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Sample records for ongoing pharmacological treatment

  1. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leucht, S; Heres, S; Kissling, W; Davis, J M

    2013-05-01

    We present the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia based on a simple algorithm that starts with the most important decisions starting from the choice of an antipsychotic drug for an acutely ill patient and ends with maintenance treatment. It represents experts opinions, a formal guideline development process was not followed. Concerning acute treatment we present recommendations for the choice of drug in acutely patients, the treatment of agitated patients, persistent depression, negative symptoms and treatment resistance. Concerning maintenance treatment with antipsychotics we discuss indication, choice of drug, continuous versus intermittent treatment, duration of relapse prevention and dose.

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of paraphilias.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Alessandra Almeida; Garcia, Frederico Duarte; Garcia, Heloise Delavenne; Bradford, John M W; Thibaut, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of paraphilias remains a challenge in the mental health field. Combined pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with better efficacy. The gold standard treatment of severe paraphilias in adult males is antiandrogen treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been used in mild types of paraphilia and in cases of sexual compulsions and juvenile paraphilias. Antiandrogen treatments seem to be effective in severe paraphilic subjects committing sexual offenses. In particular, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs have shown high efficacy working in a similar way to physical castration but being reversible at any time. Treatment recommendations, side effects, and contraindications are discussed.

  3. [Pharmacological treatment of hyperinflation].

    PubMed

    Devillier, P; Roche, N

    2009-06-01

    Introduction Lung hyperinflation leads to breathlessness, limitation in exercise capacity and tolerance, and impaired quality of life. Thus, it is important to target this key and characteristic feature of COPD. Current knowledge Available pharmacological approaches rely mainly on bronchodilators, in particular beta2 agonists and anticholinergic agents. These treatments act through the reduction of expiratory airflow limitation. However, changes in classical indices of airflow obstruction do not accurately predict effects on hyperinflation and symptoms. The decrease in operating lung volumes (as reflected by inspiratory capacity or functional residual capacity) at rest and during exercise is one of the mechanisms by which these treatments improve quality of life and maybe also decrease the impact of exacerbations. The effect of beta2 agonists on hyperinflation might be amplified by concurrent treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Perspectives The effect of new treatments targeting airways inflammation on hyperinflation remains to be explored. Conclusions Measuring the reduction in the degree of lung hyperinflation allows a better understanding of the symptomatic effect of COPD pharmacological treatments.

  4. [Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Decades of practice in psychiatriy and hundreds of clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of antipsychotics on symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, the knowledge acquired from non-interventional studies have supplemented the information needed in daily practice by raising the issue of efficiency by incorporating not only the effectiveness and safety of treatment but also its acceptability by the patient. Adherence to antipsychotic treatment has become the key issue of the prognosis. The pharmacological management of patients with an acute episode of schizophrenia requires rapid therapeutic decisions to treat a patient who is likely to be sometimes unhelpful and agitated. The choice of treatment will have a significant impact on the prevention of psychotic relapses, on the overall prognosis and on the quality of life of the patient. In many countries of the recommendations and treatment algorithms for the management of acute psychosis were distributed, considering factors specific to the patient and his environment, his mental characteristics and local care setting.

  5. Pharmacologic treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Anton, Raymond F; Schacht, Joseph P; Book, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Progress in understanding the neuroscience of addiction has significantly advanced the development of more efficacious medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUD). While several medications have been approved by regulatory bodies around the world for the treatment of AUD, they are not universally efficacious. Recent research has yielded improved understanding of the genetics and brain circuits that underlie alcohol reward and its habitual use. This research has contributed to pharmacogenetic studies of medication response, and will ultimately lead to a more "personalized medicine" approach to AUD pharmacotherapy. This chapter summarizes work on clinically available medications (both approved by regulatory bodies and investigational) for the treatment of alcohol dependence, as well as the psychiatric disorders that are commonly comorbid with AUD. Studies that have evaluated genetic influences on medication response and those that have employed neuroimaging to probe mechanisms of medication action or response are highlighted. Finally, new targets discovered in animal models for possible pharmacologic intervention in humans are overviewed and future directions in medications development provided.

  6. Pharmacological Treatment of Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Lie, Janette D; Tu, Kristie N; Shen, Diana D; Wong, Bonnie M

    2015-11-01

    Up to 70 million U.S. adults have chronic sleep and wakefulness disorders. Therapies may include prescription medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration, off-label treatments, over-the-counter drugs, and herbal therapies.

  7. Pharmacological Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, RM; Vieira, CS; Ferriani, RA; Candido-dos-Reis, FJ; Brito, LGO

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are common, benign gynecologic tumors, affecting one in three to four women, with estimates of up to 80%, depending on the population studied. Their etiology is not well established, but it is under the influence of several risk factors, such as early menarche, nulliparity and family history. More than 50% of affected women are asymptomatic, but the lesions may be related to bothersome symptoms, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and bloating or urinary symptoms. The treatment of UF is classically surgical; however, various medical options are available, providing symptom control while minimizing risks and complications. A large number of clinical trials have evaluated commonly used medical treatments and potentially effective new ones. Through a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus and Google Scholar databases, through which we included 41 studies out of 7658 results, we thoroughly explored the different pharmacological options available for management of UF, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25364587

  8. Preventive pharmacological treatment --an evolving new concept in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sabbag, Rony; Levin, Raz; Edelman, Shany; Heresco-Levy, Uriel

    2011-01-01

    Treatment for schizophrenia remains one of the major challenges of modern medicine. The development of innovative pharmacological approaches for this disorder can potentially alleviate tremendous human suffering and revolutionize mental health delivery systems. While current treatment guidelines for schizophrenia refer to the post-psychosis onset phase of illness, presently there is a strong resurgent interest in secondary prevention intervention applied during schizophrenia prodrome. This development stems largely from the recognition that neurobiological deficit processes associated with schizophrenia severity and chronicity are already active by the time clinical onset is recognized. Proposed preventive treatments include presently used medications and experimental compounds that hypothetically may influence ongoing pathophysiological processes earlier in their development. The future establishment of the early recognition and intervention concept in schizophrenia is critically dependent on the outcome of ongoing research assessing the feasibility of prodrome diagnosis, the efficacy of specific medications and the alleviation of the risks associated with early pharmacological treatment.

  9. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25895634

  10. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  11. [Pharmacologic treatment of Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    Asperger syndrome is associated with various dysfunctional and problematic behaviors, in addition to the core features of communication and social skills dysfunction that define these conditions. Although there is currently no pharmacologic cure for the core features of Asperger syndrome. This article discusses the various medications for the behavioral symptoms of Asperger syndrome, which include hyperactivity, aggression, tantrums, self-injury, depression, obsession and so on. Methylphenidate, SSRIs, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizer were introduced.

  12. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, John A.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26201606

  13. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  14. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  15. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil I; Garner, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in community and clinical settings. The individual and societal burden associated with GAD is substantial, but many of those who could benefit from treatment are not recognized or treated. Recent evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of patients with GAD have recommended initial treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), on the basis of their proven efficacy and reasonable tolerability in randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, there is much room for improvement in both the efficacy and the tolerability of treatment. Response rates to first-line treatment can be disappointing and it is hard to predict reliably which patients will respond well and which will have only a limited treatment response. Many patients worry about becoming dependent on medication, a substantial proportion experience troublesome adverse effects, and these problems limit the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in clinical practice. The relative lack of longitudinal studies of clinical outcomes in GAD, and the small number of placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies lead to uncertainty about the optimal duration of treatment after a satisfactory initial response. There have been few investigations of the further management of patients who have not responded to first-line treatment and there is a pressing need for further augmentation studies in patients who have not responded to an SSRI or SNRI, or to other initial pharmacological approaches. Future treatment guidelines for GAD will be influenced by emerging data for established and novel pharmacological approaches, and possibly through the more accurate identification of certain patient subgroups who are likely to respond preferentially to particular interventions.

  16. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  17. Inflammation and Pharmacological Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer. PMID:24288441

  18. Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Substance use disorders represent a serious public health and social issue worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the addictive processes have led to the development of a growing number of pharmacological agents to treat addictions. Despite this progress, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for cocaine, methamphetamine and cannabis addiction. Moving treatment development to the next stage will require novel ways of approaching substance use disorders. One such novel approach is to target individual vulnerabilities, such as cognitive function, sex differences and psychiatric comorbidities. This review provides a summary of promising pharmacotherapies for alcohol, opiate, stimulant and nicotine addictions. Many medications that target positive and negative reinforcement of drugs, as well as individual vulnerabilities to addiction, are in different phases of development. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of these medications for substance use disorder are warranted. PMID:23039267

  19. Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    Substance use disorders represent a serious public health and social issue worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the addictive processes have led to the development of a growing number of pharmacological agents to treat addictions. Despite this progress, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for cocaine, methamphetamine and cannabis addiction. Moving treatment development to the next stage will require novel ways of approaching substance use disorders. One such novel approach is to target individual vulnerabilities, such as cognitive function, sex differences and psychiatric comorbidities. This review provides a summary of promising pharmacotherapies for alcohol, opiate, stimulant and nicotine addictions. Many medications that target positive and negative reinforcement of drugs, as well as individual vulnerabilities to addiction, are in different phases of development. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of these medications for substance use disorder are warranted.

  20. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  1. [Pharmacological treatment of vascular cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    Vascular dementia is second most common cause of dementia. The paper highlights the most important trends in pharmacological treatment of vascular dementia. Result of a clinical trial of some agents appears to be promising. Pentoxifyline appears to be useful in multi-infarct vascular dementia. Nimodipine produced improvement in subcortical dementia. Some other agents like ginkgo biloba, acetylocholinesterase inhibitors, memantine and other also have shown mild benefit or at least were associated with some stabilization of dementia. PMID:16969897

  2. Pharmacologic Strategies for Treatment of Poisonings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eric; Gooch, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the United States. Data suggest that nonmedical use of pharmaceuticals is increasing, along with a proportional increase in subsequent adverse events. The widespread use of illegal drugs contributes to the challenge, because these drugs may produce a wide array of clinical presentations that warrant time-critical recognition and treatment. Common legal and illegal poisonings highlighting clinical presentations in terms of toxidromes as a means of categorically recognizing these emergencies is the focus of this article. To optimize outcomes for situations such as these, pharmacologic considerations are discussed and explored. PMID:26897424

  3. Pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects up to 2.5% of the population of the course of a lifetime and produces substantial morbidity. Approximately 70% of patients can experience significant symptomatic relief with appropriate pharmacotherapy. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main stay of pharmacological treatment. These are typically used at higher doses and for longer periods than in depression. Remission is, unfortunately, uncommon. Proven second-line treatments include the tricyclic clomipramine and the addition of low-dose neuroleptic medications. Other augmentation strategies have been explored for patients refractory to proven interventions, but they are not as of yet robustly supported by controlled studies. The combination of medication with psychotherapy is often used, though careful studies have not documented synergistic benefit in adult patients. OCD refractory to available treatments remains a profound clinical challenge. PMID:25150568

  4. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: current treatments and future directions.

    PubMed

    Farach, Frank J; Pruitt, Larry D; Jun, Janie J; Jerud, Alissa B; Zoellner, Lori A; Roy-Byrne, Peter P

    2012-12-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments:the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use.

  5. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: Current treatments and future directions✩

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Frank J.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Jun, Janie J.; Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments: the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23023162

  6. [Pharmacological treatment of the premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Jurado López, A R

    2014-07-01

    Biomedical approach to premature ejaculation (PE) has permited a better phisiopatologycal knowledge and so the use of pharmacological agents for the treatment of this sexual dysfuncion. Most of the studies to evaluate the eficacy of these drugs were not carried at all the parameters which actually define PE: intravaginal ejaculatory latencie time (IELT) tested with watch, ejaculation control self perception cuantification (questionaries) and cuantification of generated consequences in patient and partner, if it existes. For this reason, it is difficult to analyse the scientific evidence and we use medicines with no approved indication for PE ("off label"). This text is a review of pharmacologycal agents with no approved indication (PDE type 5 inhibitors, α-blockers, tramadol, SSRI, clomipramine), and pharmacologycal agents developed to be used in the treatment of PE and having got indication in this sexual dysfunction or "on label" drugs (topic anesthesics, dapoxetine).

  7. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Bell, James

    2014-02-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been 'programmatic', with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some 'nonresponders' and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy.

  8. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James

    2014-01-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been ‘programmatic’, with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some ‘nonresponders’ and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy. PMID:23210630

  9. Pharmacologic therapies aid treatment for autism.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ronald L; Aman, Michael G

    2003-10-01

    In the absence of other guidelines, practitioners often prescribe by analogy with roles of psychotropic medicines in other psychiatric disorders (e.g., the ability of serotonergic antidepressants to reduce compulsive behavior). There is a slow but steady accumulation of data supporting the use of psychotropic medications to manage certain symptoms in children with autism. These data support the use of stimulant medications for attention/hyperactivity symptoms, with willingness to suspend such treatment if a trial is unsuccessful. Risperidone is supported for other disruptive behaviors, especially of an irritable/disruptive nature, but with attention to increases in appetite and weight. SSRIs and atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for a variety of perseverative behaviors, although one would seldom prescribe antipsychotic medication for mild perseverative behavior alone. SSRIs may be useful for anxiety. Again, there is no compelling evidence that existing pharmacologic treatments have a major role in treating the core symptoms of autism, especially the profound impairments in social interaction and communication. Further well-designed double-blind studies with significant numbers of subjects and defined target symptoms will provide the data that will guide therapeutic decisions in the future.

  10. Past and Present Progress in the Pharmacologic Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kane, John M.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite treatment advances over the past decades, schizophrenia remains one of the most severe psychiatric disorders that is associated with a chronic relapsing course and marked functional impairment in a substantial proportion of patients. Methods A historical overview of the pharmacologic advances in the treatment of schizophrenia over the past 50 years is presented. This is followed by a review of the current developments in optimizing the treatment and outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Methodological challenges, potential solutions, and areas of particular need for further research are highlighted. Results Although treatment goals of response, remission and recovery have been defined more uniformly, a good “effectiveness” measure mapping onto functional outcomes is still lacking. Moreover, the field has to advance in transferring measurement based approaches from research to clinical practice. There is an ongoing debate whether and which first- or second-generation antipsychotics should be used. However, especially, when considering individual adverse effect profiles, the differentiation into first- and second-generation antipsychotics as unified classes can not be upheld and a more differentiated view and treatment selection is required. The desired, individualized treatment approach needs to consider current symptoms, comorbid conditions, past therapeutic response and adverse effects, as well as patient choice and expectations. Acute and long-term goals and effects of medication treatment need to be balanced. To date, clozapine is the only evidence based treatment for refractory patients, and the role of antipsychotic polypharmacy and other augmentation strategies remains unclear, at best. Conclusions To discover novel treatments with enhanced/broader efficacy and improved tolerability, and to enable personalized treatment, the mechanisms underlying illness development and progression, symptomatic improvement and side effect development

  11. Pharmacological Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, G. Scott; Ryan, Neal D.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that studies examining efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments of depressive and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are relatively rare; that current clinical practice bases pharmacological treatment decisions on few existing studies, open clinical data on children and adolescents, and extrapolation from adult…

  12. [Pharmacologic treatment of fibromyalgia: Towards chemical neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Collado, Antonio; Conesa, Arantxa

    2009-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pathology and its main symptom is pain which usually does not respond to traditional analgesia. Its clinical characteristics and the diverse neurophysiologic findings in these patients point to a central sensitization process of the nociceptive system as the central physiopathologic axis in this disease. The knowledge of the nociceptive system functioning and its behavior in this disease has led, in the past few years, to new possibilities for the therapeutic approach. In that way, drugs with a differential mechanism of action, allowing a modulation of the nociceptive system capable of producing analgesia where other medications have failed are being developed. Different drugs with the capacity increasing the activity of biologically active amines implicated in the nociceptive inhibition process and others which are destined to reduce the excitability of the system through ion channels, are being tested with some benefit in Fibromyalgia patients and may constitute a more rational neuromodulating drug profile for this disease. This article reviews the different pharmacological strategies supported by scientific evidence and points to some future research lines that fortifies the therapeutic change taking place in the treatment approach of these patients.

  13. [Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension: current situation].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J

    2012-11-01

    A permanent and successful treatment of high blood pressure is based on a combination of non-pharmacological treatment measures and pharmacological therapy. The most proven non-pharmacological measures are physical and sports activities, weight reduction, dietary adaption and reduction of salt intake as well as nicotine abstinence and moderate alcohol consumption. A blood pressure reducing effect of evidence grade A was demonstrated for these 4 pillars of non-pharmacological therapy in studies. For pharmacological treatment five main substance groups are available: thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, AT1 blockers, calcium channel blockers and beta blockers. A very good blood pressure reducing effect with an advantageous side effect profile has been proven for all substances. The initial high blood pressure therapy can be carried out with monotherapy but therapy with several antihypertensives is often necessary for the very varied combination of compounds which are available in a meaningful combination and dosage of effective ingredients. For the treatment of comorbid hypertensive patients recommendations are available for an individualized pharmacological treatment corresponding to the specific cardiovascular risk and comorbidity. High blood pressure therapy must be continuously carried out over many years. For permanent success of the therapy good compliance is indispensible which can be encouraged by integration in the therapy and should be regularly controlled.

  14. Non-pharmacological treatment of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Afton L; Williams, David A

    2011-04-01

    Individuals with chronic widespread pain, including those with fibromyalgia, pose a particular challenge to treatment, given the modest effectiveness of pharmacological agents for this condition. The growing consensus indicates that the best approach to treatment involves the combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Several non-pharmacological interventions, particularly exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), have garnered good evidence of effectiveness as stand-alone, adjunctive treatments for patients with chronic pain. In this article, evidenced-based, non-pharmacological management techniques for chronic widespread pain are described by using two broad categories, exercise and CBT. The evidence for decreasing pain, improving functioning and changing secondary symptoms is highlighted. Lastly, the methods by which exercise and CBT can be combined for a multi-component approach, which is consistent with the current evidence-based guidelines of several American and European medical societies, are addressed.

