accurately in large numbers of histological specimens. New investigative procedures make use of computer-assisted automated image analysis systems. Details regarding the employed methodology are discussed along with the results of the information. The radiations of high linear energy transfer (LET) cause apparently earlier and more dramatic shrinkage of olfactory glomeruli in exposed rabbit brains than comparable doses of Co-60 gamma photons.

  18. Interfacing brain with computer to improve communication and rehabilitation after brain damage.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Pichiorri, F; Schettini, F; Toppi, J; Risetti, M; Formisano, R; Molinari, M; Astolfi, L; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D

    2016-01-01

    Communication and control of the external environment can be provided via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to replace a lost function in persons with severe diseases and little or no chance of recovery of motor abilities (ie, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke). BCIs allow to intentionally modulate brain activity, to train specific brain functions, and to control prosthetic devices, and thus, this technology can also improve the outcome of rehabilitation programs in persons who have suffered from a central nervous system injury (ie, stroke leading to motor or cognitive impairment). Overall, the BCI researcher is challenged to interact with people with severe disabilities and professionals in the field of neurorehabilitation. This implies a deep understanding of the disabled condition on the one hand, and it requires extensive knowledge on the physiology and function of the human brain on the other. For these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach and the continuous involvement of BCI users in the design, development, and testing of new systems are desirable. In this chapter, we will focus on noninvasive EEG-based systems and their clinical applications, highlighting crucial issues to foster BCI translation outside laboratories to eventually become a technology usable in real-life realm. PMID:27590975

  19. Role of microvascular disruption in brain damage from traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Aric F.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simpkins, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is acquired from an external force, which can inflict devastating effects to the brain vasculature and neighboring neuronal cells. Disruption of vasculature is a primary effect that can lead to a host of secondary injury cascades. The primary effects of TBI are rapidly occurring while secondary effects can be activated at later time points and may be more amenable to targeting. Primary effects of TBI include diffuse axonal shearing, changes in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and brain contusions. These mechanical events, especially changes to the BBB, can induce calcium perturbations within brain cells producing secondary effects, which include cellular stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. These secondary effects can be potentially targeted to preserve the tissue surviving the initial impact of TBI. In the past, TBI research had focused on neurons without any regard for glial cells and the cerebrovasculature. Now a greater emphasis is being placed on the vasculature and the neurovascular unit following TBI. A paradigm shift in the importance of the vascular response to injury has opened new avenues of drug treatment strategies for TBI. However, a connection between the vascular response to TBI and the development of chronic disease has yet to be elucidated. Long-term cognitive deficits are common amongst those sustaining severe or multiple mild TBIs. Understanding the mechanisms of cellular responses following TBI is important to prevent the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms. With appropriate intervention following TBI, the vascular network can perhaps be maintained and the cellular repair process possibly improved to aid in the recovery of cellular homeostasis. PMID:26140712

  20. Alcohol-induced vascular damage of brain can be ameliorated by administration of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Altura, B.M.; Altura, B.T.; Gebrewold, A.

    1986-03-01

    Long-term as well as short-term administration of alcohol can cause neuronal and vascular damage in the brain. The authors have reported that acute administration of ethyl alcohol (ALC), either directly into the rat brain, IV or locally, can produce concentration-dependent spasms of cerebral arterioles, venules, arteries and veins followed by irreversible rupture of capillaries and veins followed by irreversible rupture of capillaries and venules. Several experiments have suggested that administration of magnesium ions (Mg/sup 2 +/) can modify vascular tone. Whether Mg/sup 2 +/ can exert direct actions on the intact cerebral microcirculation is not known. Using the above intact rat brain model, and TV-image intensification, the authors determine whether administration of Mg/sup 2 +/ : 1) exerts actions on cerebral (coritical) arterioles (A) and venules (V) (12-40..mu..m); 2) directly into the brain alters arterial blood pressure (BP); and 3) could ameliorate or prevent some of the detrimental cerebral-vascular actions ALC exerts in the brain. The data show that infusion of Mg/sup 7 +/ : 1) into the rat brain result in a rapid dose-dependent lowering of systolic and diastolic and BP; 2) IV or intra-arterially (IA) produces dose-dependent vaso-dilation of A and V; 3) IV or IA prevents spasms and rupture of A and V induced by 10% ALC. The cerebral vascular actions of Mg/sup 2 +/ may prove to be useful in treatment and prevention of ALC-induced brain damage.

  1. Nutritional management of a patient with brain damage and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bildsten, C; Lamid, S

    1983-08-01

    Few reports on nutritional management of patients with both brain damage and spinal-cord-injury appear in the literature. We present a case of a 20-year-old male quadriplegic, C4 complete, who also sustained brain damage secondary to cerebral anoxia. When the patient was transferred to our rehabilitation unit, deterioration in nutritional status was noted, as evidenced by weight loss and depressed serum albumin and hemoglobin. Nutritional rehabilitation consisted of weaning from nasogastric tube feedings to an oral diet providing snacks and commercial supplements. This resulted in a positive nitrogen balance. Other factors, such as mobilization, exercises, and closure of a pressure sore, contributed favorably to improvement of nutritional status. PMID:6411046

  2. [Progress on Hypoxic-ischemic Brain Damage Associated with CCR2 and CCL2].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-jia; Li, Ru-bo; Ma, Shi-yu; Lü, Meng-yan

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is referred to a common type of cerebral damage, which is caused by injury, leading to shallow bleeding in the cortex with intact cerebral pia mater. In recent years, studies show that a various kinds of immune cells and immune cellular factors are involved in the occurrence of HIBD. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a representative of CC chemokine receptor, and is widely distributed in cerebral neuron, astrocyte, and microglial cells, and is the main chemo-tactic factor receptor in brain tissue. CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is a kind of basophilic protein and the ligand of CCR2, and plays an important role in inflammation. In order to provide evidence for correlational studies in HIBD, this review will introduce the biological characteristics of CCR2 and CCL2, and illustrate the relationship between the immunoreactivity and HIBD. PMID:27295859

  3. Nutritional management of a patient with brain damage and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bildsten, C; Lamid, S

    1983-08-01

    Few reports on nutritional management of patients with both brain damage and spinal-cord-injury appear in the literature. We present a case of a 20-year-old male quadriplegic, C4 complete, who also sustained brain damage secondary to cerebral anoxia. When the patient was transferred to our rehabilitation unit, deterioration in nutritional status was noted, as evidenced by weight loss and depressed serum albumin and hemoglobin. Nutritional rehabilitation consisted of weaning from nasogastric tube feedings to an oral diet providing snacks and commercial supplements. This resulted in a positive nitrogen balance. Other factors, such as mobilization, exercises, and closure of a pressure sore, contributed favorably to improvement of nutritional status.

  4. Infiltrating monocytes promote brain inflammation and exacerbate neuronal damage after status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Varvel, Nicholas H; Neher, Jonas J; Bosch, Andrea; Wang, Wenyi; Ransohoff, Richard M; Miller, Richard J; Dingledine, Raymond

    2016-09-20

    The generalized seizures of status epilepticus (SE) trigger a series of molecular and cellular events that produce cognitive deficits and can culminate in the development of epilepsy. Known early events include opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and astrocytosis accompanied by activation of brain microglia. Whereas circulating monocytes do not infiltrate the healthy CNS, monocytes can enter the brain in response to injury and contribute to the immune response. We examined the cellular components of innate immune inflammation in the days following SE by discriminating microglia vs. brain-infiltrating monocytes. Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2(+)) monocytes invade the hippocampus between 1 and 3 d after SE. In contrast, only an occasional CD3(+) T lymphocyte was encountered 3 d after SE. The initial cellular sources of the chemokine CCL2, a ligand for CCR2, included perivascular macrophages and microglia. The induction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β was greater in FACS-isolated microglia than in brain-invading monocytes. However, Ccr2 knockout mice displayed greatly reduced monocyte recruitment into brain and reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in hippocampus after SE, which was explained by higher expression of the cytokine in circulating and brain monocytes in wild-type mice. Importantly, preventing monocyte recruitment accelerated weight regain, reduced BBB degradation, and attenuated neuronal damage. Our findings identify brain-infiltrating monocytes as a myeloid-cell subclass that contributes to neuroinflammation and morbidity after SE. Inhibiting brain invasion of CCR2(+) monocytes could represent a viable method for alleviating the deleterious consequences of SE.

  5. Monochloroacetic acid toxicity in the mouse associated with blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of mice when administered orally at lethal doses. Damage was characterized by the finding of RBC's in the brain parenchyma of mice exhibiting neurologic dysfunction after MCA treatment, and by the entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin and (/sup 3/H)dopamine into the brain following a lethal dose of MCA. Results of acute toxicity studies, pharmacological antidote studies, and toxicokinetics studies in mice and rats are also presented. Acute toxicity of MCA in rats and mice by several routes of administration was determined. Toxicity of molten MCA by the dermal route was characterized by a small amount of surface area exposure and short application time necessary to produce death in both species. Some mice surviving an acute lethal oral dose of MCA exhibited a rigid clasping of the front paws (myotonia) with impairment of walking. Oral administration of (/sup 14/C)MCA to both mice and rats was followed by a rapid elimination of radioactivity from non-cerebral tissues and rapid appearance in the urine. As the dose was increased from a trace dose to a toxic dose, the percent of the administrated dose which was found in the tissues, including brain regions, was greatly increased. Two hours after oral administration of an LD80 of MCA to mice, and coinciding with the onset of toxic signs, entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin into brain regions was significantly increased compared to controls. Both MCA lethality and front paw dysfunction in mice appear to be associated with damage to the BBB.

  6. Chronic hypertension aggravates heat stress-induced brain damage: possible neuroprotection by cerebrolysin.

    PubMed

    Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2010-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) aggravates brain edema formation and cell damage in chronic hypertensive rats compared with normotensive animals. In this investigation, we examined the influence of cerebrolysin on WBH-induced edema formation and brain pathology in hypertensive and normotensive rats. Rats subjected to 4 h WBH at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator showed breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF), edema formation and cell injuries in several parts of the brain. These effects were further aggravated in chronic hypertensive rats (two-kidney one clip model (2K1C), for 4 weeks) subjected to WBH. Pretreatment with cerebrolysin (5 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) markedly attenuated the BBB dysfunction and brain pathology in normal animals. However, in hypertensive animals, a high dose of cerebrolysin (10 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) was needed to attenuate WBH-induced BBB dysfunction and brain pathology. These observations indicate that heat stress could affect differently in normal and hypertensive conditions. Furthermore, our results suggest that patients suffering from various chronic cardiovascular diseases may respond differently to hyperthermia and to neuroprotective drugs, e.g., cerebrolysin not reported earlier.

  7. Tertiary mechanisms of brain damage: a new hope for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is caused by injury or developmental disturbances to the immature brain and leads to substantial motor, cognitive, and learning deficits. In addition to developmental disruption associated with the initial insult to the immature brain, injury processes can persist for many months or years. We suggest that these tertiary mechanisms of damage might include persistent inflammation and epigenetic changes. We propose that these processes are implicit in prevention of endogenous repair and regeneration and predispose patients to development of future cognitive dysfunction and sensitisation to further injury. We suggest that treatment of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be possible by various means, including preventing the repressive effects of microglia and astrocyte over-activation, recapitulating developmentally permissive epigenetic conditions, and using cell therapies to stimulate repair and regeneration Recognition of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be the first step in a complex translational task to tailor safe and effective therapies that can be used to treat the already developmentally disrupted brain long after an insult.

  8. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Liu, Jian; Gao, Dengfeng; Wei, Jin; Yuan, Haifeng; Niu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Qiaojun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age‑related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase‑3). In addition, the expression of PPAR‑γ and Bcl‑2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64‑week‑old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro‑apoptotic proteins compared with age‑matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR‑γ. Compared with the 16 and 32‑week‑old WKY group, the 64‑week‑old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro‑apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR‑γ may contribute to the age‑related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  9. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YALI; LIU, JIAN; GAO, DENGFENG; WEI, JIN; YUAN, HAIFENG; NIU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, QIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase-3). In addition, the expression of PPAR-γ and Bcl-2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64-week-old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic proteins compared with age-matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR-γ. Compared with the 16 and 32-week-old WKY group, the 64-week-old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro-apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR-γ may contribute to the age-related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  10. The challenge of mild traumatic brain injury: role of biochemical markers in diagnosis of brain damage.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Stefania; Schmid, Kara; Berger, Rachel P; Kobeissy, Firas; Italiano, Domenico; Jeromin, Andreas; Hayes, Ronal L; Tortella, Frank C; Buki, Andras

    2014-05-01

    During the past decade there has been an increasing recognition of the incidence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and a better understanding of the subtle neurological and cognitive deficits that may result from it. A substantial, albeit suboptimal, effort has been made to define diagnostic criteria for mTBI and improve diagnostic accuracy. Thus, biomarkers that can accurately and objectively detect brain injury after mTBI and, ideally, aid in clinical management are needed. In this review, we discuss the current research on serum biomarkers for mTBI including their rationale and diagnostic performances. Sensitive and specific biomarkers reflecting brain injury can provide important information regarding TBI pathophysiology and serve as candidate markers for predicting abnormal computed tomography findings and/or the development of residual deficits in patients who sustain an mTBI. We also outline the roles of biomarkers in settings of specific interest including pediatric TBI, sports concussions and military injuries, and provide perspectives on the validation of such markers for use in the clinic. Finally, emerging proteomics-based strategies for identifying novel markers will be discussed.

  11. Rehabilitation of executive functioning in patients with frontal lobe brain damage with goal management training.

    PubMed

    Levine, Brian; Schweizer, Tom A; O'Connor, Charlene; Turner, Gary; Gillingham, Susan; Stuss, Donald T; Manly, Tom; Robertson, Ian H

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning deficits due to brain disease affecting frontal lobe functions cause significant real-life disability, yet solid evidence in support of executive functioning interventions is lacking. Goal Management Training (GMT), an executive functioning intervention that draws upon theories concerning goal processing and sustained attention, has received empirical support in studies of patients with traumatic brain injury, normal aging, and case studies. GMT promotes a mindful approach to complex real-life tasks that pose problems for patients with executive functioning deficits, with a main goal of periodically stopping ongoing behavior to monitor and adjust goals. In this controlled trial, an expanded version of GMT was compared to an alternative intervention, Brain Health Workshop that was matched to GMT on non-specific characteristics that can affect intervention outcome. Participants included 19 individuals in the chronic phase of recovery from brain disease (predominantly stroke) affecting frontal lobe function. Outcome data indicated specific effects of GMT on the Sustained Attention to Response Task as well as the Tower Test, a visuospatial problem-solving measure that reflected far transfer of training effects. There were no significant effects on self-report questionnaires, likely owing to the complexity of these measures in this heterogeneous patient sample. Overall, these data support the efficacy of GMT in the rehabilitation of executive functioning deficits. PMID:21369362

  12. Blueberry treatment decreased D-galactose-induced oxidative stress and brain damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Aydın, A Fatih; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2015-06-01

    D-galactose (GAL) causes aging-related changes and oxidative stress in the organism. We investigated the effect of whole fresh blueberry (BB) (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) treatment on oxidative stress in age-related brain damage model. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with 5 % (BB1) and 10 % (BB2) BB containing chow for two months. Malondialdehyde (MDA),protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels, and Cu Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brain by immunohistochemistry. MDA and PC levels and AChE activity increased, but GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px activities decreased together with histopathological structural damage in the brain of GAL-treated rats. BB treatments, especially BB2 reduced MDA and PC levels and AChE activity and elevated GSH levels and GSH-Px activity. BB1 and BB2 treatments diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. These results indicate that BB partially prevented the shift towards an imbalanced prooxidative status and apoptosis together with histopathological amelioration by acting as an antioxidant (radical scavenger) itself in GAL-treated rats.

  13. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ming; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Su, Yu-Jih; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Kung, Chia-Te; Chiu, Tsui-Min; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Lin, Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM) damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI. PMID:24804213

  14. Neuroprotection by gonadal steroid hormones in acute brain damage requires cooperation with astroglia and microglia.

    PubMed

    Johann, Sonja; Beyer, Cordian

    2013-09-01

    The neuroactive steroids 17β-estradiol and progesterone control a broad spectrum of neural functions. Besides their roles in the regulation of classical neuroendocrine loops, they strongly influence motor and cognitive systems, behavior, and modulate brain performance at almost every level. Such a statement is underpinned by the widespread and lifelong expression pattern of all types of classical and non-classical estrogen and progesterone receptors in the CNS. The life-sustaining power of neurosteroids for tattered or seriously damaged neurons aroused interest in the scientific community in the past years to study their ability for therapeutic use under neuropathological challenges. Documented by excellent studies either performed in vitro or in adequate animal models mimicking acute toxic or chronic neurodegenerative brain disorders, both hormones revealed a high potency to protect neurons from damage and saved neural systems from collapse. Unfortunately, neurons, astroglia, microglia, and oligodendrocytes are comparably target cells for both steroid hormones. This hampers the precise assignment and understanding of neuroprotective cellular mechanisms activated by both steroids. In this article, we strive for a better comprehension of the mutual reaction between these steroid hormones and the two major glial cell types involved in the maintenance of brain homeostasis, astroglia and microglia, during acute traumatic brain injuries such as stroke and hypoxia. In particular, we attempt to summarize steroid-activated cellular signaling pathways and molecular responses in these cells and their contribution to dampening neuroinflammation and neural destruction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'. PMID:23196064

  15. Interaction of nutrition and binge ethanol treatment on brain damage and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Crews, F T; Braun, C J; Ali, R; Knapp, D J

    2001-01-01

    To determine if nutrition plays a role in ethanol withdrawal and alcohol-induced brain damage, the effects of a 4-day ethanol binge treatment using ethanol in a nutritionally complete liquid diet compared to ethanol mixed with water were studied. The nutritionally complete diet group (ETOH-diet) received a complete diet of sugars, proteins and fats with vitamins and minerals with approximately 53% of calories from ethanol while the nutritionally deprived group (ETOH-H2O) received 100% of calories from ethanol. No difference in withdrawal behavior was found between the ETOH-diet and ETOH-H2O groups during the 72-hour period studied. In addition, no difference was seen for serum levels of magnesium and zinc taken at last dose or following 72 h of withdrawal. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ammonia were increased in both groups with ETOH-diet showing a greater increase in ALT than ETOH-H2O. Both groups showed damage in the olfactory bulb, perirhinal, agranular insular, piriform and lateral entorhinal cortical areas as well as hippocampal dentate gyrus and CA-3. Interestingly, the ETOH-diet group displayed more damage at last dose in the posterior dentate and CA-3 of hippocampus than did the ETOH-H2O group. This study suggests that nutritional components and total caloric intake do not effect behavior during ethanol withdrawal and that a nutritionally complete diet may increase ethanol-induced brain damage.

  16. The role and clinical significance of DNA damage response and repair pathways in primary brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Primary brain tumors, in particular, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), continue to have dismal survivability despite advances in treating other neoplasms. The goal of new anti-glioma therapy development is to increase their therapeutic ratios by enhancing tumor control and/or decreasing the severity and incidence of side effects. Because radiotherapy and most chemotherapy agents rely on DNA damage, the cell’s DNA damage repair and response (DRR) pathways may hold the key to new therapeutic strategies. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents are the most lethal form of damage, and are repaired via either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. Understanding and exploitation of the differences in the use of these repair pathways between tumor and normal brain cells will allow for an increase in tumor cell killing and decreased normal tissue damage. A literature review and discussion on new strategies which can improve the anti-glioma therapeutic ratio by differentially targeting HR and NHEJ function in tumor and normal neuronal tissues is the focus of this article. PMID:23388100

  17. Distinct time courses of secondary brain damage in the hippocampus following brain concussion and contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuko; Horiuchi, Yutaka; Kamata, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Masayoshi; Kuwabara, Masato; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary brain damage (SBD) is caused by apoptosis after traumatic brain injury that is classified into concussion and contusion. Brain concussion is temporary unconsciousness or confusion caused by a blow on the head without pathological changes, and contusion is a brain injury with hemorrhage and broad extravasations. In this study, we investigated the time-dependent changes of apoptosis in hippocampus after brain concussion and contusion using rat models. We generated the concussion by dropping a plumb on the dura from a height of 3.5 cm and the contusion by cauterizing the cerebral cortex. SBD was evaluated in the hippocampus by histopathological analyses and measuring caspase-3 activity that induces apoptotic neuronal cell death. The frequency of abnormal neuronal cells with vacuolation or nuclear condensation, or those with DNA fragmentation was remarkably increased at 1 hr after concussion (about 30% for each abnormality) from the pre-injury level (0%) and reached the highest level (about 50% for each) by 48 hrs, whereas the frequency of abnormal neuronal cells was increased at 1 hr after contusion (about 10%) and reached the highest level (about 40%) by 48 hrs. In parallel, caspase-3 activity was increased sevenfold in the hippocampus at 1 hr after concussion and returned to the pre-injury level by 48 hrs, whereas after contusion, caspase-3 activity was continuously increased to the highest level at 48 hrs (fivefold). Thus, anti-apoptotic-cell-death treatment to prevent SBD must be performed by 1 hr after concussion and at latest by 48 hrs after contusion.

  18. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II. PMID:24297753

  19. L-tyrosine induces DNA damage in brain and blood of rats.

    PubMed

    De Prá, Samira D T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Fagundes, Gabriela E; Bristot, Bruno N; Borges, Gabriela D; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Andrade, Vanessa M; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene have been identified to cause tyrosinemia type II which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Studies have demonstrated that an excessive production of ROS can lead to reactions with macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Considering that the L-tyrosine may promote oxidative stress, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of L-tyrosine on DNA damage determined by the alkaline comet assay, in brain and blood of rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. For chronic administration, the animals received two subcutaneous injections of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg, 12-h intervals) or saline administered for 24 days starting at postnatal day (PD) 7 (last injection at PD 31), 12 h after the last injection, the animals were killed by decapitation. We observed that acute administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. Moreover, we observed that chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased DNA damage frequency and damage index in hippocampus, striatum, cerebral cortex and blood when compared to control group. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that DNA damage can be encountered in brain from animal models of hypertyrosinemia, DNA alterations may represent a further means to explain neurological dysfunction in this inherited metabolic disorder and to reinforce the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of tyrosinemia type II.

  20. Line and word bisection in right-brain-damaged patients with left spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Veronelli, Laura; Vallar, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Chiara V; Primativo, Silvia; Arduino, Lisa S

    2014-01-01

    Right-brain-damaged patients with left unilateral spatial neglect typically set the mid-point of horizontal lines to the right of the objective center. By contrast, healthy participants exhibit a reversed bias (pseudoneglect). The same effect has been described also when bisecting orthographic strings. In particular, for this latter kind of stimulus, some recent studies have shown that visuo-perceptual characteristics, like stimulus length, may contribute to both the magnitude and the direction bias of the bisection performance (Arduino et al. in Neuropsychologia 48:2140-2146, 2010). Furthermore, word stress was shown to modulate reading performances in both healthy participants, and patients with left spatial neglect and neglect dyslexia (Cubelli and Beschin in Brain Lang 95:319-326, 2005; Rusconi et al. in Neuropsychology 18:135-140, 2004). In Experiment I, 22 right-brain-damaged patients (11 with left visuo-spatial neglect) and 11 matched neurologically unimpaired control participants were asked to set the subjective mid-point of word letter strings, and of lines of comparable length. Most patients exhibited an overall disproportionate rightward bias, sensitive to stimulus length, and similar for words and lines. Importantly, in individual patients, biases differed according to stimulus type (words vs. lines), indicating that at least partly different mechanisms may be involved. In Experiment II, the putative effects on the bisection bias of ortho-phonological information (i.e., word stress endings), arising from the non-neglected right hand side of the stimulus were investigated. The orthographic cue induced a rightward shift of the perceived mid-point in both patients and controls, with short words stressed on the antepenultimate final sequence inducing a smaller rightward deviation with respect to short words stressed on the penultimate final sequence. In conclusion, partly different mechanisms, including both visuo-spatial and lexical factors, may support

  1. Organophosphates induce distal axonal damage, but not brain oedema, by inactivating neuropathy target esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Read, David J.; Li Yong; Chao, Moses V.; Cavanagh, John B.; Glynn, Paul

    2010-05-15

    Single doses of organophosphorus compounds (OP) which covalently inhibit neuropathy target esterase (NTE) can induce lower-limb paralysis and distal damage in long nerve axons. Clinical signs of neuropathy are evident 3 weeks post-OP dose in humans, cats and chickens. By contrast, clinical neuropathy in mice following acute dosing with OPs or any other toxic compound has never been reported. Moreover, dosing mice with ethyloctylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF) - an extremely potent NTE inhibitor - causes a different (subacute) neurotoxicity with brain oedema. These observations have raised the possibility that mice are intrinsically resistant to neuropathies induced by acute toxic insult, but may incur brain oedema, rather than distal axonal damage, when NTE is inactivated. Here we provide the first report that hind-limb dysfunction and extensive axonal damage can occur in mice 3 weeks after acute dosing with a toxic compound, bromophenylacetylurea. Three weeks after acutely dosing mice with neuropathic OPs no clinical signs were observed, but distal lesions were present in the longest spinal sensory axons. Similar lesions were evident in undosed nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice in which NTE had been genetically-deleted from neural tissue. The extent of OP-induced axonal damage in mice was related to the duration of NTE inactivation and, as reported in chickens, was promoted by post-dosing with phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. However, phenyldipentylphosphinate, another promoting compound in chickens, itself induced in mice lesions different from the neuropathic OP type. Finally, EOPF induced subacute neurotoxicity with brain oedema in both wild-type and nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice indicating that the molecular target for this effect is not neural NTE.

  2. Mutations of the Thyroid Hormone Transporter MCT8 Cause Prenatal Brain Damage and Persistent Hypomyelination

    PubMed Central

    López-Espíndola, Daniela; Morales-Bastos, Carmen; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Lev, Dorit; Sugo, Ella; Verge, Charles F.; Refetoff, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mutations in the MCT8 (SLC16A2) gene, encoding a specific thyroid hormone transporter, cause an X-linked disease with profound psychomotor retardation, neurological impairment, and abnormal serum thyroid hormone levels. The nature of the central nervous system damage is unknown. Objective: The objective of the study was to define the neuropathology of the syndrome by analyzing brain tissue sections from MCT8-deficient subjects. Design: We analyzed brain sections from a 30th gestational week male fetus and an 11-year-old boy and as controls, brain tissue from a 30th and 28th gestational week male and female fetuses, respectively, and a 10-year-old girl and a 12-year-old boy. Methods: Staining with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostaining for myelin basic protein, 70-kDa neurofilament, parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k, and synaptophysin were performed. Thyroid hormone determinations and quantitative PCR for deiodinases were also performed. Results: The MCT8-deficient fetus showed a delay in cortical and cerebellar development and myelination, loss of parvalbumin expression, abnormal calbindin-D28k content, impaired axonal maturation, and diminished biochemical differentiation of Purkinje cells. The 11-year-old boy showed altered cerebellar structure, deficient myelination, deficient synaptophysin and parvalbumin expression, and abnormal calbindin-D28k expression. The MCT8-deficient fetal cerebral cortex showed 50% reduction of thyroid hormones and increased type 2 deiodinase and decreased type 3 deiodinase mRNAs. Conclusions: The following conclusions were reached: 1) brain damage in MCT8 deficiency is diffuse, without evidence of focal lesions, and present from fetal stages despite apparent normality at birth; 2) deficient hypomyelination persists up to 11 years of age; and 3) the findings are compatible with the deficient action of thyroid hormones in the developing brain caused by impaired transport to the target neural cells. PMID:25222753

  3. Bumetanide increases manganese accumulation in the brain of rats with liver damage.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Castro-Chávez, Armando; Florian-Soto, Circe; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Ríos, Camilo; Rivera-Mancía, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication in cases of liver damage; it results from several factors, including the accumulation of toxic substances in the brain, e.g. manganese, ammonia and glutamine. We have previously reported that manganese favors ammonia and glutamine accumulation in the brain of cirrhotic rats, and we suggested that such effect could be mediated by manganese-elicited activation of the NKCC1 (Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter 1). To test this hypothesis, we used bumetanide, an NKCC1 blocker prescribed to treat ascites in cirrhotic patients; we expected that if NKCC1 was responsible for manganese-mediated ammonia buildup and the subsequent glutamine accumulation, bumetanide could counteract such effect and improve motor coordination. In addition, we considered essential to test the effect of bumetanide on manganese brain levels. We used a model of liver damage in rats, consisting in bile-duct ligation. Animals were exposed to manganese in the drinking water (1 mg/ml) for two weeks and ammonia in the food (20% w/w of ammonia acetate) during the second week after surgery. Bumetanide was administered intraperitoneally in the course of the ammonia treatment. We measured glutamine and manganese in three brain regions: frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum. Bumetanide produced no effect on glutamine accumulation; however, because of bumetanide treatment, manganese was increased in the brain, and also the activity of gamma-glutamyl transferase in plasma; thus, we consider that the influence of bumetanide and similar diuretics on liver function and manganese homeostasis should be further studied. PMID:26851372

  4. Treatment with nicardipine protects brain in an animal model of hypertension-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Francesco; Tomassoni, Daniele

    2004-05-01

    Control of blood pressure protects from the development of cerebrovascular lesions and vascular dementia (VaD). This study has assessed the influence of treatment with the dihydropyridine-type Ca2+ antagonist nicardipine on brain microanatomical changes in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR were treated from 16th to 26th week of age with hypotensive (3 mg/Kg/day) or non-hypotensive (0.1 mg/Kg/day) doses of nicardipine, with the non-dihydropyridine-type vasodilator hydralazine (10 mg/kg/day) or with vehicle (control group). Untreated age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were used as a normotensive reference group. Brain volume, number of neurons, glial fibrillary-acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes and neurofilament 200 KDa (NFP)-immunoreactivity (IR) were assessed in frontal and occipital cortex, hippocampus and striatum. A decrease of volume and number of nerve cells and a loss of NFP-IR was found in the frontal and occipital cortex and in the CA1 subfield of hippocampus and in the striatum of SHR. Treatment with nicardipine countered microanatomical changes occurring in SHR, whereas hydralazine displayed a less pronounced effect. Comparatively, the non-hypotensive dose of nicardipine was less active than the hypotensive one. The observation that equihypotensive doses of nicardipine or hydralazine did not protect brain in the same way from hypertensive brain damage suggests that lowering blood pressure is per se not enough for affording neuroprotection. The demonstration of neuroprotective effect of nicardipine suggests an use of the compound in situations in which hypertension is accompanied by the risk of brain damage.

  5. Oxidative Glial Cell Damage Associated with White Matter Lesions in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Mashhadi, Sufana; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Dickman, Mark; Forster, Gillian; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common in brain aging and are associated with dementia. We aimed to investigate whether oxidative DNA damage and occur in WML and in apparently normal white matter in cases with lesions. Tissue from WML and control white matter from brains with lesions (controls lesional) and without lesions (controls non-lesional) were obtained, using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging-guided sampling, from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Oxidative damage was assessed by immunohistochemistry to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) and Western blotting for malondialdehyde. DNA response was assessed by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), p53, senescence markers and by quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) panel for candidate DNA damage-associated genes. 8-OHdG was expressed in glia and endothelium, with increased expression in both WML and controls lesional compared with controls non-lesional (P < 0.001). γH2Ax showed a similar, although attenuated difference among groups (P = 0.03). Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16 suggested induction of senescence mechanisms in glia. Oxidative DNA damage and a DNA damage response are features of WML pathogenesis and suggest candidate mechanisms for glial dysfunction. Their expression in apparently normal white matter in cases with WML suggests that white matter dysfunction is not restricted to lesions. The role of this field-effect lesion pathogenesis and cognitive impairment are areas to be defined.

  6. The neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and neurotrophic factors after focal brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Sumizono, Megumi; Takada, Seiya; Terashi, Takuto; Yoshida, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-15

    Preconditioning exercise can exert neuroprotective effects after stroke. However, the mechanism underlying these neuroprotective effects by preconditioning exercise remains unclear. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and the expression levels of the midkine (MK) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after brain ischemia. Animals were assigned to one of 4 groups: exercise and ischemia (Ex), no exercise and ischemia (No-Ex), exercise and no ischemia (Ex-only), and no exercise and intact (Control). Rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min once a day at a speed of 25 m/min for 5 days a week for 3 weeks. After the exercise program, stroke was induced by a 60 min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. The infarct volume, motor function, neurological deficits, and the cellular expressions levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, PECAM-1, caspase 3, and nitrotyrosine (NT) were evaluated 48 h after the induction of ischemia. The infarct volume, neurological deficits and motor function in the Ex group were significantly improved compared to that of the No-Ex group. The expression levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, and PECAM-1 were enhanced in the Ex group compared to the expression levels in the No-Ex group after brain ischemia, while the expression levels of activated caspase 3 and NT were reduced in the area surrounding the necrotic lesion. Our findings suggest that preconditioning exercise reduced the infract volume and ameliorated motor function, enhanced expression levels of MK and BDNF, increased astrocyte proliferation, increased angiogenesis, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress. PMID:26808606

  7. The neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and neurotrophic factors after focal brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Sumizono, Megumi; Takada, Seiya; Terashi, Takuto; Yoshida, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-15

    Preconditioning exercise can exert neuroprotective effects after stroke. However, the mechanism underlying these neuroprotective effects by preconditioning exercise remains unclear. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and the expression levels of the midkine (MK) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after brain ischemia. Animals were assigned to one of 4 groups: exercise and ischemia (Ex), no exercise and ischemia (No-Ex), exercise and no ischemia (Ex-only), and no exercise and intact (Control). Rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min once a day at a speed of 25 m/min for 5 days a week for 3 weeks. After the exercise program, stroke was induced by a 60 min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. The infarct volume, motor function, neurological deficits, and the cellular expressions levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, PECAM-1, caspase 3, and nitrotyrosine (NT) were evaluated 48 h after the induction of ischemia. The infarct volume, neurological deficits and motor function in the Ex group were significantly improved compared to that of the No-Ex group. The expression levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, and PECAM-1 were enhanced in the Ex group compared to the expression levels in the No-Ex group after brain ischemia, while the expression levels of activated caspase 3 and NT were reduced in the area surrounding the necrotic lesion. Our findings suggest that preconditioning exercise reduced the infract volume and ameliorated motor function, enhanced expression levels of MK and BDNF, increased astrocyte proliferation, increased angiogenesis, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  8. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  9. Can neuropsychological testing produce unequivocal evidence of brain damage? II. Testing for right vs. left differences.

    PubMed

    Reitan, Ralph M; Wolfson, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Sensation and perception, as well as motor functions, have played an important role in the history of psychology. Although tests of these abilities are sometimes included in neuropsychological assessments, comparisons of intraindividual performances on the two sides of the body (as a basis for drawing conclusions and comparisons about the functional status of the two cerebral hemispheres) are in many instances neglected or considered only casually. This study, utilizing several motor and sensory-perceptual tests, compared intraindividual differences on the two sides of the body in a group of controls and a group of persons with brain damage. The results indicated that the sensory-perceptual tests were particularly effective in differentiating the groups. More than 60% of the group with brain damage had greater differences on the two sides of the body than did any of the controls. These findings suggest that a substantial proportion of persons with cerebral disease or damage may be subject to unequivocal identification using sensory-perceptual tests that take only about 20 minutes to administer. These tests may serve a valuable role as an adjunct to comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation and should be further evaluated in this respect.

  10. The neural correlates of abstract and concrete words: evidence from brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Martello, Giorgia; Mattavelli, Giulia

    2013-08-07

    Neuropsychological and activation studies on the neural correlates of abstract and concrete words have produced contrasting results. The present study explores the anatomical substrates of abstract/concrete words in 22 brain-damaged patients with a single vascular lesion either in the right or left hemisphere. One hundred and twenty (60 concrete and 60 abstract) noun triplets were used for a semantic similarity judgment task. We found a significant interaction in word type × group since left temporal brain-damaged patients performed significantly better with concrete than abstract words. Lesion mapping of patients with predominant temporal damage showed that the left superior and middle temporal gyri and the insula were the areas of major overlapping, while the anterior portion of the left temporal lobe was generally spared. Errors on abstract words mainly concerned (although at a non-significant level) semantically associate targets, while in the case of concrete words, coordinate targets were significantly more impaired than associate ones. Our results suggest that the left superior and middle temporal gyri and the insula are crucial regions in processing abstract words. They also confirm the hypothesis of a semantic similarity vs. associative organization of concrete and abstract concepts.

  11. Ethyl Pyruvate Protects against Blood-Brain Barrier Damage and Improves Long-Term Neurological Outcomes in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Wang, Hailian; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Guohua; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Aims Many traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors sustain neurological disability and cognitive impairments due to the lack of defined therapies to reduce TBI-induced long-term brain damage. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown neuroprotection in several models of acute brain injury. The present study therefore investigated the potential beneficial effect of EP on long-term outcomes after TBI and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to unilateral controlled cortical impact injury. EP was injected intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI and again at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h after TBI. Neurological deficits, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and neuroinflammation were assessed. Results EP improved sensorimotor and cognitive functions and ameliorated brain tissue damage up to 28 d post-TBI. BBB breach and brain edema were attenuated by EP at 48 h after TBI. EP suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production from peripheral neutrophils and reduced the number of MMP-9-overproducing neutrophils in the spleen, and therefore mitigated MMP-9-mediated BBB breakdown. Moreover, EP exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects in cultured microglia and inhibited the elevation of inflammatory mediators in the brain after TBI. Conclusion EP confers long-term neuroprotection against TBI, possibly through breaking the vicious cycle among MMP-9-mediated BBB disruption, neuroinflammation and long-lasting brain damage. PMID:25533312

  12. Behavioural profiles of children and adolescents after pre- or perinatal unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed

    Trauner, D A; Nass, R; Ballantyne, A

    2001-05-01

    Recent case reports of individuals with early-onset damage to the prefrontal cortex have suggested that such early insults could result in severely impaired social behaviour in later childhood and adolescence. The investigators speculated that the acquisition of complex social conventions and moral rules had been impaired. In a large cohort of children, we sought to determine whether early focal brain insults might result in clinically significant behavioural or emotional problems. This study reports on 39 children with pre- or perinatal-onset unilateral brain damage (focal lesion) from cerebral infarction or intraparenchymal haemorrhage, using the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist to assess the presence or absence of behavioural and emotional difficulties. Two-thirds of the subjects had left hemisphere (LH) lesions and one-third had right hemisphere (RH) lesions. Age range was 4.0-15.4 years at the time of questionnaire completion. Their results were compared with those of 54 control children. Analyses were conducted on focal lesion versus controls, RH versus LH lesion, frontal versus non-frontal lesion, and seizure versus non-seizure groups. When the effect of IQ was partialled out, there were no significant differences on the nine Behavior Problem scales, the Internalizing-Externalizing dichotomy or the Total Problem score for any of the group comparisons. Our subjects showed no evidence of clinically significant behavioural or emotional problems, even when the frontal lobe was involved. Individuals with more extensive and bilateral damage may be at higher risk of significant behavioural and emotional dysfunction than were those in our study population. In future studies of brain-behaviour relationships in developing children, all potential causes for any observed behavioural abnormalities, such as genetic and environmental factors and toxin exposure, must be considered before concluding that specific anatomical lesions are causally related to specific

  13. Exposure of rats to ozone: evidence of damage to heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, I.; Massaro, G.D.; Massaro, D. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent, and in many locations it is a major atmospheric pollutant. It is phytotoxic and an important cause of lung dysfunction in humans. Recently, a significant association has been established between total atmospheric oxidants, of which ozone is one, and daily cardiovascular mortality rates. In this article, we show that exposure of rats to ozone for 5 days, in a concentration found in major urban centers, results in an increased concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material (an indicator of lipid peroxidation) in heart and brain tissue as well as elevated activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (enzymic scavengers of peroxides) in these tissues. We examined the heart anatomically and found evidence of extracellular and intracellular edema. These findings indicate that the heart and brain are damaged by a concentration of ozone present in major urban centers; they may have important implications for chronic illness and degenerative processes in humans.

  14. Syzigium cumini seed extracts reduce tissue damage in diabetic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Stanely Mainzen Prince, P; Kamalakkannan, N; Menon, Venugopal P

    2003-02-01

    Syzigium cumini commonly known as Jamun, is widely used in different parts of India for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Oral administration of an aqueous Jamun seed extract (JSEt) for 6 weeks caused a significant decrease in lipids, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase in the brain of alloxan induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of an alcoholic JSEt for 6 weeks brought back all the parameters to near normal. The effect of alcoholic JSEt (100 mg/kg) was better than aqueous JSEt (5 g/kg). The effect of both these extracts was better than glibenclamide (600 microg/kg). Thus, our study shows that S. cumini seed extracts reduce tissue damage in diabetic rat brain. PMID:12648817

  15. Preventive effect of safranal against oxidative damage in aged male rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its elimination by antioxidant defense system in the body has been implicated for causes of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. This study was design to assess the changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase), lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the brain of 2, 10 and 20 month old rats, and to determine the effect of safranal on the status of selected oxidative stress indices in the 10 and 20 month old rats. The aged rats (10 and 20 months) were given intraperitoneal injections of safranal (0.5 mg/kg day) daily for one month. The results of this study demonstrated that aging caused significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation as well decrease in the GSH level and activities of SOD and GST in the brain of aging rats. The results of this study showed that safranal ameliorated the increased lipid peroxidation level as well as decreased GSH content of the brain of 10 and 20 month old rats. In addition, safranal treatment to the 20 month old rats, which restored the SOD and GST activities. In conclusion, safranal can be effective to protect susceptible aged brain from oxidative damage by increasing antioxidant defenses. PMID:25312506

  16. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke.

    PubMed

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a 'map of stroke'.

  17. Plumbagin alters telomere dynamics, induces DNA damage and cell death in human brain tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Aik Kia; Sameni, Safoura; Venkatesan, Shriram; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Hande, M Prakash

    2015-11-01

    Natural plant products may possess much potential in palliative therapy and supportive strategies of current cancer treatments with lesser cytotoxicity to normal cells compared to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, anti-cancer properties of plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone, on brain cancer cells were determined. Plumbagin treatment resulted in the induction of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, followed by suppression of the colony forming ability of the brain tumour cells. These effects were substantiated by upregulation of PTEN, TNFRSF1A and downregulation of E2F1 genes, along with a drop in MDM2, cyclin B1, survivin and BCL2 protein expression. Plumbagin induced elevated levels of caspase-3/7 activity as well. For the first time, we show here that plumbagin inhibits telomerase in brain tumour cells and results in telomere shortening following chronic long-term treatment. This observation implies considerable cytotoxicity of plumbagin towards cancer cells with higher telomerase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest plumbagin as a potential chemotherapeutic phytochemical in brain tumour treatment modalities.

  18. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D.; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a ‘map of stroke’. PMID:26448908

  19. Brain damage associated with apraxia of speech: evidence from case studies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Dana; Basilakos, Alexandra; Fillmore, Paul; Fridriksson, Julius

    2016-08-01

    The site of crucial damage that causes acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) has been debated in the literature. This study presents five in-depth cases that offer insight into the role of brain areas involved in AOS. Four of the examined participants had a primary impairment of AOS either with (n = 2) or without concomitant mild aphasia (n = 2). The fifth participant presented with a lesion relatively isolated to the left anterior insula (AIns-L), damage that is rarely reported in the literature, but without AOS. Taken together, these cases challenge the role of the AIns-L and implicate the left motor regions in AOS. PMID:27264534

  20. Damage to histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons and other hypothalamic neurons with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Valko, Philipp O; Gavrilov, Yury V; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Finn, Kristen; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge; Scammell, Thomas E; Baumann, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    The need for increased sleep after traumatic brain injury is a common and disabling complaint, yet its etiology is unknown. Previous studies have demonstrated diffuse damage to various hypothalamic systems, but the integrity of the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus, a major arousal-promoting system located in the posterior hypothalamus, has never been examined in head trauma patients. Here, we demonstrate that severe head trauma is associated with a marked loss (41%) of histaminergic neurons. Reduced histamine signaling may contribute to increased sleep need, and therapies that enhance histaminergic tone may improve arousal after head trauma or other conditions.

  1. Rehabilitation for cognitive-communication disorders in right hemisphere brain damage.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Connie A

    2012-01-01

    Although the left hemisphere of the brain has long been linked with language, the right cerebral hemisphere also contributes importantly to cognitive operations that underlie language processing and communicative performance. Adults with right hemisphere damage (RHD) typically do not have aphasia, but they often have communication disorders that may have a substantial impact on their social functioning. After a brief summary of communicative and cognitive characteristics of RHD in adults and of extant theoretical accounts of common communicative difficulties, this article discusses rehabilitation issues, approaches, evidence, and needs.