  15. Current concepts and pharmacologic treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses and reason for hospitalization in the United States. Ace inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers and digitalis are the leading agents in pharmacologic management of heart failure. In order to improve patient outcomes, adult-health nurses need to understand the diagnosis, pathophysiology, nursing interventions, and pharmacologic treatment of this common disorder.

  16. [Novelties in the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Nyolczas, Noémi

    2016-09-01

    Recently, results of several novel clinical trials on the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure have been published. In addition, the new European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure and a focused update by the ACC/AHA/HFSA on new pharmacological therapy for heart failure has been reported in 2016. This paper intends to provide an overview of the current state of the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure in the light of the new guidelines which incorporate the results of the new clinical trials. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1517-1521. PMID:27640618

  17. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Curković, Bozidar

    2010-01-01

    Non-pharmacologic interventions are the part of comprehensive therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, proposed by all guidelines and recommendations. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have pain, limited joint mobility, and impaired quality of life. Physical modalities are prescribed exactly with idea to diminish pain, iprove joint mobility and quality of life. Physical procedures are generally safe and well tolerated.

  18. [Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Vlak, Tonko; Aljinović, Jure

    2014-01-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is a mandatory part of all algorithms and recommendations for dealing with this disease. However, the belief that pharmacological therapy is much more superior to treating osteoporosis than non-pharmacological treatment is still common in the medical community. The probable reason is that pharmacological treatment can be measured and statistically analyzed, and that's why the abundance of data from controlled randomized trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews are available. Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is not so much represented in evidence based medicine (EBM) because there are a lot of different exercise protocols, different machines with different setups for applying the same models of physical therapy. So the main problem are inclusion criteria in meta-analyses or systematic reviews of patients whose data is collected using different protocols. Non-pharmacological treatment ofosteoporosis: myth or reality? Maybe we did not answer this question in fullness, but by analyzing data from the scientifically relevant data bases we can conclude that non-pharmacological treatment is an important factor in prevention of osteoporosis and part of all treatment protocols available today--almost as equally significant as pharmacological treatment. Cochrane library database and PEDro database provide EBM information that can help to identify the best types of ex- ercises and physical procedures for bone mineral density and prevention of falls. The best result in non-pharmaco- logical treatment of osteoporosis showed a combination of exercise programs that include muscle strengthening exercises, aerobic exercises, exercises with progressive resistance increase, and high-impact exercises. As for individual exercises, a non-weight-bearing high force exercise showed small but statistically significant increase in bone mineral density in femoral neck, in some scientific papers. Exercises for balance and

  19. Pharmacological treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: current practice and novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammirati, Enrico; Contri, Rachele; Coppini, Raffaele; Cecchi, Franco; Frigerio, Maria; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is entering a phase of intense translational research that holds promise for major advances in disease-specific pharmacological therapy. For over 50 years, however, HCM has largely remained an orphan disease, and patients are still treated with old drugs developed for other conditions. While judicious use of the available armamentarium may control the clinical manifestations of HCM in most patients, specific experience is required in challenging situations, including deciding when not to treat. The present review revisits the time-honoured therapies available for HCM, in a practical perspective reflecting real-world scenarios. Specific agents are presented with doses, titration strategies, pros and cons. Peculiar HCM dilemmas such as treatment of dynamic outflow obstruction, heart failure caused by end-stage progression and prevention of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias are assessed. In the near future, the field of HCM drug therapy will rapidly expand, based on ongoing efforts. Approaches such as myocardial metabolic modulation, late sodium current inhibition and allosteric myosin inhibition have moved from pre-clinical to clinical research, and reflect a surge of scientific as well as economic interest by academia and industry alike. These exciting developments, and their implications for future research, are discussed. PMID:27109894

  20. Systematic review of the pharmacological treatment of alcohol use disorders in individuals infected with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Alexis; Brissette, Suzanne; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Treating alcohol use disorders (AUD) is critical in individuals suffering from hepatitis C infection (HCV). Aside from psychosocial interventions, pharmacological treatment is effective for decreasing alcohol consumption and promoting abstinence. However, unique factors belonging to HCV-infected individuals, such as baseline hepatic vulnerability and possible ongoing hepatitis C treatment, complicate AUD drug therapy. The goal of this review is to systematically identify, summarize, and evaluate the existing evidence on the pharmacological management of AUD in HCV-infected individuals. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for English- and French-language articles published from 1993 to December 2013. The search criteria focused on clinical trials and observational studies assessing the efficacy and/or safety of pharmacological management of AUD in patients infected with HCV. Of 421 identified studies, three were included for analysis. Two were observational studies assessing the safety of disulfiram. One was a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of baclofen. There is paucity of data regarding the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of AUD in HCV-infected individuals, with studies being small series and showing significant heterogeneity. No strong recommendations can be made based on the current studies as to which pharmacological option should be preferred in this sub-population. PMID:25928362

  1. Neuroscience of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Marc N.; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although substantial advances have been made in behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions, moving treatment development to the next stage may require novel ways of approaching addictions, particularly those derived from new findings regarding of the neurobiological underpinnings of addictions, while assimilating and incorporating relevant information from earlier approaches. In this review, we first briefly review theoretical and biological models of addiction and then describe existing behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for the addictions within this framework. We then propose new directions for treatment development and targets that are informed by recent evidence regarding the heterogeneity of addictions and the neurobiological contributions to these disorders. PMID:21338880

  2. [Pharmacological treatment of COPD. Where are we now?].

    PubMed

    Calle Rubio, Myriam; Pinedo Sierra, Celia; Rodríguez Hermosa, Juan Luis

    2010-12-01

    Current clinical guidelines recommend a step-wise approach to the pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with drugs being added according to the severity of airflow obstruction, symptoms, and the number of acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, greater knowledge of the physiopathogenesis of this disease has led to COPD being considered a heterogeneous process in which therapeutic decisions should not be based exclusively on the results of spirometry. Treatment is increasingly individualized according to the patient's characteristics. The present article reviews the scientific evidence on the aims of treatment in COPD and the benefits achieved by the various pharmacological options available. PMID:21316549

  3. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder.

  4. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder. PMID:27067344

  5. The ongoing risk assessment in the treatment of forensic patients on conditional release status.

    PubMed

    Wack, R C

    1993-01-01

    In New York State, patients who have been found not criminally responsible by reason of mental disease or defect, eventually become outpatients while still under the supervision of the courts. The treatment of these patients on outpatient orders of condition poses special problems. Treatment needs to center on the issues related to patient's potential for harmful/violent behavior. Therefore, outpatient clinicians need to conduct periodic risk assessments and must continuously monitor identified risk indicators. The author outlines steps for information gathering and evaluation necessary for risk assessment. Treatment of these patients is conceptualized as ongoing clinical risk identification and management. It is framed by a treatment contract that integrates mandates of the Orders of Conditions with information gathered through ongoing risk assessments and spells out legal and other consequences that may arise from non-compliance.

  6. Pharmacologic treatments for women with addictions.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Geppert, Cynthia M A

    2003-09-01

    Physicians have a growing array of pharmacotherapies available for the treatment of substance use disorders. These medications are of central importance in the treatment of opioid and nicotine dependence and are of growing importance in the treatment of alcohol and stimulant dependence. Pharmacotherapy alone is rarely sufficient treatment for substance use disorder; appropriate psychosocial treatment or mutual help (eg, 12-step) participation is almost always indicated whether or not pharmacotherapy is used. Specialized facilities, licensing, and training are necessary for the use of some of the pharmacotherapies discussed in this article. The obstetrician gynecologist must determine the scope of his or her own practice in this area (ie, when to treat and when to refer) based on interest, training and experience, and available resources.

  7. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs. PMID:34189

  8. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs.

  9. Pharmacologic treatments for pulmonary hypertension: exploring pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Julio D; Hanson, Rebekah L; Machado, Roberto F

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with multiple etiologies and is categorized into five broad groups. Of these groups, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the most studied and, therefore, all of the currently available drug classes (prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors) were developed to treat PAH. Thus, limited treatment data exist for the less-studied non-PAH forms of PH. Pharmacogenomics can be a tool to better understand the pathways involved in PH, as well as to improve personalization of therapy. However, little pharmacogenomic research has been carried out on this disease. New treatments for PH are on the horizon, deriving from both repurposed currently available drugs and novel therapeutics. PMID:23668740

  10. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  11. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  12. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  13. [How to initiate, optimise and stop pharmacological treatments: applications in real life].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    Some patients are exposed to complex clinical situations, which impose a careful analysis of both the indications and contraindications of ongoing pharmacological treatments as well as of the dosing or drug adjustments to be proposed. This article illustrates some problems encountered when a new drug therapy is initiated, when medications with narrow therapeutic window should be supervised and when some drugs should be stopped mainly for safety reasons. The clinical case relates the story of a patient with type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, who presents a congestive heart failure associated with an episode of atrial fibrillation and a severe renal insufficiency.

  14. Evidence-Based Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Findling, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is an important component of treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. The body of evidence supporting safe and effective treatments in this population is growing. Available data provide information on the risks and benefits of pharmacologic agents used for acute manic, mixed, and depressive episodes as well as for maintenance treatment. Lithium, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics comprise the armamentarium for treating pediatric bipolar disorder. When selecting treatment, clinicians must consider the efficacy and side effect profile of potential pharmacotherapies, as well as the patient's history, including the presence of comorbidities, in order to develop a treatment plan that will ensure optimal outcomes. PMID:27570928

  15. PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENTS FOR TINNITUS: NEW AND OLD

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, R.; Lobarinas, E.; Sun, W.

    2011-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus, the phantom ringing or buzzing sensation that occurs in the absence of sound, affects 12–14% of adults; in some cases the tinnitus is so severe or disabling that patients seek medical treatment. However, although the economic and emotional impact of tinnitus is large, there are currently no FDA-approved drugs to treat this condition. Clinical trials are now underway to evaluate the efficacy of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and dopamine D2 antagonists, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and zinc dietary supplements. Previous off-label clinical studies, while not definitive, suggest that patients with severe depression may experience improvement in their tinnitus after treatment with antidepressants such as nortriptyline or sertraline. A small subpopulation of patients with what has been described as “typewriter tinnitus” have been shown to gain significant relief from the anticonvulsant carbamazepine. Preliminary studies with misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue, and sulpiride, a dopamine D2 antagonist, have shown promise. Animal behavioral studies suggest that GABA transaminase inhibitors and potassium channel modulators can suppress tinnitus. Additionally, improvements in tinnitus have also been noted in patients taking melatonin for significant sleep disturbances. Like other complex neurological disorders, one drug is unlikely to resolve tinnitus in all patients; therapies targeting specific subgroups are likely to yield the greatest success. PMID:21765586

  16. Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, D S

    1990-09-01

    Weight reduction, alcohol restriction, mild salt restriction, eating a vegetarian diet and increasing aerobic exercise will generally lower the blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension. Eating a diet rich in potassium and reducing caffeine intake may also be helpful in reducing the pressure, but increasing the fiber or calcium intake will generally be ineffective. Reducing fat intake from the usual 40% of total calories to 25-30% may reduce hypertension directly or by weight reduction. Smoking, when combined with excessive caffeine or alcohol intake may have an additive effect on blood pressure. Monotherapy with such behavioral techniques as self-monitoring of blood pressure, biofeedback, meditation, yoga, progressive muscular relaxation or cognitive therapy may reduce the blood pressure to a variable degree, and combinations of these treatments may be even more successful.

  17. Migraine: pathophysiology, pharmacology, treatment and future trends.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; Centurión, David; Valdivia, Luis Felipe; de Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    2003-03-01

    Migraine treatment has evolved into the scientific arena, but it seems still controversial whether migraine is primarily a vascular or a neurological dysfunction. Irrespective of this controversy, the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), a vasoconstrictor and a central neurotransmitter, seem to decrease during migraine (with associated carotid vasodilatation) whereas an i.v. infusion of 5-HT can abort migraine. In fact, 5-HT as well as ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and other antimigraine agents invariably produce vasoconstriction in the external carotid circulation. The last decade has witnessed the advent of sumatriptan and second generation triptans (e.g. zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan), which belong to a new class of drugs, the 5-HT1B/1D/1F receptor agonists. Compared to sumatriptan, the second-generation triptans have a higher oral bioavailability and longer plasma half-life. In line with the vascular and neurogenic theories of migraine, all triptans produce selective carotid vasoconstriction (via 5-HT1B receptors) and presynaptic inhibition of the trigeminovascular inflammatory responses implicated in migraine (via 5-HT1D/5-ht1F receptors). Moreover, selective agonists at 5-HT1D (PNU-142633) and 5-ht1F (LY344864) receptors inhibit the trigeminovascular system without producing vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, PNU-142633 proved to be ineffective in the acute treatment of migraine, whilst LY344864 did show some efficacy when used in doses which interact with 5-HT1B receptors. Finally, although the triptans are effective antimigraine agents producing selective cranial vasoconstriction, efforts are being made to develop other effective antimigraine alternatives acting via the direct blockade of vasodilator mechanisms (e.g. antagonists at CGRP receptors, antagonists at 5-HT7 receptors, inhibitors of nitric oxide biosynthesis, etc). These alternatives will hopefully lead to fewer side effects. PMID:15320857

  18. Pharmacological treatment of depression. Consulting with Dr Oscar.

    PubMed Central

    Berber, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the pharmacological treatment of depression and to evaluate current strategies for treatment to maximize the benefits of antidepressant medications. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched to January 1999, using the headings depression, combination, augmentation, lithium, triiodothyronine, pindolol, buspirone, methylphenidate, and electroconvulsive therapy, for randomized controlled trials, systematic overviews, and consensus reports. Recent high-quality reviews were often found. References from papers retrieved were scrutinized for other relevant reports. Preference was given to more recent articles and well-designed studies. Recommendations from academic groups were analyzed. MAIN MESSAGE: Optimization of antidepressant therapy is the cornerstone of pharmacological treatment of depression. When symptoms persist despite optimization, further strategies include substitution, combination, augmentation, and reviewing and sometimes referring. Decisions are based on the evidence supporting the various strategies. CONCLUSIONS: Antidepressants will work only if prescribed correctly. Awareness of the strategies for using antidepressants and evaluating their effectiveness improves primary care physicians' ability to treat this common disorder. PMID:10587774

  19. [Treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Part 2: Pharmacological strategies].

    PubMed

    Roesch-Ely, D; Pfueller, U; Mundt, C; Müller, U; Weisbrod, M

    2010-05-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are a clinically relevant symptom dimension and one of the best predictors for functional outcome. Pharmacological treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is still a challenge. The objective of this article is to present a detailed review of the literature on strategies for the pharmacological treatment of cognitive deficits. It is not clear whether first-generation antipsychotics have a genuine positive influence on cognition. There is only sparse evidence for the positive effect of second-generation antipsychotics on cognitive processes. Furthermore it is not evident that second-generation antipsychotics are more beneficial than first-generation antipsychotics in the treatment of cognitive deficits. The add-on use of substances which directly influence cognitive processes, so-called cognition-enhancing drugs is more promising.

  20. Music therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huan; Jiang, Guohui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. Currently, the primary methods of treatment include pharmacological and surgical treatment. However, approximately one-third of patients exhibit refractory epilepsy. Therefore, a novel approach to epilepsy treatment is necessary. Several studies have confirmed that music therapy can be effective at reducing seizures and epileptiform discharges, thus providing a new option for clinicians in the treatment of epilepsy. Although the underlying mechanism of music therapy is unknown, it may be related to resonance, mirror neurons, dopamine pathways and parasympathetic activation. Large sample, multicenter, randomized double-blind and more effectively designed studies are needed for future music therapy studies. PMID:26196169

  1. Treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma: ongoing trials, critical issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Blanchard, P; Moreau, F; Guigay, J; Hartl, D M; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-04-01

    Due to the generally poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treatment has been intensified, these last decades, leading to an increase of serious side effects. High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been recently etiologically linked to a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is on the increase. These tumors are different, at the clinical and molecular level, when compared to tumors caused by traditional risk factors. Additionally, their prognosis is much more favorable which has led the medical community to consider new treatment strategies. Indeed, it is possible that less intensive treatment regimens could achieve similar efficacy with less toxicity and improved quality of life. Several clinical trials, investigating different ways to de-escalate treatment, are currently ongoing. In this article, we review these main approaches, discuss the rationale behind them and the issues raised by treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:24622970

  2. Neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Linares, Ila M; Chags, Marcos H N; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2014-01-01

    Specific phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by irrational fear and avoidance of specific things or situations, interfering significantly with the patients' daily life. Treatment for the disorder consists of both pharmacological and psychological approaches, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Neuroimaging techniques have been used in an attempt to improve our understanding of the neurobiology of SP and of the effects of treatment options available. This review describes the design and results of eight articles investigating the neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for SP. The studies show that CBT is effective in SP, leading to a reduction of anxiety symptoms that is accompanied by functional alterations in the brain. The results of pharmacological interventions for SP are less uniform, but suggest that the partial agonist of the NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptor DCS (D-cycloserine) can be used in combination with psychotherapy techniques for the achievement of quicker treatment response and that DCS modulates the function of structures implicated in the neurobiology of SP. Further research should explore the augmentation of CBT treatment with DCS in controlled trials.