  2. Are preterm newborns who have relative hyperthyrotropinemia at increased risk of brain damage?

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Soto-Rivera, Carmen L.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Agus, Michael; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to disentangle the contributions of hyperthyrotropinemia (an indicator of thyroid dysfunction) (HTT) and intermittent or sustained systemic inflammation (ISSI) to structural and functional indicators of brain damage. Methods We measured the concentrations of TSH on day 14, and of 25 inflammation-related proteins in blood collected during the first 2 postnatal weeks from 786 infants born before the 28th week of gestation who were not considered to have hypothyroidism. We defined hyperthyrotropinemia (HTT) as a TSH concentration in the highest quartile for gestational age on postnatal day 14 and ISSI was defined as a concentration in the top quartile for gestational age of a specific inflammation-related protein on two separate days a week apart during the first two postnatal weeks. We first assessed the risk of brain damage indicators comparing 1) neonates who had HTT to those without (regardless of ISSI), and 2) neonates with HTT only, ISSI only, or HTT+ ISSI, to those who were exposed to neither HTT nor ISSI. HTT was defined as a TSH concentration in the highest quartile for gestational age on postnatal day 14. Results In univariable models that compared those with HTT to those without, HTT was not significantly associated with any indicator of brain damage. In models that compared HTT only, ISSI only, and HTT+ISSI, to those with neither, children with ISSI only or with HTT+ISSI were at significantly higher risk of ventriculomegaly [odds ratios (OR) ranged from 2–6], while those with HTT only were at significantly reduced risk of a hypoechoic lesion [ORs ranged from 0.2–0.4]. Children with HTT only had a higher risk of quadriparesis and those with ISSI alone had a higher risk of hemiparesis [ORs ranged from 1.6–2.4]. Elevated risk of a very low mental development score was associated with both ISSI only and with HTT+ISSI while a very low motor development score and microcephaly were associated with HTT+ISSI. Conclusions The association

  3. Tool use in left brain damage and Alzheimer's disease: What about function and manipulation knowledge?

    PubMed

    Jarry, Christophe; Osiurak, François; Besnard, Jérémy; Baumard, Josselin; Lesourd, Mathieu; Croisile, Bernard; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Le Gall, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Tool use disorders are usually associated with difficulties in retrieving function and manipulation knowledge. Here, we investigate tool use (Real Tool Use, RTU), function (Functional Association, FA) and manipulation knowledge (Gesture Recognition, GR) in 17 left-brain-damaged (LBD) patients and 14 AD patients (Alzheimer disease). LBD group exhibited predicted deficit on RTU but not on FA and GR while AD patients showed deficits on GR and FA with preserved tool use skills. These findings question the role played by function and manipulation knowledge in actual tool use. PMID:26765078

  4. Evidence of nitrosative damage in the brain white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, Oscar A; DeJesus, Gisela; Bixler, Heather A; Pastuszyn, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of both experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis (MS). NO-mediated protein damage in MS appears to be confined to large plaques where 3-nitrotyrosine has been detected. To determine whether nitrosative damage takes place beyond visible MS plaques, the occurrence of various NO-triggered protein modifications in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of eight MS brains was assessed and compared to that in white matter (WM) of four control brains. As determined by amino acid analysis and western blotting, no evidence of tyrosine nitration was found in the MS samples studied, suggesting that they did not contain appreciable amounts of plaque-derived material. The amino acid composition of total myelin proteins and proteolipid protein (PLP) was also unaltered in the diseased tissue, as was the fatty acid composition of PLP. In addition, we detected no changes in the number of protein free thiols suggesting that oxidation do not occur to any appreciable extent. However, the levels of nitrite in MS-NAWM were higher than those in control WM, while in the MS-gray matter (GM) the concentration of this ion was unaltered. Furthermore, five of the MS samples analyzed, and the same as those with high levels of glial fibrilary acidic protein, showed increased amounts of protein nitrosothiols as determined by the "biotin switch" method. S-nitrosation of GM proteins was again normal. There was no indication of N-nitrosation of tryptophan and N-terminal amino groups in both control and MS tissue. Overall, the data suggests that WM, but not GM, from MS brains is subjected to considerable nitrosative stress. This is the first report to present direct evidence of increased protein S-nitrosation and nitrite content in the brain parenchyma of MS patients.

  5. Candesartan and glycyrrhizin ameliorate ischemic brain damage through downregulation of the TLR signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Waleed; Safwet, Nancy; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Zakaria, Mohamed N M

    2014-02-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. The final outcome of stroke is determined not only by the volume of the ischemic core, but also by the extent of secondary brain damage inflicted to penumbral tissues by brain swelling, impaired microcirculation, and inflammation. The only drug approved for the treatment ischemic stroke is recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). The current study was designed to investigate the protective effects of candesartan (0.15 mg/kg, orally) and glycyrrhizin (30 mg/kg, orally) experimentally-induced ischemic brain damage in C57BL/6 mice (middle cerebral artery occlusion, MCAO) in comparison to the effects of a standard neuroprotective drug (cerebrolysin, 7.5 mg/kg, IP). All drugs were administered 30 min before and 24h after MCAO. Both candesartan and glycyrrhizin ameliorated the deleterious effects of MCAO as indicated by the improvement in the performance of the animals in behaviour tests, reduction in brain infarction, neuronal degeneration, and leukocyte infiltration. In addition, MCAO induced a significant upregulation in the different elements of the TLR pathway including TLR-2 and TLR-4, Myd88, TRIF and IRF-3 and the downstream effectors TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and NF-kB. All these changes were significantly ameliorated by treatment with candesartan and glycyrrhizin. The results of the current study represent a new indication for both candesartan and glycyrrhizin in the management of ischemic stroke with effects comparable to those of the standard neuroprotective drug cerebrolysin.

  6. Characterization of empathy deficits following prefrontal brain damage: the role of the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, S G; Tomer, R; Berger, B D; Aharon-Peretz, J

    2003-04-01

    Impaired empathic response has been described in patients following brain injury, suggesting that empathy may be a fundamental aspect of the social behavior disturbed by brain damage. However, the neuroanatomical basis of impaired empathy has not been studied in detail. The empathic response of patients with localized lesions in the prefrontal cortex (n = 25) was compared to responses of patients with posterior (n = 17) and healthy control subjects (n = 19). To examine the cognitive processes that underlie the empathic ability, the relationships between empathy scores and the performance on tasks that assess processes of cognitive flexibility, affect recognition, and theory of mind (TOM) were also examined. Patients with prefrontal lesions, particularly when their damage included the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, were significantly impaired in empathy as compared to patients with posterior lesions and healthy controls. However, among patients with posterior lesions, those with damage to the right hemisphere were impaired, whereas those with left posterior lesions displayed empathy levels similar to healthy controls. Seven of nine patients with the most profound empathy deficit had a right ventromedial lesion. A differential pattern regarding the relationships between empathy and cognitive performance was also found: Whereas among patients with dorsolateral prefrontal damage empathy was related to cognitive flexibility but not to TOM and affect recognition, empathy scores in patients with ventromedial lesions were related to TOM but not to cognitive flexibility. Our findings suggest that prefrontal structures play an important part in a network mediating the empathic response and specifically that the right ventromedial cortex has a unique role in integrating cognition and affect to produce the empathic response. PMID:12729486

  7. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death.

  8. Vision restoration after brain and retina damage: the "residual vision activation theory".

    PubMed

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Fedorov, Anton; Gall, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Vision loss after retinal or cerebral visual injury (CVI) was long considered to be irreversible. However, there is considerable potential for vision restoration and recovery even in adulthood. Here, we propose the "residual vision activation theory" of how visual functions can be reactivated and restored. CVI is usually not complete, but some structures are typically spared by the damage. They include (i) areas of partial damage at the visual field border, (ii) "islands" of surviving tissue inside the blind field, (iii) extrastriate pathways unaffected by the damage, and (iv) downstream, higher-level neuronal networks. However, residual structures have a triple handicap to be fully functional: (i) fewer neurons, (ii) lack of sufficient attentional resources because of the dominant intact hemisphere caused by excitation/inhibition dysbalance, and (iii) disturbance in their temporal processing. Because of this resulting activation loss, residual structures are unable to contribute much to everyday vision, and their "non-use" further impairs synaptic strength. However, residual structures can be reactivated by engaging them in repetitive stimulation by different means: (i) visual experience, (ii) visual training, or (iii) noninvasive electrical brain current stimulation. These methods lead to strengthening of synaptic transmission and synchronization of partially damaged structures (within-systems plasticity) and downstream neuronal networks (network plasticity). Just as in normal perceptual learning, synaptic plasticity can improve vision and lead to vision restoration. This can be induced at any time after the lesion, at all ages and in all types of visual field impairments after retinal or brain damage (stroke, neurotrauma, glaucoma, amblyopia, age-related macular degeneration). If and to what extent vision restoration can be achieved is a function of the amount of residual tissue and its activation state. However, sustained improvements require repetitive

  9. Vision restoration after brain and retina damage: the "residual vision activation theory".

    PubMed

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Fedorov, Anton; Gall, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Vision loss after retinal or cerebral visual injury (CVI) was long considered to be irreversible. However, there is considerable potential for vision restoration and recovery even in adulthood. Here, we propose the "residual vision activation theory" of how visual functions can be reactivated and restored. CVI is usually not complete, but some structures are typically spared by the damage. They include (i) areas of partial damage at the visual field border, (ii) "islands" of surviving tissue inside the blind field, (iii) extrastriate pathways unaffected by the damage, and (iv) downstream, higher-level neuronal networks. However, residual structures have a triple handicap to be fully functional: (i) fewer neurons, (ii) lack of sufficient attentional resources because of the dominant intact hemisphere caused by excitation/inhibition dysbalance, and (iii) disturbance in their temporal processing. Because of this resulting activation loss, residual structures are unable to contribute much to everyday vision, and their "non-use" further impairs synaptic strength. However, residual structures can be reactivated by engaging them in repetitive stimulation by different means: (i) visual experience, (ii) visual training, or (iii) noninvasive electrical brain current stimulation. These methods lead to strengthening of synaptic transmission and synchronization of partially damaged structures (within-systems plasticity) and downstream neuronal networks (network plasticity). Just as in normal perceptual learning, synaptic plasticity can improve vision and lead to vision restoration. This can be induced at any time after the lesion, at all ages and in all types of visual field impairments after retinal or brain damage (stroke, neurotrauma, glaucoma, amblyopia, age-related macular degeneration). If and to what extent vision restoration can be achieved is a function of the amount of residual tissue and its activation state. However, sustained improvements require repetitive

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Induced Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a clinical condition in the neonate, resulting from oxygen deprivation around the time of birth. HIE affects 1–5/1000 live births worldwide and is associated with the development of neurological deficits, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. Even though the brain is considered as an immune-privileged site, it has innate and adaptive immune response and can produce complement (C) components and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Dysregulation of cerebral expression of AMPs and C can exacerbate or ameliorate the inflammatory response within the brain. Brain ischemia triggers a prolonged inflammatory response affecting the progression of injury and secondary energy failure and involves both innate and adaptive immune systems, including immune-competent and non-competent cells. Following injury to the central nervous system (CNS), including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI), resident microglia, and astroglia are the main cells providing immune defense to the brain in a stimulus-dependent manner. They can express and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and therefore trigger prolonged inflammation, resulting in neurodegeneration. Microglial cells express and release a wide range of inflammation-associated molecules including several components of the complement system. Complement activation following neonatal HI injury has been reported to contribute to neurodegeneration. Astrocytes can significantly affect the immune response of the CNS under pathological conditions through production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory AMPs. Astrocytes express β-defensins, which can chemoattract and promote maturation of dendritic cells (DC), and can also limit inflammation by controlling the viability of these same DC. This review will focus on the balance of complement components and AMPs within the CNS following neonatal HI injury and the effect of that balance on the subsequent brain damage

  11. The oxidative damage and inflammation caused by pesticides are reverted by lipoic acid in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the administration of low doses of dimethoate, glyphosate and zineb to rats (i.p. 1/250 LD50, three times a week for 5weeks) provokes severe oxidative stress (OS) in specific brain regions: substantia nigra, cortex and hippocampus. These effects were also observed in plasma. Lipoic acid (LA) is considered an "ideal antioxidant" due to its ability to scavenge reactive species, reset antioxidant levels and cross the blood-brain barrier. To investigate its protective effect we administered LA (i.p. 25, 50 and 100mg/kg) simultaneously with the pesticide mixture (PM) for 5weeks. After suppression of PM administration, we evaluated the restorative effect of LA for a further 5weeks. LA prevented OS and the production of nitrites+nitrates [NOx] caused by PM in a dose-dependent manner. The PM-induced decrease in reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels in all brain regions was completely restored by LA at both high doses. PM administration also caused an increase in prostaglandins E(2) and F(2α) in brain that was reduced by LA in a dose-dependent fashion. Taking into account the relationship between OS, inflammation and apoptosis, we measured caspase and calpain activity. Only milli- and micro-calpain isoforms were increased in the PM-treated group and LA reduced the activities to basal levels. We also demonstrated that interrupting PM administration is not enough to restore the levels of all the parameters measured and that LA is necessary to achieve basal status. In our experimental model LA displayed a protective role against pesticide-induced damage, suggesting that LA administration is a promising therapeutic strategy to cope with disorders suspected to be caused by OS generators, especially in brain.

  12. Attenuation of Oxidative Damage by Boerhaavia diffusa L. Against Different Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Homogenate.

    PubMed

    Ayyappan, Prathapan; Palayyan, Salin Raj; Kozhiparambil Gopalan, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of oxidative metabolic activity in the brain, intense production of reactive oxygen metabolite occurs, and the subsequent generation of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and ischemia as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, protective effects of polyphenol rich ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE), a neuroprotective edible medicinal plant against oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents, were evaluated. BDE was tested against quinolinic acid (QA), 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and Fe (II)/EDTA complex induced oxidative stress in rat brain homogenates. QA, NPA, SNP, and Fe (II)/EDTA treatment caused an increased level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in brain homogenates along with a decline in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. BDE treatment significantly decreased the production of TBARS (p < .05) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and superoxide dismutase along with increased concentration of non-enzymatic antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). Similarly, BDE caused a significant decrease in the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the cerebral cortex. Inhibitory potential of BDE against deoxyribose degradation (IC50 value 38.91 ± 0.12 μg/ml) shows that BDE can protect hydroxyl radical induced DNA damage in the tissues. Therefore, B. diffusa had high antioxidant potential that could inhibit the oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents in brain. Since many of the neurological disorders are associated with free radical injury, these data may imply that B. diffusa, functioning as an antioxidant agent, may be beneficial for reducing various neurodegenerative complications.

  13. Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on cognition in apathy has largely focused on executive functions. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have investigated the relationship between apathy symptoms and processes involved in social cognition. Apathy symptoms include attenuated emotional behaviour, low social engagement and social withdrawal, all of which may be linked to underlying socio-cognitive deficits. Methods We compared patients with brain damage who also had apathy symptoms against similar patients with brain damage but without apathy symptoms. Both patient groups were also compared against normal controls on key socio-cognitive measures involving moral reasoning, social awareness related to making judgements between normative and non-normative behaviour, Theory of Mind processing, and the perception of facial expressions of emotion. We also controlled for the likely effects of executive deficits and depressive symptoms on these comparisons. Results Our results indicated that patients with apathy were distinctively impaired in making moral reasoning decisions and in judging the social appropriateness of behaviour. Deficits in Theory of Mind and perception of facial expressions of emotion did not distinguish patients with apathy from those without apathy. Conclusion Our findings point to a possible socio-cognitive profile for apathy symptoms and provide initial insights into how socio-cognitive deficits in patients with apathy may affect social functioning. PMID:24450311

  14. The problem of aphasia in the assessment of consciousness in brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Steve; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Schnakers, Caroline; Giacino, Joseph T; Laureys, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of the level and content of consciousness in brain-damaged patients relies to a large extent on behavioral assessment techniques. The limited behavioral repertoire displayed by vegetative and minimally conscious states requires the use of highly sensitive and reliable behavioral assessment methods, allowing the detection of subtle changes in behavior and associated level of consciousness. This situation is further complicated when patients with such disorders of consciousness have underlying deficits in the domain of communication functions, such as aphasia. The present paper examines the consequences of receptive and/or productive aphasia on the already limited behavioral repertoire presented in these patients and discusses a number of behavioral and neuroimaging assessment procedures designed to: (1) detect the presence of aphasia in patients with disorders of consciousness, and (2) reliably assess the level of consciousness of brain-damaged patients while taking into account the existence of receptive and/or expressive language deficits. The combined use of behavioral and neuroimaging assessment techniques appears to be particularly promising for disentangling impaired consciousness and aphasia.

  15. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Renée; Thienel, Anna; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients’ quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35–40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano. PMID:26345312

  16. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Renée; Thienel, Anna; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients' quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35-40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano. PMID:26345312

  17. Dimensions of Personality Disturbance After Focal Brain Damage: Investigation with the Iowa Scales of Personality Change

    PubMed Central

    Barrash, Joseph; Asp, Erik; Markon, Kristian; Manzel, Kenneth; Anderson, Steven W.; Tranel, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This study employed a multi-step, rational-empirical approach to identify dimensions of personality disturbance in brain-damaged individuals: (1) Five dimensions were hypothesized based on empirical literature and conceptual grounds. (2) Principal components analysis was performed on the Iowa Scales of Personality Change to determine the pattern of covariance among 30 personality characteristics. (3) When discrepancies existed between principal components analysis results and conceptually-based dimensions, empirical findings and clinical considerations were weighed to determine assignment of ISPC scales to dimensions. (4) The fit of data to the refined dimensions was assessed by examination of intercorrelations. (5) Differential predictions concerning the relationship of dimensions to ventromedial prefrontal (vmPFC) damage were tested. This process resulted in specification of five dimensions: Disturbed Social Behavior, Executive/Decision-Making Deficits, Diminished Motivation/Hypo-emotionality, Irascibility, and Distress. In accord with predictions, the 28 participants with vmPFC lesions, compared to 96 participants with focal lesions elsewhere in the brain, had significantly more Disturbed Social Behavior and Executive/Decision-Making Deficits, and tended to have more Diminished Motivation/Hypo-emotionality. Irascibility was not significantly higher among the vmPFC group, and the groups had very similar levels of Distress. The findings indicate that conceptually distinctive dimensions with differential relationships to vmPFC can be derived from the Iowa Scales of Personality Change. PMID:21500116

  18. Dimensions of personality disturbance after focal brain damage: investigation with the Iowa Scales of Personality Change.

    PubMed

    Barrash, Joseph; Asp, Erik; Markon, Kristian; Manzel, Kenneth; Anderson, Steven W; Tranel, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    This study employed a multistep, rational-empirical approach to identify dimensions of personality disturbance in brain-damaged individuals: (a) Five dimensions were hypothesized based on empirical literature and conceptual grounds; (b) principal components analysis was performed on the Iowa Scales of Personality Change (ISPC) to determine the pattern of covariance among 30 personality characteristics; (c) when discrepancies existed between principal components analysis results and conceptually based dimensions, empirical findings and clinical considerations were weighed to determine assignment of ISPC scales to dimensions; (d) the fit of data to the refined dimensions was assessed by examination of intercorrelations; (e) differential predictions concerning the relationship of dimensions to ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) damage were tested. This process resulted in the specification of five dimensions: Disturbed Social Behavior, Executive/Decision-Making Deficits, Diminished Motivation/Hypo-Emotionality, Irascibility, and Distress. In accord with predictions, the 28 participants with vmPFC lesions, compared to 96 participants with focal lesions elsewhere in the brain, had significantly more Disturbed Social Behavior and Executive/Decision-Making Deficits and tended to have more Diminished Motivation/Hypo-Emotionality. Irascibility was not significantly higher among the vmPFC group, and the groups had very similar levels of Distress. The findings indicate that conceptually distinctive dimensions with differential relationships to vmPFC can be derived from the Iowa Scales of Personality Change. PMID:21500116

  19. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults. PMID:23403282

  20. Assessment of hand after brain damage with the aim of functional surgery.

    PubMed

    Romain, M; Benaim, C; Allieu, Y; Pelissier, J; Chammas, M

    1999-01-01

    The semiology of the hand after brain damage is really rich. Its clinical evaluation remains quite difficult and must be integrated in the neuro-orthopedic and cognitive context. Deficiency, neuropsychological, analytic and functional status, must be assessed before any surgical decision aiming the improvement of prehension. Neuropsychological evaluation precise the hemispheric specialization: right hemisphere lesions conduct to unilateral spatial neglect while left hemispherical lesions determine language troubles and gesture impairment (apraxia). The analytical evaluation describes motor and sensitive function and assesses spasticity and pain. Concerning the functional assessment, the Enjalbert's score seems to be the most adapted to the upper limb. The assessment of hand deficiency and its origin is necessary to orientate the surgical decision and includes the Zancolli classification for the fingers and wrist and the House classification for the thumb. These classification used for cerebral palsy seems to be insufficient for all the different situations occurring after brain damage. A new classification is proposed based on 3 parameters: fingers extension, thumb abduction and supination. Surgical decision should be examined only after an adapted rehabilitation program.

  1. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Renée; Thienel, Anna; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients' quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35-40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano.

  2. Iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS) reduces brain cell damage in rats intrastriatally lesioned by quinolinate.

    PubMed

    González-Cortés, Carolina; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Gómez-López, Marcos Artemio; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Gómez-Ruiz, Celedonio; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is involved in the neurotoxic pattern produced by quinolinic acid in the rat brain [V. Pérez-De La Cruz, C. González-Cortés, S. Galván-Arzate, O.N. Medina-Campos, F. Pérez-Severiano, S.F. Ali, J. Pedraza-Chaverrí, A. Santamaría, Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III), Neuroscience 135 (2005) 463-474.]. The aim of this work was to investigate whether ONOO(-) can also be responsible for morphological alterations and inflammatory events in the same paradigm. For this purpose, we evaluated the effect of a pre-treatment with the iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS), a well-known ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst (10 mg/kg, i.p., 120 min before lesion), on the quinolinate-induced striatal cell damage and immunoreactivities to glial-fibrilar acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), one and seven days after the intrastriatal infusion of quinolinate (240 nmol/microl) to rats. The striatal tissue from animals lesioned by quinolinate showed a significant degree of damage and enhanced immunoreactivities to GFAP, IL-6 and iNOS, both at 1 and 7 days post-lesion. Pre-treatment of rats with Fe(TPPS) significantly attenuated or prevented all these markers at both post-lesion times tested, except for GFAP immunoreactivity at 7 days post-lesion and iNOS immunoreactivity at 1 day post-lesion. Altogether, our results suggest that ONOO(-) is actively participating in triggering inflammatory events and morphological alterations in the toxic model produced by quinolinate, since the use of agents affecting its formation, such as Fe(TPPS), are effective experimental tools to reduce the brain lesions associated to excitotoxic and oxidative damage.

  3. Metformin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Cognitive Impairment and Brain Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjun; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, also known as ‘chemobrain’, is now widely recognized as a frequent adverse side effect of cancer treatment that often persists into survivorship. There are no drugs available to prevent or treat chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to establish a mouse model of cisplatin-induced cognitive deficits and to determine the potential preventive effects of the anti-diabetic drug metformin. Results Treatment of C57/BL6J mice with cisplatin (cumulative dose 34.5mg/kg) impaired performance in the novel object and place recognition task as well as in the social discrimination task indicating cognitive deficits. Co-administration of metformin prevented these cisplatin-induced cognitive impairments. At the structural level, we demonstrate that cisplatin reduces coherency of white matter fibers in the cingulate cortex. Moreover, the number of dendritic spines and neuronal arborizations as quantified on Golgi-stained brains was reduced after cisplatin treatment. Co-administration of metformin prevented all of these structural abnormalities in cisplatin-treated mice. In contrast to what has been reported in other models of chemobrain, we do not have evidence for persistent microglial or astrocyte activation in the brains of cisplatin-treated mice. Finally, we show that co-administration of metformin also protects against cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. Conclusion In summary, we show here for the first time that treatment of mice with cisplatin induces cognitive deficits that are associated with structural abnormalities in the brain. Moreover, we present the first evidence that the widely used and safe anti-diabetic drug metformin protects against these deleterious effects of cancer treatment. In view of the ongoing clinical trials to examine the potential efficacy of metformin as add-on therapy in patients treated for cancer, these findings should allow rapid clinical translation. PMID

  4. Default network connectivity reflects the level of consciousness in non-communicative brain-damaged patients

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Noirhomme, Quentin; Tshibanda, Luaba J.-F.; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Boveroux, Pierre; Schnakers, Caroline; Soddu, Andrea; Perlbarg, Vincent; Ledoux, Didier; Brichant, Jean-François; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre; Greicius, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The ‘default network’ is defined as a set of areas, encompassing posterior-cingulate/precuneus, anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal cortex and temporo-parietal junctions, that show more activity at rest than during attention-demanding tasks. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify this network in the absence of any task, by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers. However, the functional significance of these spontaneous brain activity fluctuations remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test if the integrity of this resting-state connectivity pattern in the default network would differ in different pathological alterations of consciousness. Fourteen non-communicative brain-damaged patients and 14 healthy controls participated in the study. Connectivity was investigated using probabilistic independent component analysis, and an automated template-matching component selection approach. Connectivity in all default network areas was found to be negatively correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative then coma patients. Furthermore, precuneus connectivity was found to be significantly stronger in minimally conscious patients as compared with unconscious patients. Locked-in syndrome patient’s default network connectivity was not significantly different from controls. Our results show that default network connectivity is decreased in severely brain-damaged patients, in proportion to their degree of consciousness impairment. Future prospective studies in a larger patient population are needed in order to evaluate the prognostic value of the presented methodology. PMID:20034928

  5. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  6. [Characteristics of brain tissue damage in kaolin-induced infantile rat hydrocephalus].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, T; Hashi, K; Okada, T; Sasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Experimental hydrocephalus was induced by an intracisternal injection of 4% or 40% kaolin suspension in 2 days old Wistar rats. They were examined histologically and microangiographically 2 weeks after the injection of kaolin. Hydrocephalic rats were classified into 2 groups, severe hydrocephalic group A and mild hydrocephalic group B. In group A, a marked enlargement of the entire ventricular system with a thinning of the cerebral mantle was observed. On the other hand, the dilatation of the fourth ventricle was more pronounced compared with the other ventricles in group B. In group A, a spongy appearance of brain tissue was observed in the periventricular white matter accompanied with an intracerebral cavity. In these edematous areas, the lack of carbon black perfusion was apparent indicating an occurrence of microcirculatory disturbances. These microcirculatory disturbances and mechanical compression to the cerebral parenchyma may produce defective brain tissue (intracerebral cavity formation). The ependymal cell walls and subependymal glial cell layers were well preserved in spite of the damaged periventricular white matter. In group A, kaolin was present in the fourth ventricle and Sylvian aqueduct. Subependymal gliosis containing macrophages and newly produced blood vessels were observed in the region between the periventricular brain tissue and kaolin granules. These findings indicate that kaolin may produce changes in the ependymal cell and cerebral parenchyma as well as fibrosis and meningitis in the subarachnoid space. PMID:3964487

  7. Coefficient of variation of R-R intervals in severe brain damage.

    PubMed

    Nezu, A; Kimura, S; Kobayashi, T; Osaka, H; Uehara, S

    1996-01-01

    The coefficient of variation of R-R intervals (CVRR) was studied in 18 children having severe brain damage with a mean +/- standard deviation (s.d.) age of 8.4 +/- 5.9 years, who were divided into ten patients complicated with respiratory insufficiency (RI group) and eight patients with severe athetotic cerebral palsy (SA group). CVRR was obtained in the resting supine position, and was compared with that in 22 neurologically normal controls. CVRR in the RI group (mean +/- S.D., 2.19 +/- 1.28%) was significantly lower than that in controls (5.56 +/- 1.53%), while CVRR in the SA group (11.30 +/- 3.91%) was significantly higher than that in controls (both P < 0.01, ANOVA). In particular, the four patients with brain death showed extremely low CVRR of 1.00-1.29%. Since CVRR was 4.09% in the patient aged 4 years with birth injury of the upper cervical spinal cord causing absence of spontaneous respiration, the extremely low CVRR in patients with brain death may be directly related to brainstem dysfunction. The cause of the high CVRR in the SA group was not determined. Thus, CVRR may be useful for quantitative evaluation of severe neurological disorder.

  8. Overexpression of Thioredoxin in Transgenic Mice Attenuates Focal Ischemic Brain Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Mitsui, Akira; Nishiyama, Akira; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Sono, Hiroshi; Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Yodoi, Junji

    1999-03-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) plays important biological roles both in intra- and extracellular compartments, including in regulation of various intracellular molecules via thiol redox control. We produced TRX overexpressing mice and confirmed that there were no anatomical and physiological differences between wild-type (WT) mice and TRX transgenic (Tg) mice. In the present study we subjected mice to focal brain ischemia to shed light on the role of TRX in brain ischemic injury. At 24 hr after middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct areas and volume were significantly smaller in Tg mice than in WT mice. Moreover neurological deficit was ameliorated in Tg mice compared with WT mice. Protein carbonyl content, a marker of cellular protein oxidation, in Tg mice showed less increase than did that of WT mice after the ischemic insult. Furthermore, c-fos expression in Tg mice was stronger than in WT mice 1 hr after ischemia. Our results suggest that transgene expression of TRX decreased ischemic neuronal injury and that TRX and the redox state modified by TRX play a crucial role in brain damage during stroke.

  9. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas.

  10. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  11. Frontal lobe syndrome reassessed: comparison of patients with lateral or medial frontal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, S; Chemerinski, E; Yazici, K M; Tartaro, A; Robinson, R G

    1999-11-01

    Examination of mood and behaviour changes after frontal damage may contribute to understanding the functional role of distinct prefrontal areas in depression and anxiety. Depression and anxiety disorders, symptoms, and behaviour were compared in eight patients with single lateral and eight patients with single medial frontal lesions matched for age, sex, race, education, socioeconomic status, side, and aetiology of lesion 2 weeks and 3 months after brain injury. DSM IV major depressive and generalised anxiety disorders were more frequent in patients with lateral compared with medial lesions at 2 weeks but not at 3 months. At 3 months, however, patients with lateral damage showed greater severity of depressive symptoms, and greater impairment in both activities of daily living and social functioning. At initial evaluation depressed mood and slowness were more frequent, whereas at 3 months slowness, lack of energy, and social unease were more frequent in the lateral than the medial group. Patients with lateral lesions showed greater reduction of emotion and motivation (apathy) during both examinations. Medial frontal injury may fail to produce emotional dysregulation or may inhibit experience of mood changes, anxiety, or apathy. Lateral prefrontal damage may disrupt mood regulation and drive while leaving intact the ability to experience (negative) emotions. PMID:10519877

  12. Through metal binding, curcumin protects against lead- and cadmium-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates and against lead-induced tissue damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Sheril; Limson, Janice L; Dairam, Amichand; Watkins, Gareth M; Daya, Santy

    2004-02-01

    Curcumin, the major constituent of turmeric is a known, naturally occurring antioxidant. The present study examined the ability of this compound to protect against lead-induced damage to hippocampal cells of male Wistar rats, as well as lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The thiobarbituric assay (TBA) was used to measure the extent of lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The results show that curcumin significantly protects against lipid peroxidation induced by both these toxic metals. Coronal brain sections of rats injected intraperitoneally with lead acetate (20 mg/kg) in the presence and absence of curcumin (30 mg/kg) were compared microscopically to determine the extent of lead-induced damage to the cells in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, and to establish the capacity of curcumin to prevent such damage. Lead-induced damage to the neurons was significantly curtailed in the rats injected with curcumin. Possible chelation of lead and cadmium by curcumin as its mechanism of neuroprotection against such heavy metal insult to the brain was investigated using electrochemical, ultraviolet spectrophotometric and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The results of the study show that there is an interaction between curcumin and both cadmium and lead, with the possible formation of a complex between the metal and this ligand. These results imply that curcumin could be used therapeutically to chelate these toxic metals, thus potentially reducing their neurotoxicity and tissue damage.

  13. Intranasal delivery of obidoxime to the brain prevents mortality and CNS damage from organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Arun, Peethambaran; Appu, Abhilash P; Vijayakumar, Nivetha; Figueiredo, Taíza H; Braga, Maria F M; Baskota, Sudikshya; Olsen, Cara H; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John; Frey, William H; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2016-03-01

    Intranasal delivery is an emerging method for bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB) and targeting therapeutics to the CNS. Oximes are used to counteract the effects of organophosphate poisoning, but they do not readily cross the BBB. Therefore, they cannot effectively counteract the central neuropathologies caused by cholinergic over-activation when administered peripherally. For these reasons we examined intranasal administration of oximes in an animal model of severe organophosphate poisoning to determine their effectiveness in reducing mortality and seizure-induced neuronal degeneration. Using the paraoxon model of organophosphate poisoning, we administered the standard treatment (intramuscular pralidoxime plus atropine sulphate) to all animals and then compared the effectiveness of intranasal application of obidoxime (OBD) to saline in the control groups. Intranasally administered OBD was effective in partially reducing paraoxon-induced acetylcholinesterase inhibition in the brain and substantially reduced seizure severity and duration. Further, intranasal OBD completely prevented mortality, which was 41% in the animals given standard treatment plus intranasal saline. Fluoro-Jade-B staining revealed extensive neuronal degeneration in the surviving saline-treated animals 24h after paraoxon administration, whereas no detectable degenerating neurons were observed in any of the animals given intranasal OBD 30min before or 5min after paraoxon administration. These findings demonstrate that intranasally administered oximes bypass the BBB more effectively than those administered peripherally and provide an effective method for protecting the brain from organophosphates. The addition of intranasally administered oximes to the current treatment regimen for organophosphate poisoning would improve efficacy, reducing both brain damage and mortality. PMID:26751814

  14. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUANG; WANG, SU; GUO, ZHI-GANG; HUANG, NING; ZHAO, FAN-RONG; ZHU, MO-LI; MA, LI-JUAN; LIANG, JIN-YING; ZHANG, YU-LIN; HUANG, ZHONG-LIN; WAN, GUANG-RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26640531

  15. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  16. Acute exposure of uranyl nitrate causes lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage in brain and bone of Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Badri Narain; Mishra, Kaushala Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium (U) toxicity, recent studies have shown that U can cross the blood-brain barrier to accumulate in the brain. Uranyl nitrate (U-238)induced oxidative damage was investigated in brain and bone of Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of uranyl nitrate at acute doses either nephrotoxic (576 microg of U/kg body weight) or subnephrotoxic (144 microg U/kg body weight). The health effects of U administration at 576 microg of U/kg body weight were seen in terms of decrease in food intake and no gain in body weight compared to respective controls. These alterations were correlated with increased lipid peroxidation as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in rat brain and bone. However, at lower dosage of U (144 microg U/kg body weight), no significant lipid peroxidation was observed in brain and bone. Histological examination of U-treated (576 microg of U/kg body weight) rat brain tissues showed marked and diffuse cystic degeneration and a similar pattern in histological alterations was observed in kidneys in treated animals; whereas no significant histological change was observed in rat brains and kidney treated with a lower dose of U (144 microg U/kg body weight). It is concluded that administration of U at an acute nephrotoxic dose caused oxidative stress in brain and bone manifested as lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage.

  17. An anticomplement agent that homes to the damaged brain and promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruseva, Marieta M.; Ramaglia, Valeria; Morgan, B. Paul; Harris, Claire L.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of complement is a key determinant of neuropathology and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and inhibition is neuroprotective. However, systemic complement is essential to fight infections, a critical complication of TBI. We describe a targeted complement inhibitor, comprising complement receptor of the Ig superfamily (CRIg) fused with complement regulator CD59a, designed to inhibit membrane attack complex (MAC) assembly at sites of C3b/iC3b deposition. CRIg and CD59a were linked via the IgG2a hinge, yielding CD59-2a-CRIg dimer with increased iC3b/C3b binding avidity and MAC inhibitory activity. CD59-2a-CRIg inhibited MAC formation and prevented complement-mediated lysis in vitro. CD59-2a-CRIg dimer bound C3b-coated surfaces with submicromolar affinity (KD). In experimental TBI, CD59-2a-CRIg administered posttrauma homed to sites of injury and significantly reduced MAC deposition, microglial accumulation, mitochondrial stress, and axonal damage and enhanced neurologic recovery compared with placebo controls. CD59-2a-CRIg inhibited MAC-induced inflammasome activation and IL-1β production in microglia. Given the important anti-infection roles of complement opsonization, site-targeted inhibition of MAC should be considered to promote recovery postneurotrauma. PMID:26578778

  18. Spirulina or dandelion-enriched diet of mothers alleviates lead-induced damages in brain and cerebellum of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Manel; Ghorbel-Koubaa, Fatma; Bonenfant-Magné, Michèle; Magné, Christian; Dauvergne, Xavier; Ksouri, Riadh; Krichen, Yousef; Abdelly, Chedly; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2012-07-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the toxic effects of a prenatal exposure to lead acetate on brain tissues of newborn rats, and potent protective effects of spirulina (Arthropira platensis) or dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) added to rat diet. Female rats were given a normal diet (control) or a diet enriched with spirulina or dandelion. Additionally, lead acetate was administered to one half of these rats through drinking water from the 5th day of gestation, to day 14 postpartum. Lead toxicity was assessed by measuring blood lead levels, brain weight, tissue damage, as well as protein content, lipid peroxidation and activities of antioxidant enzymes in brain tissues of neonates. Lead poisoning of mothers caused lead deposition in the brain and cerebellum of newborns and cerebellum tissue damages. Moreover, a significant decrease in weight and protein content of these tissues was found. Oxidative stress and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in brain tissues were also recorded. Conversely, no such damages or biochemical changes were found in neonates from plant fed lead-poisoned mothers. These results strongly suggest that beneficial effects of spirulina- or dandelion-added diet on lead-intoxicated rats proceeded through the reduction of the lead-induced oxidative stress and related damages.

  19. Biomarkers of Brain Damage and Postoperative Cognitive Disorders in Orthopedic Patients: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in orthopedic patients varies from 16% to 45%, although it can be as high as 72%. As a consequence, the hospitalization time of patients who developed POCD was longer, the outcome and quality of life were worsened, and prolonged medical and social assistance were necessary. In this review the short description of such biomarkers of brain damage as the S100B protein, NSE, GFAP, Tau protein, metalloproteinases, ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase, microtubule-associated protein, myelin basic protein, α-II spectrin breakdown products, and microRNA was made. The role of thromboembolic material in the development of cognitive decline was also discussed. Special attention was paid to optimization of surgical and anesthetic procedures in the prevention of postoperative cognitive decline. PMID:26417595

  20. Coming back to oneself: a case of anoxic brain damage from a phenomenological perspective.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Elisabeth L'orange

    2015-03-01

    Struck by a cardiac arrest that lasted 3/4 of an hour, a 53-year-old man suddenly collapsed one day at work. The result was a serious anoxic brain damage that developed into dementia. This essay presents the process of 'coming back to himself' while it questions what this concept might imply. The descriptions and analyses rest upon an ethnographic study of his life, at hospitals and then at home, assisted by his wife, who is also the author of this article. Theoretically, the analysis depends on Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception and is also based on the therapeutic use of music in treating people with dementia championed by Oliver Sachs. It is argued that the field of medicine has much to learn from the anthropological method of long-term observation, as well as theories of embodiment that see the body as simultaneously being an object and a subject. PMID:25300711

  1. Alleged brain damage, diminished capacity, mens rea, and misuse of medical concepts.

    PubMed

    Perr, I N

    1991-05-01

    As focus on the insanity defense diminishes, defendants may place emphasis on a lack of knowing or purposeful behavior in order to negate a criminal charge. This use of a mens rea defense in accord with Model Penal Code principles is exemplified by the current New Jersey statute. Such a defense may result in a lesser charge or a finding of not guilty. In addition to reviewing applicable law, this report presents a sex offense case in which remote brain damage was invoked as a purported basis for incapacity to formulate the required intent; the study also raises the issue of the inappropriate or questionable use of medical principles, a practice that diminishes professional credibility in the courts and in the community.

  2. [Relationship between location of stress erosive gastritis and brain damage in resuscitated patients].

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Fumio; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Mitsugi

    2002-03-01

    Patients after resuscitation from cardiopulmonary arrest often show stress erosive gastritis. This study investigated the relationship between the location of gastric mucosal injury and the degree of brain damage. Forty-five resuscitated patients with gastrointestinal bleeding complications were enrolled and were examined by esophagogastric fiberscope after 72 hours of hospitalization. Their brainstem and cerebral functions were evaluated brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and electrical encephalogram (EEG), respectively. Thirty patients showed complications with acute gastric lesions. Ten patients had gastric mucosal injury in the antrum and they all showed a good response for BAEP (I, III and V waves were positive). In contrast, patients without antral gastric mucosal lesions showed poor response for ABR (defect of III and V waves) and EGG (Hockerday Grade III or IV). These results indicate that fair brainstem function is necessary for stress erosive gastritis in gastric antrum.

  3. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Christian E.; Gross, James J.; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty – defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal – did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered. PMID:24711799

  4. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Salas, Christian E; Gross, James J; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty - defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal - did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered.

  5. Correlation of behavior with brain damage after in utero exposure to toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.; Kimler, B.F.

    1987-03-01

    Early postnatal behaviors involving sensorimotor integration were measured along with thickness of the sensorimotor cortex in rats irradiated with 1.0 Gy on gestational day 11 or 17. Body weight and morphology of anterior pituitary cells were recorded. Irradiation on day 17 was more effective in reducing cortical thickness and body weight and performance on behavioral tests and less effective in altering pituitary cells than irradiation on day 11. Prediction of behavioral effects, using cortical layers, body weight and pituitary morphology as predictors in stepwise multiple regression, was measured in both irradiated and control rats. Cortical Layer V more than I more than IV and VI as significant predictors of behavior. The best predictions accounted for about half of the variance in the data. When behavioral data were used to predict brain damage, the best predictor was negative geotaxis. Significant association of behavior with Layers V and VI was found. These experiments show the difficulties in correlating complex behaviors with specific brain areas and, at the same time, implicate especially Layer V of the sensorimotor cortex in these behaviors.

  6. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  7. Brain white matter damage in aging and cognitive ability in youth and older age.

    PubMed

    Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Booth, Tom; Murray, Catherine; Gow, Alan J; Penke, Lars; Morris, Zoe; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Royle, Natalie A; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Bastin, Mark E; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) reflect accumulating white matter damage with aging and impair cognition. The role of childhood intelligence is rarely considered in associations between cognitive impairment and WMH. We studied community-dwelling older people all born in 1936, in whom IQ had been assessed at age 11 years. We assessed medical histories, current cognitive ability and quantified WMH on MR imaging. Among 634 participants, mean age 72.7 (SD 0.7), age 11 IQ was the strongest predictor of late life cognitive ability. After accounting for age 11 IQ, greater WMH load was significantly associated with lower late life general cognitive ability (β = -0.14, p < 0.01) and processing speed (β = -0.19, p < 0.001). WMH were also associated independently with lower age 11 IQ (β = -0.08, p < 0.05) and hypertension. In conclusion, having more WMH is significantly associated with lower cognitive ability, after accounting for prior ability, age 11IQ. Early-life IQ also influenced WMH in later life. Determining how lower IQ in youth leads to increasing brain damage with aging is important for future successful cognitive aging.

  8. Rewarding brain stimulation reverses the disruptive effect of amygdala damage on emotional learning.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Elisabet; Ramoneda, Marc; Aldavert-Vera, Laura; Huguet, Gemma; Morgado-Bernal, Ignacio; Segura-Torres, Pilar

    2014-11-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (SS) in the lateral hypothalamus, a rewarding deep-brain stimulation, is able to improve acquisition and retention of implicit and explicit memory tasks in rats. SS treatment is also able to reverse cognitive deficits associated with aging or with experimental brain injuries and evaluated in a two-way active avoidance (2wAA) task. The main objective of the present study was to explore the potential of the SS treatment to reverse the complete learning and memory impairment caused by bilateral lesion in the lateral amygdala (LA). The effects of post-training SS, administered after each acquisition session, were evaluated on distributed 2wAA acquisition and 10-day retention in rats with electrolytic bilateral LA lesions. SS effect in acetylcholinestaresase (AchE) activity was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in LA-preserved and Central nuclei (Ce) of the amygdala of LA-damaged rats. Results showed that LA lesion over 40% completely impeded 2wAA acquisition and retention. Post-training SS in the LA-lesioned rats improved conditioning and retention compared with both the lesioned but non-SS treated and the non-lesioned control rats. SS treatment also seemed to induce a decrease in AchE activity in the LA-preserved area of the lesioned rats, but no effects were observed in the Ce. This empirical evidence supports the idea that self-administered rewarding stimulation is able to completely counteract the 2wAA acquisition and retention deficits induced by LA lesion. Cholinergic mechanisms in preserved LA and the contribution of other brain memory-related areas activated by SS could mediate the compensatory effect observed. PMID:25106737

  9. Lesion correlates of impairments in actual tool use following unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed

    Salazar-López, E; Schwaiger, B J; Hermsdörfer, J

    2016-04-01

    To understand how the brain controls actions involving tools, tests have been developed employing different paradigms such as pantomime, imitation and real tool use. The relevant areas have been localized in the premotor cortex, the middle temporal gyrus and the superior and inferior parietal lobe. This study employs Voxel Lesion Symptom Mapping to relate the functional impairment in actual tool use with extent and localization of the structural damage in the left (LBD, N=31) and right (RBD, N=19) hemisphere in chronic stroke patients. A series of 12 tools was presented to participants in a carousel. In addition, a non-tool condition tested the prescribed manipulation of a bar. The execution was scored according to an apraxic error scale based on the dimensions grasp, movement, direction and space. Results in the LBD group show that the ventro-dorsal stream constitutes the core of the defective network responsible for impaired tool use; it is composed of the inferior parietal lobe, the supramarginal and angular gyrus and the dorsal premotor cortex. In addition, involvement of regions in the temporal lobe, the rolandic operculum, the ventral premotor cortex and the middle occipital gyrus provide evidence of the role of the ventral stream in this task. Brain areas related to the use of the bar largely overlapped with this network. For patients with RBD data were less conclusive; however, a trend for the involvement of the temporal lobe in apraxic errors was manifested. Skilled bar manipulation depended on the same temporal area in these patients. Therefore, actual tool use depends on a well described left fronto-parietal-temporal network. RBD affects actual tool use, however the underlying neural processes may be more widely distributed and more heterogeneous. Goal directed manipulation of non-tool objects seems to involve very similar brain areas as tool use, suggesting that both types of manipulation share identical processes and neural representations. PMID

  10. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  11. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  12. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2), an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 10(6) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2) for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  13. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600–1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2, an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 106 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2 for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. PMID:25206807

  14. Nature and distribution of brain lesions in rats intoxicated with 3-nitropropionic acid: a type of hypoxic (energy deficient) brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, B F; Gould, D H

    1987-01-01

    The clinical signs and morphological brain lesions associated with histotoxic hypoxia induced by subcutaneous injection of 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA) in rats are described, and compared to hypoxic brain damage from other causes including ischemia and hypoglycemia. The brains were perfusion-fixed with paraformaldehyde/glutaraldehyde fixative, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Intoxicated rats developed severe neurological disease characterized by somnolence, uncoordinated gait with stereotypical paddling movements, and ventral or lateral recumbency. Recumbent rats had a selective, bilaterally symmetrical pattern of severe morphological injury in the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, and thalamus. Recumbency was a consistent indicator of the development of morphological brain lesions. In contrast to reports describing rat models of ischemia and hypoglycemia, morphological injury was not seen in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices of NPA-intoxicated rats. Ultrastructurally, neuronal alterations ranged from chromatin clumping with increased cytoplasmic lucency to severe cellular shrinkage or swelling with marked mitochondrial swelling (high amplitude swelling). White matter alterations included axonal swelling and adaxonal splitting of myelin lamellae. Vascular changes included perivascular deposits of proteinaceous material presumably from leakage of serum proteins, variable electron lucency of endothelial cell cytoplasm, an apparent increase in pinocytotic vesicles, rare platelet thrombosis of capillaries, and rare intravascular blebs of luminal plasma membrane. As a model of brain damage following energy deficiency, NPA intoxication has the advantages of producing morphological brain injury in a highly predictable anatomical pattern, and at a time paralleling the onset of clinical recumbency.