  3. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: a critical review of the pharmacology and clinical effects of current and future therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Miyake, N; Jarskog, L F; Fleischhacker, W W; Lieberman, J A

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of chlorpromazine and throughout the development of the new-generation antipsychotic drugs (APDs) beginning with clozapine, the D(2) receptor has been the target for the development of APDs. Pharmacologic actions to reduce neurotransmission through the D(2) receptor have been the only proven therapeutic mechanism for psychoses. A number of novel non-D(2) mechanisms of action of APDs have been explored over the past 40 years but none has definitively been proven effective. At the same time, the effectiveness of treatments and range of outcomes for patients are far from satisfactory. The relative success of antipsychotics in treating positive symptoms is limited by the fact that a substantial number of patients are refractory to current medications and by their lack of efficacy for negative and cognitive symptoms, which often determine the level of functional impairment. In addition, while the newer antipsychotics produce fewer motor side effects, safety and tolerability concerns about weight gain and endocrinopathies have emerged. Consequently, there is an urgent need for more effective and better-tolerated antipsychotic agents, and to identify new molecular targets and develop mechanistically novel compounds that can address the various symptom dimensions of schizophrenia. In recent years, a variety of new experimental pharmacological approaches have emerged, including compounds acting on targets other than the dopamine D(2) receptor. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to whether drugs selective for singe molecular targets (that is, 'magic bullets') or drugs selectively non-selective for several molecular targets (that is, 'magic shotguns', 'multifunctional drugs' or 'intramolecular polypharmacy') will lead to more effective new medications for schizophrenia. In this context, current and future drug development strategies can be seen to fall into three categories: (1) refinement of precedented mechanisms of action to provide drugs

  4. Non-pharmacological approaches to the treatment of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Bourne, P G

    1975-07-01

    As a result largely of dissatisfaction with existing treatment methods for narcotic addiction, there has been considerable recent interest in various non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. Acupuncture, transcendental meditation, electrosleep, biofeedback and hypnotism all have generated considerable interest and seem to be effective in a number of cases. Although apparently quite different, all of these approaches seek to induce a state of relaxation which in turn appears to exert specific neurophysiological changes in the brain. These treatment methods not only help for some addicts, but should contribute to our overall understanding of the addiction process.

  5. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with “n = 1 case study research”. Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient’s sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  6. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures.

    PubMed

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with "n = 1 case study research". Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient's sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  7. The pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nash, Lawrence T; Hack, Sabine

    2002-05-01

    As the recognition of paediatric and adolescent anxiety disorders improves, so does the number of recommended treatments. Newer medications (chiefly serotonergic antidepressants) have emerged as the pharmacological treatment of choice and have largely replaced benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) for these disorders. This review will focus on placebo-controlled and open-label studies concerning the treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents, comparing data from newer antidepressant medications (plus buspirone) with data on TCAs and benzodiazepines in this population. There are few randomised, placebo-controlled trials of medications for anxiety in children and adolescents, with most data coming from open-label trials and case series. Moreover, there are no studies comparing pharmacological versus behavioural treatments. Most recent data concerning the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors suggests that these agents will be effective and safe in the treatment of paediatric anxiety disorders. The potential side effect profiles of these newer agents also makes them an attractive first choice for anxiety when compared to the benzodiazepines or TCAs, each of which poses its own potentially serious adverse effects. More research is needed in the area of psychopharmacological treatments for paediatric and adolescent anxiety, not only to substantiate the current beliefs that serotonergic agents are effective and safe but to pinpoint the factors that might predict responses to particular agents or classes of medications. Future investigations should focus on treatments which have already proven effective for adult anxiety disorders (both medications and psychotherapies), given the apparent links between paediatric and adult anxiety disorders.

  8. Systematic review of pharmacological treatments in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Jose-Ramon; Ballesteros, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is considered the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. Affected people have mental impairment that can include Attention Deficit and/or Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism disorder, and speech and behavioural disorders. Several pharmacological interventions have been proposed to treat those impairments. Methods Systematic review of the literature and summary of the evidence from clinical controlled trials that compared at least one pharmacological treatment with placebo or other treatment in individuals with diagnosis of FXS syndrome and assessed the efficacy and/or safety of the treatments. Studies were identified by a search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Databases using the terms fragile X and treatment. Risk of bias of the studies was assessed by using the Cochrane Collaboration criteria. Results The search identified 276 potential articles and 14 studies satisfied inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 studies on folic acid (9 with crossover design, only 1 of them with good methodological quality and low risk of bias) did not find in general significant improvements. A small sample size trial assessed dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD and found some improvements in those taking methylphenidate, but the length of follow-up was too short. Two studies on L-acetylcarnitine, showed positive effects and no side effects in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD. Finally, one study on patients with an additional diagnosis of autism assessed ampakine compound CX516 and found no significant differences between treatment and placebo. Regarding safety, none of the studies that assessed that area found relevant side effects, but the number of patients included was too small to detect side effects with low incidence. Conclusion Currently there is no robust evidence to support recommendations on pharmacological treatments in patients with FXS in general or in those

  9. New developments in the pharmacologic treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2) ) >30, is a significant public health problem. It's estimated that 50 percent of the U.S. population will be classified as obese by the year 2030. Due to associated health complications and rising health care costs related to obesity, new treatment options are being explored. For people who need additional treatment beyond lifestyle modification, new pharmacologic options have been developed that may assist in reducing BMI. Health care providers and patients should consider each person's individual health history and consider both the potential risks and benefits of these therapies. PMID:23399013

  10. [Dual diagnosis in anxiety disorders: pharmacologic treatment recommendations].

    PubMed

    Sáiz Martínez, Pilar Alejandra; Jimenez Treviño, Luis; Díaz Mesa, Eva M; García-Portilla González, M Paz; Marina González, Pedro; Al-Halabí, Susana; Szerman, Néstor; Bobes García, Julio; Ruiz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are highly comorbid (between 18% and 37%), and such comorbidity complicates treatment and worsens prognosis (including higher suicide risk). There are not many research works on the specific pharmacologic treatment of dual comorbid anxiety disorders. Most authors recommend a simultaneous approach of both, anxiety and substance use, disorders. Research data on pharmacotherapy suggest that psychotropics used in the treatment of anxiety disorders are also effective in dual diagnosis. SSRIs are considered first-line therapy in the treatment of dual anxiety while benzodiacepines should be avoided. New generation antiepileptic have shown efficacy in case series and open label studies in the latest years, thus being a promising treatment option for dual comorbid anxiety disorders, specially pregabalin in generalized anxiety disorder.

  11. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  12. New pharmacological treatments for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ebbert, Jon O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is quickly becoming the leading preventable cause of death in the USA. Over 60 obesity-related comorbidities exist which increase the complexity and cost of medical care in obese patients. Even a moderate weight loss of 5 % can reduce morbidity associated with these conditions. Lifestyle modification through caloric restriction and enhanced exercise and physical activity remain the first line treatment for obesity. The development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of obesity has been challenged by both lack of efficacy and serious adverse side effects leading to their removal from market. Two new agents were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to complement lifestyle modification in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight patients (BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and one obesity-related comorbidity). Lorcaserin is a novel serotonin 5-HT2C selective agonist which has been shown in three phase III studies to significantly reduce weight and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. Phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER) is a novel combination of two agents which have individually been shown to significantly reduce weight. The combination agent phentermine/topiramate ER has been shown to reduce weight in overweight and obese subjects in a number of studies. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of these new agents compared to past and other presently available medications for the treatment of obesity. PMID:24828101

  13. Episodic migraines in children: limited evidence on preventive pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Rema; Taylor, Frederick R

    2013-10-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review of preventive pharmacological treatments for episodic childhood migraines searching several databases through May 20, 2012. Episodic migraine prevention was examined in 24 publications of randomized controlled trials that enrolled 1578 children in 16 nonrandomized studies. Single randomized controlled trials provided low-strength evidence that propranolol would result in complete cessation of migraine attacks in 713 per 1000 children treated (95% confidence interval, 452-974); trazodone and nimodipine decreased migraine days, while topiramate, divalproex, and clonidine were no more effective than placebo in preventing migraines. Migraine prevention with multidisciplinary drug management was not sustained at 6 months. Divalproex resulted in treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects, and topiramate increased the risk of paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, and weight loss. Long-term preventive benefits and improvement in disability and quality of life are unknown. No studies examined quality of life or provided evidence for individualized treatment decisions.

  14. Use of quantitative pharmacology tools to improve malaria treatments.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy M E; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Batty, Kevin T; Manning, Laurens

    2016-01-01

    The use of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data to inform antimalarial treatment regimens has accelerated in the past few decades, due in no small part to the stimulus provided by progressive development of parasite resistance to most of the currently available drugs. An understanding of the disposition, interactions, efficacy and toxicity of the mainstay of contemporary antimalarial treatment, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT), has been facilitated by PK/PD studies which have been used to refine treatment regimens across the spectrum of disease, especially in special groups including young children and pregnant women. The present review highlights recent clinically-important examples of the ways in which these quantitative pharmacology tools have been applied to improve ACT, as well as 8-aminoquinoline use and the characterisation of novel antimalarial therapies such as the spiroindolones.

  15. [Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorders: rationale and limitations].

    PubMed

    Boulenger, J-P; Capdevielle, D

    2007-01-01

    The rational use of pharmacological treatment in generalized anxiety disorders is still a matter of debate due to the uncertainties concerning the nature, diagnostic criteria and target-symptoms of this frequent and potentially invalidating disorder. If benzodiazepines may still be prescribed for a limited amount of time (i.e. 6 to 12 weeks) due to the fluctuating nature of generalized anxiety, the chronic evolution of this disorder in most patients often justifies the long-term prescription of serotoninergic (5-HT) or dual-action (5HT-NA) antidepressants and sometimes of 5HT-la partial agonists like buspirone. Imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant was the first to demonstrate its efficacy in carefully selected patients; however, due to the side-effects of this molecule recent guidelines based on controlled clinical trials, suggest to use either serotonergic antidepressants (SSRIs) or venlafaxine as a first-line treatment of generalized anxiety disorders. Because of its pharmacological profile buspirone remains however a useful option in patients with cognitive or addictive problems, especially alcoholics. If most SSRIs have demonstrated efficacy over placebo, head to head comparisons remain limited except for escitalopram which appear better tolerated than paroxétine in this indication. More recently, an anticonvulsant, pregabaline also demonstrated its efficacy in several clinical trials but the symptomatic profile of generalized anxiety patients likely to respond to this GABA analog compared to other psychotropic treatments remain to be established. The traditional use of other psychotropic agents such as hydroxyzine, an H1 histaminergic receptor antagonist, is only supported by limited scientific data; this is also the case of sedative typical antipsychotics which benefit/risk ratio should be carefully evaluated before being prescribed to generalized anxiety patients resistant to other psychotropic agents. However, the possible use of atypical antipsychotics

  16. Pharmacological treatment of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Robert J; Ng, Boon Han; Gamie, Zakareya; El Masry, Mohamed A; Velonis, Stylianos; Schizas, Constantin; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2008-04-01

    Heterotopic ossification is a common complication following total hip arthroplasty and surgery following acetabular trauma. It is associated with pain and a decreased range of movement. Prophylaxis is achieved by either non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment or localised irradiation therapy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the evidence for pharmacological agents used for the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. The study used a comprehensive literature search to identify all major clinical studies investigating the pharmacological agents used in the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. It was concluded that indometacin remains the 'gold standard' for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis following total hip arthroplasty and is the only drug proven to be effective against heterotopic ossification following acetabular surgery. Following total hip arthroplasty, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including naproxen and diclofenac, are equally as effective as indometacin and can be considered as alternative first-line treatments. Celecoxib is also of equal efficacy to indometacin and is associated with significantly fewer gastrointestinal side effects. However, serious concerns were raised over the safety of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the cardiovascular system and these should be used cautiously.

  17. Pharmacological treatment of alcohol abuse/dependence with psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Le Fauve, Charlene E; Litten, Raye Z; Randall, Carrie L; Moak, Darlene H; Salloum, Ihsan M; Green, Alan I

    2004-02-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2003 annual meeting RSA in Fort Lauderdale, FL. It was organized and cochaired by Charlene E. Le Fauve and Carrie L. Randall. The presentations were (1) Introduction, by Charlene E. Le Fauve and Raye Z. Litten; (2) Treatment of co-occurring alcohol use and anxiety disorders, by Carrie L. Randall and Sarah W. Book; (3) Pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependent patients with comorbid depression, by Darlene H. Moak; (4) Efficacy of valproate in bipolar alcoholics: a double blind, placebo-controlled study, by Ihsan M. Salloum, Jack R. Cornelius, Dennis C. Daley, Levent Kirisci, Johnathan Himmelhoch, and Michael E. Thase; (5) Alcoholism and schizophrenia: effects of antipsychotics, by Alan I. Green, Robert E. Drake, Suzannah V. Zimmet, Rael D. Strous, Melinda Salomon, and Mark Brenner; and (6) Conclusions, by Charlene E. Le Fauve; discussant, Raye Z. Litten. Alcohol-dependent individuals have exceptionally high rates of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Although this population is more likely to seek alcoholism treatment than noncomorbid alcoholics, the prognosis for treatment is often poor, particularly among patients with more severe psychiatric illnesses. Development of effective interventions to treat this population is in the early stages of research. Although the interaction between the psychiatric condition and alcoholism is complex, progress has been made. The NIAAA has supported a number of state-of-the-art pharmacological and behavioral trials in a variety of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Some of these trials have been completed and are presented here. The symposium presented some new research findings from clinical studies with the aim of facilitating the development of treatments that improve alcohol and psychiatric outcomes among individuals with alcohol-use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. The panel focused on social anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and

  18. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations.

  19. Non-pharmacologic treatment of insomnia in persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Shub, Denis; Darvishi, Roham; Kunik, Mark E

    2009-02-01

    The prevalence of insomnia increases with age and affects up to 35% of community-dwelling adults with dementia. Sleep disturbances and associated cognitive and behavioral symptoms in this patient population can be a significant contributor to morbidity, mortality, and caregiver burden. Despite the frequency with which sleep disorders are encountered in primary care, few evidence-based guidelines are available to guide physician treatment plans. Sedative-hypnotic medications are commonly prescribed but are associated with significant adverse effects and have limited efficacy data. Non-pharmacologic treatments can be safe and effective adjuncts or alternatives to medications but are often underused in clinical practice. This article reviews practical applications of modalities such as light therapy, exercise, and sleep-hygiene modification in treating insomnia in persons with dementia. PMID:19256583

  20. Pharmacologic Treatment for Pediatric Gastroparesis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Smetana, Keaton S.; Bantu, Likeselam; Buckley, Merrion G.

    2016-01-01

    There have been a number of agents that have been tried for treatment of gastroparesis over the past 3 decades, with varying levels of success. Guidelines exist for the management of gastroparesis in adults; however, even though the cause of gastroparesis in children is similar to that in adults, no guidelines exist for treating pediatric gastroparesis as studies on the topic are limited. With what little information we have on pediatric gastroparesis, medications used in children's studies do not seem to demonstrate the same results as in adult patients with gastroparesis; thus, future studies of whether certain medications are effective for treating pediatric gastroparesis and at what dose still need to be conducted. Pharmacological treatment options for pediatric gastroparesis do not show a clear correlation of resolving or even maintaining gastroparesis-associated symptoms or disease state. This article reviews the available studies of drugs that have shown some efficacy, with an emphasis on pediatric studies. PMID:27199619

  1. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Papastylianou, Andry; Mentzelopoulos, S.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated) and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids. PMID:22145080

  2. Pharmacological treatments and risks for the food chain.

    PubMed

    Girardi, C; Odore, R

    2008-09-01

    Veterinarians play a pivotal role in public health control, in particular in the management of risks deriving from pharmacological treatments of food-producing animals. Veterinary medicinal products can represent a risk for animal health and welfare (side effects, decreased efficacy), for farmers and practitioners administering the drug, for consumers of food of animal origin (presence of residues, occurrence of antibiotic resistance) and for the environment. According to pending European guidelines, risk management starts from marketing authorisation that must be based on risk evaluation and can be denied when the risk/benefit ratio is not favourable considering the advantages for animal health and welfare and for safety of consumers. Veterinarians can prevent and control risks by using correct pharmacological criteria to choose and administer medicinal products and undertaking risk-based inspection of residues of drugs in food of animal origin. Moreover, a major tool for veterinarians to prevent and control drug-borne risk is "pharmacovigilance". Risks for the environment are usually assessed during the pre-marketing approval process, however veterinarians, as risk managers, should educate farmers about correct drug handling and disposal, and periodically verify that suggested measures are applied.

  3. The evidence-based pharmacological treatment of paediatric ADHD.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Brigette S; March, John S; Kratochvil, Christopher J

    2012-02-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common in children, adolescents, and adults, with extensive research establishing it as a valid neurobiological disorder. Without intervention, ADHD can result in significant impairment throughout the lifespan for the individuals it afflicts. Fortunately, multiple evidence-based options are available for the treatment of ADHD, including several efficacious pharmacotherapies. The role of medication, including stimulants as well as non-stimulants, is well-documented by an extensive body of literature. Although there may be less enthusiasm for behavioural and other psychosocial interventions as stand-alone treatments for moderate to severe ADHD, they are recommended as first-line treatment for ADHD management in preschool-aged children, for those patients with mild symptoms, and as an adjunct to medication in patients with comorbid disorders or suboptimal responses to pharmacotherapy. When planning treatment for individuals with ADHD, the potential risks associated with the available interventions must be carefully balanced against the risks of not treating, or not treating adequately. The treatment plan must also include ongoing re-assessment of the effectiveness of and the need for continued therapy. Recent practice parameters provide further specific guidance for the evidence-based assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with ADHD.

  4. Current challenges and pitfalls in the pharmacological treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Velea, O; Gheorghe, IR; Truţescu, CI; Purcărea, VL

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of depression obliges needs an individual assessment, the psychopharmacological approach involving a biopsychosocial analysis for each individual case. The rebalancing of the depressive patient, seen as a return to a normal level of psychosocial functioning and reduced risk of relapse is achieved with a prompt and constant support of specialized teams. Treatment should include psychopharmacological and psychosocial approaches, the results being interrelated and contributing to the prognosis of the disorder. Progress in clinical and pharmacological research, vivid dynamics of socio-economic environment, the complexity of diagnostic evaluation and the need for an interdisciplinary approach may cause difficulties in addressing the depressive patient and the ethical controversies. The aim of this paper is to present a brief analysis of challenges encountered in the present psychiatric practice, starting from the heterogeneity of depressive manifestations and finishing with the prioritization of interventional forms. PMID:25866576

  5. [Indications and future perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of hypercortisolism].

    PubMed

    Stigliano, Antonio; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    The hypercortisolism is a rare endocrine disease characterized by an autonomous steroid secretion or excessive adrenal stimulation by ACTH. the Surgical removal of the lesion directly responsible hypercortisolism represents the treatment of choice. When neurosurgery for pituitary adenoma is contraindicated, radiotherapy is candidate as the second line of therapy. Currently, the recent advances in medical therapy provide a viable alternative to surgery and radiotherapy, when these are not feasible or followed by relapses (present in more than one third of cases) of the underlying disease. Recently, also in Italy, are available pharmacological agents with central activity (pasireotide) specifically indicated for treating Cushing's disease together with peripherally acting drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) that are used in a broader spectrum of hypercortisolemic clinical pictures. In addition, drugs active in the inhibition of steroidogenesis provide a valid support to the patient's surgical preparation allowing the reduction or normalization of plasma cortisol levels. PMID:27030224

  6. [Indications and future perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of hypercortisolism].

    PubMed

    Stigliano, Antonio; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    The hypercortisolism is a rare endocrine disease characterized by an autonomous steroid secretion or excessive adrenal stimulation by ACTH. the Surgical removal of the lesion directly responsible hypercortisolism represents the treatment of choice. When neurosurgery for pituitary adenoma is contraindicated, radiotherapy is candidate as the second line of therapy. Currently, the recent advances in medical therapy provide a viable alternative to surgery and radiotherapy, when these are not feasible or followed by relapses (present in more than one third of cases) of the underlying disease. Recently, also in Italy, are available pharmacological agents with central activity (pasireotide) specifically indicated for treating Cushing's disease together with peripherally acting drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) that are used in a broader spectrum of hypercortisolemic clinical pictures. In addition, drugs active in the inhibition of steroidogenesis provide a valid support to the patient's surgical preparation allowing the reduction or normalization of plasma cortisol levels.

  7. Alternative pharmacological strategies for adult ADHD treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Cahn, Wiepke

    2016-01-01

    Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition associated with high disability and frequent comorbidity. Current standard pharmacotherapy (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) improves ADHD symptoms in the short-term, but poor data were published about long-term treatment. In addition a number of patients present partial or no response to methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Research into the main database sources has been conducted to obtain an overview of alternative pharmacological approaches in adult ADHD patients. Among alternative compounds, amphetamines (mixed amphetamine salts and lisdexamfetamine) have the most robust evidence of efficacy, but they may be associated with serious side effects (e.g. psychotic symptoms or hypertension). Antidepressants, particularly those acting as noradrenaline or dopamine enhancers, have evidence of efficacy, but they should be avoided in patients with comorbid bipolar disorder. Finally metadoxine and lithium may be particularly suitable in case of comorbid alcohol misuse or bipolar disorder. PMID:26693882

  8. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  9. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  10. Considerations in the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Chris; Spigarelli, Michael G; Campbell, Sarah C; Constance, Jonathan E; Courter, Joshua D; Thorell, Emily A; Olson, Jared; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2014-02-01

    The management of neonatal sepsis is challenging owing to complex developmental and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe (i) the changing epidemiology of early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis; (ii) the pharmacologic considerations that influence the safety and efficacy of antibacterials, antifungals, and immunomodulatory adjuvants; and (iii) the recommended dosing regimens for pharmacologic agents commonly used in the treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal sepsis is marked by high morbidity and mortality, such that prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential following culture collection. Before culture results are available, combination therapy with ampicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended. When meningitis is suspected, ampicillin and cefotaxime may be considered. Following identification of the causative organism and in vitro susceptibility testing, antimicrobial therapy may be narrowed to provide targeted coverage. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered for neonates receiving vancomycin or aminoglycoside therapies. For neonates with invasive fungal infections, the development of new antifungal agents has significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in recent years. Liposomal amphotericin B has been found to be safe and efficacious in patients with renal impairment or toxicity caused by conventional amphotericin B. Antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole has also been reported to dramatically reduce rates of neonatal invasive fungal infections and to improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes among treated children. Additionally, several large multicenter studies are currently investigating the safety and efficacy of oral lactoferrin as an immunoprophylactic agent for the prevention of neonatal sepsis. PMID:24218112

  11. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder that reduces patients’ quality of life. It is a chronic disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered defecation in the absence of identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities. IBS imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. Alteration in neurohumoral mechanisms and psychological factors, bacterial overgrowth, genetic factors, gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and immune system factors are currently believed to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. It is possible that there is an interaction of one or more of these etiologic factors leading to heterogeneous symptoms of IBS. IBS treatment is predicated upon the patient’s most bothersome symptoms. Despite the wide range of medications and the high prevalence of the disease, to date no completely effective remedy is available. This article reviews the literature from January 2008 to July 2013 on the subject of IBS peripherally acting pharmacological treatment. Drugs are categorized according to their administration for IBS-C, IBS-D or abdominal pain predominant IBS. PMID:25083060

  12. Pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in adolescents and children.

    PubMed

    Wöber-Bingöl, Çiçek

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disease in children and adolescents. The incidence of migraine has increased alarmingly in the general population during recent decades. Migraine causes considerable individual suffering and impaired quality of life. Therefore, appropriate management is essential. In this article, the treatment of acute migraine in children and adolescents will be reviewed. Only a few randomized controlled studies have been published and high placebo rates are a major problem for proving superiority of active drugs. Generally, acetaminophen (paracetamol) and ibuprofen are accepted as drugs of first choice, even though the evidence is poor for the former and limited for latter. Among 14 studies on triptans in adolescents, 9 showed some superiority over placebo with respect to pain relief and pain freedom, and among 6 studies in children, 5 suggest some superiority over placebo. Sumatriptan nasal spray and zolmitriptan nasal spray have been approved for adolescents in Europe; almotriptan has been approved for adolescents in the USA, as has rizatriptan for patients aged 6-17 years. A recent study demonstrated the efficacy of a fixed combination of sumatriptan and naproxen in adolescents with migraine. In conclusion, evidence for the pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in children is very poor and evidence for adolescents is better but still limited. PMID:23575981

  13. Pharmacologic approaches to treatment resistant depression: Evidences and personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Antonio; de Filippis, Rocco; Proietti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review evidence supporting pharmacological treatments for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and to discuss them according to personal clinical experience. METHODS: Original studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing pharmacological treatment for TRD in adult patients published from 1990 to 2013 were identified by data base queries (PubMed, Google Scholar e Quertle Searches) using terms: “treatment resistant depression”, “treatment refractory depression”, “partial response depression”, “non responder depression”, “optimization strategy”, “switching strategy”, “combination strategy”, “augmentation strategy”, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors antidepressants, mirtazapine, mianserine, bupropione, monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI), lithium, thyroid hormones, second generation antipsychotics (SGA), dopamine agonists, lamotrigine, psychostimulants, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, ketamine, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosil-L-metionine, methylfolat, pindolol, sex steroids, glucocorticoid agents. Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. Selected publications were grouped by treatment strategy: (1) switching from an ineffective antidepressant (AD) to a new AD from a similar or different class; (2) combining the current AD regimen with a second AD from a different class; and (3) augmenting the current AD regimen with a second agent not thought to be an antidepressant itself. RESULTS: Switching from a TCA to another TCA provides only a modest advantage (response rate 9%-27%), while switching from a SSRI to another SSRI is more advantageous (response rate up to 75%). Evidence supports the usefulness of switching from SSRI to venlafaxine (5 positive trials out 6), TCA (2 positive trials out 3), and MAOI (2 positive trials out

  14. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  15. Children with schizophrenia: clinical picture and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pari, Cinzia

    2006-01-01

    these clinical patterns, such as multidimensionally impaired disorder and multiple complex developmental disorder. In the context of a multimodal approach, including behavioral, social, scholastic and familial interventions, a pharmacological treatment is usually the core treatment. Available experience from the few controlled studies, open studies and case reports on pharmacotherapy in children with schizophrenia aged <12 years is critically analysed in this review, with particular reference to the use of atypical antipsychotics in clinical practice. To date, the major evidence supports the efficacy of risperidone and olanzapine, while clozapine seems an effective option in treatment-refractory cases. Published experience with newer atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole) is still lacking in this age range. Safety data (namely extrapyramidal symptoms, weight gain, hyperprolactinaemia, haematological adverse effects, seizures, hepatotoxicity, metabolic effects, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and cardiovascular effects) are reviewed and discussed, along with strategies for management.

  16. Evidence-Based, Non-Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Oh, Hong Seok; Oh, Dong-Hoon; Jung, Seung Ah; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kang, Ree-Hun; Choi, Yun-Kyeung; Lee, Min-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Although pharmacological treatment constitutes the main therapeutic approach for depression, non-pharmacological treatments (self-care or psychotherapeutic approach) are usually regarded as more essential therapeutic approaches in clinical practice. However, there have been few clinical practice guidelines concerning self-care or psychotherapy in the management of depression. This study introduces the 'Evidence-Based, Non-Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea.' For the first time, a guideline was developed for non-pharmacological treatments for Korean adults with mild-to-moderate depression. The guideline development process consisted of establishing several key questions related to non-pharmacologic treatments of depression, searching the literature for studies which answer these questions, assessing the evidence level of each selected study, drawing up draft recommendation, and peer review. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence. As a result of this process, the guideline recommends exercise therapy, bibliotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy, short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy, and interpersonal psychotherapy as the non-pharmacological treatments for adult patients with mild-to-moderate depression in Korea. Hence, it is necessary to develop specific methodologies for several non-pharmacological treatment for Korean adults with depression. PMID:24431900

  17. Prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea: a clinical pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Rampal, P

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea represents a major health problem for travelers to developing countries. Although the syndrome is usually self-limited and recovery occurs in the majority of cases without any specific form of therapy, there is a need for safe and effective ways of preventing and treating it. Since the syndrome is most often caused by an infection acquired by ingesting fecally contaminated food or beverages, precautions regarding dietary habits remain the cornerstone of prophylaxis, but dietary self-restrictions do not always translate to reduced rates of diarrheal illness. Administration of probiotics (e.g. lactobacilli or Saccharomyces boulardii) and immunoprophylaxis with the newer oral cholera vaccines have been tried with promising results. Antimicrobials remain, however, the most successful form of prophylaxis, being effective in up to 90% of travelers. For those with impaired health who will take prophylaxis, systemic agents with proved efficacy should be recommended. For other otherwise healthy persons, poorly absorbed agents are preferable in order to avoid the serious, albeit rare, toxicity of systemic drugs. The key factor in the management of acute watery traveler's diarrhea, particularly in infants and young children, is the restoration of water and electrolyte balance. This does not reduce the duration of the illness but will limit dehydration and prevent acidosis. Many patients will require no additional therapy, whereas some will need pharmacologic treatment to shorten the duration of diarrhea or to relieve the accompanying symptoms, like abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. A typical 3- to 5-day illness can be reduced to approximately 1 day by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) combination. Some other systemic antimicrobials have been successfully used but, during the last few years, the 4-fluoroquinolone drugs have received considerable attention and have been shown to be highly effective in reducing the duration of traveler's diarrhea. These

  18. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  19. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Pharmacological Treatments of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: Critique and Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry K.; Marchione, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Examines theoretical, methodologic, and research issues as well as strengths, limitations, and possible interactions pertaining to behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological treatments of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Compares attrition, outcome, and maintenance effects and presents composite indices of significant improvement, endstate…

  20. Pharmacological Treatment of Mild Cognitive Impairment as a Prodromal Syndrome of Alzheimer´s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Tarik; Fußer, Fabian; Schröder, Johannes; Pantel, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a syndrome which, depending on various neurobiological, psychological and social factors, carries a high risk of developing into dementia. As far as diagnostic uncertainty and the heterogeneous underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are concerned, only limited therapeutic options are currently available. Clinical trials involving a wide range of substances have failed to show efficacy on primary and secondary outcome parameters. Most results reflect not only a lack of effectiveness of drug therapy but also methodological constraints in true prodromal Alzheimer´s disease (AD) based on clinical criteria. Biomarkers may help to identify MCI as a prodromal phase of dementia, so it is important to use them to improve specificity of case selection in future studies. For MCI as a prodromal syndrome of AD, clinical trials with disease modifying drugs that target underlying pathological mechanisms such as amyloid-beta accumulation and neurofibrillary tangle formation may help develop effective treatment options in the future. Alternative pharmacological approaches are currently being evaluated in ongoing phase 1 and phase 2 studies. Nevertheless, a lack of approved pharmacotherapeutic options has led to specific interventions that focus on patient education and life-style related factors receiving increasing attention. PMID:23814542

  1. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G.; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  2. Pharmacologic options for the treatment and management of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kobernick, Aaron K; Chambliss, Jeffrey; Burks, A Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy affects approximately 5% of adults and 8% of children in developed countries, and there is currently no cure. Current pharmacologic management is limited to using intramuscular epinephrine or oral antihistamines in response to food allergen exposure. Recent trials have examined the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapy, with varying levels of efficacy and safety demonstrated. Bacterial adjuvants, use of anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, and Chinese herbal formulations represent exciting potential for development of future pharmacotherapeutic agents. Ultimately, immunotherapy may be a viable option for patients with food allergy, although efficacy and safety are likely to be less than ideal. PMID:26289224

  3. Dental ethics case 6. Stalled payment for ongoing orthodontic treatment--balancing responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L; Naidoo, S

    2010-10-01

    It is not always easy for an orthodontist to strike the right balance between a caring, supportive and patient-centered approach, and the need to make a living and to run a profitable business in order to achieve this. Striving to act ethically and professionally at all times will help find this elusive balance and ultimately it will be more rewarding and professionally satisfying. Especially when dealing with children whose lives may be dramatically affected by the interruption or cessation of treatment, orthodontists have a duty to reassure themselves about the financial stability of their contractual relationships with patients or parents. Having consistent financial policies and flexible payment options may assist in this regard. Even in the face of non-payment of fees, treatments that have begun must in some form continue if their cessation would compromise the best interests of patients.

  4. Dental ethics case 6. Stalled payment for ongoing orthodontic treatment--balancing responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L; Naidoo, S

    2010-10-01

    It is not always easy for an orthodontist to strike the right balance between a caring, supportive and patient-centered approach, and the need to make a living and to run a profitable business in order to achieve this. Striving to act ethically and professionally at all times will help find this elusive balance and ultimately it will be more rewarding and professionally satisfying. Especially when dealing with children whose lives may be dramatically affected by the interruption or cessation of treatment, orthodontists have a duty to reassure themselves about the financial stability of their contractual relationships with patients or parents. Having consistent financial policies and flexible payment options may assist in this regard. Even in the face of non-payment of fees, treatments that have begun must in some form continue if their cessation would compromise the best interests of patients. PMID:21180294

  5. Partners' Ongoing Treatment for Chronic Disease and the Risk of Psychological Distress after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Naoki; Narita, Akira; Tsuchiya, Naho; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Ichiro; Hozawa, Atsushi; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported that not only patients with chronic diseases but also their partners are likely to face major psychosocial problems. This study examined the association between a partner's ongoing treatment for chronic disease and the risk of psychological distress after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE). In 2012, a questionnaire was distributed as part of a cross-sectional study of participants aged 20 years or older living in a municipality that had been severely inundated by the tsunami following the GEJE. We identified couples using the household numbers of the municipality and collected self-reported information on ongoing chronic disease treatment for stroke, cancer, myocardial infarction, and angina. Psychological distress was evaluated using the Kessler 6 scale (K6) and was defined as a score ≥ 5/24 points. Among 1,246 couples (2,492 participants) thus identified, 2,369 completed the K6. The number of participants whose partners were under treatment for chronic diseases was 209 (9%). Overall, participants with partners who were receiving treatment for chronic diseases (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.95-1.8, P = 0.09) did not show a significantly higher risk of psychological distress using logistic regression analysis. Women, but not men, whose partners were receiving treatment for chronic diseases, had a higher risk of psychological distress (women: OR = 1.6, P = 0.02; men: OR = 1.0, P = 0.92). After the GEJE, only in women the presence of partners under treatment for chronic diseases appears to be a risk factor for psychological distress. PMID:27506650

  6. Pharmacological Approaches in the Treatment and Maintenance of Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Van Gaal, Luc; Dirinck, Eveline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a growing global health concern, associated with a number of important comorbid conditions. It increases the risk of diabetes and contributes to development of cardiovascular disease. While the benefits of weight loss are well established, weight reduction remains a difficult-to-reach goal in overweight and obese individuals due to several metabolic and psychological factors. For many patients, lifestyle intervention is insufficient to achieve long-term weight loss, and additional options, such as pharmacotherapy, need to be considered. Besides the challenging enterprise of weight reduction, weight maintenance remains an even more crucial and outcome-determining aspect of weight management. This article focuses on the potential of currently available pharmacological strategies to support weight loss and maintenance goals in individuals at risk. Two pharmacotherapy types are considered: those developed primarily to induce weight loss and those developed primarily for blood glucose control that have a favorable effect on body weight. Finally, the potential of very low- and low-calorie diets combined with pharmacotherapy and pharmacological combination therapies are discussed, as well as emerging approaches in development. PMID:27440841

  7. Delayed Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4-Immunoglobulin Treatment Reverses Ongoing Alloantibody Responses and Rescues Allografts From Acute Rejection.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Chen, J; Miller, M L; Vu, V; Tian, C; Moon, J J; Alegre, M-L; Sciammas, R; Chong, A S

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as the leading cause of late graft loss in kidney transplant recipients, and inhibition of donor-specific antibody production should lead to improved transplant outcomes. The fusion protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4-Ig) blocks T cell activation and consequently inhibits T-dependent B cell antibody production, and the current paradigm is that CTLA4-Ig is effective with naïve T cells and less so with activated or memory T cells. In this study, we used a mouse model of allosensitization to investigate the efficacy of continuous CTLA4-Ig treatment, initiated 7 or 14 days after sensitization, for inhibiting ongoing allospecific B cell responses. Delayed treatment with CTLA4-Ig collapsed the allospecific germinal center B cell response and inhibited alloantibody production. Using adoptively transferred T cell receptor transgenic T cells and a novel approach to track endogenous graft-specific T cells, we demonstrate that delayed CTLA4-Ig minimally inhibited graft-specific CD4(+) and T follicular helper responses. Remarkably, delaying CTLA4-Ig until day 6 after transplantation in a fully mismatched heart transplant model inhibited alloantibody production and prevented acute rejection, whereas transferred hyperimmune sera reversed the effects of delayed CTLA4-Ig. Collectively, our studies revealed the unexpected efficacy of CTLA4-Ig for inhibiting ongoing B cell responses even when the graft-specific T cell response was robustly established. PMID:26928966

  8. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  9. Current Concepts and Ongoing Research in the Prevention and Treatment of Open Fracture Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D.; Pulos, Nicholas; Grice, Elizabeth A.; Mehta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Open fractures are fractures in which the bone has violated the skin and soft tissue. Because of their severity, open fractures are associated with complications that can result in increased lengths of hospital stays, multiple operative interventions, and even amputation. One of the factors thought to influence the extent of these complications is exposure and contamination of the open fracture with environmental microorganisms, potentially those that are pathogenic in nature. Recent Advances: Current open fracture care aims to prevent infection by wound classification, prophylactic antibiotic administration, debridement and irrigation, and stable fracture fixation. Critical Issues: Despite these established treatment paradigms, infections and infection-related complications remain a significant clinical burden. To address this, improvements need to be made in our ability to detect bacterial infections, effectively remove wound contamination, eradicate infections, and treat and prevent biofilm formation associated with fracture fixation hardware. Future Directions: Current research is addressing these critical issues. While culture methods are of limited value, culture-independent molecular techniques are being developed to provide informative detection of bacterial contamination and infection. Other advanced contamination- and infection-detecting techniques are also being investigated. New hardware-coating methods are being developed to minimize the risk of biofilm formation in wounds, and immune stimulation techniques are being developed to prevent open fracture infections. PMID:25566415

  10. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O.; Garbis, Spiros D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  11. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets.