  15. Swimming training attenuates oxidative damage and increases enzymatic but not non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Nonato, L.F.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Tossige-Gomes, R.; Soares, A.A.; Soares, B.A.; Freitas, D.A.; Oliveira, M.X.; Mendonça, V.A.; Lacerda, A.C.; Massensini, A.R.; Leite, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that physical training ameliorates brain oxidative function after injuries by enhancing the levels of neurotrophic factors and oxidative status, there is little evidence addressing the influence of exercise training itself on brain oxidative damage and data is conflicting. This study investigated the effect of well-established swimming training protocol on lipid peroxidation and components of antioxidant system in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were randomized into trained (5 days/week, 8 weeks, 30 min; n=8) and non-trained (n=7) groups. Forty-eight hours after the last session of exercise, animals were euthanized and the brain was collected for oxidative stress analysis. Swimming training decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels (P<0.05) and increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P<0.05) with no effect on brain non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity, estimated by FRAP (ferric-reducing antioxidant power) assay (P>0.05). Moreover, the swimming training promoted metabolic adaptations, such as increased maximal workload capacity (P<0.05) and maintenance of body weight. In this context, the reduced TBARS content and increased SOD antioxidant activity induced by 8 weeks of swimming training are key factors in promoting brain resistance. In conclusion, swimming training attenuated oxidative damage and increased enzymatic antioxidant but not non-enzymatic status in the rat brain. PMID:27706439

  16. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed.

  17. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed. PMID:27496035

  18. COMMUNICATION TRAINING IN CHILDHOOD BRAIN DAMAGE, A MONOGRAPH IN THE BANNERSTONE DIVISION OF AMERICAN LECTURES IN SPEECH AND HEARING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MECHAM, MERLIN J.; AND OTHERS

    INTENDED AS A TEXT SOURCE BOOK, OR PRACTICAL REFERENCE, THE BOOK DISCUSSES SPEECH AND HEARING PROBLEMS, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND LINGUISTIC IMPLICATIONS, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR CEREBRAL PALSIED AND BRAIN DAMAGED CHILDREN. NUMBER AND COMPLEXITY OF SPEECH AND HEARING PROBLEMS ARE EMPHASIZED, I.E., NEUROMUSCULAR INVOLVEMENT, ARTICULATION, RHYTHM, VOICE…

  19. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt Test for Both Black and White Brain-Damaged Patients Using Two Scoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Oliver T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study tested for cultural bias in the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 72 black and white patients diagnosed as either brain damaged or psychiatric. Bender protocols were scored by Pascal-Suttell and Hain systems. No race effect appeared except for the Pascal-Suttell system for which blacks scored significantly better. (Author)

  20. It's Either Brain Damage or No Father: The False Issue of Deficit Vs. Difference Models of Afro-American Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Charles A.

    The distorting notions of the deficit and different Afro-American subculture have led white psychologists and guidance counselors to diagnose incorrectly behavior aberrations in Black children. A case study of a Black child who was hastily diagnosed and institutionalized as brain damaged, retarded, and psychotic illustrates this point. A…

  1. Poor Hand-Pointing to Sounds in Right Brain-Damaged Patients: Not Just a Problem of Spatial-Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavani, Francesco; Farne, Alessandro; Ladavas, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    We asked 22 right brain-damaged (RBD) patients and 11 elderly healthy controls to perform hand-pointing movements to free-field unseen sounds, while modulating two non-auditory variables: the initial position of the responding hand (left, centre or right) and the presence or absence of task-irrelevant ambient vision. RBD patients suffering from…

  2. Brain damage from sup 125 I brachytherapy evaluated by MR imaging, a blood-brain barrier tracer, and light and electron microscopy in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Marotta, T.; Stewart, P.; Glen, J.; Resch, L.; Henkelman, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Changes in normal rat brain were studied acutely, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following interstitial brachytherapy with high-activity {sup 125}I seeds. An 80-Gy radiation dose was administered to an area with a 5.5-mm radius. Effects were measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (with and without gadolinium enhancement), leakage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Significant histological damage was seen at radiation doses above 295 Gy, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier was observed only in tissue receiving a dose of 165 Gy or greater. Blood-brain barrier breakdown increased up to the 6-month time point, and thereafter appeared to stabilize or decrease. The area of blood-brain barrier disruption indicated by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging was greater than that indicated by leakage of HRP.

  3. Cerebral Visual Impairment: which perceptive visual dysfunctions can be expected in children with brain damage? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boot, F H; Pel, J J M; van der Steen, J; Evenhuis, H M

    2010-01-01

    The current definition of Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) includes all visual dysfunctions caused by damage to, or malfunctioning of, the retrochiasmatic visual pathways in the absence of damage to the anterior visual pathways or any major ocular disease. CVI is diagnosed by exclusion and the existence of many different causes and symptoms make it an overall non-categorized group. To date, no discrimination is made within CVI based on types of perceptive visual dysfunctions. The aim of this review was to outline which perceptive visual dysfunctions are to be expected based on a number of etiologies of brain damage and brain development disorders with their onset in the pre-, peri- or postnatal period. For each period two etiologies were chosen as the main characteristic brain damage. For each etiology a main search was performed. The selection of the articles was based on the following criteria: age, etiology, imaging, central pathology and perceptive visual function test. The perceptive visual functions included for this review were object recognition, face recognition, visual memory, orientation, visual spatial perception, motion perception and simultaneous perception. Our search resulted in 11 key articles. A diversity of research history is performed for the selected etiologies and their relation to perceptive visual dysfunctions. Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL) was most studied, whereas the main tested perceptive visual function was visual spatial perception. As a conclusion, the present status of research in the field of CVI does not allow to correlate between etiology, location and perceptive visual dysfunctions in children with brain damage or a brain development disorder. A limiting factor could be the small number of objective tests performed in children experiencing problems in visual processing. Based on recent insights in central visual information processing, we recommend an alternative approach for the definition of CVI that is based on

  4. Detection of chronic brain damage by diffusion-weighted imaging with multiple b values in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tieli; Han, Yunpeng; Tang, Lemei; Wu, Jianlin; Miao, Yanwei; Gao, Bingbing; Shang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of parameters obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with multiple b values in the detection of chronic brain damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. We enrolled 30 patients with or without abnormalities on brain magnetic resonance imaging (lacunar infarction, leukoaraiosis, and/or brain atrophy) and 15 nondiabetic controls; obtained DWI parameters that included apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fast ADC (ADCfast), slow ADC (ADCslow), fraction of fast ADC (f), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and stretched exponential (α); and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the performance of parameters for the detection of chronic brain damage. The parameters ADC, ADCslow, f, and DDC were increased, whereas parameters ADCfast and α were decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared with controls without diabetes. The centrum semiovale showed the most significant change in the evaluated parameters, and the changes in parameters ADCslow, f, and DDC were greater than the changes in other parameters. There was no significance between parameters of the biexponential model (ADCfast, ADCslow, f) and parameters of the stretched model (DDC, α), but parameters of both these models were superior to the parameter of monoexponential model (ADC). Moreover, ROC analysis showed that ADCslow of the centrum semiovale supplied by the anterior cerebral artery had the highest performance for detection of chronic brain damage (area under the ROC curve of 0.987, 93.3% sensitivity, and 100% specificity). Our study shows that DWI with multiple b values can quantitatively access chronic brain damage and may be used for detection and monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27583912

  5. Detection of chronic brain damage by diffusion-weighted imaging with multiple b values in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tieli; Han, Yunpeng; Tang, Lemei; Wu, Jianlin; Miao, Yanwei; Gao, Bingbing; Shang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of parameters obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with multiple b values in the detection of chronic brain damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.We enrolled 30 patients with or without abnormalities on brain magnetic resonance imaging (lacunar infarction, leukoaraiosis, and/or brain atrophy) and 15 nondiabetic controls; obtained DWI parameters that included apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fast ADC (ADCfast), slow ADC (ADCslow), fraction of fast ADC (f), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and stretched exponential (α); and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the performance of parameters for the detection of chronic brain damage.The parameters ADC, ADCslow, f, and DDC were increased, whereas parameters ADCfast and α were decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared with controls without diabetes. The centrum semiovale showed the most significant change in the evaluated parameters, and the changes in parameters ADCslow, f, and DDC were greater than the changes in other parameters. There was no significance between parameters of the biexponential model (ADCfast, ADCslow, f) and parameters of the stretched model (DDC, α), but parameters of both these models were superior to the parameter of monoexponential model (ADC). Moreover, ROC analysis showed that ADCslow of the centrum semiovale supplied by the anterior cerebral artery had the highest performance for detection of chronic brain damage (area under the ROC curve of 0.987, 93.3% sensitivity, and 100% specificity).Our study shows that DWI with multiple b values can quantitatively access chronic brain damage and may be used for detection and monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27583912

  6. Diversity of endurance training effects on antioxidant defenses and oxidative damage in different brain regions of adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, M; Jagsz, S; Sadowska-Krepa, E; Chrapusta, S J; Klapcinska, B; Langfort, J

    2015-08-01

    Studies on the effect of physical activity on brain oxidative stress, performed mostly in adult rats, have shown that moderate aerobic activity increases resistance to oxidative stress and reduces cellular damage. These effects can greatly differ between various brain regions. The postnatal period of the highest brain sensitivity to various stimuli is adolescence. We hypothesized that endurance training will modify brain antioxidant barrier differently in various regions, depending on their role in locomotion. Therefore, we studied the effect of moderate intensity endurance training on the activities of selected antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, gluthathione peroxidase and catalase and the contents of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (the key index of lipid peroxidation) and glutathione in several brain regions with dissimilar relationship to locomotion, as well as in circulating blood. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the training on nitric oxide synthase activity that may be a major player in exercise-related oxidative stress in brain regions that are directly involved in the locomotion control and execution (the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum). The training significantly enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity only in the latter three regions. Surprisingly, it elevated the activities of all studied antioxidant enzymes (excepting gluthathione peroxidase) in the neocortex, while no appreciable change in these activities was found in either the cerebellum (except for elevated catalase activity), or the striatum, or the midbrain. The training also elevated total glutathione content (a key protector of brain proteins under the conditions of enhanced nitric oxide production) in the cerebellum and striatum, but not in the other regions. The observed brain changes greatly differed from those in circulating blood and did not prevent the training-related increases in oxidative damage as evidenced by elevations in cerebellar and striatal

  7. The protective effect of M40401, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, on post-ischemic brain damage in Mongolian gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Iannone, Michelangelo; Muscoli, Carolina; Palma, Ernesto; Granato, Teresa; Modesti, Andrea; Nisticò, Robert; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Salvemini, Daniela

    2003-01-01

    Background Overproduction of free radical species has been shown to occur in brain tissues after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, most of free radical scavengers known to antagonize oxidative damage (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase), are unable to protect against ischemia-reperfusion brain injury when given in vivo, an effect mainly due to their difficulty to gain access to brain tissues. Here we studied the effect of a low molecular weight superoxide dismutase mimetic (M40401) in brain damage subsequent to ischemia-reperfusion injury in Mongolian gerbils. Results In animals undergoing ischemia-reperfusion injury, neuropathological and ultrastructural changes were monitored for 1–7 days either in the presence or in the absence of M40401 after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCO). Administration of M40401 (1–40 mg/kg, given i.p. 1 h after BCCO) protected against post-ischemic, ultrastructural and neuropathological changes occurring within the hippocampal CA1 area. The protective effect of M40401 was associated with a significant reduction of the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA; a marker of lipid peroxidation) in ischemic brain tissues after ischemia-reperfusion. Conclusion Taken together, these results demonstrate that M40401 provides protective effects when given early after the induction of ischemia-reperfusion of brain tissues and suggest the possible use of such compounds in the treatment of neurological dysfunction subsequent to cerebral flow disturbances. PMID:12809567

  8. Development of brain damage as measured by brain impedance recordings, and changes in heart rate, and blood pressure induced by different stunning and killing methods.

    PubMed

    Savenije, B; Lambooij, E; Gerritzen, M A; Korf, J

    2002-04-01

    Poultry are electrically stunned before slaughter to induce unconsciousness and to immobilize the chickens for easier killing. From a welfare point of view, electrical stunning should induce immediate and lasting unconsciousness in the chicken. As an alternative to electroencephalography, which measures brain electrical activity, this study used brain impedance recordings, which measure brain metabolic activity, to determine the onset and development of brain damage. Fifty-six chickens were surgically equipped with brain electrodes and a canula in the wing artery and were subjected to one of seven stunning and killing methods: whole body electrical stunning; head-only electrical stunning at 50, 100 or 150 V; or an i.v. injection with MgCl2. After 30 s, the chickens were exsanguinated. Brain impedance and blood pressure were measured. Extracellular volume was determined from the brain impedance data and heart rate from the blood pressure data. An immediate and progressive reduction in extracellular volume in all chickens was found only with whole body stunning at 150 V. This treatment also caused cardiac fibrillation or arrest in all chickens. With all other electrical stunning treatments, extracellular volume was immediately reduced in some but not all birds, and cardiac fibrillation or arrest was not often found. Ischemic conditions, caused by cessation of the circulation, stimulated this epileptic effect. A stunner setting of 150 V is therefore recommended to ensure immediate and lasting unconsciousness, which is a requirement for humane slaughter. PMID:11989758

  9. Elevated Endogenous Erythropoietin Concentrations Are Associated with Increased Risk of Brain Damage in Extremely Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Allred, Elizabeth; Logan, J. Wells; Fichorova, Raina N.; Engelke, Stephen; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Holm, Mari; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to determine, in very preterm infants, whether elevated perinatal erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations are associated with increased risks of indicators of brain damage, and whether this risk differs by the co-occurrence or absence of intermittent or sustained systemic inflammation (ISSI). Methods Protein concentrations were measured in blood collected from 786 infants born before the 28th week of gestation. EPO was measured on postnatal day 14, and 25 inflammation-related proteins were measured weekly during the first 2 postnatal weeks. We defined ISSI as a concentration in the top quartile of each of 25 inflammation-related proteins on two separate days a week apart. Hypererythropoietinemia (hyperEPO) was defined as the highest quartile for gestational age on postnatal day 14. Using logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression models, we compared risks of brain damage among neonates with hyperEPO only, ISSI only, and hyperEPO+ISSI, to those who had neither hyperEPO nor ISSI, adjusting for gestational age. Results Newborns with hyperEPO, regardless of ISSI, were more than twice as likely as those without to have very low (< 55) Mental (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.5-3.5) and/or Psychomotor (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.6-3.7) Development Indices (MDI, PDI), and microcephaly at age two years (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.5-3.8). Newborns with both hyperEPO and ISSI had significantly increased risks of ventriculomegaly, hemiparetic cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and MDI and PDI < 55 (ORs ranged from 2.2-6.3), but not hypoechoic lesions or other forms of cerebral palsy, relative to newborns with neither hyperEPO nor ISSI. Conclusion hyperEPO, regardless of ISSI, is associated with elevated risks of very low MDI and PDI, and microcephaly, but not with any form of cerebral palsy. Children with both hyperEPO and ISSI are at higher risk than others of very low MDI and PDI, ventriculomegaly, hemiparetic cerebral palsy, and microcephaly. PMID:25793991

  10. Beneficial effects of TCP on soman intoxication in guinea pigs: seizures, brain damage and learning behaviour.

    PubMed

    de Groot, D M; Bierman, E P; Bruijnzeel, P L; Carpentier, P; Kulig, B M; Lallement, G; Melchers, B P; Philippens, I H; van Huygevoort, A H

    2001-12-01

    involvement of NMDA receptors in the maintenance of soman-induced seizures and the development of brain damage. They underline the current hypothesis that cholinergic mechanisms are responsible for eliciting seizure activity after soman and that, most likely, the subsequent recruitment of other excitatory neurotransmitters and loss of inhibitory control are responsible for the maintenance of seizures and the development of subsequent brain damage. PMID:11920922

  11. Implicit and Explicit Routes to Recognize the Own Body: Evidence from Brain Damaged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Candini, Michela; Farinelli, Marina; Ferri, Francesca; Avanzi, Stefano; Cevolani, Daniela; Gallese, Vittorio; Northoff, Georg; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Much research suggested that recognizing our own body-parts and attributing a body-part to our physical self-likely involve distinct processes. Accordingly, facilitation for self-body-parts was found when an implicit, but not an explicit, self-recognition was required. Here, we assess whether implicit and explicit bodily self-recognition is mediated by different cerebral networks and can be selectively impaired after brain lesion. To this aim, right- (RBD) and left- (LBD) brain damaged patients and age-matched controls were presented with rotated pictures of either self- or other-people hands. In the Implicit task participants were submitted to hand laterality judgments. In the Explicit task they had to judge whether the hand belonged, or not, to them. In the Implicit task, controls and LBD patients, but not RBD patients, showed an advantage for self-body stimuli. In the Explicit task a disadvantage emerged for self-compared to others' body stimuli in controls as well as in patients. Moreover, when we directly compared the performance of patients and controls, we found RBD, but not LBD, patients to be impaired in both the implicit and explicit recognition of self-body-part stimuli. Conversely, no differences were found for others' body-part stimuli. Crucially, 40% RBD patients showed a selective deficit for implicit processing of self-body-part stimuli, whereas 27% of them showed a selective deficit in the explicit recognition of their own body. Additionally, we provide anatomical evidence revealing the neural basis of this dissociation. Based on both behavioral and anatomical data, we suggest that different areas of the right hemisphere underpin implicit and explicit self-body knowledge.

  12. Attenuation of rat ischemic brain damage by aged garlic extracts: a possible protecting mechanism as antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Numagami, Y; Sato, S; Ohnishi, S T

    1996-08-01

    Effects of an aged garlic extract and its thioallyl components on rat brain ischemia were examined using a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and a transient global ischemia model. In focal ischemia, an aged garlic extract, S-allyl cysteine (SAC), Allyl sulfide (AS) or Allyl disulfide (ADS) was administered 30 min prior to ischemic insult. Three days after ischemic insult, water contents of both ischemic and contralateral hemispheres were measured to assess the degree of ischemic damage. The water content of the ischemic control (no drug treatment) group was 81.50 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SEM). It was significantly reduced with the administration of 300 mg/kg of SAC; the water content was 80.66 +/- 0.11% (P < 0.001). The histological observation using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining demonstrated that the administration of SAC reduced infarct volume. Neither AS nor ADS was effective. In global ischemia, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured ex vivo using a spin-trapping agent, alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The production of ROS had two peaks; first at 5 min and second at 20 min after reperfusion. Both SAC and 7-nitro indazole, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not attenuate the amount of ROS produced at the first peak, but did the amount of the second peak. A possible involvement of peroxinitrite, which may be formed from superoxide and nitric oxide and is known to be highly toxic in ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain, was suggested.

  13. Implicit and Explicit Routes to Recognize the Own Body: Evidence from Brain Damaged Patients.

    PubMed

    Candini, Michela; Farinelli, Marina; Ferri, Francesca; Avanzi, Stefano; Cevolani, Daniela; Gallese, Vittorio; Northoff, Georg; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Much research suggested that recognizing our own body-parts and attributing a body-part to our physical self-likely involve distinct processes. Accordingly, facilitation for self-body-parts was found when an implicit, but not an explicit, self-recognition was required. Here, we assess whether implicit and explicit bodily self-recognition is mediated by different cerebral networks and can be selectively impaired after brain lesion. To this aim, right- (RBD) and left- (LBD) brain damaged patients and age-matched controls were presented with rotated pictures of either self- or other-people hands. In the Implicit task participants were submitted to hand laterality judgments. In the Explicit task they had to judge whether the hand belonged, or not, to them. In the Implicit task, controls and LBD patients, but not RBD patients, showed an advantage for self-body stimuli. In the Explicit task a disadvantage emerged for self-compared to others' body stimuli in controls as well as in patients. Moreover, when we directly compared the performance of patients and controls, we found RBD, but not LBD, patients to be impaired in both the implicit and explicit recognition of self-body-part stimuli. Conversely, no differences were found for others' body-part stimuli. Crucially, 40% RBD patients showed a selective deficit for implicit processing of self-body-part stimuli, whereas 27% of them showed a selective deficit in the explicit recognition of their own body. Additionally, we provide anatomical evidence revealing the neural basis of this dissociation. Based on both behavioral and anatomical data, we suggest that different areas of the right hemisphere underpin implicit and explicit self-body knowledge. PMID:27630550

  14. Association of retinal and macular damage with brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Jan; Wernecke, Klaus D; Bock, Markus; Gaede, Gunnar; Wuerfel, Jens T; Pfueller, Caspar F; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Freing, Alina; Brandt, Alexander U; Friedemann, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Neuroaxonal degeneration in the central nervous system contributes substantially to the long term disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, in vivo determination and monitoring of neurodegeneration remain difficult. As the widely used MRI-based approaches, including the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) have some limitations, complementary in vivo measures for neurodegeneration are necessary. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potent tool for the detection of MS-related retinal neurodegeneration. However, crucial aspects including the association between OCT- and MRI-based atrophy measures or the impact of MS-related parameters on OCT parameters are still unclear. In this large prospective cross-sectional study on 104 relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients we evaluated the associations of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and total macular volume (TMV) with BPF and addressed the impact of disease-determining parameters on RNFLT, TMV or BPF. BPF, normalized for subject head size, was estimated with SIENAX. Relations were analyzed primarily by Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models considering within-patient inter-eye relations. We found that both RNFLT (p = 0.019, GEE) and TMV (p = 0.004, GEE) associate with BPF. RNFLT was furthermore linked to the disease duration (p<0.001, GEE) but neither to disease severity nor patients' age. Contrarily, BPF was rather associated with severity (p<0.001, GEE) than disease duration and was confounded by age (p<0.001, GEE). TMV was not associated with any of these parameters. Thus, we conclude that in RRMS patients with relatively short disease duration and rather mild disability RNFLT and TMV reflect brain atrophy and are thus promising parameters to evaluate neurodegeneration in MS. Furthermore, our data suggest that RNFLT and BPF reflect different aspects of MS. Whereas BPF best reflects disease severity, RNFLT might be the better parameter for monitoring axonal damage

  15. Implicit and Explicit Routes to Recognize the Own Body: Evidence from Brain Damaged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Candini, Michela; Farinelli, Marina; Ferri, Francesca; Avanzi, Stefano; Cevolani, Daniela; Gallese, Vittorio; Northoff, Georg; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Much research suggested that recognizing our own body-parts and attributing a body-part to our physical self-likely involve distinct processes. Accordingly, facilitation for self-body-parts was found when an implicit, but not an explicit, self-recognition was required. Here, we assess whether implicit and explicit bodily self-recognition is mediated by different cerebral networks and can be selectively impaired after brain lesion. To this aim, right- (RBD) and left- (LBD) brain damaged patients and age-matched controls were presented with rotated pictures of either self- or other-people hands. In the Implicit task participants were submitted to hand laterality judgments. In the Explicit task they had to judge whether the hand belonged, or not, to them. In the Implicit task, controls and LBD patients, but not RBD patients, showed an advantage for self-body stimuli. In the Explicit task a disadvantage emerged for self-compared to others' body stimuli in controls as well as in patients. Moreover, when we directly compared the performance of patients and controls, we found RBD, but not LBD, patients to be impaired in both the implicit and explicit recognition of self-body-part stimuli. Conversely, no differences were found for others' body-part stimuli. Crucially, 40% RBD patients showed a selective deficit for implicit processing of self-body-part stimuli, whereas 27% of them showed a selective deficit in the explicit recognition of their own body. Additionally, we provide anatomical evidence revealing the neural basis of this dissociation. Based on both behavioral and anatomical data, we suggest that different areas of the right hemisphere underpin implicit and explicit self-body knowledge. PMID:27630550

  16. Pomegranate from Oman Alleviates the Brain Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Braidy, Nady; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Pomegranates (石榴 Shí Liú) contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances, as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Here, the effects of the antioxidant-rich pomegranate fruit grown in Oman on brain oxidative stress status were tested in the AD transgenic mouse. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice were fed with 4% pomegranate or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress was found in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls. Concomitantly, decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes was observed in Tg2576 mice treated with control diet. Supplementation with 4% pomegranate attenuated oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), and Glutathione S transferase (GST)]. The activities of membrane-bound enzymes [Na+ K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] were altered in the brain regions of Tg2576 mouse treated with control diet, and 4% pomegranate supplementation was able to restore the activities of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. The results suggest that the therapeutic potential of 4% pomegranate in the treatment of AD might be associated with counteracting the oxidative stress by the presence of active phytochemicals in it. PMID:25379464

  17. Peripheral Nerve Damage Facilitates Functional Innervation of Brain Grafts in Adult Sensory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Ford F.; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Lee, Stefan M.

    1989-01-01

    The neuralb pathways that relay information from cutaneous receptors to the cortex provide the somatic sensory information needed for cortical function. The last sensory relay neurons in this pathway have cell bodies in the thalamus and axons that synapse on neurons in the somatosensory cortex. After cortical lesions that damage mature thalamocortical fibers in the somatosensory cortex, we have attempted to reestablish somatosensory cortical function by grafting embryonic neocortical cells into the lesioned area. Such grafts survive in adult host animals but are not innervated by thalamic neurons, and consequently the grafted neurons show little if any spontaneous activity and no responses to cutaneous stimuli. We have reported that transection of peripheral sensory nerves prior to grafting ``conditions'' or ``primes'' the thalamic neurons in the ventrobasal complex so that they extend axons into grafts subsequently placed in the cortical domain of the cut nerve. In this report we present evidence that the ingrowth of ventrobasal fibers leads to graft neurons that become functionally integrated into the sensory circuitry of the host brain. Specifically, the conditioning lesions made prior to grafting produce graft neurons that are spontaneously active and can be driven by natural activation of cutaneous receptors or electrical stimulation of the transected nerve after it regenerates. Furthermore, oxidative metabolism in these grafts reaches levels that are comparable to normal cortex, whereas without prior nerve cut, oxidative metabolism is abnormally low in neocortical grafts. We conclude that damage to the sensory periphery transsynaptically stimulates reorganization of sensory pathways through mechanisms that include axonal elongation and functional synaptogenesis.

  18. The perception of peripersonal space in right and left brain damage hemiplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Angela; Carlier, Mauraine; Hassaini, Sabrina; Martin, Yves; Coello, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Peripersonal space, as opposed to extrapersonal space, is the space that contains reachable objects and in which multisensory and sensorimotor integration is enhanced. Thus, the perception of peripersonal space requires combining information on the spatial properties of the environment with information on the current capacity to act. In support of this, recent studies have provided converging evidences that perceiving objects in peripersonal space activates a neural network overlapping with that subtending voluntary motor action and motor imagery. Other studies have also underlined the dominant role of the right hemisphere (RH) in motor planning and of the left hemisphere (LH) in on-line motor guiding, respectively. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a right or left hemiplegia in the perception of peripersonal space. 16 hemiplegic patients with brain damage to the left (LH) or right (RH) hemisphere and eight matched healthy controls performed a color discrimination, a motor imagery and a reachability judgment task. Analyses of response times and accuracy revealed no variation among the three groups in the color discrimination task, suggesting the absence of any specific perceptual or decisional deficits in the patient groups. In contrast, the patient groups revealed longer response times in the motor imagery task when performed in reference to the hemiplegic arm (RH and LH) or to the healthy arm (RH). Moreover, RH group showed longer response times in the reachability judgment task, but only for stimuli located at the boundary of peripersonal space, which was furthermore significantly reduced in size. Considered together, these results confirm the crucial role of the motor system in motor imagery task and the perception of peripersonal space. They also revealed that RH damage has a more detrimental effect on reachability estimates, suggesting that motor planning processes contribute specifically to the perception of peripersonal space.

  19. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  20. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study.

  1. Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators: central role of the brain

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2006-01-01

    The mind involves the whole body, and two-way communication between the brain and the cardiovascular, immune, and other systems via neural and endocrine mechanisms. Stress is a condition of the mind-body interaction, and a factor in the expression of disease that differs among individuals. It is not just the dramatic stressful events that exact their toll, but rather the many events of daily life that elevate and sustain activities of physiological systems and cause sleep deprivation, overeating, and other health-damaging behaviors, producing the feeling of being “stressed out.” Over time, this results in wear and tear on the body, which is called “allostatic load,” and it reflects not only the impact of life experiences but also of genetic load, individual lifestyle habits reflecting items such as diet, exercise, and substance abuse, and developmental experiences that set life-long patterns of behavior and physiological reactivity. Hormones associated with stress and allostatic load protect the body in the short run and promote adaptation by the process known as allostasis, but in the long run allostatic load causes changes in the body that can lead to disease. The brain is the key organ of stress, allostasis, and allostatic load, because it determines what is threatening and therefore stressful, and also determines the physiological and behavioral responses. Brain regions such as the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex respond to acute and chronic stress by undergoing structural remodeling, which alters behavioral and physiological responses. Translational studies in humans with structural and functional imaging reveal smaller hippocampal volume in stress-related conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment in aging and prolonged major depressive illness, as well as in individuals with low self-esteem. Alterations in amygdala and prefrontal cortex are also reported. Besides Pharmaceuticals, approaches to alleviate chronic stress and reduce

  2. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  3. Curcumin alleviates brain edema by lowering AQP4 expression levels in a rat model of hypoxia-hypercapnia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    YU, LIN-SHENG; FAN, YAN-YAN; YE, GUANGHUA; LI, JUNLI; FENG, XIANG-PING; LIN, KEZHI; DONG, MIUWU; WANG, ZHENYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of curcumin (CU) against brain edema in a rat model of hypoxia-hypercapnia (HH)-induced brain damage (HHBD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups, including a control group and four treatment groups. The rats in the control group were raised under normal laboratory conditions and were injected with water, whereas the rats in the treatment groups were exposed to a low O2/high CO2 environment simulating HH conditions, and were injected with water, CU, dimethyl sulfoxide (solvent control) or monosialoganglioside GM1. After 2 weeks, the morphological characteristics of the brain tissues were analyzed using optical and electron microscopy. In addition, aquaporin (AQP)-4 protein expression levels in brain tissue samples were analyzed using streptavidin-biotin complex immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and mRNA expression levels were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Severe brain edema, tissue structure disruption and increased AQP4 expression levels were detected in the brain tissues of the HH rats. Conversely, the rats treated with CU or GM1 exhibited attenuated HHBD-induced brain edema and tissue structure disruption, and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of AQP4. The results of the present study suggested that CU treatment was able to attenuate HHBD-induced brain edema by downregulating the expression levels of AQP4 in a rat model. Therefore, CU may be considered a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of patients with brain edema. PMID:26997983

  4. Alteration in rectification of potassium channels in perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Penghui; Wang, Liyan; Deng, Qiyue; Ruan, Huaizhen; Cai, Wenqin

    2015-01-15

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are susceptible to perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage (HIBD), which results in infant cerebral palsy due to the effects on myelination. The origin of OPC vulnerability in HIBD, however, remains controversial. In this study, we defined the HIBD punctate lesions by MRI diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) in postnatal 7-day-old rats. The electrophysiological functional properties of OPCs in HIBD were recorded by patch-clamp in acute cerebral cortex slices. The slices were intracellularly injected with Lucifer yellow and immunohistochemically labeled with NG2 antibody to identify local OPCs. Passive membrane properties and K(+) channel functions in OPCs were analyzed to estimate the onset of vulnerability in HIBD. The resting membrane potential, membrane resistance, and membrane capacitance of OPCs were increased in both the gray and white matter of the cerebral cortex. OPCs in both the gray and white matter exhibited voltage-dependent K(+) currents, which consisted of the initiated rectified potassium currents (IA) and the sustained rectified currents (IK). The significant alternation in membrane resistance was influenced by the diversity of potassium channel kinetics. These findings suggest that the rectification of IA and IK channels may play a significant role in OPC vulnerability in HIBD.

  5. Assessment of cognitive asymmetries in brain-damaged and normal subjects: validation of a test battery.

    PubMed Central

    Bentin, S; Gordon, H W

    1979-01-01

    A test battery designed to assess cognitive functions normally related to the left and right cerebral hemispheres was validated on 30 patients with unilateral (16 right, 14 left) lesions. The tests were preselected to reflect typical functioning of the hemispheres according to general agreement in the literature. A Cognitive Laterality Quotient (CLQ) was calculated from the difference in performance between the "right" and "left" test batteries and, therefore, reflected the relative functioning attributed to the right and left hemispheres. Using the CLQ measurement and a control group of 30 non-neurological patients matched for age and education, 28 out of 30 brain-damaged patients (93%) were categorised correctly according to side of lesion; the other two were considered to have either abnormal lateralisation (one was left handed) or asymmetrical premorbid cognitive profiles. Using only one (paired) test whose two subparts were designed to vary only slightly in task requirements to measure either right or left functioning, 29 out of 30 patients were correctly categorised. It is suggested that the concept of relative assessment of basic cognitive functions is more fruitful than general assessment of intellectual functions for use in diagnosis and rehabilitation of neurological patients or normal subjects with developmental or acquired behavioural cognitive abnormalities. Images PMID:490177

  6. Narrating stroke: the life-writing and fiction of brain damage.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2012-12-01

    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each individual. As stroke 'victims' necessarily speak from the position of having undergone very abrupt degeneration followed by being confronted with a gradual relocation within their 'recovery', the present study addresses how narrative texts describe the condition, that is, the insult itself and its impairing consequences for body and mind, and how patients portray themselves within their illness. Furthermore, given that all illness narrative must remain non-representative, especially when exploring conditions that impair cognitive abilities, autobiographically inspired fiction, equally, contributes to neuroscientific perspectives on embodiment: it gives further insight into how the condition is perceived and alerts us to those aspects of the experience that are understood as particularly momentous.

  7. Influence of green tea extract on oxidative damage and apoptosis induced by deltamethrin in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ogaly, Hanan A; Khalaf, A A; Ibrahim, Marwa A; Galal, Mona K; Abd-Elsalam, Reham M

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of an aqueous extract of green tea leaves (GTE) against neurotoxicity and oxidative damage induced by deltamethrin (DM) in male rats. Four different groups of rats were used: the 1st group was the vehicle treated control group, the 2nd group received DM (0.6 mg/kg BW), the 3rd group received DM plus GTE, and the 4th received GTE alone (25 mg/kg BW). The brain tissues were collected at the end of the experimental regimen for subsequent investigation. Rats that were given DM had a highly significant elevation in MDA content, nitric oxide concentration, DNA fragmentation and expression level of apoptotic genes, TP53 and COX2. Additionally, a significant reduction in the total antioxidant capacity in the second group was detected. The findings for the 3rd group highlight the efficacy of GTE as a neuro-protectant in DM-induced neurotoxicity through improving the oxidative status and DNA fragmentation as well as suppressing the expression of the TP53 and COX2 genes. In conclusion, GTE, at a concentration of 25mg/kg/day, protected against DM-induced neurotoxicity through its antioxidant and antiapoptotic influence; therefore, it can be used as a protective natural product against DM-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Effect of progesterone intervention on the dynamic changes of AQP-4 in hypoxic-ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Bai, Ruiying; Zhang, Junhe; Wang, Xiaoyin

    2015-01-01

    To observe the effect of progesterone (PROG) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, brain tissue water content and dynamic changes of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischaemic brain damage (HIBD). 72 neonatal Wistar rats, aged 7 days old, were randomly divided into control, hypoxic-ischaemic (6, 24 and 72 h, and 7 d subgroups) and drug groups (6, 24 and 72 h, and 7 d subgroups). The HIBD animal model was established. BBB was detected via an Evans blue tracer. Brain water content was determined by the dry/wet method. The AQP-4 expression in the cerebral cortex was observed through immunohistochemistry and Western blot. BBB permeability in the cerebral cortex of the neonatal rats, brain water content and AQP-4 expression in the hypoxia-ischaemia group were significantly higher than those of the control group after hypoxia for 6 h (P < 0.05), continued to rise within 24 h and then reached the peak at 72 h. BBB permeability in the cerebral cortex of the neonatal rats, brain water content and AQP-4 expression in the drug group were significantly lower than those of the hypoxia-ischaemia group after hypoxia for 6, 24 and 72 h (P < 0.05). Moreover, BBB permeability and BBB expression were positively correlated with the AQP-4 expression. In conclusion, PROG protects the brain of HIBD neonatal rats by alleviating the damage of BBB and cerebral oedema. The protective effect of PROG may be related to the down-regulation of AQP-4 expression in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats. PMID:26770503

  9. Effect of lacosamide on structural damage and functional recovery after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, A; Immonen, R; Ndode-Ekane, X; Gröhn, O; Stöhr, T; Nissinen, J

    2014-05-01

    In a subgroup of patients, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the occurrence of acute epileptic seizures or even status epilepticus, which are treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Recent experimental data, however, suggest that administration of AEDs at the early post-injury phase can compromise the recovery process. The present study was designed to assess the profile of a novel anticonvulsant, lacosamide (Vimpat) on post-TBI structural, motor and cognitive outcomes. Moderate TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in adult rats. Treatment with 0.9% saline or lacosamide (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was started at 30 min post-injury and continued at 8h intervals for 3d (total daily dose 90 mg/kg/d). Rats were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: sham-operated controls treated with vehicle (Sham-Veh) or lacosamide (Sham-LCM) and injured animals treated with vehicle (TBI-Veh) or lacosamide (TBI-LCM). As functional outcomes we tested motor recovery with composite neuroscore and beam-walking at 2, 7, and 15 d post-injury. Cognitive recovery was tested with the Morris water-maze at 12-14 d post-TBI. To assess the structural outcome, animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2 d post-TBI. At 16d post-TBI, rats were perfused for histology to analyze cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration and axonal damage. Our data show that at 2 d post-TBI, both the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups were equally impaired in neuroscore. Thereafter, motor recovery occurred similarly during the first week. At 2 wk post-TBI, recovery of the TBI-LCM group lagged behind that in the TBI-VEH group (p<0.05). Performance in beam-walking did not differ between the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups. Both TBI groups were similarly impaired in the Morris water-maze at 2 wk post-TBI. MRI and histology did not reveal any differences in the cortical or hippocampal damage between the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups. Taken together, acute treatment with LCM had no protective effects on post

  10. Use of early biomarkers in neonatal brain damage and sepsis: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Iliana; Auriti, Cinzia; Ronchetti, Maria Paola; Prencipe, Giusi; Gazzolo, Diego; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The identification of early noninvasive biochemical markers of disease is a crucial issue of the current scientific research, particularly during the first period of life, since it could provide useful and precocious diagnostic information when clinical and radiological signs are still silent. The ideal biomarker should be practical and sensitive in the precocious identification of at risk patients. An earlier diagnosis may lead to a larger therapeutic window and improve neonatal outcome. Brain damage and sepsis are common causes of severe morbidity with poor outcome and mortality during the perinatal period. A large number of potential biomarkers, including neuroproteins, calcium binding proteins, enzymes, oxidative stress markers, vasoactive agents, and inflammatory mediators, have been so far investigated. The aim of the present review was to provide a brief overview of some of the more commonly investigated biomarkers used in case of neonatal brain damage and sepsis.

  11. Solid-extracellular fluid interaction and damage in the mechanical response of rat brain tissue under confined compression.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Leahy, Lauren N; Riley, Peter; Gullapalli, Rao; Xu, Su; Hsieh, Adam H

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical processes that underlie mild traumatic brain injury from physical insults are not well understood. One aspect in particular that has not been examined is the tissue fluid, which is known to be critical in the mechanical function of other organs. To investigate the contributions of solid-fluid interactions to brain tissue mechanics, we performed confined compression tests, that force the extracellular fluid (ECF) to flow in the direction of the deformation, on 6.35mm diameter, 3mm long cylindrical samples excised from various regions of rat brains. Two types of tests in deformation control, (1) quasi-static, slow and moderate constant strain rate tests at 0.64×10(-5)/s, 0.001/s and 1/s to large strains and (2) several applications of slow linear deformation to 5% strain each followed by stress relaxation are employed to explore the solid-fluid interaction. At slow and moderate compressive strain rates, we observed stress peaks in the applied strain range at about 11%, whose magnitudes exhibited statistically significant dependence on strain rate. These data suggest that the ECF carries load until the tissue is sufficiently damaged to permit pathological fluid flow. Under the slow ramp rate in the ramp-relaxation cycles protocol, commonly used to estimate permeability, the stress relaxes to zero after the first cycle, rather than to a non-zero equilibrium stress corresponding to the applied strain, which further implicates mechanical damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of changes in tissue microstructure during confined compression, before and after compression, provides further evidence of tissue damage. The solid-fluid interactions, reflected in the morphology of the stress-stretch curves and supported by the MRI data, suggest that increases in hydrostatic pressure in the ECF may contribute to mechanical damage of brain tissue.

  12. Pre-treatment with LCZ696, an orally active angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, prevents ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui-Yu; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Kukida, Masayoshi; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Higaki, Akinori; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are known to prevent ischemic brain damage after stroke. Natriuretic peptides, which are increased by a neprilysin inhibitor, are also reported to protect against brain damage. Therefore, we investigated the possible protective effect of valsartan (VAL) compared with LCZ696 (VAL+ neprilysin inhibitor; 1:1) after middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with VAL (3mg/kg per day) or LCZ696 (6mg/kg per day) for 2 weeks before MCA occlusion. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by telemetry. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by laser-Doppler flowmetry. Ischemic area was evaluated by triphenytetrasodium chloride staining, and oxidative stress was determined by dihydroethidium staining. Blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly different before and after treatment. Pre-treatment with LCZ696 or VAL reduced the ischemic area, and this effect of LCZ696 was more marked than that of VAL pre-treatment. The decrease in CBF in the peripheral region of the ischemic area was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with LCZ696 or VAL, without any significant effect on CBF in the core region. VAL or LCZ696 pre-treatment significantly decreased the increase of superoxide anion production in the cortex on the ischemic side. However, no significant difference in CBF and superoxide anion production was observed between VAL and LCZ696 pre-treatment. The preventive effect of LCZ696 on ischemic brain damage after stroke was more marked than that of VAL. LCZ696 could be used as a new approach to prevent brain damage after stroke. (246 words). PMID:26057694

  13. Cingulate neglect in humans: disruption of contralesional reward learning in right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Lecce, Francesca; Rotondaro, Francesca; Bonnì, Sonia; Carlesimo, Augusto; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Doricchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Motivational valence plays a key role in orienting spatial attention. Nonetheless, clinical documentation and understanding of motivationally based deficits of spatial orienting in the human is limited. Here in a series of one group-study and two single-case studies, we have examined right brain damaged patients (RBD) with and without left spatial neglect in a spatial reward-learning task, in which the motivational valence of the left contralesional and the right ipsilesional space was contrasted. In each trial two visual boxes were presented, one to the left and one to the right of central fixation. In one session monetary rewards were released more frequently in the box on the left side (75% of trials) whereas in another session they were released more frequently on the right side. In each trial patients were required to: 1) point to each one of the two boxes; 2) choose one of the boxes for obtaining monetary reward; 3) report explicitly the position of reward and whether this position matched or not the original choice. Despite defective spontaneous allocation of attention toward the contralesional space, RBD patients with left spatial neglect showed preserved contralesional reward learning, i.e., comparable to ipsilesional learning and to reward learning displayed by patients without neglect. A notable exception in the group of neglect patients was L.R., who showed no sign of contralesional reward learning in a series of 120 consecutive trials despite being able of reaching learning criterion in only 20 trials in the ipsilesional space. L.R. suffered a cortical-subcortical brain damage affecting the anterior components of the parietal-frontal attentional network and, compared with all other neglect and non-neglect patients, had additional lesion involvement of the medial anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and of the adjacent sectors of the corpus callosum. In contrast to his lateralized motivational learning deficit, L.R. had no lateral bias in the early phases of

  14. Coarse coding and discourse comprehension in adults with right hemisphere brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Scharp, Victoria L.; Meigh, Kimberly M.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud

    2009-01-01

    Background Various investigators suggest that some discourse-level comprehension difficulties in adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) have a lexical-semantic basis. As words are processed, the intact right hemisphere arouses and sustains activation of a wide-ranging network of secondary or peripheral meanings and features—a phenomenon dubbed “coarse coding”. Coarse coding impairment has been postulated to underpin some prototypical RHD comprehension deficits, such as difficulties with nonliteral language interpretation, discourse integration, some kinds of inference generation, and recovery when a reinterpretation is needed. To date, however, no studies have addressed the hypothesised link between coarse coding deficit and discourse comprehension in RHD. Aims The current investigation examined whether coarse coding was related to performance on two measures of narrative comprehension in adults with RHD. Methods & Procedures Participants were 32 adults with unilateral RHD from cerebrovascular accident, and 38 adults without brain damage. Coarse coding was operationalised as poor activation of peripheral/weakly related semantic features of words. For the coarse coding assessment, participants listened to spoken sentences that ended in a concrete noun. Each sentence was followed by a spoken target phoneme string. Targets were subordinate semantic features of the sentence-final nouns that were incompatible with their dominant mental representations (e.g., “rotten” for apple). Targets were presented at two post-noun intervals. A lexical decision task was used to gauge both early activation and maintenance of activation of these weakly related semantic features. One of the narrative tasks assessed comprehension of implied main ideas and details, while the other indexed high-level inferencing and integration. Both comprehension tasks were presented auditorily. For all tasks, accuracy of performance was the dependent measure. Correlations were computed

  15. Pain and Body Awareness: Evidence from Brain-Damaged Patients with Delusional Body Ownership

    PubMed Central

    Pia, Lorenzo; Garbarini, Francesca; Fossataro, Carlotta; Fornia, Luca; Berti, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the cognitive neuroscience of pain is the interplay between pain perception and body awareness. Here we report a novel neuropsychological condition in which right brain-damaged patients displayed a selective monothematic delusion of body ownership. Specifically, when both their own and the co-experimenter’s left arms were present, these patients claimed that the latter belonged to them. We reasoned that this was an ideal condition to examine whether pain perception can be “referred” to an alien arm subjectively experienced as one’s own. Seventeen patients (11 with, 6 without the delusion), and 10 healthy controls were administered a nociceptive stimulation protocol to assess pain perception. In the OWN condition, participants placed their arms on a table in front of them. In the ALIEN condition, the co-experimenter’s left (or right) arm was placed alongside the participants’ left (or right) arm, respectively. In the OWN condition, left (or right) participants’ hand dorsum were stimulated. In the ALIEN condition, left (or right) co-experimenter’s hand dorsum was stimulated. Participants had to rate the perceived pain on a 0–5 Likert scale (0 = no pain, 5 = maximal imaginable pain). Results showed that healthy controls and patients without delusion gave scores higher than zero only when their own hands were stimulated. On the contrary, patients with delusion gave scores higher than zero both when their own hands (left or right) were stimulated and when the co-experimenter’s left hand was stimulated. Our results show that in pathological conditions, a body part of another person can become so deeply embedded in one’s own somatosensory representation to effect the subjective feeling of pain. More in general, our findings are in line with a growing number of evidence emphasizing the role of the special and unique perceptual status of body ownership in giving rise to the phenomenological experience of pain. PMID:23801958

  16. Evidence for a therapeutic effect of Braintone on ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuanyuan; Luo, Yu; Gu, Weiwei; Yang, Lei; Shen, Xikun; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhang, Huiling; Gao, Xiumei

    2013-07-01

    This study used a novel combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to show that Braintone had neuroprotective effects and clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying its efficacy. The Chinese herbal extract Braintone is composed of Radix Rhodiolase Essence, Radix Notoginseng Essence, Folium Ginkgo Essence and Rhizoma Chuanxiong. In vivo experiments showed that cerebral infarction volume was reduced, hemispheric water content decreased, and neurological deficits were alleviated in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion after administration of 87.5, 175 or 350 mg/kg Braintone for 7 consecutive days. Western blot analysis showed that Braintone enhanced the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, heme oxygenase-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic cortex of these rats. The 350 mg/kg dose of Braintone produced the most dramatic effects. For the in vitro experiments, prior to oxygen-glucose deprivation, rats were intragastrically injected with 440, 880 or 1 760 mg/kg Braintone to prepare a Braintone-containing serum, which was used to pre-treat human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 24 hours. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury was alleviated with this pre-treatment. Western blot and real-time PCR analysis showed that the Braintone-containing serum increased the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α mRNA and protein, heme oxygenase-1 protein and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in oxygen-glucose deprived human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The 1 760 mg/kg dose produced the greatest increases in expression. Collectively, these experimental findings suggest that Braintone has neuroprotective effects on ischemia-induced brain damage via the up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, heme oxygenase-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:25206471

  17. Influence of response modality on awareness of contralesional tactile stimuli in right brain damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Neppi-Modona, M

    1999-12-01

    Thirty right brain-damaged (RBD) patients with left tactile extinction (19 of whom also showed neglect) were given a sequence of 240 tactile stimuli--80 right, 80 left, 80 bilateral--across 4 different response conditions: (a) verbal report of stimulated side/s, (b) motor report of stimulated side/s, (c) verbal report of unstimulated side/s, (d) motor report of unstimulated side/s. Earlier experiments based on similar tasks but involving RBD patients with visual extinction and/or neglect have shown that visual awareness of contralesional stimuli can be influenced by manipulation of response conditions. Since neglect and extinction can be double-dissociated both anatomically and behaviourally, the question arises of whether the underlying neuronal mechanisms are different. To answer this question the present work investigated the role of perceptual and premotor factors in generating tactile extinction in response to Double Simultaneous Stimulation (DSS). The hypothesis was that a directional response bias would result in an overall higher frequency of errors for verbal or motor responses indicating the ipsilesional side (right); a perceptual bias would instead result in errors distributed with similar frequency on the ipsilesional and the contralesional (left) side. Results showed that, in RBD patients, contralesional extinction was not influenced by response conditions (verbal/motor; report of stimulated/unstimulated side) and presence/absence of neglect. This suggests that: (1) among RBD patients, directional response biases are unlikely to play a role in extinction of tactile stimuli on DSS; (2) the mechanisms underlying extinction are, at least to some extent, different from those underlying unilateral neglect.

  18. Anatomical and spatial matching in imitation: Evidence from left and right brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Mengotti, Paola; Ripamonti, Enrico; Pesavento, Valentina; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2015-12-01

    Imitation is a sensorimotor process whereby the visual information present in the model's movement has to be coupled with the activation of the motor system in the observer. This also implies that greater the similarity between the seen and the produced movement, the easier it will be to execute the movement, a process also known as ideomotor compatibility. Two components can influence the degree of similarity between two movements: the anatomical and the spatial component. The anatomical component is present when the model and imitator move the same body part (e.g., the right hand) while the spatial component is present when the movement of the model and that of the imitator occur at the same spatial position. Imitation can be achieved by relying on both components, but typically the model's and imitator's movements are matched either anatomically or spatially. The aim of this study was to ascertain the contribution of the left and right hemisphere to the imitation accomplished either with anatomical or spatial matching (or with both). Patients with unilateral left and right brain damage performed an ideomotor task and a gesture imitation task. Lesions in the left and right hemispheres gave rise to different performance deficits. Patients with lesions in the left hemisphere showed impaired imitation when anatomical matching was required, and patients with lesions in the right hemisphere showed impaired imitation when spatial matching was required. Lesion analysis further revealed a differential involvement of left and right hemispheric regions, such as the parietal opercula, in supporting imitation in the ideomotor task. Similarly, gesture imitation seemed to rely on different regions in the left and right hemisphere, such as parietal regions in the left hemisphere and premotor, somatosensory and subcortical regions in the right hemisphere.

  19. Effect of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA damage and seizures induced by kainic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiro-aki; Mohanan, Parayanthala V

    2003-07-20

    The effects of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and seizures induced by kainic acid were examined both in vivo and in vitro. An intraperitoneal (ip) injection of kainic acid (45 mg/kg) produced broad-spectrum limbic and severe sustained seizures in all of the treated mice. The seizures were abolished when alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in the animals 1 min before kainic acid administration. In addition, the administration of kainic acid caused damage to mtDNA in brain frontal and middle cortex of mice. These effects were completely abolished by the ip preinjection of alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg). In vitro exposure of kainic acid (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mM) to brain homogenate inflicted damage to mtDNA in a concentration-dependent manner. The damage of mtDNA induced by 1.0 mM kainic acid was attenuated by the co-treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate (2.5 or 5.0 mM) or oxaloacetate (0.75 or 1.0 mM). Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro exposure of kainic acid elicited an increase in lipid peroxidation. However, the increased lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited by cotreatment of alpha-ketoglutarate or oxaloacetate. These results suggest that alpha-keto acids such as alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate play a role in the inhibition of seizures and subsequent mtDNA damage induced by the excitotoxic/neurotoxic agent, kainic acid.

  20. Right-sided representational neglect after left brain damage in a case without visuospatial working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    van Dijck, Jean-Philippe; Gevers, Wim; Lafosse, Christophe; Fias, Wim

    2013-10-01

    Brain damaged patients suffering from representational neglect (RN) fail to report, orient to, or verbally describe contra-lesional elements of imagined environments or objects. So far this disorder has only been reported after right brain damage, leading to the idea that only the right hemisphere is involved in this deficit. A widely accepted account attributes RN to a lateralized impairment in the visuospatial component of working memory. So far, however, this hypothesis has not been tested in detail. In the present paper, we describe, for the first time, the case of a left brain damaged patient suffering from right-sided RN while imagining both known and new environments and objects. An in-depth evaluation of her visuospatial working memory abilities, with special focus on the presence of a lateralized deficit, did not reveal any abnormality. In sharp contrast, her ability to memorize visual information was severely compromised. The implications of these results are discussed in the light of recent insights in the neglect syndrome.

  1. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  2. Negative regulation of miRNA-9 on oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lijun; Cui, Hong; Cao, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays a key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and myelin repair. miRNA-9 is involved in the occurrence of many related neurological disorders. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that miRNA-9 complementarily, but incompletely, bound oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1, but whether miRNA-9 regulates oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 remains poorly understood. Whole brain slices of 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and divided into four groups: control group; oxygen-glucose deprivation group (treatment with 8% O2 + 92% N2 and sugar-free medium for 60 minutes); transfection control group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with control plasmid) and miRNA-9 transfection group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with miRNA-9 plasmid). From the third day of transfection, and with increasing culture days, oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression increased in each group, peaked at 14 days, and then decreased at 21 days. Real-time quantitative PCR results, however, demonstrated that oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression was lower in the miRNA-9 transfection group than that in the transfection control group at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transfection. Results suggested that miRNA-9 possibly negatively regulated oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 in brain tissues during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. PMID:25206848

  3. Dose-dependent effect of sulfur dioxide on brain damage induced by recurrent febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Yi, Wenxia; Qin, Jiong; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Chang, Xingzhi

    2014-03-20

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) regulates many physiological processes. Little is known about its roles in neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the role of endogenous SO2 in the development of febrile seizures (FS) and related brain damages. In the rat model of recurrent FS, we found that endogenous SO2 in the plasma and hippocampus was increased, accompanied by upregulation of aspartate amino-transferase 1 (AAT1) and AAT2, and neuronal apoptosis and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in the hippocampus. Preconditioning with low concentration of SO2 (1-10 μmol/kg) alleviated the neuronal damage, and attenuated neuronal apoptosis and MFS, whereas preconditioning with high concentration of SO2 (100 μmol/kg) or inhibition of AAT aggravated the neuronal damage, and promoted neuronal apoptosis and MFS in hippocampus of rats with recurrent FS. These data indicate that endogenous SO2 is involved in the development of FS and related brain damage. Preconditioning with low concentration of SO2 may protect neurons from toxicity caused by FS. PMID:24373994

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of post-ischemic blood-brain barrier damage with PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-Fang; Qian, Cheng; An, Yan-Li; Chang, Di; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage during ischemia may induce devastating consequences like cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation. This study presents a novel strategy for dynamically imaging of BBB damage with PEGylated supermagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents. The employment of SPIONs as contrast agents made it possible to dynamically image the BBB permeability alterations and ischemic lesions simultaneously with T2-weighted MRI, and the monitoring could last up to 24 h with a single administration of PEGylated SPIONs in vivo. The ability of the PEGylated SPIONs to highlight BBB damage by MRI was demonstrated by the colocalization of PEGylated SPIONs with Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection of SPION-PEG/Gd-DTPA into a mouse. The immunohistochemical staining also confirmed the leakage of SPION-PEG from cerebral vessels into parenchyma. This study provides a novel and convenient route for imaging BBB alteration in the experimental ischemic stroke model.

  5. A Review of the Bender Gestalt Test as a Screening Instrument for Brain Damage with School-Aged Children of Normal Intelligence Since 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eno, Larry; Deichmann, John

    1980-01-01

    All methods reviewed significantly discriminate between groups of brain damaged and unimpaired children. No method, however, provides successful predictive rates high enough to warrant the use of the Bender as the sole diagnostic instrument in individual cases. (Author)

  6. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  7. [Effect of salvianolic acid B on neural cells damage and neurogenesis after brain ischemia-reperfusion in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Tang, Min-ke; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Qiu-ping; Zhang, Jun-tian

    2007-07-01

    This study is to observe the effect of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on neural cells damage and neurogenesis in sub-granular zone (SGZ) and sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) after brain ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in rats. A modified middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was used. The rats were divided into four groups: sham control group, ischemia-reperfusion group, Sal B 1 and 10 mg x kg(-1) groups. Sal B was consecutively administrated once a day by ip injection after MCAO. The neurogenesis in SGZ and SVZ was investigated by BrdU method 7 days after MCAO. The Nissl staining for neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and cerebral cortex was performed 14 days after MCAO. A beam-walking test was used to monitor the motor function recovery. We found that brain ischemia resulted in an increase of BrdU positive cells both in ipsilateral SGZ and SVZ at 7th day after MCAO. Sal B (10 mg x kg(-1)) significantly increased further the number of BrdU positive cells both in SGZ and SVZ (P < 0.01). Ipsilateral hippocampal neuron damage occurred and CA1 almost lost 14 days after MCAO. Sal B (10 mg x kg(-1)) obviously attenuated the neuron damage and increased the number of neuron both in ipsilateral CA1 and cerebral cortex (P < 0.01). We also observed an obvious improvement of motor function recovery when Sal B (10 mg x kg(-1)) administrated. From the results above we concluded that Sal B stimulated neurogenesis process both in SGZ and SVZ after brain ischemia, and also alleviated neural cells loss and improved motor function recovery after brain ischemia in rats.

  8. Body knowledge in brain-damaged children: a double-dissociation in self and other's body processing.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Fiori, Simona; D'Angelo, Valentina; Magnani, Barbara; Guzzetta, Andrea; Brizzolara, Daniela; Cioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Bodies are important element for self-recognition. In this respect, in adults it has been recently shown a self vs other advantage when small parts of the subjects' body are visible. This advantage is lost following a right brain lesion underlying a role of the right hemisphere in self body-parts processing. In order to investigate the bodily-self processing in children and the development of its neuronal bases, 57 typically developing healthy subjects and 17 subjects with unilateral brain damage (5 right and 12 left sided), aged 4-17 years, were submitted to a matching-to-sample task. In this task, three stimuli vertically aligned were simultaneously presented at the centre of the computer screen. Subjects were required which of two stimuli (the upper or the lower one) matched the central target stimulus, half stimuli representing self and half stimuli representing other people's body-parts and face-parts. The results showed that corporeal self recognition is present since at least 4 years of age and that self and others' body parts processing are different and sustained by separate cerebral substrates. Indeed, a double dissociation was found: right brain damaged patients were impaired in self but not in other people's body parts, showing a self-disadvantage, whereas left brain damaged patients were impaired in others' but not in self body parts processing. Finally, since the double dissociation self/other was found for body-parts but not for face parts, the corporal self seems to be dissociated for body and face-parts. This opens the possibility of independent and lateralized functional modules for the processing of self and other body parts during development.

  9. Reorganization of syntactic processing following left-hemisphere brain damage: does right-hemisphere activity preserve function?

    PubMed

    Tyler, Lorraine K; Wright, Paul; Randall, Billi; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A

    2010-11-01

    The extent to which the human brain shows evidence of functional plasticity across the lifespan has been addressed in the context of pathological brain changes and, more recently, of the changes that take place during healthy ageing. Here we examine the potential for plasticity by asking whether a strongly left-lateralized system can successfully reorganize to the right-hemisphere following left-hemisphere brain damage. To do this, we focus on syntax, a key linguistic function considered to be strongly left-lateralized, combining measures of tissue integrity, neural activation and behavioural performance. In a functional neuroimaging study participants heard spoken sentences that differentially loaded on syntactic and semantic information. While healthy controls activated a left-hemisphere network of correlated activity including Brodmann areas 45/47 and posterior middle temporal gyrus during syntactic processing, patients activated Brodmann areas 45/47 bilaterally and right middle temporal gyrus. However, voxel-based morphometry analyses showed that only tissue integrity in left Brodmann areas 45/47 was correlated with activity and performance; poor tissue integrity in left Brodmann area 45 was associated with reduced functional activity and increased syntactic deficits. Activity in the right-hemisphere was not correlated with damage in the left-hemisphere or with performance. Reduced neural integrity in the left-hemisphere through brain damage or healthy ageing results in increased right-hemisphere activation in homologous regions to those left-hemisphere regions typically involved in the young. However, these regions do not support the same linguistic functions as those in the left-hemisphere and only indirectly contribute to preserved syntactic capacity. This establishes the unique role of the left hemisphere in syntax, a core component in human language.

  10. Body knowledge in brain-damaged children: a double-dissociation in self and other's body processing.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Fiori, Simona; D'Angelo, Valentina; Magnani, Barbara; Guzzetta, Andrea; Brizzolara, Daniela; Cioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Bodies are important element for self-recognition. In this respect, in adults it has been recently shown a self vs other advantage when small parts of the subjects' body are visible. This advantage is lost following a right brain lesion underlying a role of the right hemisphere in self body-parts processing. In order to investigate the bodily-self processing in children and the development of its neuronal bases, 57 typically developing healthy subjects and 17 subjects with unilateral brain damage (5 right and 12 left sided), aged 4-17 years, were submitted to a matching-to-sample task. In this task, three stimuli vertically aligned were simultaneously presented at the centre of the computer screen. Subjects were required which of two stimuli (the upper or the lower one) matched the central target stimulus, half stimuli representing self and half stimuli representing other people's body-parts and face-parts. The results showed that corporeal self recognition is present since at least 4 years of age and that self and others' body parts processing are different and sustained by separate cerebral substrates. Indeed, a double dissociation was found: right brain damaged patients were impaired in self but not in other people's body parts, showing a self-disadvantage, whereas left brain damaged patients were impaired in others' but not in self body parts processing. Finally, since the double dissociation self/other was found for body-parts but not for face parts, the corporal self seems to be dissociated for body and face-parts. This opens the possibility of independent and lateralized functional modules for the processing of self and other body parts during development. PMID:22138213

  11. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    PubMed

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased. PMID:27188144

  12. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    PubMed

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  13. A novel, implicit treatment for language comprehension processes in right hemisphere brain damage: Phase I data.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Connie A; Blake, Margaret T; Wambaugh, Julie; Meigh, Kimberly

    2011-03-22

    BACKGROUND: This manuscript reports the initial phase of testing for a novel, "Contextual constraint" treatment, designed to stimulate inefficient language comprehension processes in adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). Two versions of treatment were developed to target two normal comprehension processes that have broad relevance for discourse comprehension and that are often disrupted by RHD: coarse semantic coding and suppression. The development of the treatment was informed by two well-documented strengths of the RHD population. The first is consistently better performance on assessments that are implicit, or nearly so, than on explicit, metalinguistic measures of language and cognitive processing. The second is improved performance when given linguistic context that moderately-to-strongly biases an intended meaning. Treatment consisted of providing brief context sentences to prestimulate, or constrain, intended interpretations. Participants made no explicit associations or judgments about the constraint sentences; rather, these contexts served only as implicit primes. AIMS: This Phase I treatment study aimed to determine the effects of a novel, implicit, Contextual Constraint treatment in adults with RHD whose coarse coding or suppression processes were inefficient. Treatment was hypothesized to speed coarse coding or suppression function in these individuals. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURES: Three adults with RHD participated in this study, one (P1) with a coarse coding deficit and two (P2, P3) with suppression deficits. Probe tasks were adapted from prior studies of coarse coding and suppression in RHD. The dependent measure was the percentage of responses that met predetermined response time criteria. When pre-treatment baseline performance was stable, treatment was initiated. There were two levels of contextual constraint, Strong and Moderate, and treatment for each item began with the provision of the Strong constraint context. OUTCOMES

  14. Evaluation of lipofuscin-like pigments as an index of lead-induced oxidative damage in the brain.

    PubMed

    Patková, Jana; Vojtíšek, Max; Tůma, Jan; Vožeh, František; Knotková, Jana; Santorová, Pavlína; Wilhelm, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the role of lead in the development of oxidative stress in the brain. We examined the rate of lipid peroxidation and we determined lipid fluorescence products (lipofuscin-like pigments - LFP) as a marker of lipid peroxidation after short in vitro incubation of rat brain homogenates with lead acetate (10(-2), 10(-4), 10(-6) M lead acetate, 2 h). Simultaneously we examined by the same method in vivo indices of oxidative stress in brains of mice exposed for 12 weeks to 0.2% lead acetate in drinking water. The results show that the concentration of LFP in rat brain homogenates increased significantly after 2 h incubation with 10(-2) M lead acetate as compared to controls (P<0.0001). This effect was not observed in lower doses of lead acetate (10(-4) and 10(-6) M). After the long-term exposure of mice to 0.2% lead acetate, pronounced accumulation of lead and significantly increased concentration of LFP (P<0.004) in the brains of exposed animals as compared to controls were observed. The evidence for the formation of specific fluorophores originating from oxidative damage was shown also in qualitative changes in 3D spectral arrays and synchronous spectra. The presented results proved the influence of lead on the activation of radical reactions in the brain after short in vitro exposure of rat brain as well as within long-term in vivo exposure in mice using lipofuscin-like pigments as an indicator of oxidative stress.

  15. Effect of montelukast on the expression of interleukin-18, telomerase reverse transcriptase, and Bcl-2 in the brain tissue of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, J L; Zhao, X H; Zhang, D L; Zhang, J B; Liu, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of montelukast on the expression of interleukin (IL)-18, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and Bcl-2 in the brain tissue of neonatal rats with hypox-ic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). To establish the model of HIBD, 8% oxygen was applied to rats after the unilateral carotid artery was ligated. Twenty rats were randomly assigned to the control group, while another 40 were used to establish the HIBD model and were randomly divided equally into model group and treatment group. A 0.1 mg/kg dose of montelukast or an equal volume of saline was intraperitoneally injected to the rats in the treatment group and the model group, respectively. Brain tissue from 4 rats in each group was sampled at 0, 6, 12, 24, and 72 h after brain damage, and immunohistochemistry was used to measure IL-18, TERT and Bcl-2 expressions. IL-18, TERT, and Bcl-2 levels increased after 12 h in both the model group and treatment group, peaked after 48 h, and then decreased. Although not statistically significant, IL-18, TERT, and Bcl-2 expressions after 24, 48, and 96 h were all lower in the treatment group than those in the model group. In conclusion, montelukast has a protective effect on the cerebral tissue of neonatal rats with HIBD, and may mediate an increase of TERT and Bcl-2 levels but not of IL-18. Further study is required to elucidate the mechanism of the protective effect of montelukast on HIBD. PMID:26345821

  16. Early Exposure to Toxic Substances Damages Brain Architecture. Working Paper #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    New science shows that exposure to toxins prenatally or early in life can have a devastating and lifelong effect on the developing architecture of the brain. Exposures to many chemicals have much more severe consequences for embryos, fetuses, and young children, whose brains are still developing, than for adults. Substances that can have a truly…

  17. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans. PMID:26872850

  18. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans.

  19. Preserved Self-Awareness following Extensive Bilateral Brain Damage to the Insula, Anterior Cingulate, and Medial Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Damasio, Antonio; Tranel, Daniel; Landini, Gregory; Williford, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that self-awareness (SA), a multifaceted phenomenon central to human consciousness, depends critically on specific brain regions, namely the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Such a proposal predicts that damage to these regions should disrupt or even abolish SA. We tested this prediction in a rare neurological patient with extensive bilateral brain damage encompassing the insula, ACC, mPFC, and the medial temporal lobes. In spite of severe amnesia, which partially affected his “autobiographical self”, the patient's SA remained fundamentally intact. His Core SA, including basic self-recognition and sense of self-agency, was preserved. His Extended SA and Introspective SA were also largely intact, as he has a stable self-concept and intact higher-order metacognitive abilities. The results suggest that the insular cortex, ACC and mPFC are not required for most aspects of SA. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that SA is likely to emerge from more distributed interactions among brain networks including those in the brainstem, thalamus, and posteromedial cortices. PMID:22927899

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia attenuates tissue damage and cytokine expression after traumatic brain injury by inhibiting necroptosis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Dong-xu; Cui, Hua; Chen, Lei; Bao, Ying-hui; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis has been shown as an alternative form of cell death in many diseases, but the detailed mechanisms of the neuron loss after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rodents remain unclear. To investigate whether necroptosis is induced after TBI and gets involved in the neuroprotecton of therapeutic hypothermia on the TBI, we observed the pathological and biochemical change of the necroptosis in the fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) model of the rats. We found that receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 1 and 3, and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL), the critical downstream mediators of necroptosis recently identified in vivo, as well as HMGB1 and the pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18, were increased at an early phase (6 h) in cortex after TBI. Posttraumatic hypothermia (33 °C) led to the decreases in the necroptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and brain tissue damage in rats compared with normothermia-treated TBI animals. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that posttraumatic hypothermia also decreased the necroptosis-associated proteins staining in injured cortex and hippocampal CA1. Therefore, we conclude that the RIP1/RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis occurs after experimental TBI and therapeutic hypothermia may protect the injured central nervous system from tissue damage and the inflammatory responses by targeting the necroptosis signaling after TBI. PMID:27080932

  1. Positive Modulation of Pink Nelumbo nucifera Flowers on Memory Impairment, Brain Damage, and Biochemical Profiles in Restraint Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prabsattroo, Thawatchai; Somsapt, Pichet; Sritragool, Opass

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress in the stress-induced memory deficit, the benefit of substance possessing antioxidant effect is focused. Since no data are available, we aimed to determine the effect of Nelumbo nucifera flowers extract on spatial memory and hippocampal damage in stressed rats. Male Wistar rats, weighing 250–350 g, were orally given N. nucifera extract at doses of 10, 10, and 200 mg·kg−1 45 minutes before the exposure to 12-hour restraint stress. The spatial memory and serum corticosterone were assessed at 7 and 14 days of study period. At the end of study, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), monoamine oxidase type A and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-A and MAO-B), oxidative stress status, neuron density, and Ki67 expression in hippocampus were also assessed. The results showed that N. nucifera extract decreased memory deficit and brain damage, serum corticosterone, oxidative stress status, AChE, and MAO-A and MAO-B activities but increased neuron density and Ki67 expression in hippocampus. These suggested that the improved oxidative stress status, adult neurogenesis, and cholinergic and monoaminergic functions might be responsible for the protective effect against stress-related brain damage and dysfunction of the extract. Therefore, N. nucifera extract is the potential neuroprotective and memory enhancing agent. However, further researches are still required. PMID:26858824

  2. Processing Homonymy and Polysemy: Effects of Sentential Context and Time-Course Following Unilateral Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Baum, Shari R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the abilities of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) non-fluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD), and normal control individuals to access, in sentential biasing contexts, the multiple meanings of three types of ambiguous words, namely homonyms (e.g., ''punch''), metonymies (e.g., ''rabbit''), and metaphors (e.g.,…

  3. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  4. Neuroprotection and enhanced neurogenesis by extract from the tropical plant Knema laurina after inflammatory damage in living brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Häke, Ines; Schönenberger, Silvia; Neumann, Jens; Franke, Katrin; Paulsen-Merker, Katrin; Reymann, Klaus; Ismail, Ghazally; Bin Din, Laily; Said, Ikram M; Latiff, A; Wessjohann, Ludger; Zipp, Frauke; Ullrich, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions in the CNS, resulting from a loss of control and involving a network of non-neuronal and neuronal cells, are major contributors to the onset and progress of several major neurodegenerative diseases. Therapeutic strategies should therefore keep or restore the well-controlled and finely-tuned balance of immune reactions, and protect neurons from inflammatory damage. In our study, we selected plants of the Malaysian rain forest by an ethnobotanic survey, and investigated them in cell-based-assay-systems and in living brain tissue cultures in order to identify anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. We found that alcoholic extracts from the tropical plant Knema laurina (Black wild nutmeg) exhibited highly anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in cell culture experiments, reduced NO- and IL-6-release from activated microglia cells dose-dependently, and protected living brain tissue from microglia-mediated inflammatory damage at a concentration of 30 microg/ml. On the intracellular level, the extract inhibited ERK-1/2-phosphorylation, IkB-phosphorylation and subsequently NF-kB-translocation in microglia cells. K. laurina belongs to the family of Myristicaceae, which have been used for centuries for treatment of digestive and inflammatory diseases and is also a major food plant of the Giant Hornbill. Moreover, extract from K. laurina promotes also neurogenesis in living brain tissue after oxygen-glucose deprivation. In conclusion, extract from K. laurina not only controls and limits inflammatory reaction after primary neuronal damage, it promotes moreover neurogenesis if given hours until days after stroke-like injury.

  5. Dual mechanism of brain damage induced in vivo by the major metabolites accumulating in hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; de Moura, Alana Pimentel; Grings, Mateus; Ritter, Luciana; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Ferreira, Gustavo da Costa; Sitta, Angela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2011-01-19

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, leading to accumulation of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Progressive neurological regression whose pathogenesis is not well established is common in this disease. The present work investigated the in vivo effects of intracerebroventricular administration of Orn and Hcit on important parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism in cerebral cortex from young rats. Orn and Hcit significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values and carbonyl formation, indicators of lipid and protein oxidative damage, respectively. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine and the combination of the free radical scavengers ascorbic acid plus α-tocopherol attenuated the lipid oxidation and totally prevented the protein oxidative damage provoked by Orn and Hcit, suggesting that reactive species were involved in these effects. Hcit, but not Orn administration, also decreased glutathione concentrations, as well as the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, indicating that Hcit provokes a reduction of brain antioxidant defenses. As regards to the parameters of energy metabolism, we verified that Orn and Hcit significantly inhibited the citric acid cycle function (inhibition of CO(2) synthesis from [1-(14)C] acetate), the aerobic glycolytic pathway (reduced CO(2) production from [U-(14)C] glucose) and complex I-III activity of the respiratory chain. Hcit also inhibited the activity of aconitase, an enzyme very susceptible to free radical attack. Taken together, our data indicate that mitochondrial homeostasis is disturbed by Orn and especially by Hcit. It is presumed that the impairment of brain bioenergetics and the oxidative damage induced by these metabolites may possibly contribute to the brain deterioration and neurological symptoms affecting patients with HHH syndrome. PMID

  6. Biomarkers of Brain Damage: S100B and NSE Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid—A Normative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajduková, Lenka; Sobek, Ondřej; Prchalová, Darina; Bílková, Zuzana; Koudelková, Martina; Lukášková, Jiřina; Matuchová, Inka

    2015-01-01

    NSE and S100B belong among the so-called structural proteins of the central nervous system (CNS). Lately, this group of structural proteins has been profusely used as specific biomarkers of CNS tissue damage. So far, the majority of the research papers have focused predominantly on the concentrations of these proteins in blood in relation to CNS damage of various origins. Considering the close anatomic and functional relationship between the brain or spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in case of a CNS injury, a rapid and pronounced increase of the concentrations of structural proteins specifically in CSF takes place. This study inquires into the physiological concentrations of NSE and S100B proteins in CSF, carried out on a sufficiently large group of 601 patients. The detected values can be used for determination of a normal reference range in CSF in a clinical laboratory diagnostics. PMID:26421286

  7. Biomarkers of Brain Damage: S100B and NSE Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid--A Normative Study.

    PubMed

    Hajduková, Lenka; Sobek, Ondřej; Prchalová, Darina; Bílková, Zuzana; Koudelková, Martina; Lukášková, Jiřina; Matuchová, Inka

    2015-01-01

    NSE and S100B belong among the so-called structural proteins of the central nervous system (CNS). Lately, this group of structural proteins has been profusely used as specific biomarkers of CNS tissue damage. So far, the majority of the research papers have focused predominantly on the concentrations of these proteins in blood in relation to CNS damage of various origins. Considering the close anatomic and functional relationship between the brain or spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in case of a CNS injury, a rapid and pronounced increase of the concentrations of structural proteins specifically in CSF takes place. This study inquires into the physiological concentrations of NSE and S100B proteins in CSF, carried out on a sufficiently large group of 601 patients. The detected values can be used for determination of a normal reference range in CSF in a clinical laboratory diagnostics. PMID:26421286

  8. On the efficiency of Gore-Tex layer for brain protection from shock wave damage in cranioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Voinovich, P. A.; Nakagawa, A.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.; Hirano, T.

    2004-11-01

    The effectiveness of a Gore-Tex layer for protecting soft tissue from damage in shock wave therapy is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Analytical considerations based on the fundamentals of wave dynamics and two-dimensional numerical simulations based on the elastodynamic equations are carried out for underwater shock wave propagation and interaction with Gore-Tex membrane models of different complexity. The results clearly demonstrate that considerable attenuation of shock waves with Gore-Tex is due to the air trapped inside the membrane. The experimental results confirm that a Gore-Tex sheet placed in the liquid reduces the transmitted shock wave peak overpressure significantly, by up to two orders of magnitude. Another experimental series reveals what kind of damage in the rat brain tissue can be caused by shock waves of different intensity.

  9. The potential of neural stem cells to repair stroke-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi Ping; Lang, Bradley T; Baskaya, Mustafa K; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2009-05-01

    Acute injuries to CNS such as stroke induce neural progenitor proliferation in adult brain which might be an endogenous attempt to self-repair. This process is known to be altered by several exogenous and endogenous modulators including growth factors that could help to reinforce the post-stroke neurogenesis. Increasing the neurogenesis may be a future therapeutic option to decrease the cognitive and behavioral deficits following stroke. In addition, transplantation of various types of stem cells into the injured brain is currently thought to be an exciting option to replace the neurons lost in the post-ischemic brain. These include immortalized stem cell lines, neural progenitors prepared from embryonic and adult animals and mesenchymal stem cells. Using exogenous stem cells in addition to modulating endogenous neurogenesis, we may be able to repair the injured brain after a devastating stroke. This article reviewed the current literature of these two issues. PMID:19283395

  10. Arctigenin Treatment Protects against Brain Damage through an Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanism after Needle Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Li, Na; Xia, Yang; Gao, Zhong; Zou, Sa-feng; Kong, Liang; Yao, Ying-Jia; Jiao, Ya-Nan; Yan, Yu-Hui; Li, Shao-Heng; Tao, Zhen-Yu; Lian, Guan; Yang, Jing-Xian; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary brain injury and the determination of the underlying mechanism of action in a mouse model of SWI that mimics the process of CED. After CED, mice received a gavage of ARC from 30 min to 14 days. Neurological severity scores (NSS) and wound closure degree were assessed after the injury. Histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to evaluated the extent of brain damage and neuroinflammation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to detect universal apoptosis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was used to test the inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content. Gene levels of inflammation (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) and apoptosis (Caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2) were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using these, we analyzed ARC’s efficacy and mechanism of action. Results: ARC treatment improved neurological function by reducing brain water content and hematoma and accelerating wound closure relative to untreated mice. ARC treatment reduced the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and the number of allograft inflammatory factor (IBA)- and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells and increased the levels of IL-10. ARC-treated mice had fewer TUNEL+ apoptotic neurons and activated caspase-3-positive neurons surrounding the lesion than controls, indicating increased neuronal survival. Conclusions: ARC treatment confers

  11. Monkeys that voluntarily and chronically drink alcohol damage their brains: a longitudinal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Christopher D; Rohlfing, Torsten; Park, Byung; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Grant, Kathleen A

    2014-03-01

    Neuroimaging has consistently documented reductions in the brain tissue of alcoholics. Inability to control comorbidity, environmental insult, and nutritional deficiency, however, confound the ability to assess whether ethanol itself is neurotoxic. Here we report monkey oral ethanol self-administration combined with MR imaging to characterize brain changes over 15 months in 18 well-nourished rhesus macaques. Significant brain volume shrinkage occurred in the cerebral cortices of monkeys drinking ≥ 3 g/kg ethanol/day (12 alcoholic drinks) at 6 months, and this persisted throughout the period of continuous access to ethanol. Correlation analyses revealed a cerebral cortical volumetric loss of ~0.11% of the intracranial vault for each daily drink (0.25 g/kg), and selective vulnerability of cortical and non-cortical brain regions. These results demonstrate for the first time a direct relation between oral ethanol intake and measures of decreased brain gray matter volume in vivo in primates. Notably, greater volume shrinkage occurred in monkeys with younger drinking onset that ultimately became heavier drinkers than monkeys with older drinking onset. The pattern of volumetric changes observed in nonhuman primates following 15 months of drinking suggests that cerebral cortical gray matter changes are the first macroscopic manifestation of chronic ethanol exposure in the brain.

  12. Monkeys that voluntarily and chronically drink alcohol damage their brains: a longitudinal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Christopher D; Rohlfing, Torsten; Park, Byung; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Grant, Kathleen A

    2014-03-01

    Neuroimaging has consistently documented reductions in the brain tissue of alcoholics. Inability to control comorbidity, environmental insult, and nutritional deficiency, however, confound the ability to assess whether ethanol itself is neurotoxic. Here we report monkey oral ethanol self-administration combined with MR imaging to characterize brain changes over 15 months in 18 well-nourished rhesus macaques. Significant brain volume shrinkage occurred in the cerebral cortices of monkeys drinking ≥ 3 g/kg ethanol/day (12 alcoholic drinks) at 6 months, and this persisted throughout the period of continuous access to ethanol. Correlation analyses revealed a cerebral cortical volumetric loss of ~0.11% of the intracranial vault for each daily drink (0.25 g/kg), and selective vulnerability of cortical and non-cortical brain regions. These results demonstrate for the first time a direct relation between oral ethanol intake and measures of decreased brain gray matter volume in vivo in primates. Notably, greater volume shrinkage occurred in monkeys with younger drinking onset that ultimately became heavier drinkers than monkeys with older drinking onset. The pattern of volumetric changes observed in nonhuman primates following 15 months of drinking suggests that cerebral cortical gray matter changes are the first macroscopic manifestation of chronic ethanol exposure in the brain. PMID:24077067

  13. Pentosan polysulfate protects brain endothelial cells against bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Farkas, Attila E; Krizbai, István; Ngo, Thi Khue Dung; Niwa, Masami; Abrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation can aggravate local brain inflammation and neuronal death. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key player in the event. On a relevant in vitro model of primary rat brain endothelial cells co-cultured with primary rat astroglia cells lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in several BBB functions have been investigated. LPS-treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the integrity of endothelial monolayers: transendothelial electrical resistance dropped, while flux of permeability markers fluorescein and albumin significantly increased. Immunostaining for junctional proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and beta-catenin was significantly weaker in LPS-treated endothelial cells than in control monolayers. LPS also reduced the intensity and changed the pattern of ZO-1 immunostaining in freshly isolated rat brain microvessels. The activity of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux pump at the BBB, was also inhibited by LPS. At the same time production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was increased in brain endothelial cells treated with LPS. Pentosan polysulfate, a polyanionic polysaccharide could reduce the deleterious effects of LPS on BBB permeability, and P-glycoprotein activity. LPS-stimulated increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was also decreased by pentosan treatment. The protective effect of pentosan for brain endothelium can be of therapeutical significance in bacterial infections affecting the BBB.

  14. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  15. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage and Longitudinal Changes in Brain Structure and Function: The Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Pieternella H; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Visseren, Frank L J; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Muller, Majon

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension has been related to structural and functional brain changes. In high-risk populations, hypertensive target organ damage might better represent exposure to high blood pressure than the blood pressure measurement itself. We examined the association of hypertensive target organ damage with longitudinal changes in brain structure and function within the Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) study. Renal function, albuminuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography were measured in 663 patients with manifest arterial disease (mean age, 57±9 years; 81% men). Automated brain segmentation was used to quantify progression of global brain atrophy (change in brain parenchymal fraction) and progression of cerebral small vessel disease on 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging, and memory and executive functioning were assessed at baseline and after on average 3.9 years of follow-up. Regression analyses showed that an increasing number of signs of target organ damage was associated with more progression of global brain atrophy and more rapid decline in memory performance. Compared with no target organ damage, mean differences in change in brain parenchymal fraction (95% confidence interval) for 1 and ≥2 signs of organ damage were -0.12 (-0.30; 0.06) and -0.41 (-0.77; -0.05) % intracranial volume, and mean (95% confidence interval) differences in change in memory performance (z score) were -0.15 (-0.29; -0.00) and -0.27 (-0.54; -0.01). Results were independent of blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, and other confounders. Hypertension target organ damage was not associated with progression of cerebral small vessel disease or change in executive functioning. Routinely assessed signs of hypertensive target organ damage, and in particular impaired renal function, could be used to identify patients at the highest risk of cognitive decline.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen can induce neuroplasticity and improve cognitive functions of patients suffering from anoxic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, A.; Golan, H.; Fishlev, G.; Bechor, Y.; Volkov, O.; Suzin, G.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Efrati, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Cognitive impairment may occur in 42–50% of cardiac arrest survivors. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) has recently been shown to have neurotherapeutic effects in patients suffering from chronic cognitive impairments (CCI) consequent to stroke and mild traumatic brain injury. The objective of this study was to assess the neurotherapeutic effect of HBO2 in patients suffering from CCI due to cardiac arrest. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with CCI caused by cardiac arrest, treated with 60 daily sessions of HBO2. Evaluation included objective computerized cognitive tests (NeuroTrax), Activity of Daily Living (ADL) and Quality of life questionnaires. The results of these tests were compared with changes in brain activity as assessed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging. Results: The study included 11 cases of CCI patients. Patients were treated with HBO2, 0.5–7.5 years (mean 2.6 ± 0.6 years) after the cardiac arrest. HBO2 was found to induce modest, but statistically significant improvement in memory, attention and executive function (mean scores) of 12% , 20% and 24% respectively. The clinical improvements were found to be well correlated with increased brain activity in relevant brain areas as assessed by computerized analysis of the SPECT imaging. Conclusions: Although further research is needed, the results demonstrate the beneficial effects of HBO2 on CCI in patients after cardiac arrest, even months to years after the acute event. PMID:26409406

  17. Dizocilpine (MK-801) arrests status epilepticus and prevents brain damage induced by Soman. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Sparenborg, S.; Brennecke, L.H.; Jaax, N.K.; Braitman, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    The involvement of the NMDA receptor in the neurotoxicity induced by soman, an organophosphorus compound which irreversibly inhibits cholinesterase, was studied in guinea pigs. The drug MK-801 (0.5, 1 or 5 mg/kg, i.p.) was given as a pretreatment before a convulsant dose of soman or as a post treatment (30, 100 or 300 micron g/kg, i.m.) 5 min after the development of soman-induced status epilepticus. Pyridostigmine, atropine and pralidoxime chloride were also given to each subject to counteract the lethality of soman. All subjects that were challenged with soman and given the vehicle for MK-801 (saline) exhibited severe convulsions and electrographic seizure activity. Neuronal necrosis was found in the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and the pyriform and cerebral cortices of those subjects surviving for 48 hr. Pretreatment with 0.5 or 1 mg/kg doses of MK-801 did not prevent nor delay the onset of seizure activity but did diminish its intensity and led to its early arrest. At the largest dose (5 mg/kg), MK-801 completely prevented the development of seizure activity and brain damage. Post treatment with MK-801 prevented, arrested or reduced seizure activity, convulsions and neuronal necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. The NMDA receptor may play a more critical role in the spread and maintenance, rather than the initiation of cholinergically-induced seizure activity....Seizure-related brain damage, Organophosphorus compound, Nerve agent, Cholinesterase inhibition, Excitotoxicity, Guinea pig.

  18. Association between microscopic brain damage as indicated by magnetization transfer imaging and anticardiolipin antibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Steens, Stefan CA; Bosma, Gerlof PTh; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M; le Cessie, Saskia; Huizinga, Tom WJ; van Buchem, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenetic role of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCLs) in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) without cerebral infarcts remains elusive. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) has proved to be a sensitive tool for detecting diffuse microscopic brain damage in NPSLE patients. In this study we examined the correlation between grey and white matter magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) parameters and the presence of IgM and IgG aCLs and lupus anticoagulant in 18 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and a history of NPSLE but without cerebral infarcts on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Lower grey matter mean MTR (P < 0.05), white matter mean MTR (P < 0.05), white matter peak location (P < 0.05) and grey matter peak location (trend toward statistical significance) were observed in IgM aCL-positive patients than in IgM aCL-negative patients. No significant differences were found in MTR histogram parameters with respect to IgG aCL and lupus anticoagulant status, nor with respect to anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA (extractable nuclear antigen) status. This is the first report of an association between the presence of aCLs and cerebral damage in grey and white matter in NPSLE. Our findings suggest that aCLs are associated with diffuse brain involvement in NPSLE patients. PMID:16469116

  19. Poststroke depression as a factor adversely affecting the level of oxidative damage to plasma proteins during a brain stroke.

    PubMed

    Cichoń, Natalia; Bijak, Michał; Miller, Elżbieta; Niwald, Marta; Saluk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Poststroke depression, the second most serious psychosomatic complication after brain stroke, leads to delay of the rehabilitation process and is associated with an increased disability and cognitive impairment along with increase in term mortality. Research into the biochemical changes in depression is still insufficiently described. The aim of our study was therefore to evaluate the possible association between plasma protein oxidative/nitrative damages and the development of poststroke depression. We evaluated oxidative/nitrative modifications of specific proteins by measurement of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups levels using ELISA test. Additionally, we checked differences in proteins thiol groups by spectrophotometric assay based on reaction between DTNB and thiols. We also evaluated catalase activity in erythrocytes measured as ability to decompose H2O2. Correlation analysis was performed using Spearman's rank. We observed significant (P < 0.001) differences in all oxidative/nitrative stress parameters in brain stroke patients compared to healthy group. Our research shows that oxidative damage of proteins is correlated with the degree of poststroke depression, while nitrative changes do not show any relationship. We demonstrate a positive correlation between the concentration of carbonyl groups and the Geriatric Depression Scale and a negative correlation between the degree of depression and the concentration of -SH groups or catalase activity.

  20. [Focal connatal acquired brain damage--sonographic study of the course of healing].