  12. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  13. Dyslipidemia: evidence of efficacy of the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gravina, Claudia F; Bertolami, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Giselle HP

    2012-01-01

    The clinical decision to control risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly takes the followings into consideration: (1) the elderly life expectancy; (2) the elderly biological age and functional capacity; (3) the role of cardiovascular disease in the elderly group; (4) the prevalence of risk factors in the elderly; and (5) The effectiveness of treatment of risk factors in the elderly. A large number of studies showed the efficacy of secondary and primary prevention of dyslipidemia in the elderly. However, the only trial that included patients over 80 years was the Heart Protection Study (HPS). Statins are considered the first line therapy for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Because lifestyle changes are very difficult to achieve, doctors in general tend to prescribe many drugs to control cardiovascular risk factors. However, healthy food consumption remains a cornerstone in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention and should be implemented by everyone. PMID:22916052

  14. Stuttering Treatment Research 1970-2005: II. Systematic Review Incorporating Trial Quality Assessment of Pharmacological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothe, Anne K.; Davidow, Jason H.; Bramlett, Robin E.; Franic, Duska M.; Ingham, Roger J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To complete a systematic review, incorporating trial quality assessment, of published research about pharmacological treatments for stuttering. Goals included the identification of treatment recommendations and research needs based on the available high-quality evidence. Method: Multiple readers reviewed 31 articles published between 1970…

  15. Effects of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment on Smokeless Tobacco Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsukami, Dorothy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the effects of 2 mg of nicotine polacrilex versus placebo gum and a group behavioral treatment versus minimal contact on cessation of smokeless tobacco use. Participants (n=210) were randomly assigned 1 of the 4 treatment conditions. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed throughout the treatment. Discusses findings. (KW)

  16. Non-Pharmacological Treatments for ADHD in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Gerbarg, Patricia L.; Brown, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in psychiatry or integrative psychiatry covers a wide range of biological, psychological and mind-body treatments that enhance standard medical practices and patient outcomes. While CAM approaches are popular amongst patients in their practice as well as in self-report because of their ease of use, health professionals have received limited education in these interventions and often are unaware of their patients’ use of CAM treatments. Method This overview highlights evidence-based CAM treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) including dietary interventions, phytomedicines, mind-body practices and neurofeedback. Results While conventional treatments are the mainstays for ADHD, there are a large number of available treatments that can be used to enhance treatment response. Conclusion With improved education and further scientific and clinical research, validated integrative treatments will provide more effective, lower risk and lower cost care for patients with ADHD. PMID:27489754

  17. Pharmacologic treatment of anorexia nervosa: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Attia, Evelyn; Schroeder, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental disorder, characterized by severely low weight and cognitive distortions about body shape and weight. AN is generally associated with a range of psychological symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessions, and rituals. The current study summarized findings from randomized controlled trials (RCT) using pharmacologic treatments in patients with AN. We conducted a review of literature using Medline. Several classes of pharmacologic agents have been studied in small samples of patients with acute AN without finding clear benefit to eating, weight, body shape concerns, or associated psychopathology. Studies have been limited by small sample sizes, as well as by research design with most studies adding medication to comprehensive hospital-based treatment programs. Future directions for pharmacologic treatment research in AN should include outpatient trials, rigorous study of atypical antipsychotic medication, and assessment of medication effect for relapse prevention in weight-restored patients.

  18. Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review

    PubMed Central

    de Kleine, Rianne A.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; van Minnen, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in the improvement of exposure therapy efficacy for PTSD emerged. Basic research found evidence of the pharmacological enhancement of the underlying learning and memory processes of exposure therapy. The current review aims to give an overview of clinical studies on pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment for PTSD. The working mechanisms, efficacy studies in PTSD patients, and clinical utility of four different pharmacological enhancers will be discussed: d-cycloserine, MDMA, hydrocortisone, and propranolol. PMID:24147208

  19. [Is there a specific pharmacological treatment for anxiety disorders? Summary of a controversy].

    PubMed

    Todorov, Christo

    2004-01-01

    The acute pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders is barely specific with the exception of the obsessive-compulsive disorder: it responds preferentially to potent serotoninergic antidepressants only. For all other anxiety disorders all antidepressants regardless of their mechanism of action could be equally efficient thanks to their common class effect and are considered to be the pharmacological treatment of first choice. Benzodiazepines that also share a common class effect are recommended as possible and temporary adjuvants. Augmentation strategies for the cases of refractory anxiety disorders are also non-specific: lithium, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants.

  20. Role of "old" pharmacological agents in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, A G; Cavagnini, F

    2016-09-01

    Despite recent advances in the management of endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), its treatment remains a challenge. When surgery has been unsuccessful or unfeasible as well in case of recurrence, the "old" pharmacological agents represent an important alternative for both ACTH-dependent and independent hypercortisolism. Especially in the latter, the advent of novel molecules directly targeting ACTH secretion has not outweighed the "old" drugs, which continue to be largely employed and have recently undergone a reappraisal. This review provides a survey of the "old" pharmacological agents in the treatment of CS. PMID:27086313

  1. Role of "old" pharmacological agents in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, A G; Cavagnini, F

    2016-09-01

    Despite recent advances in the management of endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), its treatment remains a challenge. When surgery has been unsuccessful or unfeasible as well in case of recurrence, the "old" pharmacological agents represent an important alternative for both ACTH-dependent and independent hypercortisolism. Especially in the latter, the advent of novel molecules directly targeting ACTH secretion has not outweighed the "old" drugs, which continue to be largely employed and have recently undergone a reappraisal. This review provides a survey of the "old" pharmacological agents in the treatment of CS.

  2. Pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sixty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria, being the most of them focused in SSRI and Clomipramine. The trials on augmentation strategies and third line monotherapies are scarce, being the majority open-trials and case series. Similarly, studies on combined treatment (psychological and pharmacological) are few; furthermore this is a relevant future research line. It is also remarkable the lack of quasi-experimental and experimental comparison studies and the long-term follow-up measures. PMID:23803803

  3. Effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments for chronic depression: a systematic review (METACHRON)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic depressions represent a substantial part of depressive disorders and are associated with severe consequences. Several studies were performed addressing the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments for chronic depressions. Yet, a systematic review comparing the effectiveness of multiple treatment options and considering all subtypes of chronic depressions is still missing. Methods/Design Aim of this project is to summarize empirical evidence on efficacy and effectiveness of treatments for chronic depression by means of a systematic review. The primary objectives of the study are to examine, which interventions are effective; to examine, if any differences in effectiveness between active treatment options exist; and to find possible treatment effect modifiers. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments will be considered as experimental interventions and no treatment, wait-list, psychological/pharmacological placebo, treatment as usual, and other active treatments will be seen as comparators. The population of patients will include adults with chronic major depression, dysthymia, double depression, or recurrent depression without complete remission between episodes. Outcomes of the analyses are depressive symptoms, associated consequences, adverse events, and study discontinuation. Only randomized controlled trials will be considered. Discussion Given the high prevalence and serious consequences of chronic depression and a considerable amount of existing primary studies addressing the effectiveness of different treatments the present systematic review may be of high relevance. Special attention will be given to the use of current methodological standards. Findings are likely to provide crucial information that may help clinicians to choose the appropriate treatment for chronically depressed patients. PMID:21092304

  4. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  5. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Sun-Edelstein, Christina; Rapoport, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is a common and disabling disorder that remains underdiagnosed and poorly treated. Significant unmet therapeutic needs add to the burden of this disorder; even when CM is recognized, effective treatment options are limited and randomized controlled trials supporting the use of various preventive medications are sparse. In this review, we discuss the available options for CM treatment. Currently the only FDA-approved treatment for CM prevention is onabotulinumtoxinA. Two double-blind studies have demonstrated the efficacy of topiramate for CM prevention, but it is not FDA-approved for this indication. Treatments in development for migraine will also be reviewed. Advancements in the understanding of migraine pathogenesis have identified new targets for both acute and preventive treatment and have engendered the development of targeted and mechanism-based therapies. The need for more effective treatment for CM patients, which has long since been identified, is now being addressed. Several of the emerging treatments for migraine prevention are under investigation specifically for CM or high-frequency episodic migraine.

  6. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine. PMID:26246787

  7. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine.

  8. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hui Poon, Shi; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered "treatment resistant." We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  9. Pharmacological treatment of catarrh in Iranian traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choopani, Rasool; Sadr, Saeed; Kaveh, Shahpar; Kaveh, Narges; Dehghan, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Catarrh is a condition that is carefully explained in Iranian traditional medicine. Medieval Iranian physicians used some medicinal plants in the treatment of the catarrh. Some of these substances are used in treatment today, although still more of these materials can be used in modern medicine. In this study we searched known sources of Iranian traditional medicine and collected the ideas of former great scholars and physicians about medicinal plants that are used for treatment of catarrh. Then we searched PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science databases and found 10 medicinal herbs that have the ability to treat catarrh. Plants discussed in this study are consistent with new research and can be used in modern treatments. According to rising bacterial resistance to antibiotics and complications of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs, it seems that the various components of the medicinal herbs can be beneficial in producing new drugs. Also it is hoped that more investigations on medicinal plants will be conducted in the future treatment of catarrh and other diseases related to it. PMID:26151014

  10. From non-pharmacological treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder to novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Olivier, Berend; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    The development of new pharmacological therapies starts with target discovery. Finding new therapeutic targets for anxiety disorders is a difficult process. Most of the currently described drugs for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are based on the inhibition of serotonin reuptake. The mechanism of action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was already described in 1977 (Benkert et al., 1977). Now, almost 40 years later, we still rely on the same mechanism of action and more effective pharmacological therapies, based on other working mechanisms, are not on the market yet. Finding new molecular switches that upon modulation cure or alleviate the disorder is hampered by a lack of valid animal models. Many of the characteristics of psychiatric disorders are typically human and hence animal models feature only part of the underlying pathology. In this review we define a set of criteria for animal models of PTSD. First, we describe the symptomatology and pathology of PTSD and the current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. Next, we compare three often-used animal models and analyze how these models comply with the set of criteria. Finally, we discuss how resolving the underlying mechanisms of effective non-pharmacological treatments (environmental enrichment, re-exposure) may aid therapeutic target discovery.

  11. Psychosocial and pharmacological treatment for pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Paige H; Tobkes, Jonathan L; Kotcher, Lauren; Masia-Warner, Carrie

    2006-11-01

    Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are highly prevalent and associated with long-term impairment. This article reviews the main diagnostic features of the most common pediatric anxiety disorders, including specific phobia, separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder, and highlights the state-of-the-art treatments for these diagnoses. The most recent evidence for empirically supported treatments is described, namely cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. The review concludes by providing practitioners with recommendations for treating pediatric anxiety and highlighting areas for further investigation.

  12. Pharmacologically assisted treatment of opioid-dependent youth.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Anna; Fishman, Marc; Ma, Michelle; Piralishvili, Gvantsa; Woody, George E

    2013-12-01

    Opioid misuse, abuse, and dependence are global problems whose patterns vary across cultures. In the USA, the non-medical use of prescription opioids has become particularly serious because of its association with addiction and overdose death. Agonist and antagonist medications have been shown to be effective for opioid-dependent adults, and there is a growing body of data that they are also effective for youth. Here, we summarize evidence that detoxification alone results in high rates of treatment dropout and relapse but that the limited but growing data on the extended use of medication-assisted treatment for opioid-dependent youth have been positive. The implementation of medication-assisted treatment as a standard practice is feasible, easily integrated with counseling or psychotherapy, and has potential to greatly improve outcomes. Although concerns about safety and efficacy with youth require more research, and we do not advocate indefinite maintenance, we suggest that opioid-dependent youth should be considered as candidates for medication-assisted treatment delivered in a comprehensive, developmentally appropriate context, beginning at the first episode of care, with the strength of the recommendation to use medication increasing with each care episode.

  13. A comparison of psychological and pharmacological treatment of pediatric migraine.

    PubMed

    Sartory, G; Müller, B; Metsch, J; Pothmann, R

    1998-12-01

    A comparison was carried out of the efficacy of psychological and drug treatments for children with migraine. Forty-three children aged between 8 and 16 years (mean age: 11.3 years) who suffered from migraine received either progressive relaxation or cephalic vasomotor feedback, both with stress management training, or metoprolol, a beta-blocker. Psychological treatment was administered in ten sessions lasting six weeks and the drug treatment lasted ten weeks. Relaxation and stress management training reduced the headache index (frequency x intensity of headache episodes), more effectively than metoprolol with cephalic vasomotor feedback and stress management training in between. An overall improvement over time was found with regard to frequency and intensity of headache episodes and analgesics intake. When comparing pre- to post-treatment data, children treated with relaxation training improved significantly in headache frequency and intensity, whereas those treated with cephalic vasomotor feedback improved significantly in headache frequency and duration as well as mood. The clinical improvement was stable at an 8-months follow-up.

  14. Psychophysiological Outcome of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments of Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry; Mavissakalian, Matig

    1985-01-01

    Examined relative and combined effectiveness of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy in 62 severe, chronic agoraphobics. Identified differential temporal response and treatment patterns across psychophysiological domains. Synchrony/desynchrony phenomena yielded significant findings with regard to process and clinical outcome status. Exploratory…

  15. Pharmacological Management of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; March, John

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presents with treatment-resistant symptoms of major depression. This is his first episode of depression, initially treated with 200 mg sertraline for 12 weeks with no significant benefit. The severe depression has shown a partial response to weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, which was titrated up to 60 mg…

  16. Commissioning Pharmacological Treatments for Drug Users: A Brief Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Jenny; Oliver, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To provide a brief review of relevant existing evidence regarding pharmacological treatment for drug users, in order to enable commissioners and service providers to make informed decisions that are evidence based wherever possible. Methods: The review process involved an examination of key reference texts and literature derived from…

  17. Managing Urinary Incontinence in Patients with Dementia: Pharmacological Treatment Options and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orme, Susie; Morris, Vikky; Gibson, William; Wagg, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in late life and are strongly associated with dementia and frailty. Incontinence is extremely common among those living in long-term care and is most commonly due to urgency incontinence. Although national and international guidelines for continence care exist, they often fail to consider the complex comorbidity found in patients with dementia and are often not followed; continence practices in long-term care may promote rather than prevent incontinence. The majority of those with dementia living in the community can be managed successfully with standard treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological; the expectations and aims of treatment of both the patient and their caregivers should be considered. A dementia diagnosis does not preclude management of incontinence, but treatment options may be more limited in those with advanced dementia who are unable to retain information and modify behaviors. High-quality data to guide the choice of pharmacological agent in those with dementia are lacking. Oxybutynin has been shown to have significant adverse cognitive effects, but data to support the use of trospium, solifenacin, darifenacin, and fesoterodine are limited. No data are available for mirabegron. Neither age, frailty, nor dementia should be considered a barrier to pharmacological management, but consideration should be given to the total anticholinergic load. Evidence to guide the treatment of incontinence in this vulnerable patient group is scarce, and available guidelines adapted for each individual's situation should be applied. PMID:26169438

  18. Managing Urinary Incontinence in Patients with Dementia: Pharmacological Treatment Options and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orme, Susie; Morris, Vikky; Gibson, William; Wagg, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in late life and are strongly associated with dementia and frailty. Incontinence is extremely common among those living in long-term care and is most commonly due to urgency incontinence. Although national and international guidelines for continence care exist, they often fail to consider the complex comorbidity found in patients with dementia and are often not followed; continence practices in long-term care may promote rather than prevent incontinence. The majority of those with dementia living in the community can be managed successfully with standard treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological; the expectations and aims of treatment of both the patient and their caregivers should be considered. A dementia diagnosis does not preclude management of incontinence, but treatment options may be more limited in those with advanced dementia who are unable to retain information and modify behaviors. High-quality data to guide the choice of pharmacological agent in those with dementia are lacking. Oxybutynin has been shown to have significant adverse cognitive effects, but data to support the use of trospium, solifenacin, darifenacin, and fesoterodine are limited. No data are available for mirabegron. Neither age, frailty, nor dementia should be considered a barrier to pharmacological management, but consideration should be given to the total anticholinergic load. Evidence to guide the treatment of incontinence in this vulnerable patient group is scarce, and available guidelines adapted for each individual's situation should be applied.