    PubMed

    Franek, A

    1985-06-01

    A case of a perinatal acquired focal brain lesion is reported, and the process of resorption and healing demonstrated by ultrasound. Within four weeks a cortical area of increased echogenicity was resorbed. After two months, the resulting porencephalic cyst had been transformed into glial tissue of very high echogenicity. The neurologic development of two children with such glial focus was good. These cases demonstrate that porencephalic cysts are not always the final state after resorption of a focal brain lesion. They are no reliable prognostic indicator of poor neurological outcome. Traumatic and complicated delivery, asphyxia and coagulopathy are conditions which have been found several times in connection with a focal brain lesion. In contrast to periventricular injury, prematurity does not seem to be a factor of higher risk. PMID:3895372

  1. Aging aggravates ischemic stroke-induced brain damage in mice with chronic peripheral infection.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Denes, Adam; Valonen, Piia; Wojciechowski, Sara; Magga, Johanna; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Humphreys, Neil; Grencis, Richard; Rothwell, Nancy; Koistinaho, Jari

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is confounded by conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infection, all of which alter peripheral inflammatory processes with concomitant impact on stroke outcome. The majority of the stroke patients are elderly, but the impact of interactions between aging and inflammation on stroke remains unknown. We thus investigated the influence of age on the outcome of stroke in animals predisposed to systemic chronic infection. Th1-polarized chronic systemic infection was induced in 18-22 month and 4-month-old C57BL/6j mice by administration of Trichuris muris (gut parasite). One month after infection, mice underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and infarct size, brain gliosis, and brain and plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed. Chronic infection increased the infarct size in aged but not in young mice at 24 h. Aged, ischemic mice showed altered plasma and brain cytokine responses, while the lesion size correlated with plasma prestroke levels of RANTES. Moreover, the old, infected mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of both plasma interleukin-17α and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Neither age nor infection status alone or in combination altered the ischemia-induced brain microgliosis. Our results show that chronic peripheral infection in aged animals renders the brain more vulnerable to ischemic insults, possibly by increasing the invasion of neutrophils and altering the inflammation status in the blood and brain. Understanding the interactions between age and infections is crucial for developing a better therapeutic regimen for ischemic stroke and when modeling it as a disease of the elderly.

  2. An investigation of body part as object (BPO) responses in normal and brain-damaged adults.

    PubMed

    Duffy, R J; Duffy, J R

    1989-07-01

    A test of simple pantomime was administered to three groups of adults and comparisons were made across groups of the incidence of subjects who exhibited body part as object (BPO) responses and of the mean frequency of occurrence of BPO in each group. The three groups were left-hemisphere-damaged aphasics (N = 28), right-hemisphere-damaged (N = 24), and normal controls (N = 28). The results indicated no significant differences among groups on the BPO measures. Also, to test the strength of association between the frequency of occurrence of BPO and measures of limb apraxia and severity of aphasia for the left-hemisphere-damaged aphasic group, correlation coefficients were obtained. The correlations were low and nonsignificant. The results of this investigation do not support the common clinical assumption that the occurrence of BPO during the performance of simple pantomimes is pathognomic for left-hemisphere pathology or associated with limb apraxia.

  3. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  4. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  5. Hypertensive brain damage: comparative evaluation of protective effect of treatment with dihydropyridine derivatives in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, M; Tomassoni, D; Amenta, F

    2001-11-01

    Hypertension is the main risk factor for cerebrovascular disease including vascular dementia and control of blood pressure might protect from lesions causing cognitive impairment. The influence of anti-hypertensive treatment on hypertensive brain damage was assessed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR and age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated from the 14-26th week of age with the dihydropyridine-type Ca2+ channel blockers lercanidipine, manidipine and nimodipine and as a reference with the non-dihydropyridine-type vasodilator hydralazine. Volume of brain areas, number of nerve cells and glial fibrillary-acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive astrocytes and neurofilament 200 kDa immunoreactivity were investigated in frontal and occipital cortex and in hippocampus. In control SHR, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly higher in comparison with WKY rats. Compounds tested decreased to a similar extent SBP values in SHR, with the exception of nimodipine that caused a smaller reduction of SBP compared with other compounds. Decreased volume and number of nerve cells and loss of neurofilament protein immunoreactivity were observed in SHR. GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes increased in number (hyperplasia) and in size (hypertrophy) in the frontal and occipital cortex of control SHR, and only in number in the hippocampus. Anti-hypertensive treatment countered in part microanatomical changes occurring in SHR. Drugs investigated with the exception of nimodipine exerted an equi-hypotensive effect. In spite of this the best protection was exerted by lercanidipine and, to a lesser extent, by nimodipine. Compared with nimodipine, lercanidipine induced a more effective decrease of SBP. This may represent an advantage in the treatment of hypertension with risk of brain damage.

  6. Is There Chronic Brain Damage in Retired NFL Players? Neuroradiology, Neuropsychology, and Neurology Examinations of 45 Retired Players

    PubMed Central

    Casson, Ira R.; Viano, David C.; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng; LeStrange, Danielle G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neuropathology and surveys of retired National Football League (NFL) players suggest that chronic brain damage is a frequent result of a career in football. There is limited information on the neurological statuses of living retired players. This study aimed to fill the gap in knowledge by conducting in-depth neurological examinations of 30- to 60-year-old retired NFL players. Hypothesis: In-depth neurological examinations of 30- to 60-year-old retired players are unlikely to detect objective clinical abnormalities in the majority of subjects. Study Design: A day-long medical examination was conducted on 45 retired NFL players, including state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI]), comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological examinations, interviews, blood tests, and APOE (apolipoprotein E) genotyping. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Participants’ histories focused on neurological and depression symptoms, exposure to football, and other factors that could affect brain function. The neurological examination included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) evaluation of cognitive function and a comprehensive search for signs of dysarthria, pyramidal system dysfunction, extrapyramidal system dysfunction, and cerebellar dysfunction. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) measured depression. Neuropsychological tests included pen-and-paper and ImPACT evaluation of cognitive function. Anatomical examination SWI and DTI MRI searched for brain injuries. The results were statistically analyzed for associations with markers of exposure to football and related factors, such as body mass index (BMI), ethanol use, and APOE4 status. Results: The retired players’ ages averaged 45.6 ± 8.9 years (range, 30-60 years), and they had 6.8 ± 3.2 years (maximum, 14 years) of NFL play. They reported 6.9 ± 6.2 concussions (maximum, 25) in the NFL. The

  7. EEG Delta Band as a Marker of Brain Damage in Aphasic Patients after Recovery of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    In this study spectral delta percentage was used to assess both brain dysfunction/inhibition and functional linguistic impairment during different phases of word processing. To this aim, EEG delta amplitude was measured in 17 chronic non-fluent aphasic patients while engaged in three linguistic tasks: Orthographic, Phonological and Semantic.…

  8. The Expanded Sensory-Perceptual Examination as a Diagnostic Screening Instrument for Organic Brain Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grundvig, John L.

    The primary objectives of this research program were the development of a battery of tests to investigate the effects of brain impairment on sensory and perceptual functioning. The Sensory-Perceptual Exam (SPE) contains measures intended to evaluate both relatively "pure" sensory functions, as well as those which involve more integrated and…

  9. Structural brain changes in chronic pain reflect probably neither damage nor atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Niemeier, Andreas; Ihle, Kristin; Ruether, Wolfgang; May, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain appears to be associated with brain gray matter reduction in areas ascribable to the transmission of pain. The morphological processes underlying these structural changes, probably following functional reorganisation and central plasticity in the brain, remain unclear. The pain in hip osteoarthritis is one of the few chronic pain syndromes which are principally curable. We investigated 20 patients with chronic pain due to unilateral coxarthrosis (mean age 63.25±9.46 (SD) years, 10 female) before hip joint endoprosthetic surgery (pain state) and monitored brain structural changes up to 1 year after surgery: 6-8 weeks, 12-18 weeks and 10-14 month when completely pain free. Patients with chronic pain due to unilateral coxarthrosis had significantly less gray matter compared to controls in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insular cortex and operculum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex. These regions function as multi-integrative structures during the experience and the anticipation of pain. When the patients were pain free after recovery from endoprosthetic surgery, a gray matter increase in nearly the same areas was found. We also found a progressive increase of brain gray matter in the premotor cortex and the supplementary motor area (SMA). We conclude that gray matter abnormalities in chronic pain are not the cause, but secondary to the disease and are at least in part due to changes in motor function and bodily integration.

  10. Monocrotaline: Histological Damage and Oxidant Activity in Brain Areas of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Honório Junior, José Eduardo Ribeiro; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Rodrigues, Francisca Taciana Sousa; Sena Filho, José Guedes; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Aguiar, Carlos Clayton Torres; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Woods, David John; Fonteles, Marta Maria de França; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2012-01-01

    This work was designed to study MCT effect in histopathological analysis of hippocampus (HC) and parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and in oxidative stress (OS) parameters in brain areas such as hippocampus (HC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and striatum (ST). Swiss mice (25–30 g) were administered a single i.p. dose of MCT (5, 50, or 100 mg/kg) or 4% Tween 80 in saline (control group). After 30 minutes, the animals were sacrificed by decapitation and the brain areas (HC, PHC, PFC, or ST) were removed for histopathological analysis or dissected and homogenized for measurement of OS parameters (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and catalase) by spectrophotometry. Histological evaluation of brain structures of rats treated with MCT (50 and 100 mg/kg) revealed lesions in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex compared to control. Lipid peroxidation was evident in all brain areas after administration of MCT. Nitrite/nitrate content decreased in all doses administered in HC, PFC, and ST. Catalase activity was increased in the MCT group only in HC. In conclusion, monocrotaline caused cell lesions in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex regions and produced oxidative stress in the HC, PFC, and ST in mice. These findings may contribute to the neurological effects associated with this compound. PMID:23251721

  11. A Cross-Talk between Brain-Damage Patients and Infants on Action and Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papeo, Liuba; Hochmann, Jean-Remy

    2012-01-01

    Sensorimotor representations in the brain encode the sensory and motor aspects of one's own bodily activity. It is highly debated whether sensorimotor representations are the core basis for the representation of action-related knowledge and, in particular, action words, such as verbs. In this review, we will address this question by bringing to…

  12. Psychosocial Adjustment and Life Satisfaction until 5 Years after Severe Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorbo, Ann K.; Blomqvist, Maritha; Emanuelsson, Ingrid M.; Rydenhag, Bertil

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe psychosocial adjustment and outcome over time for severely brain-injured patients and to find suitable outcome measures for clinical practice during the rehabilitation process and for individual rehabilitation planning after discharge from hospital. The methods include a descriptive, prospective,…

  13. Brain zinc chelation by diethyldithiocarbamate increased the behavioral and mitochondrial damages in zebrafish subjected to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Marcos M.; Silva, Emerson S.; Moraes, Tarsila B.; Schirmbeck, Gabriel Henrique; Rico, Eduardo P.; Pinto, Charles B.; Rosemberg, Denis B.; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S.; Dias, Renato D.; Oliveira, Diogo L.; T. Rocha, João Batista; Souza, Diogo O.

    2016-01-01

    The increase in brain levels of chelatable zinc (Zn) in dysfunctions involving oxygen deprivation has stimulated the treatment with Zn chelators, such as diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC). However, DEDTC is a redox-active compound and it should be better evaluated during hypoxia. We use the hypoxia model in zebrafish to evaluate DEDTC effects. The exploratory behavior, chelatable Zn content, activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, reactive species levels (nitric oxide, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical scavenger capacity) and cellular antioxidants (sulfhydryl, superoxide dismutase) of zebrafish brain were assessed after recovery, with or without 0.2 mM DEDTC. The increased brain levels of chelatable Zn induced by hypoxia were mitigated by DEDTC. However, the novel tank task indicated that DEDTC did further enhance the exploratory deficit caused by hypoxia. Furthermore, these behavioral impairments caused by DEDTC were more associated with a negative action on mitochondrial activity and brain oxidative balance. Thus, due to apparent pro-oxidant action of DEDTC, our data do not support its use for neuroprotection in neuropathologies involving oxygen deprivation. PMID:26854133

  14. Chronic Exposure to Tributyltin Induces Brain Functional Damage in Juvenile Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping; Shi, Ze-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Tributyltin (TBT) on brain function and neurotoxicity of freshwater teleost. The effects of long-term exposure to TBT on antioxidant related indices (MDA, malondialdehyde; SOD, superoxide dismutase; CAT, catalase; GR, glutathione reductase; GPx, glutathione peroxidase), Na+-K+-ATPase and neurological parameters (AChE, acetylcholinesterase; MAO, monoamine oxidase; NO, nitric oxide) in the brain of common carp were evaluated. Fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of TBT (75 ng/L, 0.75 μg/L and 7.5 μg/L) for 15, 30, and 60 days. Based on the results, a low level and short-term TBT-induced stress could not induce the notable responses of the fish brain, but long-term exposure (more than 15 days) to TBT could lead to obvious physiological-biochemical responses (based on the measured parameters). The results also strongly indicated that neurotoxicity of TBT to fish. Thus, the measured physiological responses in fish brain could provide useful information to better understand the mechanisms of TBT-induced bio-toxicity. PMID:25879203

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment promotes neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhichun; Liu, Jing; Ju, Rong

    2013-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage has been used clinically for many years, but its effectiveness remains controversial. In addition, the mechanism of this potential neuroprotective effect remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (7 days old) subjected to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Six hours after modeling, rats were treated with hyperbaric oxygen once daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats increased at day 3 after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and peaked at day 5. After hyperbaric oxygen treatment, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells began to increase at day 1, and was significantly higher than that in normal rats and model rats until day 21. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that hyperbaric oxygen treatment could attenuate pathological changes to brain tissue in neonatal rats, and reduce the number of degenerating and necrotic nerve cells. Our experimental findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen treatment enhances the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, and has therapeutic potential for promoting neurological recovery following brain injury.

  16. Cerebral white matter injury and damage to myelin sheath following whole-brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingzhu; Yi, Qiong; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xue; Xuan, Lihui; Tian, Ye

    2013-02-01

    Myelin sheath, either in white matter or in other regions of brain, is vulnerable to ischemia. The specific events involved in the progression of ischemia in white matter have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological alterations in cerebral white matter and levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) in ischemia-injured brain tissue during the acute and subacute phases of central nervous injury following whole-brain ischemia. The whole cerebral ischemia model (four-vessel occlusion (4-VO)) was established in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and MBP gene expression and protein levels in the brain tissue were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days following ischemia. Demyelination was determined by Luxol fast blue myelin staining, routine histopathological staining, and electron microscopy in injured brain tissue. Results showed that edema, vascular dilation, focal necrosis, demyelination, adjacent reactive gliosis and inflammation occurred 7 days after ischemia in HE staining and recovered to control levels at 28 days. The absence of Luxol fast blue staining and vacuolation was clearly visible at 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Semiquantitative analysis showed that the transparency of myelin had decreased significantly by 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Demyelination and ultrastructual changes were detected 7 days after ischemia. The relative levels of MBP mRNA decreased 2 days after ischemia and this trend continued throughout the remaining four points in time. The MBP levels measured using ELISA also decreased significantly at 2 days and 4 days, but they recovered by 7 days and returned to control levels by 14 days. These results suggest that the impact of ischemia on cerebral white matter is time-sensitive and that different effects may follow different courses over time.

  17. Suppression and Narrative Time Shifts in Adults with Right-Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharp, Victoria L.; Tompkins, Connie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the functioning of a central comprehension mechanism, suppression, in adults with right-hemisphere damage (RHD) while they processed narratives that cued a shift in time frame. In normal language comprehension, mental activation of concepts from a prior time frame is suppressed. The (re)activation of information…

  18. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty. PMID:26960103

  19. An Aminopyridazine Inhibitor of Death Associated Protein Kinase Attenuates Hypoxia-Ischemia Induced Brain Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Velentza, A.V.; Wainwright, M.S.; Zasadzki, M.; Mirzoeva, S.; Haiech, J.; Focia, P.J.; Egli, M.; Watterson, D.M.

    2010-03-08

    Death associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a calcium and calmodulin regulated enzyme that functions early in eukaryotic programmed cell death, or apoptosis. To validate DAPK as a potential drug discovery target for acute brain injury, the first small molecule DAPK inhibitor was synthesized and tested in vivo. A single injection of the aminopyridazine-based inhibitor administered 6 h after injury attenuated brain tissue or neuronal biomarker loss measured, respectively, 1 week and 3 days later. Because aminopyridazine is a privileged structure in neuropharmacology, we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of a binary complex between the kinase domain and a molecular fragment of the DAPK inhibitor. The co-crystal structure describes a structural basis for interaction and provides a firm foundation for structure-assisted design of lead compounds with appropriate molecular properties for future drug development.

  20. White Matter Damage Disorganizes Brain Functional Networks in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Garcés, Pilar; López, María Eugenia; Aurtenetxe, Sara; Cuesta, Pablo; Marcos, Alberto; Montejo, Pedro; Yus, Miguel; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; del Pozo, Francisco; Becker, James T.; Maestú, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although progressive functional brain network disruption has been one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease, little is known about the origin of this functional impairment that underlies cognitive symptoms. We investigated how the loss of white matter (WM) integrity disrupts the organization of the functional networks at different frequency bands. The analyses were performed in a sample of healthy elders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects. Spontaneous brain magnetic activity (measured with magnetoencephalography) was characterized with phase synchronization analysis, and graph theory was applied to the functional networks. We identified WM areas (using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging) that showed a statistical dependence between the fractional anisotropy and the graph metrics. These regions are part of an episodic memory network and were also related to cognitive functions. Our data support the hypothesis that disruption of the anatomical networks influences the organization at the functional level resulting in the prodromal dementia syndrome of MCI. PMID:24617580

  1. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Brain Damage After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jincheng; Xie, Xuemeng; Pan, Hao; Wu, Ziqian; Lu, Wen; Yang, Guangtian

    2015-07-01

    Postcardiac arrest syndrome yields poor neurological outcomes, but the mechanisms underlying this condition remain poorly understood. This study investigated whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis is induced in injured brain after resuscitation. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 min of cardiac arrest (CA) and then resuscitated successfully. In the first experiment, animals were sacrificed 1, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h (n = 3 per group) after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Brain tissues were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. In the second experiment, either dimethyl sulfoxide or salubrinal (Sal; 1 mg/kg), an ER stress inhibitor, was injected 30 min before the induction of CA (n = 10 per group). Neurological deficits were evaluated 24 h after CA. Brain specimens were analyzed using electron microscopy, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays and immunohistochemistry. We found that the messenger RNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78, X-box binding protein 1, C/EBP homologous protein, and caspase 12 were significantly elevated after resuscitation. We also observed that rats treated with Sal exhibited an improved neurological deficit score (32.3 ± 15.5 in the Sal group vs. 49.8 ± 20.9 in controls, P < 0.05). In addition, morphological improvements in the hippocampal ER were observed in the Sal group compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide group 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, in situ immunostaining revealed that markers of ER stress were significantly inhibited by Sal pretreatment. Our findings suggested that ER stress and the associated apoptotic pathways were activated in the hippocampus after resuscitation. Administration of Sal 30 min before cardiopulmonary resuscitation ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24 h after CA, possibly through the inhibition of ER stress after postresuscitation brain injury. PMID:25705860

  2. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Brain Damage After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jincheng; Xie, Xuemeng; Pan, Hao; Wu, Ziqian; Lu, Wen; Yang, Guangtian

    2015-07-01

    Postcardiac arrest syndrome yields poor neurological outcomes, but the mechanisms underlying this condition remain poorly understood. This study investigated whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis is induced in injured brain after resuscitation. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 min of cardiac arrest (CA) and then resuscitated successfully. In the first experiment, animals were sacrificed 1, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h (n = 3 per group) after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Brain tissues were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. In the second experiment, either dimethyl sulfoxide or salubrinal (Sal; 1 mg/kg), an ER stress inhibitor, was injected 30 min before the induction of CA (n = 10 per group). Neurological deficits were evaluated 24 h after CA. Brain specimens were analyzed using electron microscopy, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays and immunohistochemistry. We found that the messenger RNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78, X-box binding protein 1, C/EBP homologous protein, and caspase 12 were significantly elevated after resuscitation. We also observed that rats treated with Sal exhibited an improved neurological deficit score (32.3 ± 15.5 in the Sal group vs. 49.8 ± 20.9 in controls, P < 0.05). In addition, morphological improvements in the hippocampal ER were observed in the Sal group compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide group 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, in situ immunostaining revealed that markers of ER stress were significantly inhibited by Sal pretreatment. Our findings suggested that ER stress and the associated apoptotic pathways were activated in the hippocampus after resuscitation. Administration of Sal 30 min before cardiopulmonary resuscitation ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24 h after CA, possibly through the inhibition of ER stress after postresuscitation brain injury.

  3. Anxious phenotypes plus environmental stressors are related to brain DNA damage and changes in NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abaleira, Helena M; Michels, Monique; Tomaz, Débora B; dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Carlessi, Anelise S; Matias, Beatriz I; Leffa, Daniela D; Damiani, Adriani P; Gomes, Vitor de C; Andrade, Vanessa M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Landeira-Fernadez, Jesus; Quevedo, João

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of chronic mild stress on DNA damage, NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate transport levels in the brains of rats with an anxious phenotype, which were selected to represent both the high-freezing (CHF) and low-freezing (CLF) lines. The anxious phenotype induced DNA damage in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAc). CHF rats subjected to chronic stress presented a more pronounced DNA damage in the hippocampus and NAc. NMDAR1 were increased in the prefrontal cortex (PC), hippocampus and amygdala of CHF, and decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and NAc of CHF stressed. NMDAR2A were decreased in the amygdala of the CHF and stressed; and increased in CHF stressed. NMDRA2A in the NAc was increased after stress, and decreased in the CLF. NMDAR2B were increased in the hippocampus of CLF and CHF. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the NMDAR2B for stress in the CLF and CHF. NMDAR2B in the NAc were decreased for stress and increased in the CHF; in the PC NMDAR2B increased in the CHF. EAAT1 increased in the PC of CLF+stress. In the hippocampus, EAAT1 decreased in all groups. In the amygdala, EAAT1 decreased in the CLF+stress and CHF. EAAT2 were decreased in the PC for stress, and increased in CHF+control. In the hippocampus, the EAAT2 were increased for the CLF and decreased in the CLF+stress. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the EATT2 in the CLF+stress and CHF. These findings suggest that an anxious phenotype plus stress may induce a more pronounced DNA damage, and promote more alterations in the glutamatergic system. These findings may help to explain, at least in part, the common point of the mechanisms involved with the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety. PMID:25772108

  4. Quantitation of heavy ion damage to the mammalian brain: Some preliminary findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Kraft, L. M.

    Histological preparations of brains from rabbits and mice exposed to different doses of various HZE particles or to low-LET photons have been subjected to preliminary quantitation of radiation-induced morphometric changes. Computer assisted measurements of several brain structures and cell types have been made using the KONTRON Automated Interactive Measurement System (IBAS, Carl Zeiss, Inc., Thornwood, N.,Y. 10594 U.S.A.). New Zealand white rabbits irradiated at ~6 weeks of age were euthanatized 6.5-25 months after exposure to 60Co gamma photons (LET∞ = ~ 0.3 keV/μm, 20Ne particles (LET∞ = 35 +/- 3 keV/μm), or 40Ar particles (LET∞ = 90 +/- 5 keV/μm). Measurements of stained sections of the olfactory bulbs of those animals indicate that the mean size (volume) of olfactory glomeruli is reduced in a dose-dependent (and perhaps an LET-dependent) manner as soon as 6.5 months after irradiation. Differences between mean volumes of additional structures have been noted when histological preparations of control mouse brains were compared with irradiated specimens. Quantitation of intermediate and late changes in nervous (and other) tissues exposed to low- and high-LET radiations will improve our ability to predict late effects in tissues of astronauts and others exposed to the radiation hazards of the space environment.

  5. Detection of neuronal damage in degenerative brain disease with cobalt-55 and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim, J.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We suggest Cobalt-55 (Co) as a Calcium (Ca)-marker to visualize Ca transport across the neuronal membrane. Elevation of intracellular Ca is closely linked with the process of neuronal cell-decay. Co-uptake is correlated with Ca-accumulation through divalent cation-permeable kainate (KA)-activated receptor-operated channels in the neuronal membrane. This hypothesis was studied with position emission tomography (PET) both in patients with a ischemic cerebro-vascular accident (CVA) and in patients with relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Co-PET studies were performed in a dynamic mode (6 frames of 10 minutes) 20-25 hours after iv.-administration of 1-2 mCi Co. Regional specific accumulation irrespective of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity in the (clinically appropriate) affected cerebral region could be demonstrated in CVA-patients, thus suggesting neuronal decay in (the early phase of) infarction. In MS, inhomogeneous cerebral distribution of Co was detected, in contrast to healthy volunteers. This suggests focal accumulation of Co in multiple spots of neuronal decay, possibly related to MS-lesions on MRI. In conclusion, Co-PET may prove to be a valuable tool for the early detection of neuronal decay not only in CVA and MS, but in other brain-pathology as well. The usefulness of Co-PET in imaging brain-tumors and myocardial ischemia has already been established.

  6. A multi-contrast MRI study of microstructural brain damage in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Granziera, C.; Daducci, A.; Donati, A.; Bonnier, G.; Romascano, D.; Roche, A.; Bach Cuadra, M.; Schmitter, D.; Klöppel, S.; Meuli, R.; von Gunten, A.; Krueger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate pathological mechanisms underlying brain tissue alterations in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using multi-contrast 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Forty-two MCI patients and 77 healthy controls (HC) underwent T1/T2* relaxometry as well as Magnetization Transfer (MT) MRI. Between-groups comparisons in MRI metrics were performed using permutation-based tests. Using MRI data, a generalized linear model (GLM) was computed to predict clinical performance and a support-vector machine (SVM) classification was used to classify MCI and HC subjects. Results Multi-parametric MRI data showed microstructural brain alterations in MCI patients vs HC that might be interpreted as: (i) a broad loss of myelin/cellular proteins and tissue microstructure in the hippocampus (p ≤ 0.01) and global white matter (p < 0.05); and (ii) iron accumulation in the pallidus nucleus (p ≤ 0.05). MRI metrics accurately predicted memory and executive performances in patients (p ≤ 0.005). SVM classification reached an accuracy of 75% to separate MCI and HC, and performed best using both volumes and T1/T2*/MT metrics. Conclusion Multi-contrast MRI appears to be a promising approach to infer pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain tissue alterations in MCI. Likewise, parametric MRI data provide powerful correlates of cognitive deficits and improve automatic disease classification based on morphometric features. PMID:26236628

  7. The natural xanthone alpha-mangostin reduces oxidative damage in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Lugo-Huitrón, Rafael; Valdivia-Cerda, Verónica; Miranda-Ramírez, Luis Rubén; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cuahutencos, Octavio; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Mata, Rachel; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-02-01

    The antiperoxidative properties of alpha-mangostin, a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit, were tested for the first time in nerve tissue exposed to different toxic insults. Two reliable biological preparations (rat brain homogenates and synaptosomal P2 fractions) were exposed to the toxic actions of a free radical generator (ferrous sulfate), an excitotoxic agent (quinolinate), and a mitochondrial toxin (3-nitropropionate). alpha-Mangostin decreased the lipoperoxidative action of FeSO(4) in both preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely abolished the peroxidative effects of quinolinate, 3-nitropropionate and FeSO(4) + quinolinate at all concentrations tested. Interestingly, when tested alone in brain homogenates, alpha-mangostin significantly decreased the lipoperoxidation even below basal levels. alpha-Mangostin also prevented the decreased reductant capacity of mitochondria in synaptosomal fractions. Our results suggest that alpha-mangostin exerts a robust antiperoxidative effect in brain tissue preparations probably through its properties as a free radical scavenger. In light of these findings, this antioxidant should be tested in other neurotoxic models involving oxidative stress.

  8. The accumulation of brain water-free sodium is associated with ischemic damage independent of the blood pressure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Manabu; Kitazato, Keiko T; Yagi, Kenji; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kurashiki, Yoshitaka; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Kinouchi, Tomoya; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Satomi, Junichiro; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    Estrogen deficiency worsens ischemic stroke outcomes. In ovariectomized (OVX(+)) rats fed a high-salt diet (HSD), an increase in the body Na(+)/water ratio, which characterizes water-free Na(+) accumulation, was associated with detrimental vascular effects independent of the blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that an increase in brain water-free Na(+) accumulation is associated with ischemic brain damage in OVX(+)/HSD rats. To test our hypothesis we divided female Wistar rats into 4 groups, OVX(+) and OVX(-) rats fed HSD or a normal diet (ND), and subjected them to transient cerebral ischemia. The brain Na(+)/water ratio was increased even in OVX(+)/ND rats and augmented in OVX(+)/HSD rats. The increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio was positively correlated with expansion of the cortical infarct volume without affecting the BP. Interestingly, OVX(+) was associated with the decreased expression of ATP1α3, a subtype of the Na(+) efflux pump. HSD increased the expression of brain Na(+) influx-related molecules and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). The pretreatment of OVX(+)/HSD rats with the MR antagonist eplerenone reduced brain water-free Na(+) accumulation, up-regulated ATP1α3, down-regulated MR, and reduced the cortical infarct volume. Our findings show that the increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio elicited by estrogen deficiency or HSD is associated with ischemic brain damage BP-independently, suggesting the importance of regulating the accumulation of brain water-free Na(+). The up-regulation of ATP1α3 and the down-regulation of MR may provide a promising therapeutic strategy to attenuate ischemic brain damage in postmenopausal women.

  9. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  10. No increases in biomarkers of genetic damage or pathological changes in heart and brain tissues in male rats administered methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) for 28 days.

    PubMed

    Witt, Kristine L; Malarkey, David E; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Davis, Jeffrey P; Kissling, Grace E; Caspary, William; Travlos, Gregory; Recio, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Following a 2005 report of chromosomal damage in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who were treated with the commonly prescribed medication methylphenidate (MPH), numerous studies have been conducted to clarify the risk for MPH-induced genetic damage. Although most of these studies reported no changes in genetic damage endpoints associated with exposure to MPH, one recent study (Andreazza et al. [2007]: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 31:1282-1288) reported an increase in DNA damage detected by the Comet assay in blood and brain cells of Wistar rats treated by intraperitoneal injection with 1, 2, or 10 mg/kg MPH; no increases in micronucleated lymphocyte frequencies were observed in these rats. To clarify these findings, we treated adult male Wistar Han rats with 0, 2, 10, or 25 mg/kg MPH by gavage once daily for 28 consecutive days and measured micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood, and DNA damage in blood, brain, and liver cells 4 hr after final dosing. Flow cytometric evaluation of blood revealed no significant increases in MN-RET. Comet assay evaluations of blood leukocytes and cells of the liver, as well as of the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of the brain showed no increases in DNA damage in MPH-treated rats in any of the three treatment groups. Thus, the previously reported observations of DNA damage in blood and brain tissue of rats exposed to MPH for 28 days were not confirmed in this study. Additionally, no histopathological changes in brain or heart, or elevated serum biomarkers of cardiac injury were observed in these MPH-exposed rats.

  11. Social isolation stress-induced oxidative damage in mouse brain and its modulation by majonoside-R2, a Vietnamese ginseng saponin.

    PubMed

    Huong, Nguyen Thi Thu; Murakami, Yukihisa; Tohda, Michihisa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2005-08-01

    Stressors with a physical factor such as immobilization, electric foot shock, cold swim, etc., have been shown to produce oxidative damage to membrane lipids in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of protracted social isolation stress on lipid peroxidation activity in the mouse brain and elucidated the protective effect of majonoside-R2, a major saponin component of Vietnamese ginseng, in mice exposed to social isolation stress. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels, one of the end products of lipid peroxidation reaction, were increased in the brains of mice subjected to 6-8 weeks of social isolation stress. Measurements of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (NO(x)(-)) also revealed a significant increase of NO production in the brains of socially isolated mice. Moreover, the depletion of brain glutathione content, an endogenous antioxidant, in socially isolated animals occurred in association with the rise in lipid peroxidation. The intraperitoneal administration of majonoside-R2 (10-50 mg/kg) had no effect on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), NO, or glutathione levels in the brains of group-housed control mice but it significantly suppressed the increase in TBARS and NO levels and the decrease in glutathione levels caused by social isolation stress. These results suggest that mice subjected to 6-8 weeks of social isolation stress produces oxidative damage in the brain partly via enhancement of NO production, and that majonoside-R2 exerts a protective effect by modulating NO and glutathione systems in the brain.

  12. Computerized video tasks as training techniques for driving-related perceptual deficits of persons with brain damage: a pilot evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M; Hill, C S; Olson, P L

    1984-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the modifiability of perceptual deficits by training which consisted of performing microcomputer-generated video tasks. These commercially available remedial programs tapped a range of skills, such as right/left discrimination, color matching, visual scanning, judgment of line orientation, visual search, shape discrimination, visual memory, eye tracking, visuomotor coordination, and visual imagery. Four subjects with acquired brain damage were given 10 hours of training. Perceptual skills were assessed with a battery of seven paper-and-pencil tests administered both before and after the training. Following the training two subjects showed some improvement on several of the perceptual tests used, while two other subjects showed improvement on only a limited number of tests. Based on these results and on the performance changes on the video tasks themselves, a comprehensive evaluation of the potential benefits of this type of training on driving performance is recommended.

  13. Head injuries in the 18th century: the management of the damaged brain.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-07-01

    The 18th century was the time when trauma neurosurgery began to develop into the modern discipline. Before this, the management had, for the most part, changed little from the days of Hippocrates, Celsus, and Galen. Attention was directed to skull injuries, and the brain was treated as the seat of the rational soul but without other function. Symptoms after trauma were attributed to injuries to the bone and meninges. Following the lead of the Royal Academy of Surgery in Paris, it was accepted from the 1730s that the brain was the seat of symptoms after cranial trauma. During the 18th century, at least 12 surgeons published articles on cranial injury, 6 describing significant clinical series on this topic. They were Henri-François Le Dran (1685-1770) of Paris, Percival Pott (1714-1788) of London, James Hill (1703-1776) from Dumfries, Sylvester O'Halloran (1728-1807) of Limerick (Ireland), William Dease (1750-1798) of Dublin, and John Abernethy (1764-1831) of London. This article analyzes these series. Each individual made a different contribution. It is suggested that the relatively lesser-known James Hill in Scotland demonstrated the greatest understanding of the management of brain trauma and achieved the best results. A product of the Scottish Enlightenment, he adapted his management to his own experience and was not tied to the accepted authorities of his day, but he improved the management of each case following his experience with previous patients. He deserves to be remembered.

  14. Obesity-mediated inflammation may damage the brain circuit that regulates food intake

    PubMed Central

    Cazettes, Fanny; Cohen, Jessica I.; Yau, Po Lai; Talbot, Hugues; Convit, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Adiposity is associated with chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and increased inflammation in the hypothalamus, a key structure in feeding behavior. It remains unknown whether inflammation impacts other brain structures that regulate feeding behavior. We studied 44 overweight/obese and 19 lean individuals with MRI and plasma fibrinogen levels (marker of inflammation). We performed MRI-based segmentations of the medial and lateral orbitofrotal cortex (OFC) and hippocampal volumes. Gray matter (GM) volumes were adjusted for head size variability. We conducted logistic and hierarchical regressions to assess the association between fibrinogen levels and brain volumetric data. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we created apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and conducted voxelwise correlational analyses. Fibrinogen concentrations were higher among the overweight/obese (t[61]=-2.33, P=0.023). Lateral OFC associated together with fibrinogen correctly classified those with excess of weight (accuracy=76.2%, sensitivity=95.5%, specificity=31.6%). The lateral OFC volumes of overweight/obese were negatively associated with fibrinogen (r=-0.37, P=0.016) and after accounting for age, hypertension, waist/hip ratio and lipid and sugar levels, fibrinogen significantly explained an additional 9% of the variance in the lateral OFC volume (β=-0.348, ΔR2=0.093, ΔF P=0.046). Among overweight/obese the associations between GM ADC and fibrinogen were significantly positive (P<0.001) in the left and right amygdala and the right parietal region. Among lean individuals these associations were negative and located in the left prefrontal, the right parietal and the left occipital lobes. This is the first study to report that adiposity-related inflammation may reduce the integrity of some of the brain structures involved in reward and feeding behaviors. PMID:21146506

  15. Structure and function in acquired prosopagnosia: lessons from a series of 10 patients with brain damage.

    PubMed

    Barton, Jason J S

    2008-03-01

    Acquired prosopagnosia varies in both behavioural manifestations and the location and extent of underlying lesions. We studied 10 patients with adult-onset lesions on a battery of face-processing tests. Using signal detection methods, we found that discriminative power for the familiarity of famous faces was most reduced by bilateral occipitotemporal lesions that involved the fusiform gyri, and better preserved with unilateral right-sided lesions. Tests of perception of facial structural configuration showed severe deficits with lesions that included the right fusiform gyrus, whether unilateral or bilateral. This deficit was most consistent for eye configuration, with some patients performing normally for mouth configuration. Patients with anterior temporal lesions had better configuration perception, though at least one patient showed a more subtle failure to integrate configural data from different facial regions. Facial imagery, an index of facial memories, was severely impaired by bilateral lesions that included the right anterior temporal lobe and marginally impaired by fusiform lesions alone; unilateral right fusiform lesions tended to spare imagery for facial features. These findings suggest that (I) prosopagnosia is more severe with bilateral than unilateral lesions, indicating a minor contribution of the left hemisphere to face recognition, (2) perception of facial configuration critically involves the right fusiform gyrus and (3) access to facial memories is most disrupted by bilateral lesions that also include the right anterior temporal lobe. This supports assertions that more apperceptive variants of prosopagnosia are linked to fusiform damage, whereas more associative variants are linked to anterior temporal damage. Next, we found that behavioural indices of covert recognition correlated with measures of overt familiarity, consistent with theories that covert behaviour emerges from the output of damaged neural networks, rather than alternative

  16. Processing homonymy and polysemy: effects of sentential context and time-course following unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed

    Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Baum, Shari R

    2005-12-01

    The present study investigated the abilities of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) non-fluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD), and normal control individuals to access, in sentential biasing contexts, the multiple meanings of three types of ambiguous words, namely homonyms (e.g., "punch"), metonymies (e.g., "rabbit"), and metaphors (e.g., "star"). Furthermore, the predictions of the "suppression deficit" and "coarse semantic coding" hypotheses, which have been proposed to account for RH language function/dysfunction, were tested. Using an auditory semantic priming paradigm, ambiguous words were incorporated in dominant- or subordinate-biasing sentence-primes followed after a short (100 ms) or long (1,000 ms) interstimulus interval (ISI) by dominant-meaning-related, subordinate-meaning-related or unrelated target words. For all three types of ambiguous words, both the effects of context and ISI were obvious in the performance of normal control subjects, who showed multiple meaning activation at the short ISI, but eventually, at the long ISI, contextually appropriate meaning selection. Largely similar performance was exhibited by the LHD non-fluent aphasic patients as well. In contrast, RHD patients showed limited effects of context, and no effects of the time-course of processing. In addition, although homonymous and metonymous words showed similar patterns of activation (i.e., both meanings were activated at both ISIs), RHD patients had difficulties activating the subordinate meanings of metaphors, suggesting a selective problem with figurative meanings. Although the present findings do not provide strong support for either the "coarse semantic coding" or the "suppression deficit" hypotheses, they are viewed as being more consistent with the latter, according to which RH damage leads to deficits suppressing alternative meanings of ambiguous words that become incompatible with the context. PMID:16298667

  17. Morphometric studies of heavy ion damage in the brains of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Cox, A. B.

    As an approach to determining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of each of five different heavy ions for the mammalian brain, histological preparations of brains from mice exposed to various HZE particles at different doses and primary LET∞ values were examined by means of semi-automated image analysis for volume changes in specific regions of the olfactory bulb. The mice were irradiated at 100 days of age and euthanatized about 500 days (16 months) later. Exposures were: 60Co gamma photons (LET∞ = 1-2 keV/μm), 4He (LET∞ = 6 keV/μm, 12C (LET∞ = 80 keV/μm), 20Ne (LET∞ = 150 keV/μm, 56Fe (LET∞ = 180 keV/μm, and 40Ar (LET∞ = 650 keV/μm). Animals receiving particle radiation were exposed in an extended Bragg peak region except for iron where the plateau region was used. The zones measured in the olfactory bulb were 1) the external plexiform layer (zone) and 2) an internal region consisting of the granule cells, internal plexiform layer, and layer of mitral cells. These studies indicated that volume changes did indeed occur, not only in absolute terms but alos when expressed as the ratio of the structures to each other and to the bulb as a whole. Although this study is exploratory in character, the data obtained may nevertheless contribute to a determination of risk factors due to late effects from HZE particles.

  18. Morphometric studies of heavy ion damage in the brains of rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Cox, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of different heavy ions for the mammalian brain was determined in mice irradiated at 100 days of age with He-4, C-12, Ne-20, Fe-56, Ar-40, or Co-60 gamma photons (with the primary particle LET values ranging from 2 to 650). Brain preparations were examined 16 months later for volume changes in the external plexiform layer (P-zone) of the olfactory bulb and an internal region (G-zone), which consists of the granule cells, the internal plexiform layer, and the mitral cell layer. The result indicate that the volume changes did occur in the olfactory bulb, not only in absolute terms but also when expressed as the ratio of the structures to each other and to the bulb as a whole. While the observed increased neuronal loss in mice receiving 700 cGy of Co-60 support the earlier data from irradiated rabbits, the increases observed in bulbar volumes and in the volume ratios of the P and the G zones measured in the mice given lower doses (320 or 160 cGy of He or C), were not expected.

  19. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate protects rat brain mitochondria against cadmium-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Abib, Renata Torres; Peres, Kaite Cristiane; Barbosa, Anderson Machado; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Bernardes, Angela; Zimmermann, Lizandra Maria; Quincozes-Santos, André; Fiedler, Haidi D; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Farina, Marcelo; Gottfried, Carmem

    2011-10-01

    Many health claims have been made about the medicinal benefits of drinking green tea, including neuroprotection. This study mainly focuses on Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), a potent antioxidant, which is abundantly found in green tea. Cadmium [Cd(2+)] is a toxic pollutant that leads to neurotoxicity in both animals and humans. Although the entrance of Cd(2+) in the adult central nervous system is limited, developmental neurotoxicity has been evidenced as result of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) immaturity. Moreover, high Cd(2+) levels are known to impair BBB function. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms related to its neurotoxic properties remain unknown. This study evaluates the potential protective effect of the major green tea polyphenol, EGCG, against Cd(2+)-induced mitotoxicity under in vitro conditions, using mitochondrial-enriched fractions from rat brain. Co-incubation of EGCG with Cd(2+) prevented the Cd(2+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction (capacity to reduce MTT to formazan). In addition, EGCG completely prevented mitochondrial lipid peroxidation induced by Cd(2+) but did not affect non protein thiols levels. Spectroscopic studies have shown EGCG able to form a chemical complex with Cd(2+), in an equimolar ratio. In this study we demonstrate EGCG effectiveness in protecting against Cd(2+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation probably due to its antioxidant and chelating effects. PMID:21798304

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Restore Brain Damage Induced Changes in Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Geißler, Maren; Dinse, Hubert R.; Neuhoff, Sandra; Kreikemeier, Klaus; Meier, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells has been shown to reduce sensorimotor deficits after hypoxic ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. However, the neuronal correlate of the functional recovery and how such a treatment enforces plastic remodelling at the level of neural processing remains elusive. Here we show by in-vivo recordings that hUCB cells have the capability of ameliorating the injury-related impairment of neural processing in primary somatosensory cortex. Intact cortical processing depends on a delicate balance of inhibitory and excitatory transmission, which is disturbed after injury. We found that the dimensions of cortical maps and receptive fields, which are significantly altered after injury, were largely restored. Additionally, the lesion induced hyperexcitability was no longer observed in hUCB treated animals as indicated by a paired-pulse behaviour resembling that observed in control animals. The beneficial effects on cortical processing were reflected in an almost complete recovery of sensorimotor behaviour. Our results demonstrate that hUCB cells reinstall the way central neurons process information by normalizing inhibitory and excitatory processes. We propose that the intermediate level of cortical processing will become relevant as a new stage to investigate efficacy and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of brain injury. PMID:21673795

  1. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral "Lesions" and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    PubMed

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p < 0.05) and Symbol-Digit-Substitution (SDS; p < 0.01). Compared to subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents, divers scored similar on DSB and SDS tests, but significantly better on the Simple Reaction Time (REA) and Hand-Eye Coordination (EYE) tests. There was no correlation between PFO, number of UBO's and any of the neuro-psychometric tests. We conclude that for

  2. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral "Lesions" and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    PubMed

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p < 0.05) and Symbol-Digit-Substitution (SDS; p < 0.01). Compared to subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents, divers scored similar on DSB and SDS tests, but significantly better on the Simple Reaction Time (REA) and Hand-Eye Coordination (EYE) tests. There was no correlation between PFO, number of UBO's and any of the neuro-psychometric tests. We conclude that for

  3. Methodology and validity in the construction of computational models of cognitive deficits following brain damage.

    PubMed

    Mayall, K

    1998-05-01

    Over recent years, neural network models of several cognitive neuropsychological disorders have been developed. These include word recognition difficulties, face recognition difficulties, attentional deficits, visual processing impairments, semantic deficits, and aphasia. These models are useful in various ways. Firstly, they require detailed specifications of theories, and can focus attention on critical assumptions. Secondly, they can query alternative theories, and provide predictions which can be verified by testing patients. In this paper, issues relating both to the methodology and validity of attempts to model cognitive deficits using neural networks will be discussed, providing examples from several studies. Issues discussed will include the requirement for models to perform normally prior to damage, and to show potential effects of rehabilitation or partial recovery following damage. A single model should be able to incorporate multiple symptoms of a deficit and ideally also multiple syndromes when different lesions are introduced. The model must also be able to handle variability between patients with the same syndrome, and even with the same patient at different test sessions.