  19. Approved and Off-Label Uses of Obesity Medications, and Potential New Pharmacologic Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Isidro, Maria Luisa; Cordido, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Available anti-obesity pharmacotherapy options remain very limited and development of more effective drugs has become a priority. The potential strategies to achieve weight loss are to reduce energy intake by stimulating anorexigenic signals or by blocking orexigenic signals, and to increase energy expenditure. This review will focus on approved obesity medications, as well as potential new pharmacologic treatment options.

  20. Update on the pharmacological treatment of adult myositis.

    PubMed

    Oddis, C V

    2016-07-01

    The management of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) remains a challenge given the systemic features beyond active myositis. That is, recognizing the inflammatory arthropathy, varying dermatomyositis rashes, and overt and occult features of interstitial lung disease in addition to myositis adds to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of IIM. However, clinicians now have available many more immunosuppressive drugs as well as biologic agents for use in patients with myositis and other autoimmune diseases. Here, the use of these agents is reviewed and support based on available published literature is provided even though many studies have been small and results somewhat anecdotal. Glucocorticoids remain the initial treatment of choice in most instances and methotrexate and azathioprine are often used early in the treatment course. These agents are followed by other immunosuppressive drugs, for example mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide, some of which are used alone while combinations of these agents also provide an effective option. There is more rationale for the use of biologic agents such as rituximab from a mechanistic perspective and, given the incorporation of validated core set measures in assessing myositis patients, we can look forward to better designed clinical trials in the future. PMID:27098592

  1. Guanfacine Extended Release: A New Pharmacological Treatment Option in Europe.

    PubMed

    Huss, Michael; Chen, Wai; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2016-01-01

    Children/adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a poor or inadequate response to psychostimulants or be unable to tolerate their side-effects; furthermore, stimulants may be inappropriate because of co-existing conditions. Only one non-stimulant ADHD pharmacotherapy, the noradrenaline transporter inhibitor atomoxetine, is currently approved for use in Europe. We review recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of ADHD with a focus on the roles of catecholamine receptors in context of the α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine extended release (GXR), a new non-stimulant treatment option in Europe. Neuroimaging studies of children/adolescents with ADHD show impaired brain maturation, and structural and functional anomalies in brain regions and networks. Neurobiological studies in ADHD and medication response patterns support involvement of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (primarily dopamine and noradrenaline). Guanfacine is a selective α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist that has been shown to improve prefrontal cortical cognitive function, including working memory. The hypothesized mode of action of guanfacine centres on direct stimulation of post-synaptic α2A-adrenergic receptors to enhance noradrenaline neurotransmission. Preclinical data suggest that guanfacine also influences dendritic spine growth and maturation. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of GXR in ADHD, and it is approved as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to stimulants in Canada and the USA (for children and adolescents). GXR was approved recently in Europe for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents for whom stimulants are not suitable, not tolerated or have been shown to be ineffective. GXR may provide particular benefit for children/adolescents who have specific co-morbidities such as chronic tic disorders or oppositional defiant disorder (or oppositional symptoms) that have failed to respond to first-line treatment

  2. Pharmacological treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mohamad; Henning, Oliver; Larsson, Pål G; Johannessen, Svein I; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of psychopharmacological drugs for the treatment of a stated or presumed psychiatric comorbid condition in patients with refractory epilepsy and discuss the clinical implications of such treatment. The study was a retrospective descriptive study in patients admitted to the National Center for Epilepsy in Norway based on medication described in medical records. The mean age was 40 years (range: 9-90), and the gender ratio was 56/44% female/male. Psychotropic drugs (antidepressants and antipsychotics) were used to a lower extent than in the general population in Norway. Drugs for ADHD were predominantly used in children. The prevalence of patients treated with psychiatric comedication was 13% (143 of 1139 patients). The patients used two to eight concomitant CNS-active drugs, which calls for the close monitoring of potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions and should challenge clinicians to achieve a less complex pharmacotherapy. Psychiatric comorbidity is an important concern in patients with refractory epilepsy and may be undertreated.

  3. Pharmacologic treatments for opioid dependence: detoxification and maintenance options

    PubMed Central

    Kleber, Herbert D.

    2007-01-01

    While opioid dependence has more treatment agents available than other abused drugs, none are curative. They can, however, markedly diminish withdrawal symptoms and craving, and block opioid effects due to lapses. The most effective withdrawal method is substituting and tapering methadone or buprenorphine, α-2 Adrenergic agents can ameliorate untreated symptoms or substitute for agonists if not available. Shortening withdrawal by precipitating it with narcotic antagonists has been studied, but the methods are plagued by safety issues or persisting symptoms. Neither the withdrawal agents nor the methods are associated with better long-term outcome, which appears mostly related to post-detoxification treatment. Excluding those with short-term habits, the best outcome occurs with long-term maintenance on methadone or buprenorphine accompanied by appropriate psychosocial interventions. Those with strong external motivation may do well on the antagonist naltrexone. Currently, optimum duration of maintenance on either is unclear. Better agents are needed to impact the brain changes related to addiction. PMID:18286804

  4. Suicidal Behavior in Mood Disorders: Response to Pharmacological Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tondo, Leonardo; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2016-09-01

    Suicidal behavior is strongly associated with depression, especially if accompanied by behavioral activation, dysphoria, or agitation. It may respond to some treatments, but the design of scientifically sound, ethical trials to test for therapeutic effects on suicidal behavior is highly challenging. In bipolar disorder, and possibly also unipolar major depression, an underprescribed medical intervention with substantial evidence of preventive effects on suicidal behavior is long-term treatment with lithium. It is unclear whether this effect is specifically antisuicidal or reflects beneficial effects of lithium on depression, mood instability, and perhaps aggression and impulsivity. Antisuicidal effects of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, valproate) appear to be less than with lithium. Further evaluation is needed for potential antisuicidal effects of atypical antipsychotics with growing evidence of efficacy in depression, particularly acute bipolar depression, while generally lacking risk of inducing agitation, mania, or mood instability. Short-term and long-term value and safety of antidepressants are relatively secure for unipolar depression but uncertain and poorly tested for bipolar depression; their effects on suicidal risk in unipolar depression may be age-dependent. Sedative anxiolytics are virtually unstudied as regards suicidal risks. Adequate management of suicidal risks in mood disorder patients requires comprehensive, clinically skillful monitoring and timely interventions. PMID:27542851

  5. [New pharmacological approaches to the treatment of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Uzbay, I Tayfun

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder with a challenging rational pharmacotherapy. Neurochemical transmission in the dopaminergic system, especially via D2 receptors, and related changes in postsynaptic signal transduction are very important in both the formation of schizophrenia and current pharmacotherapeutic treatment with antipsychotic drugs. Blocking the serotonergic 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors is growing growing importance with regard to the action mechanisms of new generation antipsychotic medications. Recent preclinical and clinical data show that dysfunction of central neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurophin-3 (NT-3) might contribute to impaired brain development and neuroplasticity, leading to schizophrenia. In addition, some recent studies suggest that there is an important relationship between alcohol and substance addiction, and schizophrenia. There is also some preclinical data indicating that the central nitrergic system and agmatine(3/4)a biologically active agent produced after decarboxylation of arginine(3/4)might be interesting and important targets for understanding the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia and for development of new drugs. Selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, specific agonists for metabotropic and NMDA receptors of the glutamatergic system, and nicotinic alpha-7 receptor agonists were reported in preclinical and a limited number of clinical studies as potential new targets for schizophrenia treatment. In this review, new advances in the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia and possible new targets are discussed in the light of the current literature.

  6. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Pathological Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Scott A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    This is an update to a previously published article discussing the neuropsychopharmacology of pathological gambling (PG) (1). In the prior manuscript, we described how cortico-limbic circuitry and neurotransmitter systems (norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, opioids, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) have been implicated in PG. These systems represent potential targets for psychopharmacological treatments for PG, with opioid antagonists arguably showing the most consistent benefit in RCTs. In the past year and half since this publication was prepared, there has been one additional randomized clinical trial (RCT) published along with a single case study. Our original manuscript did not describe in detail findings from case studies or open-label studies so in addition to the new RCT data and a new case report involving naltrexone, here we describe case and open-label findings. A PubMed search was conducted using terms such as “pathological gambling treatment”, “clinical trials and gambling”, and “gambling psychopharmacology.” Using these search terms, numerous results were obtained, necessitating further search modifiers. For example, using just “pathological gambling treatment” results in over 1600 hits. In order to focus in on the search modalities, we searched within the initial results for specific phrases such as “psychopharmacology, clinical trial, medication, serotonergic, dopaminergic, etc.” in addition to searching for specific medications. Results not directly related to the treatment of pathological gambling were not included. The study of pathological gambling is relatively new. As such, our search did not exclude any studies due to age of material, but with a few exceptions, the majority of the studies discussed were published later than 2000. This resulted in 24 case studies and/or RCTs not previously included in our original review article. These findings in conjunction with our prior publication provide a

  7. Current Controversies in the Pharmacological Treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dave; Roche, Nicolas; Halpin, David; Agusti, Alvar; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-09-01

    Clinical phenotyping is currently used to guide pharmacological treatment decisions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a personalized approach to care. Precision medicine integrates biological (endotype) and clinical (phenotype) information for a more individualized approach to pharmacotherapy, to maximize the benefit versus risk ratio. Biomarkers can be used to identify endotypes. To evolve toward precision medicine in COPD, the most appropriate biomarkers and clinical characteristics that reliably predict treatment responses need to be identified. FEV1 is a marker of COPD severity and has historically been used to guide pharmacotherapy choices. However, we now understand that the trajectory of FEV1 change, as an indicator of disease activity, is more important than a single FEV1 measurement. There is a need to develop biomarkers of disease activity to enable a more targeted and individualized approach to pharmacotherapy. Recent clinical trials testing commonly used COPD treatments have provided new information that is likely to influence pharmacological treatment decisions both at initial presentation and at follow up. In this Perspective, we consider the impact of recent clinical trials on current COPD treatment recommendations. We also focus on the movement toward precision medicine and propose how this field needs to evolve in terms of using clinical characteristics and biomarkers to identify the most appropriate patients for a given pharmacological treatment. PMID:27585383

  8. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence. PMID:23145768

  9. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence.

  10. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ralevski, Elizabeth; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening A; Petrakis, Ismene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture) is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. PMID:24648794

  11. The meaning of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenic patients1

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of medication therapy for schizophrenic patients and formulate a theoretical model about the study phenomenon. METHOD: a qualitative approach was employed, using Symbolic Interactionism as the theoretical and Grounded Theory as the methodological framework. The research was developed between 2008 and 2010 at three community mental health services in the interior of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Thirty-six patients and thirty-six family members were selected through theoretical sampling. The data were mainly collected through open interviews and observation and simultaneously analyzed through open, axial and selective coding. RESULTS: the meaning of the pharmacotherapy is centered on the phenomenon "Living with a help that bothers", which expresses the patients' ambivalence towards the medication and determines their decision making. The insight, access, limitations for self-administration of the drugs and interactions with family members and the health team influenced the patient's medication-related behavior. CONCLUSION: the theory presented in this study provides a comprehensive, contextualized, motivational and dynamic understanding of the relation the patient experiences and indicates potentials and barriers to follow the medication treatment. PMID:25296152

  12. Pharmacologic treatment of knee osteoarthritis in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy D; Fowler, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    There is a greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears due to noncontact sports injuries in women compared with men. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with accelerated development of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which is also more prevalent in women than in men. This article considers therapeutic modalities that are best suited for athletic women with knee OA. Clinical data on the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapies for knee OA, including acetaminophen, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and topical NSAIDs, are discussed, with attention paid to special considerations for women who participate in athletic activity. Adverse events associated with the use of acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs place potential limits on the dose and duration of therapy and may be of greater concern in female athletes than in other patient groups. Topical NSAIDs, which effect relief through the same mechanism of action as oral NSAIDs, produce dramatically lower systemic NSAID exposure compared with oral NSAIDs and are associated with a lower incidence of systemic adverse events. These findings, along with additional future studies, may have particular relevance to the choice of the most effective treatment options for athletic women with OA of the knee.

  13. Osteoporosis - a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =-2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically - in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients - and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  14. Pharmacologic treatment of knee osteoarthritis in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy D; Fowler, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    There is a greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears due to noncontact sports injuries in women compared with men. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with accelerated development of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which is also more prevalent in women than in men. This article considers therapeutic modalities that are best suited for athletic women with knee OA. Clinical data on the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapies for knee OA, including acetaminophen, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and topical NSAIDs, are discussed, with attention paid to special considerations for women who participate in athletic activity. Adverse events associated with the use of acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs place potential limits on the dose and duration of therapy and may be of greater concern in female athletes than in other patient groups. Topical NSAIDs, which effect relief through the same mechanism of action as oral NSAIDs, produce dramatically lower systemic NSAID exposure compared with oral NSAIDs and are associated with a lower incidence of systemic adverse events. These findings, along with additional future studies, may have particular relevance to the choice of the most effective treatment options for athletic women with OA of the knee. PMID:22030939

  15. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  16. Osteoporosis – a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =−2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically – in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients – and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  17. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: natural history and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Savelieva, Irina; John Camm, A

    2004-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Congestive heart failure (CHF), an increasingly frequent cardiovascular disorder affecting millions of people world-wide, has become the most important risk factor of AF in developed countries, as a result of ageing populations. Approximately two thirds of patients with CHF are >65 years of age and likely to have AF as a coexistent complication. Epidemiological surveys and large clinical trials in CHF provide strong evidence that AF is a marker of increased mortality. AF may compromise LV systolic function and worsen CHF through poor rate control, irregularity of ventricular response, and loss of atrial systolic activity. Furthermore, enhanced adrenergic stimulation in the setting of CHF facilitates AV conduction and promotes the progression of cardiomyopathy, and AF may worsen CHF as a consequence of the negative inotropic effects of drugs used to control the heart rate of rhythm, or of the proarrhythmic effects of drugs used to maintain sinus rhythm. This article reviews the putative mechanisms behind atrial remodelling due to long-standing AF, and the role of neuro-hormonal alterations in the atrial electrophysiologic and structural changes which facilitate its perpetuation. It also reviews and discusses various controlled trials of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and AT-1 receptor blockade in the perspective of AF treatment and prevention. Finally the role of specific antiarrhythmic drugs, the respective advantages and shortcomings of rate versus rhythm control in patients with AF and CHF, and the important issue of chronic anticoagulation are presented in the light of time-tested therapies, as well as new promising therapeutic approaches.

  18. A meta-analysis to determine the effect of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on fibromyalgia symptoms comprising OMERACT-10 response criteria.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Fassoulaki, Argyro; Tsoulas, Christos; Siafaka, Ioanna; Vadalouca, Athina

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, functional impairment, psychological distress, and cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this meta-analysis is to synthesize the available data on the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions across all domains included in the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT-10) fibromyalgia response definitions, and to examine response based on these definitions. We searched Cochrane, PubMed, Scopus, and the reference lists of articles for randomized controlled trials of any drug formulation or non-pharmacological intervention used for fibromyalgia treatment. We extracted efficacy data regarding pain, sleep, physical function, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and cognition. The available data were insufficient to draw definite conclusions regarding response. Indirect evidence indicates that it may be expected with the use of serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), and multidisciplinary treatment.

  19. A survey of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Bellentani, Stefano; Bastiani, Rudy De; Tosetti, Cesare; Cicala, Michele; Esposito, Gianluca; Arullani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) is based on symptoms relieve by conventional drugs, but increasingly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used. Objective This survey aimed to investigate the current treatments used by FGIDs patients. Methods A total of 25 Italian gastroenterologists interviewed outpatients on gastrointestinal symptoms and treatments (pharmacological, CAM, diet/dietary supplements) used during the last year to relieve FGIDs. Consecutive adults with FGIDs according to Rome III were included. Results Of the 199 patients, 81% used conventional drugs, 64.3% diet/dietary supplements, and 48.7% CAM. Conventional drugs, diet/dietary supplements, or CAM as exclusive treatment were used by 24.6, 6, and 2.5% of patients, respectively. Two-thirds used more than one treatment: 34.7% conventional drugs, CAM, and diet/dietary supplements, 17.1% conventional drugs and diet/dietary supplements, 10.1% diet and CAM, and 5% conventional drugs and CAM. Benefits and adverse effects were similar for conventional drugs and nonpharmacological treatments. Males (OR 2.4) without lower GI symptoms (OR 5.4) used more frequently exclusive pharmacological treatment of FGIDs. Conclusions Conventional drugs are the preferred treatment for FGID. CAM and dietary modifications are more likely used as an adjunct to rather than instead of conventional drugs. Adverse effects occurred in all treatments. PMID:24917987

  20. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care: executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Peuckmann‐Post, Vera; Minton, Ollie; Stone, Patrick; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In palliative care patients, fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted with rest, thereby impacting daily activity and quality of life. Further complicating issues are the multidimensionality, subjective nature and lack of a consensus definition of fatigue. The review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for fatigue in palliative care, with a focus on patients at an advanced stage of disease, including patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Methods We considered randomized controlled trials concerning adult palliative care with a focus on pharmacological treatment of fatigue compared with placebo, application of two drugs, usual care or a non‐pharmacological intervention. The primary outcome had to be non‐specific fatigue (or related terms such as asthenia). We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a selection of cancer journals up to 28 April 2014. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Results We screened 1645 publications of which 45 met the inclusion criteria. In total, we analysed data from 18 drugs and 4696 participants. There was a very high degree of statistical and clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Meta‐analysis of data was possible for modafinil, pemoline, and methylphenidate. Conclusions Due to the limited evidence, we cannot recommend a specific drug for the treatment of fatigue in palliative care patients. Some drugs, which may be beneficial for the treatment of fatigue associated with palliative care such as amantadine, methylphenidate, and modafinil, should be further researched. PMID:27066315

  1. [Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy guided by echocardiography].

    PubMed

    La Canna, Giovanni; Montorfano, Matteo; Ficarra, Eleonora; Michev, Iassen; Capritti, Elvia; Grimaldi, Antonio; De Cobelli, Francesco; Verzini, Alessandro; Colombo, Antonio; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2006-03-01

    As a relevant cause of symptoms and adverse clinical prognosis, left ventricular obstruction should be regarded as an important therapeutic target in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. The surgical approach (including septal myectomy or mitral valve surgery) and percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation offer a non-pharmacological option for the treatment of symptomatic left ventricular obstruction and symptoms unresponsive to medical treatment. The surgical approach is established as an effective strategy for relieving symptoms from dynamic obstruction. Percutaneous septal ablation, on the other hand, has only recently been introduced into clinical practice and, despite its efficacy as an obstructive abolisher, little is known about the prognostic long-term impact of procedural-induced myocardial damage. Due to its accuracy and diagnostic versatility, including intraprocedural use, Doppler echocardiography provides essential information for the planning and monitoring of non-pharmacological therapy in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis with traditional biologic and non-biologic DMARDs.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Enrique Roberto; Acosta-Felquer, Maria Laura; Luong, Phat; Caplan, Liron

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript focuses on the pharmacologic treatment of psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis - including ankylosing spondylitis - using traditional biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Early treatment of psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis/ankylosing spondylitis as well as the treat-to-target concept receive particular attention. This review also surveys recent national and international guidelines for the treatment of both psoriatic arthritis and couches practice recommendations for axial spondyloarthritis/ankylosing spondylitis within the context of various international guidelines.

  3. Treating the insomniac patient - General measures and psychological and pharmacological treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general preliminary measures for treating insomnia include moderate physical exercise several hours before bedtime, and the relaxation of complex mental activity before bedtime. A case history concerning a woman with marital troubles is offered as evidence that insomnia may be caused by deeply rooted psychological and situational problems. Another case history illustrates how prior pharmacological treatment may complicate the process of clinically evaluating an insomniac.

  4. [Biological treatment strategies of depression--psychopharmacology and non-pharmacological methods].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Biological treatment procedures are based on evidence-based guidelines. According to all of them, a correct diagnosis of depression is required before starting therapy. Within recent years many different types of antidepressants have been introduced to the pharmacotherapeutic armamentarium. The "newer" antidepressants were developed with a view to reduced side effects. However, the classes of antidepressants currently available differ little in their antidepressant efficacy, thus, all producing treatment responses of 50 - 75 %. Therefore, the selection of a particular antidepressant for the individual patient depends on various factors: patient's prior experience with medication, concurrent medical conditions that may be worsened by selected antidepressants, concomitant use of non-psychiatric medications that may lead to negative drug-drug interactions, a drug's short and long-term side effects, physician's experience with the medication and patient's history of adherence to medication. Importantly, if the patient does not show any improvement after two to four weeks of treatment with an antidepressant dose at the upper level of the standard dose, it becomes less likely that he will respond to this particular medication later. When a partial or non-response is present, several therapeutic options are available: (1) combining two antidepressants from different classes, (2) switch to new antidepressant from a different or the same pharmacological class and (3) augmentation strategies. For patients who are reluctant to take traditional antidepressants, herbal remedies such as hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) provide an alternative for treatment of mild to moderate depression. Besides pharmacological treatment options non pharmacological biological interventions are available. Electroconvulsive therapy and partial sleep deprivation are very effective in the treatment of acute depression. Especially for seasonal affective disorders light therapy is a well

  5. Long-Term Pharmacological Treatments of Anxiety Disorders: An Updated Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Alciati, Alessandra; Riva, Alice; Micieli, Wilma; Caldirola, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of long-term pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders (AnxDs) are still debated. We undertook an updated systematic review of long-term pharmacological studies on panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Relevant studies dating from January 1, 2012 to August 31, 2015 were identified using the PubMed database and a review of bibliographies. Of 372 records identified in the search, five studies on PD and 15 on GAD were included in the review. No studies on SAD were found. Our review confirms the usefulness of long-term pharmacological treatments for PD and GAD and suggests that they can provide further improvement over that obtained during short-term therapy. Paroxetine, escitalopram, and clonazepam can be effective for long-term treatment of PD. However, further studies are needed to draw conclusions about the long-term benzodiazepine use in PD, particularly for the possible cognitive side-effects over time. Pregabalin and quetiapine can be effective for long-term treatment of GAD, while preliminary suggestions emerged for agomelatine and vortioxetine. We did not find any evidence for determining the optimal length and/or dosage of medications to minimize the relapse risk. Few investigations have attempted to identify potential predictors of long-term treatment response. Personalized treatments for AnxDs can be implemented using predictive tools to explore those factors affecting treatment response/tolerability heterogeneity, including neurobiological functions/clinical profiles, comorbidity, biomarkers, and genetic features, and to tailor medications according to each patient's unique features. PMID:26830881

  6. Long-Term Pharmacological Treatments of Anxiety Disorders: An Updated Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Alciati, Alessandra; Riva, Alice; Micieli, Wilma; Caldirola, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of long-term pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders (AnxDs) are still debated. We undertook an updated systematic review of long-term pharmacological studies on panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Relevant studies dating from January 1, 2012 to August 31, 2015 were identified using the PubMed database and a review of bibliographies. Of 372 records identified in the search, five studies on PD and 15 on GAD were included in the review. No studies on SAD were found. Our review confirms the usefulness of long-term pharmacological treatments for PD and GAD and suggests that they can provide further improvement over that obtained during short-term therapy. Paroxetine, escitalopram, and clonazepam can be effective for long-term treatment of PD. However, further studies are needed to draw conclusions about the long-term benzodiazepine use in PD, particularly for the possible cognitive side-effects over time. Pregabalin and quetiapine can be effective for long-term treatment of GAD, while preliminary suggestions emerged for agomelatine and vortioxetine. We did not find any evidence for determining the optimal length and/or dosage of medications to minimize the relapse risk. Few investigations have attempted to identify potential predictors of long-term treatment response. Personalized treatments for AnxDs can be implemented using predictive tools to explore those factors affecting treatment response/tolerability heterogeneity, including neurobiological functions/clinical profiles, comorbidity, biomarkers, and genetic features, and to tailor medications according to each patient's unique features.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Practical strategies for pharmacological and somatic treatment in adults.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Reghunandanan, Samar; Simpson, Helen B; Phillips, Katharine A; Richter, Margaret A; Matthews, Keith; Stein, Dan J; Sareen, Jitender; Brown, Angus; Sookman, Debbie

    2015-05-30

    This narrative review gathers together a range of international experts to critically appraise the existing trial-based evidence relating to the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for obsessive compulsive disorder in adults. We discuss the diagnostic evaluation and clinical characteristics followed by treatment options suitable for the clinician working from primary through to specialist psychiatric care. Robust data supports the effectiveness of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and clomipramine in the short-term and the longer-term treatment and for relapse prevention. Owing to better tolerability, SSRIs are acknowledged as the first-line pharmacological treatment of choice. For those patients for whom first line treatments have been ineffective, evidence supports the use of adjunctive antipsychotic medication, and some evidence supports the use of high-dose SSRIs. Novel compounds are also the subject of active investigation. Neurosurgical treatments, including ablative lesion neurosurgery and deep brain stimulation, are reserved for severely symptomatic individuals who have not experienced sustained response to both pharmacological and cognitive behavior therapies.

  8. Development of a self-treatment approach for patients with COPD and comorbidities: an ongoing learning process

    PubMed Central

    Lenferink, Anke; Buckman, Julie; Spicer, Deborah; Cafarella, Paul A.; Burt, Morton G.; Bassett, Katherine L.; van Ommeren, Clara; Anesbury, Sally; van der Valk, Paul D L P M; Frith, Peter A.; van der Palen, Job

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-initiated action plans are an important component of COPD self-management (SM) interventions. When integrated into SM interventions, these action plans have proven to be effective in reducing exacerbation severity, hospitalisations, and costs and in improving health status in patients with COPD without severe comorbidities. Because of overlap in symptoms, a self-treatment (ST) approach that focuses solely on traditional symptoms of COPD is inadequate for patients with COPD and comorbidities. The COPE-III SM intervention combines (I) patient-initiated action plans that are tailored to the individual’s co-morbid disease(s), and (II) ongoing nurse support. In this paper we provide information regarding the integration of information from two previous COPD SM studies (COPE I and II) in the development of the current COPE-III ST approach. Materials and methods COPE-III ST materials include daily symptom diaries and action plans that take patient’s common comorbidities [chronic heart failure (CHF), anxiety, depression, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and diabetes] into account. The comorbid diary and action plans components were developed in collaboration with multiple disease-experts. Results Previous SM studies have highlighted some essential topics that need to be considered when developing a SM or ST approach: ‘when to initiate ST’, ‘how to optimize materials and safety’, and ‘how to achieve behavioural change’. In the COPE-III study, ST is initiated after a significant change in symptoms. This is consistent with the COPE-II approach and was implemented because disease symptoms are often present even when patients are stable. We have tried to ensure patient safety by providing an easily accessible case-manager to patients throughout their involvement in the study. Furthermore, a psychologist has ensured the use of behavioural change techniques throughout the intervention. Conclusions We should continue to learn from our experiences

  9. Non-pharmacological treatment for neuropathic pain in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Casanova-García, C; Lerma Lara, S; Pérez Ruiz, M; Ruano Domínguez, D; Santana Sosa, E

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) associated with childhood cancer is currently a difficult problem to control. It is treated with drugs that not only fail to provide the expected improvements, but which also have side effects. Therefore, the main aim of this pilot study is to assess whether non-pharmacological treatments, Graded Motor Imagery (GMI) and Neural Mobilization (NM), have a positive effect on this pain, thus improving the associated comorbid factors and, consequently, the quality of life of the children. In an n = 6, the results after 4 weeks of treatment show a 10-point improvement in the pain threshold and a 3.1-point improvement in the perception of pain.

  10. Anxiety levels and related pharmacological drug treatment: a memorandum for the third millennium.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Isabella

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders frequently affect the general population and have a lifetime prevalence ranging from 13.6% to 28.8%. This paper reviews full articles dealing with the pharmacological treatments of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder (PD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This review also attempts to evaluate the use of new drugs acting on several neurotransmitters involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. Major advances include the development of glutamatergic drugs for treating GAD and OCD. Further randomized controlled trials to test the effect of glutamatergic agents in the treatment of OCD and GAD would be warranted.

  11. Clinical pharmacology of lysergic acid diethylamide: case reports and review of the treatment of intoxication.

    PubMed

    Blaho, K; Merigian, K; Winbery, S; Geraci, S A; Smartt, C

    1997-01-01

    Intoxication and overdose are common presenting complaints to the emergency department. Acute intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has become a relatively rare event, especially when compared with the incidence of ethanol and cocaine intoxication. We recently had an outbreak of presumed LSD intoxications occurring over one weekend. All patients had attended a performance by the musical group The Grateful Dead. At present, LSD intoxication or overdose can only be suspected based on clinical findings because there are no readily available rapid laboratory tests for detecting either the parent compound or the metabolites of the drug. The clinical findings and outcomes of five patients with suspected LSD intoxication are presented. The pharmacological effects of LSD and treatment modalities of intoxication are reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively based on clinical signs and symptoms. Only one patient required hospital admission for combative behavior that was initially refractory to pharmacological restraint.

  12. Physical exercise as non-pharmacological treatment of chronic pain: Why and when.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Kirsten R; Golightly, Yvonne M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pain broadly encompasses both objectively defined conditions and idiopathic conditions that lack physical findings. Despite variance in origin or pathogenesis, these conditions are similarly characterized by chronic pain, poor physical function, mobility limitations, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, and they are treated alone or in combination by pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches, such as physical activity (aerobic conditioning, muscle strengthening, flexibility training, and movement therapies). Physical activity improves general health, disease risk, and progression of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. When applied to chronic pain conditions within appropriate parameters (frequency, duration, and intensity), physical activity significantly improves pain and related symptoms. For chronic pain, strict guidelines for physical activity are lacking, but frequent movement is preferable to sedentary behavior. This gives considerable freedom in prescribing physical activity treatments, which are most successful when tailored individually, progressed slowly, and account for physical limitations, psychosocial needs, and available resources. PMID:26267006

  13. Managing insomnia: an overview of insomnia and pharmacologic treatment strategies in use and on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas L; Goradia, Viral

    2013-01-01

    This review explores basic sleep physiology, the mechanism of action for each class of hypnotic agents, their clinical application based on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic factors, and potential pharmacologic sleep-inducing mechanisms of future hypnotics. The paper challenges the reader to understand the neuroscientific basis of insomnia and use this knowledge to guide prescription of hypnotic agents. Currently indicated hypnotic agents are discussed with regard to their mechanism of drug action and clinical application. A broader discussion is developed throughout this paper regarding other non-indicated agents that may improve sleep and describing newer pharmacological treatments that may become available in the future for use in sleep disorders and their comorbid conditions. PMID:24432044

  14. Pharmacologic treatments for the behavioral symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Carolyn A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    This review outlines pharmacologic treatments for the behavioral symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, adolescents, and adults. Symptom domains include repetitive and stereotyped behaviors, irritability and aggression, hyperactivity and inattention, and social impairment. Medications covered include serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), mirtazapine, antipsychotics, psychostimulants, atomoxetine, α-2 agonists, D-cycloserine, and memantine. Overall, SRIs are less efficacious and more poorly tolerated in children with ASDs than in adults. Antipsychotics are the most efficacious drugs for the treatment of irritability in ASDs, and may be useful in the treatment of other symptoms. Psychostimulants demonstrate some benefit for the treatment of hyperactivity and inattention in individuals with ASDs, but are less efficacious and associated with more adverse effects compared with individuals with ADHD. D-cycloserine and memantine appear helpful in the treatment of social impairment, although further research is needed. PMID:23226952

  15. Recurrent Vascular Headache: Home-Based Behavioral Treatment versus Abortive Pharmacological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a home-based behavioral intervention (relaxation and thermal biofeedback training) with an abortive pharmacological intervention (with compliance training) for treating recurrent migraine and migraine/tension headaches. Both interventions yielded reductions in headache activity, psychosomatic symptoms, and daily life…

  16. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and co-occurring substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Smelson, David A; Dixon, Lisa; Craig, Thomas; Remolina, Stephen; Batki, Steven L; Niv, Noosha; Owen, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Substance abuse among individuals with schizophrenia is common and is often associated with poor clinical outcomes. Comprehensive, integrated pharmacological and psychosocial treatments have been shown to improve these outcomes. While a growing number of studies suggest that second-generation antipsychotic medications may have beneficial effects on the treatment of co-occurring substance use disorders, this review suggests that the literature is still in its infancy. Few existing well controlled trials support greater efficacy of second-generation antipsychotics compared with first-generation antipsychotics or any particular second-generation antipsychotic. This article focuses on and reviews studies involving US FDA-approved medications for co-occurring substance abuse problems among individuals with schizophrenia.Comprehensive treatment for individuals with schizophrenia and co-occurring substance use disorders must include specialized, integrated psychosocial intervention. Most approaches use some combination of cognitive-behavioural therapy, motivational enhancement therapy and assertive case management. The research on antipsychotic and other pharmacological treatments is also reviewed, as well as psychosocial treatments for individuals with schizophrenia and co-occurring substance use disorders, and clinical recommendations to optimize care for this population are offered.

  17. Non-pharmacological treatment options for refractory epilepsy: an overview of human treatment modalities and their potential utility in dogs.

    PubMed

    Martlé, Valentine; Van Ham, Luc; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul; Bhatti, Sofie

    2014-03-01

    Refractory epilepsy is a common disorder both in humans and dogs and treatment protocols are difficult to optimise. In humans, different non-pharmacological treatment modalities currently available include surgery, the ketogenic diet and neurostimulation. Surgery leads to freedom from seizures in 50-75% of patients, but requires strict patient selection. The ketogenic diet is indicated in severe childhood epilepsies, but efficacy is limited and long-term compliance can be problematic. In the past decade, various types of neurostimulation have emerged as promising treatment modalities for humans with refractory epilepsy. Currently, none of these treatment options are used in routine daily clinical practice to treat dogs with the condition. Since many dogs with poorly controlled seizures do not survive, the search for alternative treatment options for canine refractory epilepsy should be prioritised. This review provides an overview of non-pharmacological treatment options for human refractory epilepsy. The current knowledge and limitations of these treatments in canine refractory epilepsy is also discussed.