  4. Methodology and validity in the construction of computational models of cognitive deficits following brain damage.

    PubMed

    Mayall, K

    1998-05-01

    Over recent years, neural network models of several cognitive neuropsychological disorders have been developed. These include word recognition difficulties, face recognition difficulties, attentional deficits, visual processing impairments, semantic deficits, and aphasia. These models are useful in various ways. Firstly, they require detailed specifications of theories, and can focus attention on critical assumptions. Secondly, they can query alternative theories, and provide predictions which can be verified by testing patients. In this paper, issues relating both to the methodology and validity of attempts to model cognitive deficits using neural networks will be discussed, providing examples from several studies. Issues discussed will include the requirement for models to perform normally prior to damage, and to show potential effects of rehabilitation or partial recovery following damage. A single model should be able to incorporate multiple symptoms of a deficit and ideally also multiple syndromes when different lesions are introduced. The model must also be able to handle variability between patients with the same syndrome, and even with the same patient at different test sessions. PMID:9654377

  5. Detrimental role of the EP1 prostanoid receptor in blood-brain barrier damage following experimental ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Frankowski, Jan C.; DeMars, Kelly M.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Hawkins, Kimberly E.; Yang, Changjun; Leclerc, Jenna L.; Doré, Sylvain; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is activated in response to ischemia and significantly contributes to the neuroinflammatory process. Accumulation of COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) parallels the substantial increase in stroke-mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Disruption of the BBB is a serious consequence of ischemic stroke, and is mainly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This study aimed to investigate the role of PGE2 EP1 receptor in neurovascular injury in stroke. We hypothesized that pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of EP1 protects against BBB damage and hemorrhagic transformation by decreasing the levels and activity of MMP-3 and MMP-9. We found that post-ischemic treatment with the EP1 antagonist, SC-51089, or EP1 genetic deletion results in a significant reduction in BBB disruption and reduced hemorrhagic transformation in an experimental model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. These neurovascular protective effects of EP1 inactivation are associated with a significant reduction in MMP-9/-3, less peripheral neutrophil infiltration, and a preservation of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) composing the BBB. Our study identifies the EP1 signaling pathway as an important link between neuroinflammation and MMP-mediated BBB breakdown in ischemic stroke. Targeting the EP1 receptor could represent a novel approach to diminish the devastating consequences of stroke-induced neurovascular damage. PMID:26648273

  6. Relationship between opioid therapy, tissue-damaging procedures, and brain metabolites as measured by proton MRS in asphyxiated term neonates.

    PubMed

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Ashwal, Stephen; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Ebner, Charlotte; Fayard, Elba; Sowers, Lawrence; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effects of opioid and tissue-damaging procedures (TDPs) [i.e. procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) known to result in pain, stress, and tissue damage] on brain metabolites, we reviewed the medical records of 28 asphyxiated term neonates (eight opioid-treated, 20 non-opioid treated) who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within the first month of life as well as eight newborns with no clinical findings of asphyxial injury. We found that lower creatine (Cr), myoinositol (Ins), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) (p < or = 0.03) and higher Cho/Cr and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) Cr (p < or = 0.02) correlated with increased TDP incidence in the first 2 d of life (DOL). We also found that occipital gray matter (OGM) NAA/Cr was decreased (p = 0.03) and lactate (Lac) was present in a significantly higher amount (40%; p = 0.03) in non-opioid-treated neonates compared with opioid-treated neonates. Compared with controls, untreated neonates showed larger changes in more metabolites in basal ganglia (BG), thalami (TH), and OGM with greater significance than treated neonates. Our data suggest that TDPs affect spectral metabolites and that opioids do not cause harm in asphyxiated term neonates exposed to repetitive TDPs in the first 2-4 DOL and may provide a degree of neuroprotection.

  7. The effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Karami, Reza; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Mohammadpour, Toktam; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In the present work, the effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum), on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage were investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into the following groups: (1) vehicle, (2) PTZ (90 mg/kg), (3) water fraction (WF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg), (4) n-butanol fraction (NBF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg), and (5) ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg). Results: The first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) latency in groups treated with 100 mg /kg of WF or EAF was significantly higher than that of PTZ group (p<0.01). In contrast to WF, the EAF and NBF were not effective in increasing the first minimal clonic seizure (MCS) latency. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in both cortical and hippocampal tissues of PTZ group were significantly higher than those of control animals (p<0.001). Pretreatment with WF, NBF, or EAF resulted in a significant reduction in the MDA levels of hippocampi (p<0.01 - p<0.001). Following PTZ administration, a significant reduction in total thiol groups was observed in the brain tissues (p<0.05). Pretreatment with WF and NBF significantly elevated thiol concentrations in cortical and hippocampal tissues, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: The present study showed that different fractions of C. sativum possess antioxidant activity in the brain and WF and EAF of this plant have anticonvulsant effects. PMID:27222836

  8. Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Damage Induced by Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury and Prolonged Febrile Convulsions in Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Joo Yeon; Sun, Woong; Kim, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and prolonged febrile seizures (pFS) are common neurologic problems that occur during childhood. However, there is insufficient evidence from experimental studies to conclude that pFS directly induces hippocampal injury. We studied cognitive function and histological changes in a rat model and investigated which among pFS, HIE, or a dual pathologic effect is most detrimental to the health of children. Methods A rat model of HIE at postnatal day (PD) 7 and a pFS model at PD10 were used. Behavioral and cognitive functions were investigated by means of weekly open field tests from postnatal week (PW) 3 to PW7, and by daily testing with the Morris water maze test at PW8. Pathological changes in the hippocampus were observed in the control, pFS, HIE, and HIE+pFS groups at PW9. Results The HIE priming group showed a seizure-prone state. The Morris water maze test revealed a decline in cognitive function in the HIE and HIE+pFS groups compared with the pFS and control groups. Additionally, the HIE and HIE+pFS groups showed significant hippocampal neuronal damage, astrogliosis, and volume loss, after maturation. The pFS alone induced minimal hippocampal neuronal damage without astrogliosis or volume loss. Conclusion Our findings suggest that pFS alone causes no considerable memory or behavioral impairment, or cellular change. In contrast, HIE results in lasting memory impairment and neuronal damage, gliosis, and tissue loss. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the developing brain concerning conditions caused by HIE or pFS. PMID:26279809

  9. Excitotoxic damage, disrupted energy metabolism, and oxidative stress in the rat brain: antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Herrera-Mundo, María Nieves; Mendoza-Macedo, Karina; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-05-01

    Excitotoxicity and disrupted energy metabolism are major events leading to nerve cell death in neurodegenerative disorders. These cooperative pathways share one common aspect: triggering of oxidative stress by free radical formation. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the antioxidant and energy precursor, levocarnitine (L-CAR), on the oxidative damage and the behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations produced in nerve tissue by the excitotoxin and free radical precursor, quinolinic acid (2,3-pyrindin dicarboxylic acid; QUIN), and the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). Oxidative damage was assessed by the estimation of reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptosomal fractions. Behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations were evaluated as markers of neurotoxicity in animals systemically administered with L-CAR, chronically injected with 3-NP and/or intrastriatally infused with QUIN. At micromolar concentrations, L-CAR reduced the three markers of oxidative stress stimulated by both toxins alone or in combination. L-CAR also prevented the rotation behavior evoked by QUIN and the hypokinetic pattern induced by 3-NP in rats. Morphological alterations produced by both toxins (increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactivity for QUIN and enhanced neuronal damage in different brain regions for 3-NP) were reduced by L-CAR. In addition, L-CAR prevented the synergistic action of 3-NP and QUIN to increase motor asymmetry and depleted striatal GABA levels. Our results suggest that the protective properties of L-CAR in the neurotoxic models tested are mostly mediated by its characteristics as an antioxidant agent.

  10. Brain Damage and Motor Cortex Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Implication of Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep Desaturation

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Francois; Heraud, Nelly; Sanchez, Anthony M.J.; Tremey, Emilie; Oliver, Nicolas; Guerin, Philippe; Varray, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep desaturation may cause neuronal damage due to the withdrawal of cerebrovascular reactivity. The current study (1) assessed the prevalence of NREM sleep desaturation in nonhypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and (2) compared a biological marker of cerebral lesion and neuromuscular function in patients with and without NREM sleep desaturation. Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 2 and 3), resting PaO2 of 60–80 mmHg, aged between 40 and 80 y, and without sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index < 15) had polysomnographic sleep recordings. In addition, twenty-nine patients (substudy) were assessed i) for brain impairment by serum S100B (biological marker of cerebral lesion), and ii) for neuromuscular function via motor cortex activation and excitability and maximal voluntary quadriceps strength measurement. Results: A total of 51.3% patients (n = 59) had NREM sleep desaturation (NREMDes). Serum S100B was higher in the NREMDes patients of the substudy (n = 14): 45.1 [Q1: 37.7, Q3: 62.8] versus 32.9 [Q1: 25.7, Q3: 39.5] pg.ml−1 (P = 0.028). Motor cortex activation and excitability were lower in NREMDes patients (both P = 0.03), but muscle strength was comparable between groups (P = 0.58). Conclusions: Over half the nonhypoxemic COPD patients exhibited NREM sleep desaturation associated with higher values of the cerebral lesion biomarker and lower neural drive reaching the quadriceps during maximal voluntary contraction. The lack of muscle strength differences between groups suggests a compensatory mechanism(s). Altogether, the results are consistent with an involvement of NREM sleep desaturation in COPD brain impairment. Clinical Trial Registration: The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01679782. Citation: Alexandre F, Heraud N, Sanchez AM, Tremey E, Oliver N, Guerin P, Varray A. Brain

  11. AF64A-induced brain damage and its relation to dementia.

    PubMed

    Hörtnagl, H

    1994-01-01

    Several data obtained in the AF64A-model are of particular relevance for our understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's disease. The AF64A-induced withdrawal of cholinergic function in the rat hippocampus was associated with reversible functional changes in other neurotransmitters, including noradrenaline, serotonin, somatostatin and glutamate, thereby mimicking changes in Alzheimer's disease. Identical changes in markers for synaptic vesicles were found in Alzheimer's disease and AF64A-model. A study on the role of gender revealed a higher susceptibility to the neurotoxic action of AF64A in female rats. The cholinergic deficit was also responsible for a disinhibition of the negative feedback regulation of glucocorticoids. Increased exposure to glucocorticoids, however, enhanced the vulnerability of hippocampal cholinergic neurons to AF64A. These data indicate that the AF64A-induced cholinergic deficit in the rat brain represents a reliable tool to study several mechanisms possibly involved in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Vaccinia virus-induced smallpox postvaccinal encephalitis in case of blood-brain barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Garcel, Aude; Fauquette, William; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Crance, Jean-Marc; Favier, Anne-Laure

    2012-02-01

    Smallpox vaccination is the only currently effective mean to combat the threat of variola virus used as a bioterrorism agent, although it is responsible for a rare but serious complication, the postvaccinal encephalitis (PVE). Development of safer vaccines therefore is a high priority as the PVE physiopathology is not well understood to date. If vaccinia virus (VACV) is responsible for PVE by central nervous system (CNS) dissemination, trans-migration of the VACV across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) would be supposed to be essential. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of vaccinia neurovirulence, an in vitro BBB model was used to explore the mechanism of VACV to induce BBB permeability. Two VACV strains were studied, the neurovirulent Western Reserve strain (VACV-WR) and the vaccine reference Lister strain (VACV-List). A mouse model was also developed to study the ability of these two viral strains to propagate in the brain from the blood compartment, their neurovirulence and their neuropathogenesis. In vitro, the loss of permeability resulted from the tight-junctions disruption was induced by virus replication. The ability of VACV to release infectious particles at the abluminal side suggests the capacity of both VACV strains to migrate across the BBB from the blood to the CNS. In vivo, the virus replication in mice CNS was strain-dependent. The VACV-WR laboratory strain proved to be neuroinvasive and neurovirulent, whereas the VACV-List strain is safe in physiological conditions. Mice PVE was observed only with VACV-WR in the co-infection model, when BBB opening was obtained by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. This study suggests that VACV is able to cross the BBB but encephalitis occurs only in the presence of a co-infection by bacteria. So, a model of co-infection, mimicked by LPS treatment, could have important implication towards the assessment of neurovirulence of new vaccines.

  13. PUTATIVE AGMATINASE INHIBITOR FOR HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC NEW BORN BRAIN DAMAGE

    PubMed Central

    Piletz, John E.; Klenotich, Stephanie; Lee, Ken S.; Zhu, Qian Long; Valente, Edward; Collins, Michael A.; Jones, Vyvyca; Lee, Soeb Nam; Yangzheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous brain metabolite, decarboxylated arginine, which has neuroprotective properties when injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into rat pups following hypoxic-ischemia. A previous screen for compounds based on rat brain lysates containing agmatinase with assistance from computational chemistry, led to piperazine-1-carboxamidine as a putative agmatinase inhibitor. Herein, the neuroprotective properties of piperazine-1-carboxamidine are described both in vitro and in vivo. Organotypic entorhinal-hippocampal slices were firstly prepared from seven-day-old rat pups and exposed in vitro to atmospheric oxygen depletion for 3 hrs. Upon reoxygenation the slices were treated with piperazine-1-carboxamidine or agmatine (50 μg/ml agents), or saline, and 15 hours later propidium iodine was used to stain. Piperazine-1-carboxamidine or agmatine produced substantial in vitro protection compared to post-reoxygenated saline-treated controls. An in vivo model involved surgical right carotid ligation followed by exposure to hypoxic ischemia (8% oxygen) for 2.5 hours. Piperazine-1-carboxamidine at 50 mg/kg i.p. was given 15 minutes post-reoxygenation and continued twice daily for 3 days. Cortical agmatine levels were elevated (+28.5%) following piperazine-1-carboxamidine treatment with no change in arginine or its other major metabolites. Histological staining with anti-Neun monoclonal antibody also revealed neuroprotection of CA1–3 layers of the hippocampus. Until endpoint at 22 days of age, no adverse events were observed in treated pups' body weights, rectal temperatures, or prompted ambulation. Piperazine-1-carboxamidine therefore appears to be a neuroprotective agent of a new category, agmatinase inhibitor. PMID:23334804

  14. Norepinephrine and brain damage: alpha noradrenergic pharmacology alters functional recovery after cortical trauma.

    PubMed

    Feeney, D M; Westerberg, V S

    1990-06-01

    The goal of these experiments was to evaluate the effects of some drugs affecting noradrenergic (NE) synaptic transmission, commonly prescribed following stroke or traumatic brain injury, on functional recovery. Measurement of recovery from a transient hemiplegia produced by a traumatic unilateral focal contusion in sensorimotor cortex (SMCX) of rats was used to assess the effects of chronic haloperidol (HAL) treatment begun early (1 day) or late (18 days to recovered animals) after injury. Additionally, using the same model, the effects of a single administration of drugs with selective action at NE receptors were also evaluated early or late (30 days) after injury. These drugs were: phenoxybenzamine (PBZ), an alpha 1-NE antagonist; prazosin (PRAZ), an alpha 1-NE antagonist; yohimbine (YOH), an alpha 2-NE antagonist; propranolol (PROP), a beta 1- and 2-NE receptor antagonist; methoxymine (METHOX), an alpha 1-NE agonist; and clonidine (CLON), an alpha 2-NE agonist. The data indicate that drugs with antagonistic effects at alpha 1 NE receptors, including HAL and PRAZ but not PROP, administered early after SMCX contusion retard locomotor recovery. Beneficial effects of enhancing NE transmission by METHOX or YOH were not observed. In animals recovered from beam walk (BW) deficits, a single administration of PBZ or PRAZ (alpha 1 NE antagonists) or CLON (alpha 2 NE agonist) transiently reinstated hemiplegic symptoms. The nonspecific beta NE receptor antagonist PROP had no effect in recovered animals. A single dose of HAL had no effect in recovered animals, but a BW deficit transiently developed in some animals following chronic treatment. The data are discussed with reference to drug contraindications noted in clinical studies of recovery from poststroke aphasia and cognition in demented patients with degenerative brain disease. PMID:2166617

  15. The Mammalian Brain in the Electromagnetic Fields Designed by Man with Special Reference to Blood-Brain Barrier Function, Neuronal Damage and Possible Physical Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salford, L. G.; Nittby, H.; Brun, A.; Grafström, G.; Malmgren, L.; Sommarin, M.; Eberhardt, J.; Widegren, B.; Persson, B. R.

    Life on earth was formed during billions of years, exposed to,and shaped by the original physical forces such as gravitation, cosmic irradiation, atmospheric electric fields and the terrestrial magnetism. The Schumann resonances at 7.4 Hz are an example of oscillations possibly important for life. The existing organisms are created to function in harmony with these forces. However, in the late 19th century mankind introduced the use of electricity, in the early 20th century long-wave radio and in the 1940-ies short-wave radio. High frequency RF was introduced in the 50-ies as FM and television and during the very last decades, microwaves of the modern communication society spread around the world. Today, however, one third of the world's population is owner of the microwave-producing mobile phones and an even larger number is exposed to the cordless RF emitting systems. To what extent are all living organisms affected by these, almost everywhere present radio freque ncy fields? And what will be the effects of many years of continuing exposure? Since 1988 our group has studied the effects upon the mammalian blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rats by non-thermal radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). These have been shown to cause significantly increased leakage of the rats' own blood albumin through the BBB of exposed rats, at energy levels of 1W/kg and below, as compared to non-exposed animals in a total series of about two thousand animals.-6)} One remarkable observation is the fact that the lowest energy levels, with whole-body average power densities below 10mW/kg, give rise to the most pronounced albumin leakage. If mobile communication, even at extremely low energy levels, causes the users' own albumin to leak out through the BBB, also other unwanted and toxic molecules in the blood, may leak into the brain tissue and concentrate in and damage the neurons and glial cells of the brain. In later studies we have shown that a 2-h exposure to GSM 915 MHz, at

  16. Mirror-neuron system recruitment by action observation: effects of focal brain damage on mu suppression.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Toledo, Silvi; Bentin, Shlomo; Perry, Anat; Liebermann, Dario G; Soroker, Nachum

    2014-02-15

    Mu suppression is the attenuation of EEG power in the alpha frequency range (8-12 Hz), recorded over the sensorimotor cortex during execution and observation of motor actions. Based on this dual characteristic mu suppression is thought to signalize activation of a human analogue of the mirror neuron system (MNS) found in macaque monkeys. However, much uncertainty remains concerning its specificity and full significance. To further explore the hypothesized relationship between mu suppression and MNS activation, we investigated how it is affected by damage to cortical regions, including areas where the MNS is thought to reside. EEG was recorded in 33 first-event stroke patients during observation of video clips showing reaching and grasping hand movements. We examined the modulation of EEG oscillations at central and occipital sites, and analyzed separately the lower (8-10 Hz) and higher (10-12 Hz) segments of the alpha/mu range. Suppression was determined relative to observation of a non-biological movement. Normalized lesion data were used to investigate how damage to regions of the fronto-parietal cortex affects the pattern of suppression. The magnitude of mu suppression during action observation was significantly reduced in the affected hemisphere compared to the unaffected hemisphere. Differences between the hemispheres were significant at central (sensorimotor) sites but not at occipital (visual) sites. Total hemispheric volume loss did not correlate with mu suppression. Suppression in the lower mu range in the unaffected hemisphere (C3) correlated with lesion extent within the right inferior parietal cortex. Our lesion study supports the role of mu suppression as a marker of MNS activation, confirming previous studies in normal subjects.

  17. A link between vascular damage and cognitive deficits after whole-brain radiation therapy for cancer: A clue to other types of dementia?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Maki K

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy for the treatment of tumors can sometimes cause cognitive impairment. Memory deficits were noted in up to 50% of treated patients over a short period of several months. In addition, an increased rate of dementia in young patients has been noted over the longer term, i.e. years. A deficit in neurogenesis after irradiation has been postulated to be the main cause of cognitive decline in patients, but recent data on irradiation therapy for limited parts of the brain appear to indicate other possibilities. Irradiation can directly damage various types of cells other than neuronal stem cells. However, this paper will focus on injury to brain vasculature leading to cognitive decline since vessels represent a better therapeutic target for drug development than other cells in the brain because of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27087553

  18. Evidence for Separate Tonal and Segmental Tiers in the Lexical Specification of Words: A Case Study of a Brain-Damaged Chinese Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jie; van Heuven, Vincent J.

    2004-01-01

    We present an acoustic study of segmental and prosodic properties of words produced by a female speaker of Chinese with left-hemisphere brain damage. We measured the location of the point vowels /a, e, @?, i, y, o, u/ and determined their separation in the vowel plane, and their perceptual distinctivity. Similarly, the acoustic properties of the…

  19. Association between neuroserpin and molecular markers of brain damage in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroserpin has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia and has been associated with functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Our aim was to study whether neuroserpin serum levels could be associated to biomarkers of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption. Methods We prospectively included 129 patients with ischemic stroke (58.1% male; mean age, 72.4 ± 9.6 years) not treated with tPA within 12 hours (h) of symptoms onset (mean time, 4.7 ± 2.1 h). Poor functional outcome at 3 months was considered as a modified Rankin scale score >2. Serum levels of neuroserpin, Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), active Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and cellular fibronectin (cFn) (determined by ELISA) and glutamate (determined by HPLC) were measured on admission, 24 and 72 h. The main variable was considered the decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h. ROC analysis was used to select the best predictive value for neuroserpin to predict poor functional outcome due to a lack of linearity. Results The decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h was negatively correlated with serum levels at 24 hours of glutamate (r = -0.642), IL-6 (r = -0.678), ICAM-1 (r = -0.345), MMP-9 (r = -0.554) and cFn (r = -0.703) (all P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, serum levels of glutamate (OR, 1.04; CI95%, 1.01-1.06, p = 0.001); IL-6 (OR, 1.4; CI95%, 1.1-1.7, p = 0.001); and cFn (OR, 1.3; CI95%, 1.1-1.6, p = 0.002) were independently associated with a decrease of neuroserpin levels <70 ng/mL at 24 h after adjusting for confounding factors. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroprotective properties of neuroserpin may be related to the inhibition of excitotoxicity, inflammation, as well as blood brain barrier disruption that occur after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:21569344

  20. Melatonin reduces membrane rigidity and oxidative damage in the brain of SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    García, J J; Piñol-Ripoll, G; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Fuentes-Broto, L; Miana-Mena, F J; Venegas, C; Caballero, B; Escames, G; Coto-Montes, A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the autophagy-lysosomal pathway and membrane fluidity in brain cells and mitochondrial membranes obtained from senescence-accelerated (SAMP(8)) and senescence-resistant (SAMR(1)) mice at 5 and 10 months of age. Moreover, we studied whether chronic treatment from age 1 to 10 months with melatonin stabilizes membrane fluidity. Fluidity was measured by polarization changes of 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene-p-toluene sulfonate. Results showed that in untreated animals at 5 months of age, synaptosomal and mitochondrial fluidity was decreased in SAMP(8) compared to SAMR(1), as was the cathepsin D/B ratio, indicating dysfunction of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Moreover, we detected synaptosomal rigidity and programmed cell death capability in both groups at 10 months of age. Mitochondrial fluidity, however, did not show a significant age-dependent change but was lower in SAMP(8) than in SAMR(1) at the 5- and 10-month time points. Melatonin administration prevented rigidity in the mitochondrial membrane and seemed to decrease age-related autophagy-lysosomal alterations. These data suggest that melatonin may act to slow down the aging process because of its ability to enhance membrane fluidity and maintain structural pathways. PMID:20096480

  1. Post-transcriptional inactivation of matrix metalloproteinase-12 after focal cerebral ischemia attenuates brain damage.

    PubMed

    Chelluboina, Bharath; Warhekar, Aditi; Dillard, Matt; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Pinson, David M; Wang, David Z; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar

    2015-05-08

    This study highlights the possible pathological role of MMP-12 in the context of ischemic stroke. Male rats were subjected to a two-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) procedure. MMP-12 shRNA expressing plasmid formulation was administered to these rats twenty-four hours after reperfusion. The results showed a predominant upregulation of MMP-12 (approximately 47, 58, 143, and 265 folds on days 1, 3, 5, 7 post-ischemia, respectively) in MCAO subjected rats. MMP-12 expression was localized to neurons, oligodendrocytes and microglia, but not astrocytes. Transcriptional inactivation of MMP-12 significantly reduced the infarct size. The percent infarct size was reduced from 62.87±4.13 to 34.67±5.39 after MMP-12 knockdown compared to untreated MCAO subjected rats. Expression of myelin basic protein was increased, and activity of MMP-9 was reduced in ischemic rat brains after MMP-12 knockdown. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the extent of apoptosis was noticed after MMP-12 knockdown. TNFα expression in the ipsilateral regions of MCAO-subjected rats was reduced after MMP-12 knockdown in addition to the reduced protein expression of apoptotic molecules that are downstream to TNFα signaling. Specific knockdown of MMP-12 after focal cerebral ischemia offers neuroprotection that could be mediated via reduced MMP-9 activation and myelin degradation as well as inhibition of apoptosis.

  2. Neuroendocrine Disturbances after Brain Damage: An Important and Often Undiagnosed Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2015-04-28

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common and significant public health problem all over the world. Until recently, TBI has been recognized as an uncommon cause of hypopituitarism. The studies conducted during the last 15 years revealed that TBI is a serious cause of hypopituitarism. Although the underlying pathophysiology has not yet been fully clarified, new data indicate that genetic predisposition, autoimmunity and neuroinflammatory changes may play a role in the development of hypopituitarism. Combative sports, including boxing and kickboxing, both of which are characterized by chronic repetitive head trauma, have been shown as new causes of neuroendocrine abnormalities, mainly hypopituitarism, for the first time during the last 10 years. Most patients with TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remain undiagnosed and untreated because of the non-specific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Replacement of the deficient hormones, of which GH is the commonest hormone lost, may not only reverse the clinical manifestations and neurocognitive dysfunction, but may also help posttraumatic disabled patients resistant to classical treatment who have undiagnosed hypopituitarism and GH deficiency in particular. Therefore, early diagnosis, which depends on the awareness of TBI as a cause of neuroendocrine abnormalities among the medical community, is crucially important.

  3. Chronic Cocaine Administration Causes Extensive White Matter Damage in Brain: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Immunohistochemistry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Herrera, Juan J.; Bockhorst, Kurt H; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Xia, Ying; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The effect of chronic cocaine exposure on multiple white matter structures in rodent brain was examined using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), locomotor behavior, and end point histology. The animals received either cocaine at a dose of 100 mg/kg (N=19), or saline (N=17) for 28 days through an implanted osmotic minipump. The animals underwent serial DTI scans, locomotor assessment, and end point histology for determining the expressions of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-heavy protein (NF-H), proteolipid protein (PLP), Nogo-A, aquaporin-4 (AQP-4), and growth associated protein – 43 (GAP-43). Differences in the DTI measures were observed in the splenium (scc) and genu (gcc) of the corpus callosum (cc), fimbria (fi), and the internal capsule (ic). Significant increase in the activity in the fine motor movements and decrease in the number of rearing events were observed in the cocaine treated animals. Reduced MBP and Nogo-A, and increased GAP-43 expressions were most consistently observed in these structures. A decrease in the NF-H expression was observed in fi and ic. The reduced expression of Nogo-A and increased GAP-43 may suggest destabilization of axonal connectivity and increased neurite growth with aberrant connections. Increased GAP-43 suggests drug induced plasticity or a possible repair mechanism response. The findings indicated that multiple white matter tracts are affected following chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:24507117

  4. Chronic cocaine administration causes extensive white matter damage in brain: diffusion tensor imaging and immunohistochemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Ponnada A; Herrera, Juan J; Bockhorst, Kurt H; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Xia, Ying; Steinberg, Joel L; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-03-30

    The effect of chronic cocaine exposure on multiple white matter structures in rodent brain was examined using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), locomotor behavior, and end point histology. The animals received either cocaine at a dose of 100mg/kg (N=19), or saline (N=17) for 28 days through an implanted osmotic minipump. The animals underwent serial DTI scans, locomotor assessment, and end point histology for determining the expressions of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-heavy protein (NF-H), proteolipid protein (PLP), Nogo-A, aquaporin-4 (AQP-4), and growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Differences in the DTI measures were observed in the splenium (scc) and genu (gcc) of the corpus callosum (cc), fimbria (fi), and the internal capsule (ic). A significant increase in the activity in the fine motor movements and a significant decrease in the number of rearing events were observed in the cocaine-treated animals. Reduced MBP and Nogo-A and increased GAP-43 expressions were most consistently observed in these structures. A decrease in the NF-H expression was observed in fi and ic. The reduced expression of Nogo-A and the increased expression of GAP-43 may suggest destabilization of axonal connectivity and increased neurite growth with aberrant connections. Increased GAP-43 suggests drug-induced plasticity or a possible repair mechanism response. The findings indicated that multiple white matter tracts are affected following chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:24507117

  5. Dual-tasking postural control in patients with right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bourlon, Clémence; Lehenaff, Laurent; Batifoulier, Cécile; Bordier, Aurélie; Chatenet, Aurélia; Desailly, Eric; Fouchard, Christian; Marsal, Muriel; Martinez, Marianne; Rastelli, Federica; Thierry, Anaïs; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Duret, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The control of dual-tasking effects is a daily challenge in stroke neurorehabilitation. It maybe one of the reasons why there is poor functional prognosis after a stroke in the right hemisphere, which plays a dominant role in posture control. The purpose of this study was to explore cognitive motor interference in right brain-lesioned and healthy subjects maintaining a standing position while performing three different tasks: a control task, a simple attentional task and a complex attentional task. We measured the sway area of the subjects on a force platform, including the center of pressure and its displacements. Results showed that stroke patients presented a reduced postural sway compared to healthy subjects, who were able to maintain their posture while performing a concomitant attentional task in the same dual-tasking conditions. Moreover, in both groups, the postural sway decreased with the increase in attentional load from cognitive tasks. We also noticed that the stability of stroke patients in dual-tasking conditions increased together with the weight-bearing rightward deviation, especially when the attentional load of the cognitive tasks and lower limb motor impairments were high. These results suggest that stroke patients and healthy subjects adopt a similar postural regulation pattern aimed at maintaining stability in dual-tasking conditions involving a static standing position and different attention-related cognitive tasks. Our results indicate that attention processes might facilitate static postural control.

  6. Planning for selective amygdalohippocampectomy involving less neuronal fiber damage based on brain connectivity using tractography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hak; Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe resection is an important treatment option for epilepsy that involves removal of potentially essential brain regions. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy is a widely performed temporal lobe surgery. We suggest starting the incision for selective amygdalohippocampectomy at the inferior temporal gyrus based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography. Diffusion MRI data from 20 normal participants were obtained from Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database (www.ppmi-info.org). A tractography algorithm was applied to extract neuronal fiber information for the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and amygdala. Fiber information was analyzed in terms of the number of fibers and betweenness centrality. Distances between starting incisions and surgical target regions were also considered to explore the length of the surgical path. Middle temporal and superior temporal gyrus regions have higher connectivity values than the inferior temporal gyrus and thus are not good candidates for starting the incision. The distances between inferior temporal gyrus and surgical target regions were shorter than those between middle temporal gyrus and target regions. Thus, the inferior temporal gyrus is a good candidate for starting the incision. Starting the incision from the inferior temporal gyrus would spare the important (in terms of betweenness centrality values) middle region and shorten the distance to the target regions of the hippocampus and amygdala. PMID:26330834

  7. Planning for selective amygdalohippocampectomy involving less neuronal fiber damage based on brain connectivity using tractography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hak; Kim, Mansu; Park, Hyunjin

    2015-07-01

    Temporal lobe resection is an important treatment option for epilepsy that involves removal of potentially essential brain regions. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy is a widely performed temporal lobe surgery. We suggest starting the incision for selective amygdalohippocampectomy at the inferior temporal gyrus based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography. Diffusion MRI data from 20 normal participants were obtained from Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database (www.ppmi-info.org). A tractography algorithm was applied to extract neuronal fiber information for the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and amygdala. Fiber information was analyzed in terms of the number of fibers and betweenness centrality. Distances between starting incisions and surgical target regions were also considered to explore the length of the surgical path. Middle temporal and superior temporal gyrus regions have higher connectivity values than the inferior temporal gyrus and thus are not good candidates for starting the incision. The distances between inferior temporal gyrus and surgical target regions were shorter than those between middle temporal gyrus and target regions. Thus, the inferior temporal gyrus is a good candidate for starting the incision. Starting the incision from the inferior temporal gyrus would spare the important (in terms of betweenness centrality values) middle region and shorten the distance to the target regions of the hippocampus and amygdala.

  8. Damage in brain development by morpholino knockdown of zebrafish dax1.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Yoshifumi; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C; Takagi, Masahiro

    2012-06-01

    DAX1 is an orphan nuclear receptor and involved in development of steroidogenic organs, which activates transcription of genes involved in steroidogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the function of the zebrafish dax1 during early development of central nervous systems to appear unidentified aspects of DAX1 and decrease confusions concerned with functions of DAX1 in early development of vertebrates. By whole-mount in situ hybridization of embryo at the 32 h post fertilization (hpf), expression of zebrafish dax1 was detected around the forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain, and the extending tail tip. Embryos injected with zebrafish dax1 morpholino antisense nucleotide (MO) exhibited delayed development. When the developmental stage of wild type embryos was at Prim-15 (32 hpf), zebrafish dax1MO injected embryos were at Prim-5 (24 hpf). Concurrently with developmental delay, the MO injected embryos showed high mortality. At 48 hpf, the MO injected embryos exhibited abnormal development in the central nervous systems. The enlarged tectum and the protruded rhombomeres were observed. Moreover, development of central nervous systems, especially midbrain-hindbrain boundary, became narrower. At 5 day post fertilization, the MO injected embryos formed edemas around head, pericardial sac and abdomen. Collectively, our results indicated that the zebrafish dax1 is important for brain development. PMID:22483435

  9. Effect of Cyperus rotundus on ischemia-induced brain damage and memory dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Entezari, Maliheh; Movassaghi, Shabnam; Goushegir, Seyed Ashrafadin; Kalantari, Samaneh; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Sharifi, Zahra Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury causes loss of pyramidal cells in CA1 region of hippocampus. In this study, we investigated the possible neuroprotective effects of the ethanol extract of Cyperus rotundus (EECR) on a model of global transient ischemia in rat, by evaluating the pathophysiology of the hippocampal tissue and spatial memory. Materials and Methods: Treatment group (EECR, 100 mg/kg/day) was gavaged from 4 days before, to 3 days after ischemia. Morris water maze test was performed 1 week after ischemia for 4 days. Brain tissue was prepared for Nissl staining. Results: Our data showed no statistical difference between the treatment and ischemia groups in water maze task. So, treatment of ischemia with EECR cannot improve spatial learning and memory. On the contrary EECR ameliorated the CA1 pyramidal cell loss due to transient global ischemia/reperfusion injury. Conclusion: These results suggest that EECR cannot reduce the ischemia-induced, cognitive impairments seen after transient, global cerebral ischemia but can prevent pyramidal cell loss in CA1 region of hippocampus. PMID:25825638

  10. Neuroendocrine Disturbances after Brain Damage: An Important and Often Undiagnosed Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common and significant public health problem all over the world. Until recently, TBI has been recognized as an uncommon cause of hypopituitarism. The studies conducted during the last 15 years revealed that TBI is a serious cause of hypopituitarism. Although the underlying pathophysiology has not yet been fully clarified, new data indicate that genetic predisposition, autoimmunity and neuroinflammatory changes may play a role in the development of hypopituitarism. Combative sports, including boxing and kickboxing, both of which are characterized by chronic repetitive head trauma, have been shown as new causes of neuroendocrine abnormalities, mainly hypopituitarism, for the first time during the last 10 years. Most patients with TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remain undiagnosed and untreated because of the non-specific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Replacement of the deficient hormones, of which GH is the commonest hormone lost, may not only reverse the clinical manifestations and neurocognitive dysfunction, but may also help posttraumatic disabled patients resistant to classical treatment who have undiagnosed hypopituitarism and GH deficiency in particular. Therefore, early diagnosis, which depends on the awareness of TBI as a cause of neuroendocrine abnormalities among the medical community, is crucially important. PMID:26239451

  11. Quantitative assessment of early brain damage in a rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, K A; Shigeno, T; Balarsky, A M; Ford, I; McCulloch, J; Teasdale, G M; Graham, D I

    1987-01-01

    A method for the volumetric assessment of early cerebral infarction, together with its statistical and biological validation, is described. In halothane anaesthetised rats the stem of the right middle cerebral artery was occluded and 3 hours later (with full monitoring of respiratory and cardiovascular status) the animals were killed by perfusion fixation. In normotensive normocapnic animals the volume of infarction was 52 +/- 4 mm3 in the cerebral cortex and 21 +/- 1 mm3 in the corpus striatum. The reproducibility of the volumetric assessment was found to be excellent (coefficient of correlation 0.995 on 18 replicate measurements). The minimum number of stereotactic levels which must be assessed to yield accurate volumetric measurements of infarction is 8. The method is sensitive at detecting alterations in the amount of infarction. For example, it can readily detect the increase in amount of structural damage in cerebral cortex following a transient episode of hypotension. This approach allows an objective assessment of drug therapy and management strategies in the treatment of cerebral infarction. PMID:3585350

  12. The assessment of pragmatics in Iranian patients with right brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani-Rad, Davood; Ghorbani, Askar; Ashayeri, Hassan; Jalaei, Shohereh; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pragmatics is appropriate use of language across a variety of social contexts that provides accurate interpretation of intentions. The occurrence of the right hemisphere lesions can interfere with pragmatic abilities, and particularly with the processing of nonliteral speech acts. Methods: Since the objective of this study was to assess different aspects of pragmatic competence in the right hemisphere damage (RHD) patients, 20 Iranian patients with right hemisphere lesions were examined by adult pragmatic profile (APP) and a novel checklist was introduced for Persian language speaking individuals. Meanwhile, 40 healthy adult individuals, who were age and gender matched with RHD patients, were considered as the control group. After obtaining video records, all subjects were evaluated for 35 pragmatic skills, including 24 verbal, 5 paralinguistic, and 6 nonverbal aspects, by a two-point scale system. Results: Studying RHD patients and their healthy counterparts revealed that the performance by participants with right hemisphere lesions exhibited a high degree of inappropriate pragmatic abilities compared with controls in all domains. Furthermore, RHD patients showed a trend of increasing difficulty in understanding and producing different pragmatic phenomena, including standard communication acts. Conclusion: Present results indicated that the right hemisphere lesions significantly affected pragmatic abilities in verbal, paralinguistic and nonverbal aspects. Such a pattern of performance, which is in line with deficits previously reported for RHD, proved the unquestioned role of the right hemisphere in processing nonliteral language. PMID:25295151

  13. Hypothermia modulates cytokine responses after neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic injury and reduces brain damage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangpeng; Ghosh, Nirmalya; McFadden, Brian; Tone, Beatriz; Bellinger, Denise L; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While hypothermia (HT) is the standard-of-care for neonates with hypoxic ischemic injury (HII), the mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effect are poorly understood. We examined ischemic core/penumbra and cytokine/chemokine evolution in a 10-day-old rat pup model of HII. Pups were treated for 24 hr after HII with HT (32℃; n = 18) or normothermia (NT, 35℃; n = 15). Outcomes included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurobehavioral testing, and brain cytokine/chemokine profiling (0, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-HII). Lesion volumes (24 hr) were reduced in HT pups (total 74%, p < .05; penumbra 68%, p < .05; core 85%, p = .19). Lesion volumes rebounded at 72 hr (48 hr post-HT) with no significant differences between NT and HT pups. HT reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at all time points (p < .05); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) trended toward being decreased in HT pups (p = .09). The stem cell signaling molecule, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) was not altered by HT. Our data demonstrate that HT reduces total and penumbral lesion volumes (at 24 and 48 hr), potentially by decreasing IL-1β without affecting SDF-1. Disassociation between the increasing trend in HII volumes from 48 to 72 hr post-HII when IL-1β levels remained low suggests that after rewarming, mechanisms unrelated to IL-1β expression are likely to contribute to this delayed increase in injury. Additional studies should be considered to determine what these mechanisms might be and also to explore whether extending the duration or degree of HT might ameliorate this delayed increase in injury.

  14. Hypothermia modulates cytokine responses after neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic injury and reduces brain damage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangpeng; Ghosh, Nirmalya; McFadden, Brian; Tone, Beatriz; Bellinger, Denise L; Obenaus, Andre; Ashwal, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While hypothermia (HT) is the standard-of-care for neonates with hypoxic ischemic injury (HII), the mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effect are poorly understood. We examined ischemic core/penumbra and cytokine/chemokine evolution in a 10-day-old rat pup model of HII. Pups were treated for 24 hr after HII with HT (32℃; n = 18) or normothermia (NT, 35℃; n = 15). Outcomes included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurobehavioral testing, and brain cytokine/chemokine profiling (0, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-HII). Lesion volumes (24 hr) were reduced in HT pups (total 74%, p < .05; penumbra 68%, p < .05; core 85%, p = .19). Lesion volumes rebounded at 72 hr (48 hr post-HT) with no significant differences between NT and HT pups. HT reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at all time points (p < .05); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) trended toward being decreased in HT pups (p = .09). The stem cell signaling molecule, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) was not altered by HT. Our data demonstrate that HT reduces total and penumbral lesion volumes (at 24 and 48 hr), potentially by decreasing IL-1β without affecting SDF-1. Disassociation between the increasing trend in HII volumes from 48 to 72 hr post-HII when IL-1β levels remained low suggests that after rewarming, mechanisms unrelated to IL-1β expression are likely to contribute to this delayed increase in injury. Additional studies should be considered to determine what these mechanisms might be and also to explore whether extending the duration or degree of HT might ameliorate this delayed increase in injury. PMID:25424430

  15. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  16. A Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonist Prevents Thrombin-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Damage via the Inhibition of Microglial Activation and Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Tao, Yihao; Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Yang, Yang; Feng, Zhou; Chen, Yujie; Yang, Liming; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhu, Gang; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Thrombin mediates the life-threatening cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage that occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We previously found that the selective cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) agonist JWH-133 reduced brain edema and neurological deficits following germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). We explored whether CB2R stimulation ameliorated thrombin-induced brain edema and BBB permeability as well as the possible molecular mechanism involved. A total of 144 Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats received a thrombin (20 U) injection in the right basal ganglia. JWH-133 (1.5 mg/kg) or SR-144528 (3.0 mg/kg) and vehicle were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected 1 h after surgery. Brain water content measurement, Evans blue (EB) extravasation, Western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to study the effects of a CB2R agonist 24 h after surgery. The results demonstrated that JWH-133 administration significantly decreased thrombin-induced brain edema and reduced the number of Iba-1-positive microglia. JWH-133 also decreased the number of P44/P42(+)/Iba-1(+) microglia, lowered Evans blue extravasation, and inhibited the elevated matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9 and matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-12 activities. However, a selective CB2R antagonist (SR-144528) reversed these effects. We demonstrated that CB2R stimulation reduced thrombin-induced brain edema and alleviated BBB damage. We also found that matrix metalloproteinase suppression may be partially involved in these processes. PMID:26376816

  17. A different story on “Theory of Mind” deficit in adults with right hemisphere brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Scharp, Victoria L.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud; Meigh, Kimberly M.; Armstrong, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Difficulties in social cognition and interaction can characterise adults with unilateral right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). Some pertinent evidence involves their apparently poor reasoning from a “Theory of Mind” perspective, which requires a capacity to attribute thoughts, beliefs, and intentions in order to understand other people’s behaviour. Theory of Mind is typically assessed with tasks that induce conflicting mental representations. Prior research with a commonly used text task reported that adults with RHD were less accurate in drawing causal inferences about mental states than at making non-mental-state causal inferences from control texts. However, the Theory of Mind and control texts differed in the number and nature of competing discourse entity representations. This stimulus discrepancy, together with the explicit measure of causal inferencing, likely put the adults with RHD at a disadvantage on the Theory of Mind texts. Aims This study revisited the question of Theory of Mind deficit in adults with RHD. The aforementioned Theory of Mind texts were used but new control texts were written to address stimulus discrepancies, and causal inferencing was assessed relatively implicitly. Adults with RHD were hypothesised not to display a Theory of Mind deficit under these conditions. Methods & Procedures The participants were 22 adults with unilateral RHD from cerebrovascular accident, and 38 adults without brain damage. Participants listened to spoken texts that targeted either mental-state or non-mental-state causal inferences. Each text was followed by spoken True/False probe sentences, to gauge target inference comprehension. Both accuracy and RT data were recorded. Data were analysed with mixed, two-way Analyses of Variance (Group by Text Type). Outcomes & Results There was a main effect of Text Type in both accuracy and RT analyses, with a performance advantage for the Theory of Mind/mental-state inference stimuli. The control group

  18. Alteration of SLP2-like immunolabeling in mitochondria signifies early cellular damage in developing and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yury M; Sun, Yu-Yo; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Rakic, Pasko

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in various pathways of regulated cell death. Here we propose a novel method for detection of initial derangement of mitochondria in degenerating and dying neuronal cells. The method is based on our recent finding that antibodies directed against the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) also bind the mitochondrial stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP2) that belongs to an inner mitochondrial membrane protein complex. It is well established that SLP2 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and respiratory functions. We now show that anti-CB1 antibodies recognize conformational epitopes but not the linear amino acid sequence of SLP2. In addition we found that anti-CB1 serum mostly labels swollen mitochondria with early or advanced stages of pathology in mouse brain while other proteins of the complex may mask epitopes of SLP2 in the normal mitochondria. Although neurons and endothelial cells in healthy brains contain occasional immunopositive mitochondria detectable with anti-CB1 serum, their numbers increase significantly after hypoxic insults in parallel with signs of cellular damage. Moreover, use of electron microscopy suggests relocation of SLP2 from its normal functional position in the inner mitochondrial membrane into the mitochondrial matrix in pathological cells. Thus, SLP2-like immunolabeling serves as an in situ histochemical target detecting early derangement of mitochondria. Anti-CB1 serum is crucial for this purpose because available anti-SLP2 antibodies do not provide selective labeling of mitochondria in the fixed tissue. This new method of detecting mitochondrial dysfunction can benefit the in vitro research of human diseases and developmental disorders by enabling analysis in live animal models.

  19. Persistence of Gender Related-Effects on Visuo-Spatial and Verbal Working Memory in Right Brain-Damaged Patients.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, Laura; Matano, Alessandro; D'Antuono, Giovanni; Marin, Dario; Ciurli, Paola; Incoccia, Chiara; Verde, Paola; Guariglia, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify if gender differences in verbal and visuo-spatial working memory would persist following right cerebral lesions. To pursue our aim we investigated a large sample (n. 346) of right brain-damaged patients and healthy participants (n. 272) for the presence of gender effects in performing Corsi and Digit Test. We also assessed a subgroup of patients (n. 109) for the nature (active vs. passive) of working memory tasks. We tested working memory (WM) administering the Corsi Test (CBT) and the Digit Span (DS) using two different versions: forward (fCBT and fDS), subjects were required to repeat stimuli in the same order that they were presented; and backward (bCBT and bDS), subjects were required to repeat stimuli in the opposite order of presentation. In this way, passive storage and active processing of working memory were assessed. Our results showed the persistence of gender-related effects in spite of the presence of right brain lesions. We found that men outperformed women both in CBT and DS, regardless of active and passive processing of verbal and visuo-spatial stimuli. The presence of visuo-spatial disorders (i.e., hemineglect) can affect the performance on Corsi Test. In our sample, men and women were equally affected by hemineglect, therefore it did not mask the gender effect. Generally speaking, the persistence of the men's superiority in visuo-spatial tasks may be interpreted as a protective factor, at least for men, within other life factors such as level of education or kind of profession before retirement. PMID:27445734

  20. Persistence of Gender Related-Effects on Visuo-Spatial and Verbal Working Memory in Right Brain-Damaged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piccardi, Laura; Matano, Alessandro; D’Antuono, Giovanni; Marin, Dario; Ciurli, Paola; Incoccia, Chiara; Verde, Paola; Guariglia, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify if gender differences in verbal and visuo-spatial working memory would persist following right cerebral lesions. To pursue our aim we investigated a large sample (n. 346) of right brain-damaged patients and healthy participants (n. 272) for the presence of gender effects in performing Corsi and Digit Test. We also assessed a subgroup of patients (n. 109) for the nature (active vs. passive) of working memory tasks. We tested working memory (WM) administering the Corsi Test (CBT) and the Digit Span (DS) using two different versions: forward (fCBT and fDS), subjects were required to repeat stimuli in the same order that they were presented; and backward (bCBT and bDS), subjects were required to repeat stimuli in the opposite order of presentation. In this way, passive storage and active processing of working memory were assessed. Our results showed the persistence of gender-related effects in spite of the presence of right brain lesions. We found that men outperformed women both in CBT and DS, regardless of active and passive processing of verbal and visuo-spatial stimuli. The presence of visuo-spatial disorders (i.e., hemineglect) can affect the performance on Corsi Test. In our sample, men and women were equally affected by hemineglect, therefore it did not mask the gender effect. Generally speaking, the persistence of the men’s superiority in visuo-spatial tasks may be interpreted as a protective factor, at least for men, within other life factors such as level of education or kind of profession before retirement. PMID:27445734

  1. Chronic caloric restriction reduces tissue damage and improves spatial memory in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rich, Nicholas J; Van Landingham, Jacob W; Figueiroa, Silvia; Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S; Levenson, Cathy W

    2010-10-01

    Although it has been known for some time that chronic caloric or dietary restriction reduces the risk of neurodegenerative disorders and injury following ischemia, the possible role of chronic restriction in improving outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been previously studied. Therefore, 2-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two dietary groups, an ad libitum fed group (AL) and a caloric-restriction group (CR) that was provided with 70% of the food intake of AL rats (n = 10/group). After 4 months, a weight-drop device (300 g) was used to produce a 2-mm bilateral medial frontal cortex contusion following craniotomy. Additional animals in each dietary group (n = 10) were used as sham-operated controls. The CR diet resulted in body weights that were reduced by 30% compared with AL controls. Not only did CR decrease the size of the cortical lesion after injury, there were marked improvements in spatial memory as measured by Morris water maze that included an increase in the number of animals successfully finding the platform as well as significantly reduced time to finding the hidden platform. Western analysis, used to examine the expression of proteins that play a role in neuronal survival, revealed significant increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the cortical region around the site of injury and in the hippocampus in CR rats after injury. These findings suggest that molecular mechanisms involved in cell survival may play a role in reducing tissue damage and improving cognition after TBI and that these mechanisms can be regulated by dietary interventions. PMID:20544832

  2. Processing of visual gravitational motion in the peri-sylvian cortex: Evidence from brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Vincenzo; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Piras, Fabrizio; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Daprati, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Rich behavioral evidence indicates that the brain estimates the visual direction and acceleration of gravity quite accurately, and the underlying mechanisms have begun to be unraveled. While the neuroanatomical substrates of gravity direction processing have been studied extensively in brain-damaged patients, to our knowledge no such study exists for the processing of visual gravitational motion. Here we asked 31 stroke patients to intercept a virtual ball moving along the vertical under either natural gravity or artificial reversed gravity. Twenty-seven of them also aligned a luminous bar to the vertical direction (subjective visual vertical, SVV). Using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping as well as lesion subtraction analysis, we found that lesions mainly centered on the posterior insula are associated with greater deviations of SVV, consistent with several previous studies. Instead, lesions mainly centered on the parietal operculum decrease the ability to discriminate natural from unnatural gravitational acceleration with a timed motor response in the interception task. Both the posterior insula and the parietal operculum belong to the vestibular cortex, and presumably receive multisensory information about the gravity vector. We speculate that an internal model estimating the effects of gravity on visual objects is constructed by transforming the vestibular estimates of mechanical gravity, which are computed in the brainstem and cerebellum, into internalized estimates of virtual gravity, which are stored in the cortical vestibular network. The present lesion data suggest a specific role for the parietal operculum in detecting the mismatch between predictive signals from the internal model and the online visual signals. PMID:27007069

  3. A novel quantification of blood-brain barrier damage and histochemical typing after embolic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Dominik; Grosche, Jens; Pelz, Johann; Schneider, Dietmar; Weise, Christopher; Bauer, Ute; Kacza, Johannes; Gärtner, Ulrich; Hobohm, Carsten; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Treatment strategies in acute ischemic stroke are still limited. Considering numerous translation failures, research is tending to a preferred use of human-like animal models, and a more-complex perspective of tissue salvaging involving endothelial, glial and neuronal components according to the neurovascular unit (NVU) concept. During ischemia, blood-brain barrier (BBB) alterations lead to brain edema and hemorrhagic transformation affecting NVU components. The present study aims on a novel quantification method of BBB damage and affected tissue following experimental cerebral ischemia, closely to the human condition. Wistar rats underwent embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by an intravenous application of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-tagged albumin (≈70kDa) and/or biotinylated rat IgG (≈150kDa) as BBB permeability markers. Both fluorescent agents revealed similar leakage and allow quantification of BBB permeability by fluorescence microscopy, and after immunohistochemical conversion into a permanent diaminobenzidine label at light-microscopical level. The following markers were identified for sufficient detection of NVU components: Rat endothelial cell antigen-1 (RECA) and laminin for vessels, Lycopersicon esculentum and Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin for vessels and microglial subpopulations, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1), CD68 and CD11b for macrophages, activated microglia, monocytes and neutrophils, S100β for astroglia, as well as NeuN and HuC/D for neurons. This is the first report confirming the usefulness of simultaneously applied FITC-albumin and biotinylated rat IgG as BBB permeability markers in experimental stroke, and, specifying antibodies and lectins for multiple fluorescence labeling of NVU components. Newly elaborated protocols might facilitate a more-complex outcome measurement in drug development for cerebral ischemia. PMID:20732314

  4. Processing of visual gravitational motion in the peri-sylvian cortex: Evidence from brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Vincenzo; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Piras, Fabrizio; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Daprati, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Rich behavioral evidence indicates that the brain estimates the visual direction and acceleration of gravity quite accurately, and the underlying mechanisms have begun to be unraveled. While the neuroanatomical substrates of gravity direction processing have been studied extensively in brain-damaged patients, to our knowledge no such study exists for the processing of visual gravitational motion. Here we asked 31 stroke patients to intercept a virtual ball moving along the vertical under either natural gravity or artificial reversed gravity. Twenty-seven of them also aligned a luminous bar to the vertical direction (subjective visual vertical, SVV). Using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping as well as lesion subtraction analysis, we found that lesions mainly centered on the posterior insula are associated with greater deviations of SVV, consistent with several previous studies. Instead, lesions mainly centered on the parietal operculum decrease the ability to discriminate natural from unnatural gravitational acceleration with a timed motor response in the interception task. Both the posterior insula and the parietal operculum belong to the vestibular cortex, and presumably receive multisensory information about the gravity vector. We speculate that an internal model estimating the effects of gravity on visual objects is constructed by transforming the vestibular estimates of mechanical gravity, which are computed in the brainstem and cerebellum, into internalized estimates of virtual gravity, which are stored in the cortical vestibular network. The present lesion data suggest a specific role for the parietal operculum in detecting the mismatch between predictive signals from the internal model and the online visual signals.

  5. TGF-β1 prevents blood-brain barrier damage and hemorrhagic transformation after thrombolysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yingyuan; Liu, Xinfeng; Chen, Weixian; Wang, Zhenzhen; Xu, Gelin; Zeng, Yanying; Ma, Yuping

    2015-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) is well known to promote extracellular matrix accumulation. Recent studies demonstrated that TGF-β1 protects against blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the condition of inflammatory pain and stroke. In the present study, we investigated whether TGF-β1 can maintain BBB integrity and prevent hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment in a rat model of thromboembolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Three hours after MCAO, rats were given saline, rt-PA alone or rt-PA combined with TGF-β1 intravenously. Animals were sacrificed 24h after surgery. HT was calculated as hemorrhagic score. Evans blue dye extravasation was measured for BBB disruption. Basement membrane damage was observed by electron microscopy and quantified by collagen IV and laminin immunostaining. Gelatin zymography was used to measure the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Western blot was performed for the expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). Rats treated with rt-PA showed elevations in basement membrane damage, BBB disruption and HT. These phenomena were reduced in rats treated by TGF-β1. We also showed that TGF-β1 inhibited rt-PA mediated induction of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Meanwhile, TGF-β1 upregulated PAI-1 expression which was reduced by rt-PA. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1 can reduce rt-PA induced basement membrane degradation, BBB disruption and HT. One possible mechanism is associated with the elevation of PAI-1. Suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 elevated by rt-PA may be another mechanism contributing to the protective effects of TGF-β1.

  6. Simulated Microgravity and Low-Dose/Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Induces Oxidative Damage in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Nishiyama, Nina C; Pecaut, Michael J; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Gifford, Peter; Haynes, Kristine E; Becronis, Caroline; Gridley, Daila S

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity and radiation are stressors unique to the spaceflight environment that can have an impact on the central nervous system (CNS). These stressors could potentially lead to significant health risks to astronauts, both acutely during the course of a mission or chronically, leading to long-term, post-mission decrements in quality of life. The CNS is sensitive to oxidative injury due to high concentrations of oxidizable, unsaturated lipids and low levels of antioxidant defenses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative damage in the brain cortex and hippocampus in a ground-based model for spaceflight, which includes prolonged unloading and low-dose radiation. Whole-body low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) gamma radiation using (57)Co plates (0.04 Gy at 0.01 cGy/h) was delivered to 6 months old, mature, female C57BL/6 mice (n = 4-6/group) to simulate the radiation component. Anti-orthostatic tail suspension was used to model the unloading, fluid shift and physiological stress aspects of the microgravity component. Mice were hindlimb suspended and/or irradiated for 21 days. Brains were isolated 7 days or 9 months after irradiation and hindlimb unloading (HLU) for characterization of oxidative stress markers and microvessel changes. The level of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation, was significantly elevated in the cortex and hippocampus after LDR + HLU compared to controls (P < 0.05). The combination group also had the highest level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) expression compared to controls (P < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression in the animals that received HLU only or combined LDR + HLU compared to control (P < 0.05). In addition, 9 months after LDR and HLU exposure, microvessel densities were the lowest in the combination group, compared to age-matched controls in the cortex (P < 0.05). Our data provide the first evidence

  7. The impact of acquired brain damage in terms of epidemiology, economics and loss in quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with acquired brain damage (ABD) have suffered a brain lesion that interrupts vital development in the physical, psychological and social spheres. Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are the two main causes. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and prevalence of ABD in the population of the Basque Country and Navarre in 2008, to calculate the associated cost of the care required and finally to assess the loss in health-related quality of life. Methods On the one hand, a cross-sectional survey was carried out, in order to estimate the incidence of ABD and its consequences in terms of costs and loss in quality of life from the evolution of a sample of patients diagnosed with stroke and TBI. On the other hand, a discrete event simulation model was built that enabled the prevalence of ABD to be estimated. Finally, a calculation was made of the formal and informal costs of ABD in the population of the Basque Country and Navarre (2,750,000 people). Results The cross-sectional study showed that the incidences of ABD caused by stroke and TBI were 61.8 and 12.5 cases per 100,000 per year respectively, while the overall prevalence was 657 cases per 100,000 people. The SF-36 physical and mental component scores were 28.9 and 44.5 respectively. The total economic burden was calculated to be 382.14 million euro per year, distributed between 215.27 and 166.87 of formal and informal burden respectively. The average cost per individual was 21,040 € per year. Conclusions The main conclusion of this study is that ABD has a high impact in both epidemiological and economic terms as well as loss in quality of life. The overall prevalence obtained is equivalent to 0.7% of the total population. The substantial economic burden is distributed nearly evenly between formal and informal costs. Specifically, it was found that the physical dimensions of quality of life are the most severely affected. The prevalence-based approach showed adequate

  8. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke.

  9. Protective Effect of Calendula officinalis L. Flowers Against Monosodium Glutamate Induced Oxidative Stress and Excitotoxic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shivasharan, B D; Nagakannan, P; Thippeswamy, B S; Veerapur, V P

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a popular flavour enhancer used in food industries; however, excess MSG is neurotoxic. Oxidative stress is well documented in MSG induced neurotoxicity. The compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties reportedly possess beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Calendula officinalis Linn. flower extract (COE) is known for its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of COE on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Adult Wistar rats were administered systemically for 7 days with MSG and after one h of MSG injection, rats were treated with COE (100 and 200 mg/kg) orally. At the end the treatment period, animals were assessed for locomotor activity and were sacrificed; brains were isolated for estimation of LPO, GSH, CAT, TT, GST, Nitrite and histopathological studies. MSG caused a significant alteration in animal behavior, oxidative defense (raised levels of LPO, nitrite concentration, depletion of antioxidant levels) and hippocampal neuronal histology. Treatment with COE significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, and hippocampal damage in MSG-treated animals. Hence, this study demonstrates that COE protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of COE may be responsible for its observed neuroprotective action. PMID:24426226

  10. Efficacy of visuo-spatial training in right-brain damaged patients with spatial hemineglect and attention disorders.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, Laura; Nico, Daniele; Bureca, Ivana; Matano, Alessandro; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2006-10-01

    Several rehabilitative approaches have been used to reduce neglect disorders. Some studies tried to demonstrate that hemineglect can be ameliorated by using tasks promoting attentional activation towards the neglected hemispace (Robertson et al., 1995, 2001). As a consequence, a functional link between level of attention and disorders of space exploration has been proposed. For this reason we tried to explore the possible role of attentional deficits on the efficacy of a standard neglect treatment based on visuo spatial rehabilitation. In this study we then examined the performances of a selected group of seven right brain damaged patients, suffering from both severe hemineglect and attentional deficits (of both phasic and tonic components of attention), to several tasks before and after a visuo-spatial training (VST) whose efficacy has been already demonstrated (Pizzamiglio et al., 1992). Results showed that VST induces a significant remission of hemineglect symptoms independently from disorders of attention. Moreover, after visuo-spatial rehabilitation, no improvement of attentional deficits is detectable.

  11. Vitamin A deficiency: An oxidative stress marker in sodium fluoride (NaF) induced oxidative damage in developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Banala, Rajkiran Reddy; Karnati, Pratap Reddy

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride induced oxidative stress through depletion in levels of various anti-oxidants such as glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), fat soluble vitamins (D and E) with increased levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and fluoride aggravate the damage in rodents as well as in humans. Vitamins A, a fat soluble vitamin possess antioxidant property which plays a significant role in scavenging the free radicals species similar to vitamin D and E. Vitamin A is involved in neural tissue development and plasticity. The growing evidence about vitamin A being antioxidant in different biological reactions formed the basis to determine the effect of fluoride on its levels. The present study was conducted in Wistar rat pups. The pregnant wistar rats were dosed with 20 ppm sodium fluoride (NaF) from day one of pregnancy till the pups were aged day 30. The serum was collected from developing rat pups on regular intervals (14th, 21st, 30th day) and vitamin A levels were analyzed by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Body weights, Behavioural studies and spectrophotometric estimation of SOD, LPO in brain lysates were also performed. The results showed significant decrease (p<0.001) in vitamin A in fluoride induced samples in comparison to the control samples suggesting that decreased levels of vitamin A can be used as another marker in fluoride induced toxicity studies.

  12. Bodily ownership modulation in defensive responses: physiological evidence in brain-damaged patients with pathological embodiment of other's body parts.

    PubMed

    Fossataro, C; Gindri, P; Mezzanato, T; Pia, L; Garbarini, F

    2016-01-01

    Do conscious beliefs about the body affect defensive mechanisms within the body? To answer this question we took advantage from a monothematic delusion of bodily ownership, in which brain-damaged patients misidentify alien limbs as their own. We investigated whether the delusional belief that an alien hand is their own hand modulates a subcortical defensive response, such as the hand-blink reflex. The blink, dramatically increases when the threated hand is inside the defensive peripersonal-space of the face. In our between-subjects design, including patients and controls, the threat was brought near the face either by the own hand or by another person's hand. Our results show an ownership-dependent modulation of the defensive response. In controls, as well as in the patients' intact-side, the response enhancement is significantly greater when the threat was brought near the face by the own than by the alien hand. Crucially, in the patients' affected-side (where the pathological embodiment occurs), the alien (embodied) hand elicited a response enhancement comparable to that found when the threat is brought near the face by the real hand. These findings suggest the existence of a mutual interaction between our conscious beliefs about the body and the physiological mechanisms within the body. PMID:27292285

  13. Protective Effect of Calendula officinalis L. Flowers Against Monosodium Glutamate Induced Oxidative Stress and Excitotoxic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shivasharan, B D; Nagakannan, P; Thippeswamy, B S; Veerapur, V P

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a popular flavour enhancer used in food industries; however, excess MSG is neurotoxic. Oxidative stress is well documented in MSG induced neurotoxicity. The compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties reportedly possess beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Calendula officinalis Linn. flower extract (COE) is known for its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of COE on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Adult Wistar rats were administered systemically for 7 days with MSG and after one h of MSG injection, rats were treated with COE (100 and 200 mg/kg) orally. At the end the treatment period, animals were assessed for locomotor activity and were sacrificed; brains were isolated for estimation of LPO, GSH, CAT, TT, GST, Nitrite and histopathological studies. MSG caused a significant alteration in animal behavior, oxidative defense (raised levels of LPO, nitrite concentration, depletion of antioxidant levels) and hippocampal neuronal histology. Treatment with COE significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, and hippocampal damage in MSG-treated animals. Hence, this study demonstrates that COE protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of COE may be responsible for its observed neuroprotective action.

  14. K-134, a Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitor, Prevents Brain Damage by Inhibiting Thrombus Formation in a Rat Cerebral Infarction Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hideo; Ashikawa, Yuka; Itoh, Shinsuke; Nakagawa, Takashi; Asanuma, Akimune; Tanabe, Sohei; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Hidaka, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background K-134 is a more potent antiplatelet drug with a selective inhibitory effect on phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) compared with its analogue, cilostazol. Objectives This study was performed to compare the ameliorating effects of K-134 and cilostazol on brain damage in an experimental photothrombotic cerebral infarction model. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of oral preadministration of PDE3 inhibitors in a rat stroke model established by photothrombotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. K-134 significantly prolonged MCA occlusion time at doses >10 mg/kg, and reduced cerebral infarct size at 30 mg/kg in the stroke model (n = 12, 87.5±5.6 vs. 126.8±7.5 mm3, P<0.01), indicating its potent antithrombotic effect. On the other hand, the effects of cilostazol on MCA occlusion time and cerebral infarct size are relatively weak even at the high dosage of 300 mg/kg. Furthermore, K-134 blocked rat platelet aggregation more potently than cilostazol in vitro. Also in an arteriovenous shunt thrombosis model, K-134 showed an antithrombotic effect greater than cilostazol. Conclusions These findings suggest that K-134, which has strong antithrombotic activity, is a promising drug for prevention of cerebral infarction associated with platelet hyperaggregability. PMID:23110051

  15. High hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol produces generalized convulsions and brain damage in rats. A counteraction with the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736).

    PubMed

    Ilic, S; Drmic, D; Zarkovic, K; Kolenc, D; Coric, M; Brcic, L; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Sever, M; Djuzel, V; Ivica, M; Boban Blagaic, A; Zoricic, Z; Anic, T; Zoricic, I; Djidic, S; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2010-04-01

    We focused on stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, MW 1419, an anti-ulcer peptide efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported) because of its hepatoprotective effects. We investigate a particular aspect of the sudden onset of encephalopathy with extreme paracetamol overdose (5 g/kg intraperitoneally) so far not reported: rapidly induced progressive hepatic encephalopathy with generalized convulsions in rats. BPC 157 therapy (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg, intraperitoneally or intragastrically) was effective (microg-ng range) against paracetamol toxicity, given in early (BPC 157 immediately after paracetamol, prophylactically) or advanced stage (BPC 157 at 3 hours after paracetamol, therapeutically). At 25 min post-paracetamol increased ALT, AST and ammonium serum values precede liver lesion while in several brain areas, significant damage became apparent, accompanied by generalized convulsions. Through the next 5 hour seizure period and thereafter, the brain damage, liver damage enzyme values and hyperammonemia increased, particularly throughout the 3-24 h post-paracetamol period. BPC 157 demonstrated clinical (no convulsions (prophylactic application) or convulsions rapidly disappeared (therapeutic effect within 25 min)), microscopical (markedly less liver and brain lesions) and biochemical (enzyme and ammonium serum levels decreased) counteraction. Both, the prophylactic and therapeutic benefits (intraperitoneally and intragastrically) clearly imply BPC 157 (microg-ng range) as a highly effective paracetamol antidote even against highly advanced damaging processes induced by an extreme paracetamol over-dose. PMID:20436226

  16. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide controls pathogen load and brain damage by enhancing phagocytosis of Escherichia coli K1 in neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Goth, Kerstin A; Prasadarao, Nemani V

    2010-03-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis in humans. In this study, we sought to determine the pathophysiologic relevance of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) in experimental E. coli K1 meningitis. By using a newborn mouse model of meningitis, we demonstrate that E. coli infection triggered the expression of iNOS in the brains of mice. Additionally, iNOS-/- mice were resistant to E. coli K1 infection, displaying normal brain histology, no bacteremia, no disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and reduced inflammatory response. Treatment with an iNOS specific inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG), of wild-type animals before infection prevented the development of bacteremia and the occurrence of meningitis. The infected animals treated with AG after the development of bacteremia also completely cleared the pathogen from circulation and prevented brain damage. Histopathological and micro-CT analysis of brains revealed significant damage in E. coli K1-infected mice, which was completely abrogated by AG administration. Peritoneal macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes isolated from iNOS-/- mice or pretreated with AG demonstrated enhanced uptake and killing of the bacteria compared with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from wild-type mice in which E. coli K1 survive and multiply. Thus, NO produced by iNOS may be beneficial for E. coli to survive inside the macrophages, and prevention of iNOS could be a therapeutic strategy to treat neonatal E. coli meningitis. PMID:20093483

  17. Trauma-induced coagulopathy: standard coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy, and endothelial damage in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Pär Ingemar; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard; Sølbeck, Sacha; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Larsen, Claus Falck; Welling, Karen Lise; Windeløv, Nis Agerlin; Rasmussen, Lars S; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2013-02-15

    It remains to be debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy than does non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy, and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients was sampled (median of 68 min [IQR 48-88] post-injury) upon admission to our trauma center. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analyzed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, antithrombin, prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombin/antithrombin complex, von Willebrand factor, factor XIII, d-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), immunology (interleukin [IL]6), endothelial cell/glycocalyx damage (soluble thrombomodulin, syndecan-1), and vasculogenesis (angiopoietin-1, -2). Patients were stratified according to: (1) isolated severe head/neck injuries (Abbreviated injury score [AIS]-head/neck ≥ 3, AIS-other<3) (isoTBI); (2) severe head/neck and extracranial injuries (AIS-head/neck ≥ 3, AIS-other>3) (sTBI+other); and (3) injuries without significant head/neck injuries (AIS-head/neck<3, including all AIS-other scores) (non-TBI). Twenty-three patients presented with isoTBI, 15 with sTBI+other and 42 with non-TBI. Acute coagulopathy of trauma shock, defined as activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or international normalized ratio (INR)>35 sec and>1.2, was found in 13%, 47%, and 5%, respectively (p=0.000). sTBI+other had significantly higher plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, annexin V, d-dimer, IL-6, syndecan-1, soluble thrombomodulin, and reduced protein C and factor XIII levels (all p<0.05). No significant biomarker differences were found between isoTBI and non-TBI patients. Injury severity scale (ISS) rather than the presence or absence of head/neck injuries

  18. Can high-level inferencing be predicted by Discourse Comprehension Test performance in adults with right hemisphere brain damage?

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Meigh, Kimberly; Scott, April Gibbs; Lederer, Lisa Guttentag

    2009-01-01

    Background Adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) can have considerable difficulty in drawing high-level inferences from discourse. Standardised tests of language comprehension in RHD do not tap high-level inferences with many items or in much depth, but nonstandardised tasks lack reliability and validity data. It would be of great clinical value if a standardised test could predict performance on high-level inferencing measures. Aims This study addressed whether performance of adults with RHD on the Discourse Comprehension Test (DCT; Brookshire & Nicholas, 1993) could predict their performance on a nonstandardised measure of high-level inference in narrative comprehension. Methods & Procedures This study used a within-group correlational design. Participants were 32 adults with damage limited to the right cerebral hemisphere, as a result of cerebrovascular accident. Half of the participants were male and half female. Participants averaged 64.5 years of age and 14.2 years of education. Participants listened to narrative stimuli and to yes/no questions about each narrative. Each DCT narrative was followed by the standard 8 questions about stated or implied main ideas or details. The high-level inferencing task contained 6 narrative scenarios from Winner, Brownell, Happé, Blum, and Pincus (1998). Each scenario describes a character who commits a minor transgression and later denies it. Two versions of each story are designed to induce different interpretations of the character’s denial. In one version, the character tells a white lie when he is unaware that he was seen committing the transgression. In the other versions, when aware of being seen, the character makes an ironic joke. The narratives were interrupted periodically by comprehension questions. Four Pearson correlation coefficients were computed, between each of two DCT predictor variables (total accuracy for all comprehension questions; accuracy on questions about implied information) and two

  19. Early (N170/M170) Face-Sensitivity Despite Right Lateral Occipital Brain Damage in Acquired Prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Esther Alonso; Caharel, Stéphanie; Henson, Richard; Rossion, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130 ms and a peak at about 170 ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response to faces as typically identified in neuroimaging. Event-related potentials were recorded in response to faces, cars, and their phase-scrambled versions in a well-known brain-damaged case of prosopagnosia (PS). Despite the patient’s right inferior occipital gyrus lesion encompassing the most posterior cortical area showing preferential response to faces (“occipital face area”), we identified an early face-sensitive component over the right occipito-temporal hemisphere of the patient that was identified as the N170. A second experiment supported this conclusion, showing the typical N170 increase of latency and amplitude in response to inverted faces. In contrast, there was no N170 in the left hemisphere, where PS has a lesion to the middle fusiform gyrus and shows no evidence of face-preferential response in neuroimaging (no left “fusiform face area”). These results were replicated by a magnetoencephalographic investigation of the patient, disclosing a M170 component only in the right hemisphere. These observations indicate that face-preferential activation in the inferior occipital cortex is not necessary to elicit early visual responses associated with face perception (N170/M170) on the human scalp. These results further suggest that when the right inferior occipital cortex is damaged, the integrity of the middle fusiform gyrus and/or the superior temporal sulcus – two areas showing face-preferential responses in the patient’s right hemisphere – might be necessary to generate the N170 effect

  20. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Go, K.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Woldring, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.

  1. Activation and maintenance of peripheral semantic features of unambiguous words after right hemisphere brain damage in adults

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud; Scharp, Victoria L.; Meigh, Kimberly M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The right cerebral hemisphere (RH) sustains activation of subordinate, secondary, less common, and/or distantly related meanings of words. Much of the pertinent data come from studies of homonyms, but some evidence also suggests that the RH has a unique maintenance function in relation to unambiguous nouns. In a divided visual field priming study, Atchley, Burgess, and Keeney (1999) reported that only left visual field/RH presentation yielded evidence of continuing activation of peripheral semantic features that were incompatible with the most common image or representation of their corresponding nouns (e.g., rotten for “apple”). Activation for weakly related features that were compatible with the dominant representation (e.g., crunchy) was sustained over time regardless of the visual field/hemisphere of initial stimulus input. Several studies report that unilateral right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) in adults affects the RH’s meaning maintenance function, but this work also has centred on homonyms, and/or more recently metonymic and metaphoric polysemous words. Aims The current investigation examined whether RHD deficits in processing secondary and/or distantly related meanings of words, typically observed in studies of homonyms, would extend to peripheral, weakly related semantic features of unambiguous nouns. Methods & Procedures Participants were 28 adults with unilateral RHD from cerebrovascular accident, and 38 adults without brain damage. Participants listened to spoken sentences that ended with an unambiguous noun. Each sentence was followed by a spoken target phoneme string. Targets included peripheral semantic features of the sentence-final noun that were either compatible or incompatible with the dominant mental images of the noun, and were presented at two intervals after that noun. A lexical decision task was used to gauge both the early activation and maintenance of activation for these weakly related semantic features. Outcomes

  2. Extra virgin olive oil modulates brain docosahexaenoic acid level and oxidative damage caused by 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Amel, Nakbi; Wafa, Tayeb; Samia, Dabbou; Yousra, Belaid; Issam, Chargui; Cheraif, Imed; Attia, Nebil; Mohamed, Hammami

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is an important pathomechanism of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease, cardiovascular disorders and many others. This study sought to verify whether extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), lipophilic fraction (OOLF) and hydrophilic fraction (OOHF) exerted a brain protective effect against the oxidative stress caused by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) pesticide at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. 2,4-D, EVOO and its fractions were administered to rats by gavages for four consecutive weeks. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring brain lipid peroxide level, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), antioxidant enzyme activities and fatty acid composition. 2,4-D induced a decrease in both plasma and brain acetylcholinesterase activity and a rise in Brain TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) level and antioxidant enzyme activities compared with the control group. These changes were partly reversed by either EVOO or its fractions oral administration to 2,4-D treated rats. EVOO enhanced a neuroprotective effect evaluated by the restoration of brain fatty acid composition especially the level of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Our results indicate that EVOO exerts a neuroprotective activity against oxidative damage in brain induced by 2,4-D, which could be attributed to its antioxidative property. PMID:27570270

  3. The discrepancy between the absence of copper deposition and the presence of neuronal damage in the brain of Atp7b(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Shi, Sheng-Sheng; Chen, Sheng; Ni, Wang; Zhu, Min; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by mutations within the copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B), characterized by copper deposition in various organs, principally the liver and the brain. With the availability of Atp7b(-/-) mice, the valid animal model of WD, the mechanism underlying copper-induced hepatocyte necrosis has been well understood. Nonetheless, little is known about the adverse impact of copper accumulation on the brain in WD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify copper disturbances according to various brain compartments and further dissect the causal relationship between copper storage and neuronal damage using Atp7b(-/-) mice. Copper levels in the liver, whole brain, brain compartments and basal ganglia mitochondria of Atp7b(-/-) mice and age-matched controls were measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Delicate electron microscopic studies on hepatocytes and neurons in the basal ganglia were performed. Here we further confirmed the remarkably elevated copper content and abnormal ultrastructure findings in livers of Atp7b(-/-) mice. Interestingly, we found the ultrastructure abnormalities in neurons of the basal ganglia of Atp7b(-/-) mice, whereas copper deposition was not detected in the whole brain, even within the basal ganglia and its mitochondria. The disparity provided a new understanding of neuronal dysfunction in WD, and strongly indicated that copper might not be the sole causative player and other unidentified pathogenic factors could enhance the toxic effects of copper on neurons in WD.

  4. Regulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells for neural repair-factors that promote neurogenesis and gliogenesis in the normal and damaged brain.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly J; Turnley, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem/precursor cells in the adult brain reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. These cells primarily generate neuroblasts that normally migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and the dentate granule cell layer respectively. Following brain damage, such as traumatic brain injury, ischemic stroke or in degenerative disease models, neural precursor cells from the SVZ in particular, can migrate from their normal route along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the site of neural damage. This neural precursor cell response to neural damage is mediated by release of endogenous factors, including cytokines and chemokines produced by the inflammatory response at the injury site, and by the production of growth and neurotrophic factors. Endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis is frequently also directly or indirectly affected by neural damage. Administration of a variety of factors that regulate different aspects of neural stem/precursor biology often leads to improved functional motor and/or behavioral outcomes. Such factors can target neural stem/precursor proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation into appropriate neuronal or glial lineages. Newborn cells also need to subsequently survive and functionally integrate into extant neural circuitry, which may be the major bottleneck to the current therapeutic potential of neural stem/precursor cells. This review will cover the effects of a range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that regulate neural stem/precursor cell functions. In particular it focuses on factors that may be harnessed to enhance the endogenous neural stem/precursor cell response to neural damage, highlighting those that have already shown evidence of preclinical effectiveness and discussing others that warrant further preclinical investigation. PMID:23346046

  5. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  6. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus.

  7. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery.

  8. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery. PMID:25971543

  9. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers. PMID:23627476

  10. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  11. Late effects of enriched environment (EE) plus multimodal early onset stimulation (MEOS) after traumatic brain injury in rats: Ongoing improvement of neuromotor function despite sustained volume of the CNS lesion.

    PubMed

    Lippert-Gruener, Marcela; Maegele, Marc; Garbe, Janika; Angelov, Doychin N

    2007-01-01

    Recently we showed that the combination between MEOS and EE applied to rats for 7-15 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with reduced CNS lesion volume and enhanced reversal of neuromotor dysfunction. In a continuation of this work, we tested whether these effects persisted for longer post-operative periods, e.g. 30 days post-injury (dpi). Rats were subjected to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) or to sham injury. After LFP, one third of the animals (injured and sham) was placed under conditions of standard housing (SH), one third was kept in EE-only, and one third received EE+MEOS. Standardized composite neuroscore (NS) for neurological functions and computerized analysis of the vibrissal motor performance were used to assess post-traumatic neuromotor deficits. These were followed by evaluation of the cortical lesion volume (CLV) after immunostaining for neuron-specific enolase, caspase 3 active, and GFAP. Finally, the volume of cortical lesion containing regeneration-associated proteins (CLV-RAP) was determined in sections stained for GAP-43, MAP2, and neuronal class III beta-tubulin. We found (i) no differences in the vibrissal motor performance; (ii) EE+MEOS rats performed significantly better than SH rats in NS; (iii) EE-only and EE+MEOS animals, but not SH rats, showed better recovery at 30 dpi than at 15 dpi; (iv) no differences among all groups in CLV (larger than that at 15 dpi) and CLV-RAP, despite a clear tendency to reduction in the EE-only and EE+MEOS rats. We conclude that EE+MEOS retards, but cannot prevent the increase of lesion volume. This retardation is sufficient for a continuous restoration of neurological functions.

  12. Beneficial effect of diosgenin as a stimulator of NGF on the brain with neuronal damage induced by Aβ-42 accumulation and neurotoxicant injection.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Yun, Woo-Bin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sung-Hwa; Sung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eun-Ji; Jee, Seung-Wan; Bae, Chang-Joon; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the beneficial effects of diosgenin (DG) on the multiple types of brain damage induced by Aβ-42 peptides and neurotoxicants, alterations in the specific aspects of brain functions were measured in trimethyltin (TMT)-injected transgenic 2576 (TG) mice that had been pretreated with DG for 21 days. Multiple types of damage were successfully induced by Aβ-42 accumulation and TMT injection into the brains of TG mice. However, DG treatment significantly reduced the number of Aβ-stained plaques and dead cells in the granule cells layer of the dentate gyrus. Significant suppression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Bax/Bcl-2 expression was also observed in the DG treated TG mice (TG+DG group) when compared with those of the vehicle (VC) treated TG mice (TG+VC group). Additionally, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) was dramatically enhanced in TG+DG group, although it was lower in the TG+VC group than the non-transgenic (nTG) group. Furthermore, the decreased phosphorylation of downstream members in the TrkA high affinity receptor signaling pathway in the TG+VC group was significantly recovered in the TG+DG group. A similar pattern was observed in p75(NTR) expression and JNK phosphorylation in the NGF low affinity receptor signaling pathway. Moreover, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was enhanced in the TG+DG group, while the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation, was lower in the TG+DG group than the TG+VC group. These results suggest that DG could exert a wide range of beneficial activities for multiple types of brain damage through stimulation of NGF biosynthesis. PMID:27382379

  13. Beneficial effect of diosgenin as a stimulator of NGF on the brain with neuronal damage induced by Aβ-42 accumulation and neurotoxicant injection

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Yun, Woo-Bin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sung-Hwa; Sung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eun-Ji; Jee, Seung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the beneficial effects of diosgenin (DG) on the multiple types of brain damage induced by Aβ-42 peptides and neurotoxicants, alterations in the specific aspects of brain functions were measured in trimethyltin (TMT)-injected transgenic 2576 (TG) mice that had been pretreated with DG for 21 days. Multiple types of damage were successfully induced by Aβ-42 accumulation and TMT injection into the brains of TG mice. However, DG treatment significantly reduced the number of Aβ-stained plaques and dead cells in the granule cells layer of the dentate gyrus. Significant suppression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Bax/Bcl-2 expression was also observed in the DG treated TG mice (TG+DG group) when compared with those of the vehicle (VC) treated TG mice (TG+VC group). Additionally, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) was dramatically enhanced in TG+DG group, although it was lower in the TG+VC group than the non-transgenic (nTG) group. Furthermore, the decreased phosphorylation of downstream members in the TrkA high affinity receptor signaling pathway in the TG+VC group was significantly recovered in the TG+DG group. A similar pattern was observed in p75NTR expression and JNK phosphorylation in the NGF low affinity receptor signaling pathway. Moreover, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was enhanced in the TG+DG group, while the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation, was lower in the TG+DG group than the TG+VC group. These results suggest that DG could exert a wide range of beneficial activities for multiple types of brain damage through stimulation of NGF biosynthesis. PMID:27382379

  14. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R.; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  15. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  16. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception.

    PubMed

    Wohlschläger, Afra M; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain's ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants' left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  17. Generalization of a Novel, Implicit Treatment for Coarse Coding Deficit in Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: A Single Subject Experiment.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Connie A; Scharp, Victoria L; Meigh, Kimberly; Blake, Margaret Lehman; Wambaugh, Julie

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND: This manuscript reports generalization effects of Contextual Constraint Treatment for an adult with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). Contextual Constraint Treatment is designed to stimulate inefficient language comprehension processes implicitly, by providing linguistic context to prime, or constrain, the intended interpretations of treatment stimuli. The study participant had a coarse coding deficit, defined as delayed mental activation of particularly distant semantic features of words (e.g., rotten as a feature of "apple"). Treatment effects were expected to generalize to auditory comprehension of narrative discourse, and perhaps to figurative language interpretation, because coarse coding has been hypothesized and/or demonstrated to support these abilities. AIMS: This treatment study aimed to induce generalization of Contextual Constraint Treatment in an adult with RHD with inefficient coarse coding. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURES: The participant in this study was a 75 year old man with RHD and a coarse coding deficit. A single subject experimental design across behaviors (stimulus lists) was used to document performance in baseline, treatment, and follow-up phases. Treatment consisted of providing brief, spoken context sentences to prestimulate, or constrain, intended interpretations of stimulus items. The participant made no explicit associations or metalinguistic judgments about the constraint sentences or stimulus words; rather, these contexts served only as implicit primes. Probe tasks were adapted from prior work on coarse coding in RHD. The dependent measure was the percentage of responses that met predetermined response time criteria. There were two levels of contextual constraint, Strong and Moderate. Treatment for each item began with the provision of the Strong constraint context, to minimize the production or reinforcement of erroneous or exceedingly slow responses. Generalization was assessed to a well-standardized measure

  18. Generalization of a Novel, Implicit Treatment for Coarse Coding Deficit in Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: A Single Subject Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Scharp, Victoria L.; Meigh, Kimberly; Blake, Margaret Lehman; Wambaugh, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Background This manuscript reports generalization effects of Contextual Constraint Treatment for an adult with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). Contextual Constraint Treatment is designed to stimulate inefficient language comprehension processes implicitly, by providing linguistic context to prime, or constrain, the intended interpretations of treatment stimuli. The study participant had a coarse coding deficit, defined as delayed mental activation of particularly distant semantic features of words (e.g., rotten as a feature of “apple”). Treatment effects were expected to generalize to auditory comprehension of narrative discourse, and perhaps to figurative language interpretation, because coarse coding has been hypothesized and/or demonstrated to support these abilities. Aims This treatment study aimed to induce generalization of Contextual Constraint Treatment in an adult with RHD with inefficient coarse coding. Methods & Procedures The participant in this study was a 75 year old man with RHD and a coarse coding deficit. A single subject experimental design across behaviors (stimulus lists) was used to document performance in baseline, treatment, and follow-up phases. Treatment consisted of providing brief, spoken context sentences to prestimulate, or constrain, intended interpretations of stimulus items. The participant made no explicit associations or metalinguistic judgments about the constraint sentences or stimulus words; rather, these contexts served only as implicit primes. Probe tasks were adapted from prior work on coarse coding in RHD. The dependent measure was the percentage of responses that met predetermined response time criteria. There were two levels of contextual constraint, Strong and Moderate. Treatment for each item began with the provision of the Strong constraint context, to minimize the production or reinforcement of erroneous or exceedingly slow responses. Generalization was assessed to a well-standardized measure of narrative

  19. Changes in Interleukin-1 alpha serum levels after transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Katja; Tenbusch, Matthias; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Meier, Carola

    2013-03-01

    Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells is a potential approach for the treatment of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Neurological and motor deficits resulting from the brain lesion are ameliorated upon transplantation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these improvements are currently being unravelled. One parameter identified as part of the beneficial effects of hUCB cells is the reduction of brain inflammation. It is, however, unclear whether the modulation of brain inflammation is due to local or systemic effects of hUCB cells. In this study, the effects of hUCB cell transplantation in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury were investigated at the systemic level by measurement of serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines by multiplex bead arrays. Two days after induction of the brain damage, levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1α (IL-1α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) were increased in the serum of rats. Application of hUCB cells, in turn, correlated with a reduced elevation of serum levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. This decrease was accompanied by a reduced expression of CD68, a marker protein of activated microglia/macrophages in the brain. Therefore, systemic modulation of the immune response by hUCB cells could represent one possible mechanism of how these cells might mediate their beneficial effects. Creation of a regenerative environment with reduced inflammation might account for the functional regeneration observed upon hUCB cell treatment in lesioned animals.

  20. Rapamycin Reduced Ischemic Brain Damage in Diabetic Animals Is Associated with Suppressions of mTOR and ERK1/2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changchun; Meli, Yvonne; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are to investigate the activation of mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling after cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats and to examine the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin. Ten minutes transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in straptozotocin-induced diabetic hyperglycemic rats and non-diabetic, euglycemic rats. Brain samples were harvested after 16 h of reperfusion. Rapamycin or vehicle was injected 1 month prior to the induction of ischemia. The results showed that diabetes increased ischemic neuronal cell death and associated with elevations of p-P70S6K and Ras/ERK1/2 and suppression of p-AMPKα. Rapamycin ameliorated diabetes-enhanced ischemic brain damage and suppressed phosphorylation of P70S6K and ERK1/2. It is concluded that diabetes activates mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in rats subjected to transient cerebral ischemia and inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin reduces ischemic brain damage and suppresses the mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in diabetic settings. PMID:27489506

  1. Evidence for separate tonal and segmental tiers in the lexical specification of words: a case study of a brain-damaged Chinese speaker.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; van Heuven, Vincent J

    2004-12-01

    We present an acoustic study of segmental and prosodic properties of words produced by a female speaker of Chinese with left-hemisphere brain damage. We measured the location of the point vowels /a, e, [Symbol: see text], i, y, o, u/ and determined their separation in the vowel plane, and their perceptual distinctivity. Similarly, the acoustic properties of the four lexical tones were measured in the F0 x time space. The data for our brain-damaged speaker were compared with those of a healthy control speaker. Results show that the patient's vowels hardly suffered from her lesion (relative to the vowel dispersion in the healthy control speaker), but that the identifiability of the four lexical tones was greatly compromised. These findings show that the tonal errors in aphasic speech behave independently of the segmental errors, even though both serve to maintain lexical contrasts in Chinese, and are therefore part of the lexical specification of Chinese words. The present study suggests that the specification of segmental and tonal aspects of lexical entries in Chinese, and in tone languages in general, are located or processed separately in the brain.

  2. Rapamycin Reduced Ischemic Brain Damage in Diabetic Animals Is Associated with Suppressions of mTOR and ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changchun; Meli, Yvonne; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P Andy

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are to investigate the activation of mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling after cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats and to examine the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin. Ten minutes transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in straptozotocin-induced diabetic hyperglycemic rats and non-diabetic, euglycemic rats. Brain samples were harvested after 16 h of reperfusion. Rapamycin or vehicle was injected 1 month prior to the induction of ischemia. The results showed that diabetes increased ischemic neuronal cell death and associated with elevations of p-P70S6K and Ras/ERK1/2 and suppression of p-AMPKα. Rapamycin ameliorated diabetes-enhanced ischemic brain damage and suppressed phosphorylation of P70S6K and ERK1/2. It is concluded that diabetes activates mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in rats subjected to transient cerebral ischemia and inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin reduces ischemic brain damage and suppresses the mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in diabetic settings. PMID:27489506

  3. Arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is mediated by decreased PGC-1α expression and its downstream targets in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-25

    The present study was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relation to biogenesis in rat brain. Chronic sodium arsenite (25 ppm, orally) administration for 12 weeks decreased mitochondrial complexes activities and mRNA expression of selective complexes subunits. The expression of mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α, and its downstream targets NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam were decreased significantly both at mRNA and protein levels suggesting impaired biogenesis following chronic arsenic-exposure. In addition to this, protein expression analysis also revealed activation of Bax and caspase-3, leading to translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. This was further confirmed by electron microscopy study which depicted morphological changes in mitochondria in terms of altered nuclear and mitochondrial shape and chromatin condensation in arsenic-treated rats. The immunohistochemical studies showed both nuclear and cytosolic localization of NRF-1 and NRF-2 in arsenic-exposed rat brain further suggesting regulatory role of these transcription factors under arsenic neurotoxicity. The results of present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat brain that may present as important target to reveal the mechanism for arsenic-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27425645

  4. Cerebral Visual Impairment: Which Perceptive Visual Dysfunctions Can Be Expected in Children with Brain Damage? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, F. H.; Pel, J. J. M.; van der Steen, J.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The current definition of Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) includes all visual dysfunctions caused by damage to, or malfunctioning of, the retrochiasmatic visual pathways in the absence of damage to the anterior visual pathways or any major ocular disease. CVI is diagnosed by exclusion and the existence of many different causes and symptoms make…

  5. Blocking B7-1/CD28 Pathway Diminished Long-Range Brain Damage by Regulating the Immune and Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Shen, Xi; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Ji, Mengmeng; Luo, Chengliang; Zhang, Mingyang; Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiping; Tao, Luyang

    2016-07-01

    Acute brain injuries can activate bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. The immune system, particularly T lymphocytes and cytokines, has been implicated in the progression of brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Co-stimulatory molecules B7-1 (CD80)/B7-2 (CD86) binding cognate receptor provides a secondary signaling to T cell activation. The aim of our study was to explore the effects of anti-B7-1 antibody on the development and prognosis of cerebral hemorrhage and to investigate the possible underlying mechanism. Mice were inner canthus veniplex administered with anti-B7-1 antibody at 10 min and 24 h after ICH and sacrificed on the third day after ICH. Immune function was assessed via splenocyte proliferation assay and organism index, respectively. IFN-γ and IL-4 were detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay. The cerebral edema was evaluated via brain water content. The levels of autophagy and apoptosis related proteins were measured by western blotting analysis. In addition, functional outcome was studied with pole-climbing test and morris water maze. The mice were weighed on 0, 1, 3, 14 and 21 days after ICH. The treatment with anti-B7-1 antibody significantly lowered immune function, and reduced the latency of water maze on 18 and 20 days, the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 as well as body weight on day 3 after cerebral hemorrhage. Our study suggests that in the cerebral hemorrhage mice brain anti-B7-1 antibody may reduce long-range brain damage by reversing immune imbalance. PMID:26980009

  6. Inhibition of the group I mGluRs reduces acute brain damage and improves long-term histological outcomes after photothrombosis-induced ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hailong; Zhang, Nannan; Sun, Grace; Ding, Shinghua

    2013-01-01

    Group I mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), including mGluR1 and mGluR5, are GPCRs (G-protein coupled receptors) and play important roles in physiology and pathology. Studies on their role in cerebral ischaemia have provided controversial results. In this study, we used a PT (photothrombosis)-induced ischaemia model to investigate whether antagonists to the group I mGluRs may offer acute and long-term protective effects in adult mice. Our results demonstrated that administration with mGluR5 antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine] or mGluR1 antagonist LY367385 by intraperitoneal injection at 3 h after PT decreased brain infarct volume evaluated one day after ischaemia. Additive effects on infarct volume were observed upon co-injection with MPEP and LY367385. These antagonists also significantly alleviated neurodegeneration and apoptosis in the penumbra. In addition, when evaluated 2 weeks after PT, they reduced infarct volume and tissue loss, attenuated glial scar formation, and inhibited cell proliferation in the penumbra. Importantly, co-injection with MPEP and LY367385 reduced the expression levels of calpain, a Ca2+-activated protease known to mediate ischaemia-induced neuronal death. Injection of calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, could inhibit neuronal death and brain damage after PT but injection of calpeptin together with MPEP and LY367385 did not further improve the protective effects mediated by MPEP and LY367385. These results suggest that inhibition of group I mGluRs is sufficient to protect ischaemic damage through the calpain pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate that inhibition of group I mGluRs can mitigate PT-induced brain damage through attenuating the effects of calpain, and improve long-term histological outcomes. PMID:23772679

  7. Twenty-year brain magnetic resonance imaging follow-up study in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Factors associated with accrual of damage and central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Piga, Matteo; Peltz, Maria Teresa; Montaldo, Carlo; Perra, Daniela; Sanna, Giovanni; Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term progression of cerebral MRI abnormalities in patients with longstanding SLE, 30 patients (age 53.5 ± 11.3) underwent brain MRI at baseline (b-MRI) and after 19.4 ± 3.7 years of follow-up (fu-MRI). Two neuroradiologists visually analyzed the MRIs comparing: 1) white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs), 2) cerebral volume, and 3) parenchymal defects; these outcomes were also built in a modified MRI scoring system (mMSS) to estimate the cumulative parenchymal damage. The independent risk factors for accrual of MRI brain damage, as well as the association between MRI abnormalities and the development of new neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations classified according to the 1999 ACR case definition were also analyzed. Twenty-three patients (76.7%) showed worsening of mMSS; 19 (63.3%) had increased number and volume of WMHIs, 8 (26.7%) had significant cerebral volume loss, and 6 (20%) showed new ischemic parenchymal lesions. Only 6 patients had normal MRI. Antimalarial agents (p=0.006; OR 0.08) were protective against worsening of WMHIs. High cumulative dose of corticosteroids (p=0.026; OR 8.8) and dyslipidemia (p=0.044; OR 10.1) were associated with increased mMSS and cerebral volume loss, respectively. Higher mMSS score at baseline was independently associated with worsening of WMHIs (p=0.001; OR 5.7) and development of new NP events (p=0.019; OR 2.0); higher load of deep WMHIs at b-MRI (p=0.018; OR 2.0) was independently associated with stroke risk. This study shows that MRI brain damage in SLE patients progresses independently from NP involvement as effect of potentially modifiable risk factors and it is associated with increased risk of new NP events. PMID:25617815

  8. Biochemical modifications and neuronal damage in brain of young and adult rats after long-term exposure to mobile phone radiations.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek K; Darwish, Hebatallah A; Moustafa, Yasser M; Labib, Mohammed M

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of exposure to mobile phone radiations on oxidative stress and apoptosis in brain of rats. Rats were allocated into six groups (three young and three adult). Groups 1 and 4 were not subjected to the radiation source and served as control groups. In groups 2 and 5, the mobile phones were only connected to the global system for mobile communication, while in groups 3 and 6, the option of calling was in use. Microwaves were generated by a mobile test phone (SAR = 1.13 W/kg) during 60 days (2 h/day). Significant increments in conjugated dienes, protein carbonyls, total oxidant status, and oxidative stress index along with a significant reduction of total antioxidant capacity levels were evident after exposure. Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 activity, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha level were enhanced, whereas no DNA fragmentation was detected. The relative brain weight of young rats was greatly affected, and histopathological examination reinforced the neuronal damage. The study highlights the detrimental effects of mobile phone radiations on brain during young and adult ages. The interaction of these radiations with brain is via dissipating its antioxidant status and/or triggering apoptotic cell death.

  9. Protective effect of resveratrol on fluoride induced alteration in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, DNA damage and biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sudipta; Sarkar, Chaitali

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride, a well-established environmental carcinogen, has been found to cause various neurodegenerative diseases in human. Sub-acute exposure to fluoride at a dose of 20mg/kgb.w./day for 30 days caused significant alteration in pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant status of brain tissue as reflected by perturbation of reduced glutathione content, increased lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, nitric oxide and free hydroxyl radical production and decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes. Decreased proteolytic and transaminase enzymes' activities, protein and nucleic acid contents and associated DNA damage were observed in the brain of fluoride intoxicated rats. The neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin level was also significantly altered after fluoride exposure. Protective effect of resveratrol on fluoride-induced metabolic and oxidative dysfunctions was evaluated. Resveratrol was found to inhibit changes in metabolic activities restoring antioxidant status, biogenic amine level and structural organization of the brain. Our findings indicated that resveratrol imparted antioxidative role in ameliorating fluoride-induced metabolic and oxidative stress in different regions of the brain.

  10. Brain-Specific Cytoskeletal Damage Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Is There a Common Pattern between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Abdelhak, Ahmed; Junker, Andreas; Brettschneider, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin

    2015-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common pathophysiological pathway involving axonal degeneration despite different etiological triggers. Analysis of cytoskeletal markers such as neurofilaments, protein tau and tubulin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be a useful approach to detect the process of axonal damage and its severity during disease course. In this article, we review the published literature regarding brain-specific CSF markers for cytoskeletal damage in primary progressive multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to evaluate their utility as a biomarker for disease progression in conjunction with imaging and histological markers which might also be useful in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with affection of the upper motor neurons. A long-term benefit of such an approach could be facilitating early diagnostic and prognostic tools and assessment of treatment efficacy of disease modifying drugs. PMID:26263977

  11. Brain-Specific Cytoskeletal Damage Markers in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Is There a Common Pattern between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Abdelhak, Ahmed; Junker, Andreas; Brettschneider, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin

    2015-07-31

    Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common pathophysiological pathway involving axonal degeneration despite different etiological triggers. Analysis of cytoskeletal markers such as neurofilaments, protein tau and tubulin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be a useful approach to detect the process of axonal damage and its severity during disease course. In this article, we review the published literature regarding brain-specific CSF markers for cytoskeletal damage in primary progressive multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to evaluate their utility as a biomarker for disease progression in conjunction with imaging and histological markers which might also be useful in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with affection of the upper motor neurons. A long-term benefit of such an approach could be facilitating early diagnostic and prognostic tools and assessment of treatment efficacy of disease modifying drugs.

  12. Ginkgo biloba Extract Prevents Female Mice from Ischemic Brain Damage and the Mechanism Is Independent of the HO1/Wnt Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tulsulkar, Jatin; Glueck, Bryan; Hinds, Terry D; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that gender differences exist in experimental or clinical stroke with respect to brain damage and loss of functional outcome. We have previously reported neuroprotective properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in transient and permanent mouse models of brain ischemia using male mice, and the mechanism of action was attributed to the upregulation of the heme oxygenase 1 (HO1)/Wnt pathway. Here, we sought to investigate whether EGb 761's protective effect in ovariectomized female mice following stroke is also mediated by the HO1/Wnt pathway. Female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) to remove the protective effect of estrogen and were treated with EGb 761 for 7 days prior to inducing permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and allowed to survive for an additional 7 days. At day 8, animals were sacrificed, and the brains were harvested for infarct volume analysis, western blots, and immunohistochemistry. The OVX female mice treated with EGb 761 showed significantly lower infarct size as compared to Veh/OVX animals. EGb 761 treatment in female mice inhibited apoptosis by preventing caspase-3 cleavage and blocking the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. EGb 761 pretreatment significantly enhanced neurogenesis in OVX mice as compared to the Veh/OVX group and significantly upregulated androgen receptor expression with no changes in HO1/Wnt signaling. These results suggest that EGb 761 prevented brain damage in OVX female mice by improving grip strength and neurological deficits, and the mechanism of action is not through HO1/Wnt but via blocking the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26573919

  13. Essential role of PD-L1 in regulatory T cell-afforded protection against blood-brain barrier damage after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peiying; Mao, Leilei; Liu, Xiangrong; Gan, Yu; Zheng, Jing; Thomson, Angus W.; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our recent research revealed that adoptively-transferred regulatory T cells (Tregs) reduced acute ischemic brain injury by inhibiting neutrophil-derived MMP-9 and protecting against blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. The mechanisms underlying Treg interactions with neutrophils remain elusive. This study evaluates the contribution of program death 1-ligand 1 (PD-L1) to Treg-mediated neutrophil inhibition and neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia. Methods In vitro experiments were carried out using a transwell system or a coculture system allowing cell-to-cell contact. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced in mice for 60min. Tregs (2×106) isolated from donor animals (wild-type or PD-L1−/−) were intravenously injected into ischemic recipients 2 h post-MCAO. MMP-9 production, BBB permeability and brain infarct were assessed at 1 or 3 days post-MCAO. Results In vitro experiments reveal that Treg-mediated inhibition of neutrophil MMP-9 required direct cell-to-cell contact. The suppression of MMP-9 was abolished when Tregs were pretreated with PD-L1 neutralizing Abs or when neutrophils were pre-treated with PD-1 Abs. In vivo studies confirmed that intravenous administration of Tregs pre-treated with PD-L1 Abs or Tregs isolated from PD-L1-deficient mice failed to inhibit MMP-9 production by blood neutrophils 1 day after 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Furthermore, the BBB damage after MCAO was greatly ameliorated in PD-L1-competent Treg-treated mice, but not in PD-L1-compromised Treg-treated mice. Consequently, PD-L1 dysfunction abolished Treg-mediated brain protection and neurological improvements 3 days after MCAO. Conclusions PD-L1 plays an essential role in the neuroprotection afforded by Tregs against cerebral ischemia by mediating the suppressive effect of Tregs on neutrophil-derived MMP-9. PMID:24496394

  14. DNA damage induced by phenylalanine and its analogue p-chlorophenylalanine in blood and brain of rats subjected to a model of hyperphenylalaninemia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Kellen R; Dos Santos, Rosane M; Scaini, Giselli; Leffa, Daniela D; Damiani, Adriani P; Furlanetto, Camila B; Machado, Jéssica L; Cararo, José H; Macan, Tamires P; Streck, Emilio L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Andrade, Vanessa M; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2013-10-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a disease caused by a deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), resulting in an accumulation of phenylalanine (Phe) in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and other tissues of PKU patients. Considering that high levels of Phe are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity in PKU remain poorly understood, the main objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo and in vitro effects of Phe on DNA damage, as determined by the alkaline comet assay. The results showed that, compared to control group, the levels of DNA migration were significantly greater after acute administration of Phe, p-chlorophenylalanine (p-Cl-Phe, an inhibitor of PAH), or a combination thereof in cerebral cortex and blood, indicating DNA damage. These treatments also provoked increase of carbonyl content. Additionally, when Phe or p-Cl-Phe was present in the incubation medium, we observed an increase in the frequency and index of DNA damage in the cerebral cortex and blood, without affecting lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Our in vitro and in vivo findings indicate that DNA damage occurs in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats receiving Phe, suggesting that this mechanism could be, at least in part, responsible for the neurological dysfunction in PKU patients.

  15. Clinical significance of elevated serum A-FABP and free fatty acid in neonates with hypoxic ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Jiang, Lian; Zhang, Huifen; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lianshan

    2016-01-01

    The main function of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) is to regulate fatty acid metabolism as its molecular chaperone. The clinical significance of A-FABP in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) neonates is not yet clear. Free fatty acid (FFA) in cerebral cortex increases along with hypoxia ischemia degree. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether FFA can induce A-FABP expression and elevate the serum A-FABP level in HIBD neonates. In the present study, 42 HIBD neonates were selected including 11 cases as mild, 16 cases as moderate and 15 cases as severe. The serum was collected from peripheral vein at 72 h after the first visit (acute stage) and 7 days after birth (recovery stage), and the serum from 10 normal neonates was used as the control. The serum level of A-FABP and FFA in 42 neonates with acute phase and recovery phase HIBD were detected using ELISA and copper colorimetric method. The overall serum A-FABP content in HIBD neonates at the acute stage was significantly higher compared to the normal neonates (P<0.05). The serum A-FABP level in severe HIBD neonates was significantly higher than that in mild HIBD, moderate HIBD and normal neonates (P<0.05). The serum FFA level in HIBD neonates at the acute stage was 1,521.57±605.63 µmol/l, which was significantly higher than that in the normal neonates 838.24±294.22 µmol/l. The serum FFA levels in mild, moderate and severe HIBD neonates were significantly higher than those in the normal neonates. The overall A-FABP level in HIBD neonates at the recovery stage was significantly lower compared to the acute stage, which was significant in severe HIBD neonates. A-FABP levels in mild and moderate HIBD neonates at recovery stage were decreased compared with the acute stage, although there was no statistical difference. There was a positive correlation between serum A-FABP and FFA in HIBD neonates at acute stage (r=0.369, P<0.05). In conclusion, serum A-FABP and FFA levels were signifcantly increased in

  16. On-Going Temperature Extremes in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordov, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Temperature trends (grows up to 0.5 °C per decade), more frequent occurrence of temperature extremes provoked serious natural disasters (2010 heat waves in Russia, 2013 flood in Russia's Far East) led to socio-economical impact (crop damages, infrastructure failures, respectively). To get reliable knowledge on location, frequency and magnitude of observed extremes we have studied daily max/min temperature trends based on ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis data (0,25°×0,25°). This dataset is most accurately reproduces observed temperature behavior in the region. Statistical analysis of daily temperature time series (1979-2012) indicates the asymmetric changes in distribution tails of such extreme indices as warm/cold days/nights. Namely, the warming during winter cold nights is stronger than during warm nights, especially over the north of Siberia. Increases in minimum temperatures are more significant than in maximum temperatures. Warming determined at the high latitudes of the region is achieved mostly due to winter temperature changes. South area of Siberia has slightly cooling during winter and summer. Results obtained provide regional decision-makers with detailed high spatial and temporal resolution climatic information required for adaptation and mitigation measures development. Calculations presented have been realized using information-computational web-GIS system "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/) which automatically generates the archive of calculated fields ready for multidisciplinary studies of regional climate change impacts. The authors acknowledge partial financial support for this research from the RFBR (13-05-12034, 14-05-00502), SB RAS 131 and VIII.80.2.1.) and grant of the President of RF (№ 181).

  17. Vulnerability of the developing brain to hypoxic-ischemic damage: contribution of the cerebral vasculature to injury and repair?

    PubMed Central

    Baburamani, Ana A.; Ek, C. Joakim; Walker, David W.; Castillo-Melendez, Margie

    2012-01-01

    As clinicians attempt to understand the underlying reasons for the vulnerability of different regions of the developing brain to injury, it is apparent that little is known as to how hypoxia-ischemia may affect the cerebrovasculature in the developing infant. Most of the research investigating the pathogenesis of perinatal brain injury following hypoxia-ischemia has focused on excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and an inflammatory response, with the response of the developing cerebrovasculature receiving less attention. This is surprising as the presentation of devastating and permanent injury such as germinal matrix-intraventricular haemorrhage (GM-IVH) and perinatal stroke are of vascular origin, and the origin of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) may also arise from poor perfusion of the white matter. This highlights that cerebrovasculature injury following hypoxia could primarily be responsible for the injury seen in the brain of many infants diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Interestingly the highly dynamic nature of the cerebral blood vessels in the fetus, and the fluctuations of cerebral blood flow and metabolic demand that occur following hypoxia suggest that the response of blood vessels could explain both regional protection and vulnerability in the developing brain. However, research into how blood vessels respond following hypoxia-ischemia have mostly been conducted in adult models of ischemia or stroke, further highlighting the need to investigate how the developing cerebrovasculature responds and the possible contribution to perinatal brain injury following hypoxia. This review discusses the current concepts on the pathogenesis of perinatal brain injury, the development of the fetal cerebrovasculature and the blood brain barrier (BBB), and key mediators involved with the response of cerebral blood vessels to hypoxia. PMID:23162470

  18. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness.

  19. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  20. Surviving Brain Damage After Assault Wilson Barbara A Dhamapurkar Samira Kashinath and Rose Anita Surviving Brain Damage After Assault 154pp £19.99 Psychology Press/Routledge 9781138824584 1138824585 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This book documents the journey of Gary, a young man who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury in an attack by a gang armed with hammers and baseball bats. Gary spent 19 months with minimal awareness of his surroundings before showing signs of recovery and, after nearly three years of rehabilitation, a return to independence.

  1. Surviving Brain Damage After Assault Wilson Barbara A Dhamapurkar Samira Kashinath and Rose Anita Surviving Brain Damage After Assault 154pp £19.99 Psychology Press/Routledge 9781138824584 1138824585 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This book documents the journey of Gary, a young man who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury in an attack by a gang armed with hammers and baseball bats. Gary spent 19 months with minimal awareness of his surroundings before showing signs of recovery and, after nearly three years of rehabilitation, a return to independence. PMID:27615344

  2. Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

    This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

  3. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  4. Regional Myelin and Axon Damage and Neuroinflammation in the Adult Mouse Brain After Long-Term Postnatal Vanadium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azeez, Idris A; Olopade, Funmilayo; Laperchia, Claudia; Andrioli, Anna; Scambi, Ilaria; Onwuka, Silas K; Bentivoglio, Marina; Olopade, James O

    2016-09-01

    Environmental exposure to vanadium occurs in areas of persistent burning of fossil fuels; this metal is known to induce oxidative stress and oligodendrocyte damage. Here, we determined whether vanadium exposure (3 mg/kg) in mice during the first 3 postnatal months leads to a sustained neuroinflammatory response. Body weight monitoring, and muscle strength and open field tests showed reduction of body weight gain and locomotor impairment in vanadium-exposed mice. Myelin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for astrocytes, microglia, and nonphosphorylated neurofilaments revealed striking regional heterogeneity. Myelin damage involved the midline corpus callosum and fibers in cortical gray matter, hippocampus, and diencephalon that were associated with axonal damage. Astrocyte and microglial activation was identified in the same regions and in the internal capsule; however, no overt myelin and axon damage was observed in the latter. Double immunofluorescence revealed induction of high tumor necrosis factor (TNF) immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. Western blotting analysis showed significant induction of TNF and interleukin-1β expression. Together these findings show that chronic postnatal vanadium exposure leads to functional deficit and region-dependent myelin damage that does not spare axons. This injury is associated with glial cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction, which may reflect both neurotoxic and neuroprotective responses. PMID:27390101

  5. Bisecting or not bisecting: this is the neglect question. Line bisection performance in the diagnosis of neglect in right brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Guariglia, Paola; Matano, Alessandro; Piccardi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we analysed the bisecting behaviour of 287 chronic right brain-damaged patients by taking into account the presence and severity of extrapersonal and/or personal neglect diagnosed with the hemineglect battery. We also analysed right brain-damaged patients who had (or did not have) neglect according to their line bisection performance. Our results showed that performance of the line bisection task correlates with performance of cancellation tasks, reading and perceptual tasks, but not with the presence of personal neglect. Personal neglect seems to be unrelated to line bisection behaviour. Indeed, patients affected by extrapersonal and personal neglect do not show more severe neglect in line bisection than patients with only extrapersonal neglect. Furthermore, we observed that 20.56% of the patients were considered affected or not by neglect on the line bisection task compared with the other spatial tasks of the hemineglect battery. We conclude that using a battery with multiple tests is the only way to guarantee a reliable diagnosis and effectively plan for rehabilitative training. PMID:24937472

  6. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies.

  7. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale "subjective physical and mental performance" and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  8. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  9. Bisecting or not bisecting: this is the neglect question. Line bisection performance in the diagnosis of neglect in right brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Guariglia, Paola; Matano, Alessandro; Piccardi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we analysed the bisecting behaviour of 287 chronic right brain-damaged patients by taking into account the presence and severity of extrapersonal and/or personal neglect diagnosed with the hemineglect battery. We also analysed right brain-damaged patients who had (or did not have) neglect according to their line bisection performance. Our results showed that performance of the line bisection task correlates with performance of cancellation tasks, reading and perceptual tasks, but not with the presence of personal neglect. Personal neglect seems to be unrelated to line bisection behaviour. Indeed, patients affected by extrapersonal and personal neglect do not show more severe neglect in line bisection than patients with only extrapersonal neglect. Furthermore, we observed that 20.56% of the patients were considered affected or not by neglect on the line bisection task compared with the other spatial tasks of the hemineglect battery. We conclude that using a battery with multiple tests is the only way to guarantee a reliable diagnosis and effectively plan for rehabilitative training.

  10. Bisecting or Not Bisecting: This Is the Neglect Question. Line Bisection Performance in the Diagnosis of Neglect in Right Brain-Damaged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guariglia, Paola; Matano, Alessandro; Piccardi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we analysed the bisecting behaviour of 287 chronic right brain-damaged patients by taking into account the presence and severity of extrapersonal and/or personal neglect diagnosed with the hemineglect battery. We also analysed right brain-damaged patients who had (or did not have) neglect according to their line bisection performance. Our results showed that performance of the line bisection task correlates with performance of cancellation tasks, reading and perceptual tasks, but not with the presence of personal neglect. Personal neglect seems to be unrelated to line bisection behaviour. Indeed, patients affected by extrapersonal and personal neglect do not show more severe neglect in line bisection than patients with only extrapersonal neglect. Furthermore, we observed that 20.56% of the patients were considered affected or not by neglect on the line bisection task compared with the other spatial tasks of the hemineglect battery. We conclude that using a battery with multiple tests is the only way to guarantee a reliable diagnosis and effectively plan for rehabilitative training. PMID:24937472

  11. Topiramate Treatment Protects Blood-Brain Barrier Pericytes from Hyperglycemia-Induced Oxidative Damage in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Price, Tulin O.; Eranki, Vijay; Banks, William A.; Ercal, Nuran

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus causes cerebral microvasculature deterioration and cognitive decline. The specialized endothelial cells of cerebral microvasculature comprise the blood-brain barrier, and the pericytes (PC) that are in immediate contact with these endothelial cells are vital for blood-brain barrier integrity. In diabetes, increased mitochondrial oxidative stress is implicated as a mechanism for hyperglycemia-induced PC loss as a prerequisite leading to blood-brain barrier disruption. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases (CA) regulate the oxidative metabolism of glucose and thus play an important role in the generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. We hypothesize that the inhibition of mitochondrial CA would reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress, rescue cerebral PC loss caused by diabetes-induced oxidative stress, and preserve blood-brain barrier integrity. We studied the effects of pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial CA activity on streptozotocin-diabetes-induced oxidative stress and PC loss in the mouse brain. At 3 wk of diabetes, there was significant oxidative stress; the levels of reduced glutathione were lower and those of 3-nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal, and superoxide dismutase were higher. Treatment of diabetic mice with topiramate, a potent mitochondrial CA inhibitor, prevented the oxidative stress caused by 3 wk of diabetes. A significant decline in cerebral PC numbers, at 12 wk of diabetes, was also rescued by topiramate treatment. These results provide the first evidence that inhibition of mitochondrial CA activity reduces diabetes-induced oxidative stress in the mouse brain and rescues cerebral PC dropout. Thus, mitochondrial CA may provide a new therapeutic target for oxidative stress related illnesses of the central nervous system. PMID:22109883

  12. Protective effect of green tea on lead-induced oxidative damage in rat's blood and brain tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Enas A; Meki, Abdel-Raheim M A; Abd El-Mottaleb, Nashwa A

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that lead (Pb) could disrupt tissue prooxidant/antioxidant balance which lead to physiological dysfunction. Natural antioxidants are particularly useful in such situation. Current study was designed to investigate efficacy of green tea extract (GTE), on oxidative status in brain tissue and blood caused by chronic oral Pb administration in rats. Four groups of adult male rats (each 15 rats) were utilized: control group; GTE-group (oral 1.5% w/v GTE for 6 weeks); Pb-group (oral 0.4% lead acetate for 6 weeks), and Pb+GTE-group (1.5% GTE and 0.4% lead acetate for 6 weeks). Levels of prooxidant/antioxidant parameters [lipid peroxides (LPO), nitric oxides (NO), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD)] in plasma, erythrocytes, and brain tissue homogenate were measured using colorimetric methods. Pb concentrations in whole blood and brain tissue homogenate were measured by atomic absorption. In Pb-group, levels of LPO were higher while NO and GSH were lower in plasma, erythrocytes, and brain tissue than controls. TAC in plasma, SOD in erythrocytes, and GST in brain tissue homogenate were lower in Pb-group versus control. GTE co-administrated with Pb-reduced Pb contents, increased antioxidant status than Pb-group. In erythrocytes, Pb correlated positively with LPO and negatively with NO, GSH, SOD, and Hb. In brain tissue homogenate, Pb correlated positively with LPO and negatively with GSH. This study suggests that lead induce toxicity by interfering balance between prooxidant/antioxidant. Treatment of rats with GTE combined with Pb enhances antioxidant/ detoxification system which reduced oxidative stress. These observations suggest that GTE is a potential complementary agent in treatment of chronic lead intoxication.

  13. Reversible lesions in the brain parenchyma in Wilson's disease confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging: earlier administration of chelating therapy can reduce the damage to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kozić, Duško B.; Petrović, Igor; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Ragaji, Aleksandar; Kostić, Vladimir S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resolution of brain lesions in patients with Wilson's disease during the long-term chelating therapy using magnetic resonance imaging and a possible significance of the time latency between the initial symptoms of the disease and the introduction of this therapy. Initial magnetic resonance examination was performed in 37 patients with proven neurological form of Wilson's disease with cerebellar, parkinsonian and dystonic presentation. Magnetic resonance reexamination was done 5.7 ± 1.3 years later in 14 patients. Patients were divided into: group A, where chelating therapy was initiated < 24 months from the first symptoms and group B, where the therapy started ≥ 24 months after the initial symptoms. Symmetry of the lesions was seen in 100% of patients. There was a significant difference between groups A and B regarding complete resolution of brain stem and putaminal lesions (P = 0.005 and P = 0.024, respectively). If the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are not established less than 24 months after onset of the symptoms, irreversible lesions in the brain parenchyma could be expected. Signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging might therefore, at least in the early stages, represent reversible myelinolisis or cytotoxic edema associated with copper toxicity. PMID:25558242

  14. Reversible lesions in the brain parenchyma in Wilson's disease confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging: earlier administration of chelating therapy can reduce the damage to the brain.

    PubMed

    Kozić, Duško B; Petrović, Igor; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Ragaji, Aleksandar; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resolution of brain lesions in patients with Wilson's disease during the long-term chelating therapy using magnetic resonance imaging and a possible significance of the time latency between the initial symptoms of the disease and the introduction of this therapy. Initial magnetic resonance examination was performed in 37 patients with proven neurological form of Wilson's disease with cerebellar, parkinsonian and dystonic presentation. Magnetic resonance reexamination was done 5.7 ± 1.3 years later in 14 patients. Patients were divided into: group A, where chelating therapy was initiated < 24 months from the first symptoms and group B, where the therapy started ≥ 24 months after the initial symptoms. Symmetry of the lesions was seen in 100% of patients. There was a significant difference between groups A and B regarding complete resolution of brain stem and putaminal lesions (P = 0.005 and P = 0.024, respectively). If the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are not established less than 24 months after onset of the symptoms, irreversible lesions in the brain parenchyma could be expected. Signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging might therefore, at least in the early stages, represent reversible myelinolisis or cytotoxic edema associated with copper toxicity.

  15. Studies on Auditory and Vestibular End Organs and Brain Stem Nuclei. [inner ear damage and hearing defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cats were exposed to tones of 125, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz at sound pressure levels in the range 120 to 157.5 db, and for durations of one hour (1000, 2000, 4000 Hz) or four hours (125 Hz). Pure tone audiograms were obtained for each animal before and after exposure. Cochleas of animals were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Extent of inner ear damage and range of frequencies for which hearing loss occurred increased as exposure tone was decreased in frequency. For example, exposure to 4000 Hz produced damage in a restricted region of the cochlea and hearing loss for a relatively narrow range of frequencies; exposure to 125 Hz produced wide-spread inner ear damage and hearing loss throughout the frequency range 125 to 6000 Hz.

  16. The effects of tamoxifen on spatial and nonspatial learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and the brain tissues oxidative damage in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Sareh; Hejazian, Seyed Hassan; Alikhani, Vajiheh; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modulatory effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on the central nervous system have been reported. The effects of TAM on spatial and nonspatial learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and the brain tissues oxidative damage was investigated. Materials and Methods: The ovariectomized (OVX) rats were divided and treated: (1) Control (saline), (2) scopolamine (Sco; 2 mg/kg, 30 min before behavioral tests), (3–5) Sco-TAM 1, Sco-TAM 3 and Sco-TAM 10. TAM (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg; i.p.) was daily administered for 6 weeks. Results: In Morris water maze (MWM), both the latency and traveled distance in the Sco-group were higher than control (P < 0.001) while, in the Sco-TAM 10 group it was lower than Sco-group (P < 0.05). In passive avoidance test, the latency to enter the dark compartment was higher than control (P < 0.05 – P < 0.01). Pretreatment by all three doses of TAM prolonged the latency to enter the dark compartment compared to Sco-group (P < 0.05 – P < 0.001). The brain tissues malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration was increased while, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) decreased in the Sco-group compared to control (P < 0.05 – P < 0.01). Pretreatment by TAM lowered the concentration of MDA while, increased SOD compared to Sco-group (P < 0.05 – P < 0.001). Conclusions: It is suggested that TAM prevents spatial and nonspatial learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine in OVX rats. The possible mechanism(s) might at least in part be due to protection against the brain tissues oxidative damage. PMID:26601084

  17. Ameliorating reactive oxygen species-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation in brain, liver, mitochondria and DNA damage by Zingiber officinale Roscoe.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A

    2010-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for a number of cellular activities. However, excess cellular iron can be toxic by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion (O(2) (-)) and hydroxyl radical (HO(·)) that damage proteins, lipids and DNA. Mutagenic and genotoxic end products of lipid peroxidation can induce the decline of mitochondrial respiration and are associated with various human ailments including aging, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer etc. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) is a widely used spice around the world. The protective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against ROS-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation and DNA damage was evaluated in this study. The lipid peroxidation was induced by hydroxyl radical generated from Fenton's reaction in rat liver and brain homogenates and mitochondrial fraction (isolated from rat liver). The DNA protection was evaluated using H(2)O(2)-induced changes in pBR-322 plasmid and Fenton reaction-induced DNA fragmentation in rat liver. The results indicated that Z. officinale significantly (P<0.001) protected the lipid peroxidation in all the tissue homogenate/mitochondria. The extract at 2 and 0.5 mg/ml could protect 92 % of the lipid peroxidation in brain homogenate and liver mitochondria respectively. The percent inhibition of lipid peroxidation at 1mg/ml of Z. officinale in the liver homogenate was 94 %. However, the extract could partially alleviate the DNA damage. The protective mechanism can be correlated to the radical scavenging property of Z. officinale. The results of the study suggest the possible nutraceutical role of Z. officinale against the oxidative stress induced human ailments. PMID:23105887

  18. Exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields activates the mkp-1/ERK pathway and causes blood-brain barrier damage and cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Liming; Chen, Qianwei; Tan, Liang; Zuo, Shilun; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang

    2015-03-19

    With the rapid increase in the number of mobile phone users, the potential adverse effects of the electromagnetic field radiation emitted by a mobile phone has become a serious concern. This study demonstrated, for the first time, the blood-brain barrier and cognitive changes in rats exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) and aims to elucidate the potential molecular pathway underlying these changes. A total of 108 male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a 900 MHz, 1 mW/cm(2) EMF or sham (unexposed) for 14 or 28 days (3h per day). The specific energy absorption rate (SAR) varied between 0.016 (whole body) and 2 W/kg (locally in the head). In addition, the Morris water maze test was used to examine spatial memory performance determination. Morphological changes were investigated by examining ultrastructural changes in the hippocampus and cortex, and the Evans Blue assay was used to assess blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Immunostaining was performed to identify heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-positive neurons and albumin extravasation detection. Western blot was used to determine HO-1 expression, phosphorylated ERK expression and the upstream mediator, mkp-1 expression. We found that the frequency of crossing platforms and the percentage of time spent in the target quadrant were lower in rats exposed to EMF for 28 days than in rats exposed to EMF for 14 days and unexposed rats. Moreover, 28 days of EMF exposure induced cellular edema and neuronal cell organelle degeneration in the rat. In addition, damaged BBB permeability, which resulted in albumin and HO-1 extravasation were observed in the hippocampus and cortex. Thus, for the first time, we found that EMF exposure for 28 days induced the expression of mkp-1, resulting in ERK dephosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that exposure to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 28 days can significantly impair spatial memory and damage BBB permeability in rat by activating the mkp-1/ERK pathway.

  19. Intranasal guanosine administration presents a wide therapeutic time window to reduce brain damage induced by permanent ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Denise Barbosa; Muller, Gabriel Cardozo; Rocha, Guilherme Botter Maio; Dellavia, Gustavo Hirata; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Hansel, Gisele; Horn, Ângelo Cássio Magalhães; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In addition to its intracellular roles, the nucleoside guanosine (GUO) also has extracellular effects that identify it as a putative neuromodulator signaling molecule in the central nervous system. Indeed, GUO can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, and it can promote neuroprotective effects in animal models involving glutamate neurotoxicity, which is the case in brain ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to investigate a new in vivo GUO administration route (intranasal, IN) to determine putative improvement of GUO neuroprotective effects against an experimental model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Initially, we demonstrated that IN [(3)H] GUO administration reached the brain in a dose-dependent and saturable pattern in as few as 5 min, presenting a higher cerebrospinal GUO level compared with systemic administration. IN GUO treatment started immediately or even 3 h after ischemia onset prevented behavior impairment. The behavior recovery was not correlated to decreased brain infarct volume, but it was correlated to reduced mitochondrial dysfunction in the penumbra area. Therefore, we showed that the IN route is an efficient way to promptly deliver GUO to the CNS and that IN GUO treatment prevented behavioral and brain impairment caused by ischemia in a therapeutically wide time window.

  20. Umbilical cord serum creatine kinase BB in the diagnosis of brain damage in the newborn: problems in interpretation.

    PubMed Central

    Kumpel, B; Wood, S M; Anthony, P P; Brimblecombe, F S

    1983-01-01

    Raised values of creatine kinase BB (CKBB) in umbilical cord serum were obtained with some normal babies and those with fetal distress. Further investigation showed that the umbilical artery and vein tissue contain high CKBB activity, indicating that some cord blood samples may not solely reflect CKBB liberated from the brain. PMID:6859922

  1. Body Knowledge in Brain-Damaged Children: A Double-Dissociation in Self and Other's Body Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Fiori, Simona; D'Angelo, Valentina; Magnani, Barbara; Guzzetta, Andrea; Brizzolara, Daniela; Cioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Bodies are important element for self-recognition. In this respect, in adults it has been recently shown a self vs other advantage when small parts of the subjects' body are visible. This advantage is lost following a right brain lesion underlying a role of the right hemisphere in self body-parts processing. In order to investigate the bodily-self…

  2. Visual Field Function in School-Aged Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Related to Different Patterns of Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Lena; Rydberg, Agneta; Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Kits, Annika; Flodmark, Olof

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To relate visual field function to brain morphology in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Visual field function was assessed using the confrontation technique and Goldmann perimetry in 29 children (15 males, 14 females; age range 7-17y, median age 11y) with unilateral CP classified at Gross Motor Function Classification…

  3. The Cycad Genotoxin MAM Modulates Brain Cellular Pathways Involved in Neurodegenerative Disease and Cancer in a DNA Damage-Linked Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bammler, Theodor K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Churchwell, Mona; Doerge, Daniel R.; Meira, Lisiane B.; Palmer, Valerie S.; Ramos-Crawford, Ana-Luiza; Ren, Xuefeng; Sullivan, Robert C.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Samson, Leona D.; Zarbl, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Methylazoxymethanol (MAM), the genotoxic metabolite of the cycad azoxyglucoside cycasin, induces genetic alterations in bacteria, yeast, plants, insects and mammalian cells, but adult nerve cells are thought to be unaffected. We show that the brains of adult C57BL6 wild-type mice treated with a single systemic dose of MAM acetate display DNA damage (O6-methyldeoxyguanosine lesions, O6-mG) that remains constant up to 7 days post-treatment. By contrast, MAM-treated mice lacking a functional gene encoding the DNA repair enzyme O6-mG DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) showed elevated O6-mG DNA damage starting at 48 hours post-treatment. The DNA damage was linked to changes in the expression of genes in cell-signaling pathways associated with cancer, human neurodegenerative disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These data are consistent with the established developmental neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of MAM in rodents. They also support the hypothesis that early-life exposure to MAM-glucoside (cycasin) has an etiological association with a declining, prototypical neurodegenerative disease seen in Guam, Japan, and New Guinea populations that formerly used the neurotoxic cycad plant for food or medicine, or both. These findings suggest environmental genotoxins, specifically MAM, target common pathways involved in neurodegeneration and cancer, the outcome depending on whether the cell can divide (cancer) or not (neurodegeneration). Exposure to MAM-related environmental genotoxins may have relevance to the etiology of related tauopathies, notably, Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21731631

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  5. Neural Substrates of Linguistic Prosody: Evidence from Syntactic Disambiguation in the Productions of Brain-Damaged Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Amee P.; Baum, Shari R.; Dwivedi, Veena D.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation focussed on the neural substrates underlying linguistic distinctions that are signalled by prosodic cues. A production experiment was conducted to examine the ability of left- (LHD) and right- (RHD) hemisphere-damaged patients and normal controls to use temporal and fundamental frequency cues to disambiguate sentences…

  6. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception

    PubMed Central

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22–40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency. PMID:26106164

  7. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception.

    PubMed

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22-40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency. PMID:26106164

  8. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception.

    PubMed

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22-40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency.

  9. Neuronal damage and functional deficits are ameliorated by inhibition of aquaporin and HIF1α after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Shenaq, Mohammed; Kassem, Hassan; Peng, Changya; Schafer, Steven; Ding, Jamie Y; Fredrickson, Vance; Guthikonda, Murali; Kreipke, Christian W; Rafols, José A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2012-12-15

    The present study, using a rodent model of closed-head diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI), investigated the role of dysregulated aquaporins (AQP) 4 and 9, as well as hypoxia inducible factor -1α(HIF-1α) on brain edema formation, neuronal injury, and functional deficits. TBI was induced in adult (400-425 g), male Sprague-Dawley rats using a modified Marmarou's head impact-acceleration device (450 g weight dropped from 2m height). Animals in each treatment group were administered intravenous anti-AQP4 or -AQP9 antibodies or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, an inhibitor of HIF-1α) 30 min after injury. At 24h post-TBI, animals (n=6 each group) were sacrificed to examine the extent of brain edema by water content, as well as protein expression of AQP and HIF-1α by Western immune-blotting. At 48-hours post-TBI, neuronal injury (n=8 each group) was assessed by FluoroJade (FJ) histochemistry. Spatial learning and memory deficits were evaluated by radial arm maze (n=8 each group) up to 21 days post-TBI. Compared to non-injured controls, significant (p<0.05) increases in the expression of AQP4 and -9 were detected in the brains of injured animals. In addition, significant (p<0.05) brain edema after TBI was associated with increases (p <0.05) both in neuronal injury (FJ labeling) and neurobehavioral deficits. Selective inhibition of either AQP4 or -9, or HIF-1α significantly (p<0.05) decreased the expression of the proteins. In addition, inhibition of the AQPs and HIF-1α significantly (p<0.05) ameliorated brain edema, as well as the number of injured neurons in cortical layers II/III and V/VI, striatum and hippocampal regions CA1/CA3. Finally, compared to the non-treated TBI animals, AQP or HIF-1α inhibition significantly (p<0.01) improved neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI. Taken together, the present data supports a causal relation between HIF-AQP mediated cerebral edema, secondary neuronal injury, and tertiary behavioral deficits post-TBI. The data further suggests that

  10. Consecutive light microscopy, scanning-transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of traumatic human brain oedema and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Castejon, O J; Castejon, H V; Diaz, M; Castellano, A

    2001-10-01

    Cortical biopsies of 11 patients with traumatic brain oedema were consecutively studied by light microscopy (LM) using thick plastic sections, scanning-transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using semithin plastic sections and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using ultrathin sections. Samples were glutaraldehyde-osmium fixed and embedded in Araldite or Epon. Thick sections were stained with toluidine-blue for light microscopy. Semithin sections were examined unstained and uncoated for (S)TEM. Ultrathin sections were stained with uranyl and lead. Perivascular haemorrhages and perivascular extravasation of proteinaceous oedema fluid were observed in both moderate and severe oedema. Ischaemic pyramidal and non-pyramidal nerve cells appeared shrunken, electron dense and with enlargement of intracytoplasmic membrane compartment. Notably swollen astrocytes were observed in all samples examined. Glycogen-rich and glycogen-depleted astrocytes were identified in anoxic-ischaemic regions. Dark and hydropic satellite, interfascicular and perivascular oligodendrocytes were also found. The status spongiosus of severely oedematous brain parenchyma observed by LM and (S)TEM was correlated with the enlarged extracellular space and disrupted neuropil observed by TEM. The (S)TEM is recommended as a suitable technique for studying pathological processes in the central nervous system and as an informative adjunct to LM and TEM.

  11. Long-term neuronal damage and recovery after a single dose of MDMA: expression and distribution of serotonin transporter in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kirilly, Eszter

    2010-09-01

    "Ecstasy", 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), an amphetamine analogue is one of the most widely used recreational drugs. In spite of the fact that neurotoxic effects of MDMA has been found in several species from rodents to non-human primates, and results increasingly point to damage also in human MD