  18. Combining Pharmacological and Psychological Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder: Current Status, Limitations, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; Reas, Deborah L; Mitchell, James E

    2016-06-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress about binge eating without the extreme compensatory behaviors for weight control that characterize other eating disorders. BED is prevalent, associated strongly with obesity, and is associated with heightened levels of psychological, psychiatric, and medical concerns. This article provides an overview of randomized controlled treatments for combined psychological and pharmacological treatment of BED to inform current clinical practice and future treatment research. In contrast to the prevalence and significance of BED, to date, limited research has been performed on combining psychological and pharmacological treatments for BED to enhance outcomes. Our review here found that combining certain medications with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or behavioral weight loss (BWL) interventions produces superior outcomes to pharmacotherapy only but does not substantially improve outcomes achieved with CBT/BWL only. One medication (orlistat) has improved weight losses with CBT/BWL albeit minimally, and only one medication (topiramate) has enhanced reductions achieved with CBT in both binge eating and weight. Implications for future research are discussed.

  19. Combining Pharmacological and Psychological Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder: Current Status, Limitations, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; Reas, Deborah L; Mitchell, James E

    2016-06-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress about binge eating without the extreme compensatory behaviors for weight control that characterize other eating disorders. BED is prevalent, associated strongly with obesity, and is associated with heightened levels of psychological, psychiatric, and medical concerns. This article provides an overview of randomized controlled treatments for combined psychological and pharmacological treatment of BED to inform current clinical practice and future treatment research. In contrast to the prevalence and significance of BED, to date, limited research has been performed on combining psychological and pharmacological treatments for BED to enhance outcomes. Our review here found that combining certain medications with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or behavioral weight loss (BWL) interventions produces superior outcomes to pharmacotherapy only but does not substantially improve outcomes achieved with CBT/BWL only. One medication (orlistat) has improved weight losses with CBT/BWL albeit minimally, and only one medication (topiramate) has enhanced reductions achieved with CBT in both binge eating and weight. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27086316

  20. Nine traditional Chinese herbal formulas for the treatment of depression: an ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology review

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dan-dan; Tang, Tao; Lin, Xiang-ping; Yang, Zhao-yu; Yang, Shu; Xia, Zi-an; Wang, Yun; Zheng, Piao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Chun-hu

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major mental disorder, and is currently recognized as the second-leading cause of disability worldwide. However, the therapeutic effect of antidepressants remains unsatisfactory. For centuries, Chinese herbal formulas (CHFs) have been widely used in the treatment of depression, achieving better therapeutic effects than placebo and having fewer side effects than conventional antidepressants. Here, we review the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology studies of nine common CHFs: “banxia houpo” decoction, “chaihu shugansan”, “ganmaidazao” decoction, “kaixinsan”, “shuganjieyu” capsules, “sinisan”, “wuling” capsules, “xiaoyaosan”, and “yueju”. Eight clinical trials and seven meta-analyses have supported the theory that CHFs are effective treatments for depression, decreasing Hamilton Depression Scale scores and showing few adverse effects. Evidence from 75 preclinical studies has also elucidated the multitarget and multipathway mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of the nine CHFs. Decoctions, capsules, and pills all showed antidepressant effects, ranked in descending order of efficacy. According to traditional Chinese medicine theory, these CHFs have flexible compatibility and mainly act by soothing the liver and relieving depression. This review highlights the effective treatment choices and candidate compounds for patients, practitioners, and researchers in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. In summary, the current evidence supports the efficacy of CHFs in the treatment of depression, but additional large-scale randomized controlled clinical trials and sophisticated pharmacology studies should be performed. PMID:27703356

  1. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Beatriz; Franco-Trigo, Lucía; Moullin, Joanna C; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José P

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. Methods A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]). References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database’s indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability) was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Results A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky–Green–Levine; Brief Medication Questionnaire; Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale; Morisky Medication Adherence Scale; Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patients with Hypertension (TAQPH); and Martín–Bayarre–Grau. Questionnaire length ranged from four to 28 items. Internal consistency, assessed by Cronbach’s α, varied from 0

  2. Pharmacological recommendations for the symptomatic treatment of dementia: the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While there have been no new medications approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other dementias in Canada since 2004, the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia (CCCDTD) reviewed and updated the clinical practice guidelines on the pharmacological management of dementia that were published previously. Methods This review focused on the literature for the pharmacological treatment of dementia based on studies published since the third CCCDTD in 2006. A literature search of English-language medical databases was preformed for studies pertaining to the pharmacological treatment of AD and other dementias that examined the management of cognitive and functional impairment, as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms. All previous recommendations were reviewed, and only those that required updating based on new published studies were revised. Several new recommendations were also added. Recommendations were rated for quality of evidence and were approved by consensus. Results There were 15 revised or new recommendations approved by consensus. The revised recommendations included acknowledging that cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) possess a class effect and any of the agents can be used for AD across the spectrum of severity and with co-existing cerebrovascular disease. There was insufficient evidence to recommend for or against the use of ChEIs in combination with memantine for the primary indication of treating neuropsychiatric symptoms, or for the treatment of vascular dementia. Recommendations for the discontinuation of cognitive enhancers were revised and clarified, as well as the risks associated with discontinuing these drugs. ChEIs were recommended as a treatment option for dementia with Parkinson's disease. Risks associated with use of antipsychotics for neuropsychiatric symptoms were strengthened, and guidelines regarding the use of antidepressants for affective disturbances in dementia were weakened, and

  3. Mouse Models Applied to the Research of Pharmacological Treatments in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Marqués-García, Fernando; Marcos-Vadillo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Models developed for the study of asthma mechanisms can be used to investigate new compounds with pharmacological activity against this disease. The increasing number of compounds requires a preclinical evaluation before starting the application in humans. Preclinical evaluation in animal models reduces the number of clinical trials positively impacting in the cost and in safety. In this chapter, three protocols for the study of drugs are shown: a model to investigate corticoids as a classical treatment of asthma; a protocol to test the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on asthma; and a mouse model to test new therapies in asthma as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27300543

  4. Current and future pharmacological treatment strategies in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Johannes; Pujol, Aurora; Aubourg, Patrick; Forss-Petter, Sonja

    2010-07-01

    Mutations in the ABCD1 gene cause the clinical spectrum of the neurometabolic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (X-ALD/AMN). Currently, the most efficient therapeutic opportunity for patients with the cerebral form of X-ALD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and possibly gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Both treatments, however, are only accessible to a subset of X-ALD patients, mainly because of the lack of markers that can predict the onset of cerebral demyelination. Moreover, for female or male X-ALD patients with AMN, currently only unsatisfying therapeutic opportunities are available. Thus, this review focuses on current and urgently needed future pharmacological therapies. The treatment of adrenal and gonadal insufficiency is well established, whereas applications of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have failed to prevent progression of cerebral neuroinflammation. The use of Lorenzo's oil and the inefficacy of lovastatin to normalize very-long-chain fatty acids in clinical trials as well as currently experimental and therefore possible future therapeutic strategies are reviewed. The latter include pharmacological gene therapy mediated by targeted upregulation of ABCD2, the closest homolog of ABCD1, antioxidative drug treatment, small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrates and valproic acid, and other neuroprotective attempts.

  5. Current and Future Pharmacological Treatment Strategies in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Johannes; Pujol, Aurora; Aubourg, Patrick; Forss-Petter, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCD1 gene cause the clinical spectrum of the neurometabolic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (X-ALD/AMN). Currently, the most efficient therapeutic opportunity for patients with the cerebral form of X-ALD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and possibly gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Both treatments, however, are only accessible to a subset of X-ALD patients, mainly because of the lack of markers that can predict the onset of cerebral demyelination. Moreover, for female or male X-ALD patients with AMN, currently only unsatisfying therapeutic opportunities are available. Thus, this review focuses on current and urgently needed future pharmacological therapies. The treatment of adrenal and gonadal insufficiency is well established, whereas applications of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have failed to prevent progression of cerebral neuroinflammation. The use of Lorenzo's oil and the inefficacy of lovastatin to normalize very-long-chain fatty acids in clinical trials as well as currently experimental and therefore possible future therapeutic strategies are reviewed. The latter include pharmacological gene therapy mediated by targeted upregulation of ABCD2, the closest homolog of ABCD1, antioxidative drug treatment, small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrates and valproic acid, and other neuroprotective attempts. PMID:20626746

  6. Pharmacological Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Iughetti, Lorenzo; China, Mariachiara; Berri, Rossella; Predieri, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing in children and adolescents worldwide raising the question on the approach to this condition because of the potential morbidity, mortality, and economic tolls. Dietetic and behavioral treatments alone have only limited success; consequently, discussion on strategies for treating childhood and adolescent obesity has been promoted. Considering that our knowledge on the physiological systems regulating food intake and body weight is considerably increased, many studies have underlined the scientific and clinical relevance of potential treatments based on management of peripheral or central neuropeptides signals by drugs. In this paper, we analyze the data on the currently approved obesity pharmacological treatment suggesting the new potential drugs. PMID:21197151

  7. Novel pharmacologic treatment in acute binge eating disorder – role of lisdexamfetamine

    PubMed Central

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Casuto, Leah S; McElroy, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and an important public health problem. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive food consumption accompanied by a sense of loss of control over the binge eating behavior without the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors of bulimia nervosa. BED affects both sexes and all age groups and is associated with medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Until recently, self-help and psychotherapy were the primary treatment options for patients with BED. In early 2015, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a prodrug stimulant marketed for attention deficit hyperactive disorder, was the first pharmacologic agent to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of moderate or severe BED in adults. This article summarizes BED clinical presentation, and discusses the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of BED in adults. PMID:27143885

  8. Novel pharmacologic treatment in acute binge eating disorder - role of lisdexamfetamine.

    PubMed

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Casuto, Leah S; McElroy, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and an important public health problem. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive food consumption accompanied by a sense of loss of control over the binge eating behavior without the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors of bulimia nervosa. BED affects both sexes and all age groups and is associated with medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Until recently, self-help and psychotherapy were the primary treatment options for patients with BED. In early 2015, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a prodrug stimulant marketed for attention deficit hyperactive disorder, was the first pharmacologic agent to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of moderate or severe BED in adults. This article summarizes BED clinical presentation, and discusses the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of BED in adults. PMID:27143885

  9. Novel pharmacologic treatment in acute binge eating disorder – role of lisdexamfetamine

    PubMed Central

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Casuto, Leah S; McElroy, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and an important public health problem. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive food consumption accompanied by a sense of loss of control over the binge eating behavior without the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors of bulimia nervosa. BED affects both sexes and all age groups and is associated with medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Until recently, self-help and psychotherapy were the primary treatment options for patients with BED. In early 2015, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a prodrug stimulant marketed for attention deficit hyperactive disorder, was the first pharmacologic agent to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of moderate or severe BED in adults. This article summarizes BED clinical presentation, and discusses the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of BED in adults. PMID:27143885

  10. Pharmacological and psychosomatic treatments for an elderly patient with severe nausea and vomiting in reaction to postoperative stress.

    PubMed

    Otera, Masako; Machida, Takatsugu; Machida, Tomomi; Abe, Mai; Ichie, Masayoshi; Fukudo, Shin

    2015-10-01

    Here we present a case of successful treatment employing a mixed approach including pharmacological and psychosomatic treatments for a 72-year-old woman who experienced severe nausea and vomiting in reaction to postoperative stress from gastric cancer surgery. This case demonstrates that appropriate provision of psychosomatic treatments, including a psychotherapeutic session and autogenic training, enhances the efficacy of pharmacotherapy.

  11. Methods of Blinding in Reports of Randomized Controlled Trials Assessing Pharmacologic Treatments: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Boutron, Isabelle; Estellat, Candice; Guittet, Lydia; Dechartres, Agnes; Sackett, David L; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Ravaud, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Background Blinding is a cornerstone of therapeutic evaluation because lack of blinding can bias treatment effect estimates. An inventory of the blinding methods would help trialists conduct high-quality clinical trials and readers appraise the quality of results of published trials. We aimed to systematically classify and describe methods to establish and maintain blinding of patients and health care providers and methods to obtain blinding of outcome assessors in randomized controlled trials of pharmacologic treatments. Methods and Findings We undertook a systematic review of all reports of randomized controlled trials assessing pharmacologic treatments with blinding published in 2004 in high impact-factor journals from Medline and the Cochrane Methodology Register. We used a standardized data collection form to extract data. The blinding methods were classified according to whether they primarily (1) established blinding of patients or health care providers, (2) maintained the blinding of patients or health care providers, and (3) obtained blinding of assessors of the main outcomes. We identified 819 articles, with 472 (58%) describing the method of blinding. Methods to establish blinding of patients and/or health care providers concerned mainly treatments provided in identical form, specific methods to mask some characteristics of the treatments (e.g., added flavor or opaque coverage), or use of double dummy procedures or simulation of an injection. Methods to avoid unblinding of patients and/or health care providers involved use of active placebo, centralized assessment of side effects, patients informed only in part about the potential side effects of each treatment, centralized adapted dosage, or provision of sham results of complementary investigations. The methods reported for blinding outcome assessors mainly relied on a centralized assessment of complementary investigations, clinical examination (i.e., use of video, audiotape, or photography), or

  12. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Fred; Williams, David A; Collinge, William

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost-benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described.

  13. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Fred; Williams, David A; Collinge, William

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost–benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described. PMID:23166446

  14. ITI-007 in the treatment of schizophrenia: from novel pharmacology to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; Correll, Christoph U

    2016-06-01

    ITI-007 is an investigational drug being developed for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric/neurodegenerative diseases. ITI-007 has a unique pharmacological profile, combining potent 5-HT2a receptor antagonism with cell-type-specific dopamine and glutamate receptor modulation, plus serotonin reuptake inhibition. At dopamine-D2 receptors, ITI-007 acts as a post-synaptic antagonist and pre-synaptic partial agonist. Additionally, ITI-007 stimulates phosphorylation of glutamatergic NMDA-NR2B receptors, downstream of dopamine-D1 receptor intracellular signaling. Based on a large, placebo and risperidone controlled, Phase-II trial, ITI-007 60 mg was shown to be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia. The antipsychotic efficacy of ITI-007 60 mg in this patient population was confirmed in a recently completed Phase III study. ITI-007 was associated with minimal safety risk compared to risperidone (Phase II study) or placebo (both studies) for neuromotor disturbances, prolactin changes, weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. A second 6-week, placebo and risperidone-controlled Phase-III trial in acutely exacerbated schizophrenia is ongoing. PMID:27042868

  15. Recognition of category-related visual stimuli in Parkinson's disease: before and after pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Righi, S; Viggiano, M P; Paganini, M; Ramat, S; Marini, P

    2007-10-01

    Visual-sensory dysfunctions and semantic processing impairments are widely reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) research. The present study investigated the category-specific deficit in object recognition as a function of both the semantic category and spatial frequency content of stimuli. In the first experiment, the role of dopamine in object-recognition processing was assessed by comparing PD drug naïve (PD-DN), PD receiving levodopa treatment (PD-LD), and control subjects. Experiment 2 consisted of a retest session for PD drug naïve subjects after a period of pharmacological treatment. All participants completed an identification task which displayed animals and tools at nine levels of filtering. Each object was revealed in a sequence of frames whereby the object was presented at increasingly less-filtered images up to a complete version of the image. Results indicate an impaired identification pattern for PD-DN subjects solely for animal category stimuli. This differential pharmacological therapy effect was also confirmed at retest (experiment 2). Thus, our data suggest that dopaminergic loss has a specific role in category-specific impairment. Two possible hypotheses are discussed that may account for the defective recognition of semantically different objects in PD.

  16. Diagnosis of dementia and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacologic management of disease progression and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed Central

    van Reekum, R.; Simard, M.; Farcnik, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To highlight the importance of family physicians in the management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias. To provide an update on the diagnostic workup of people with suspected dementia and on the pharmacologic management of cognitive impairment and disease progression in AD. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and Psychological Abstracts were searched using the terms "cognitive enhancers" or a specific drug name and "dementia (exp)." Evidence is generally limited but promising. Methodologic flaws in existing research likely to affect clinicians are briefly reviewed. MAIN MESSAGE: Increasing evidence suggests that early intervention can delay the progression of AD and improve the symptoms and function of those affected. Available treatments have modest but important effects on the outcome of patients with AD; some patients respond dramatically. Most currently available treatments are relatively safe in carefully selected cases. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic workup of most cases of dementia can at least be initiated in family physicians' offices. Beginning the workup is important because, for treating AD, the earlier you start, the better. Donepezil, vitamin E, and, in the near future, propentofylline are the main pharmacologic choices for improving cognition and slowing disease progression. PMID:10216793

  17. Prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms in Lyme neuroborreliosis after pharmacological treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dersch, R; Sommer, H; Rauer, S; Meerpohl, J J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists about residual symptoms after pharmacological treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Reports of disabling long-term sequels lead to concerns in patients and health care providers. We systematically reviewed the available evidence from studies reporting treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis to assess the prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms after treatment. A literature search was performed in three databases and three clinical trial registers to find eligible studies reporting on residual symptoms in patients after pharmacological treatment of LNB. Diagnosis must have been performed according to consensus-derived case definitions. No restrictions regarding study design or language were set. Symptom prevalence was pooled using a random-effects model. Forty-four eligible clinical trials and studies were found: 8 RCTs, 17 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 case series. The follow-up period in the eligible studies ranged from 7 days to 20 years. The weighted mean proportion of residual symptoms was 28 % (95 % CI 23-34 %, n = 34 studies) for the latest reported time point. Prevalence of residual symptoms was statistically significantly higher in studies using the "possible" case definition (p = 0.0048). Cranial neuropathy, pain, paresis, cognitive disturbances, headache, and fatigue were statistically significantly lower in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. LNB patients may experience residual symptoms after treatment with a prevalence of approximately 28 %. The prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms differ according to the applied case definition. Symptoms like fatigue are not reported in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. As the "possible" case definition is more unspecific, patients with other conditions may be included. Reports of debilitating fatigue and cognitive impairment after LNB, a "post-Lyme syndrome", could therefore be an artifact of unspecific case definitions in single

  18. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear.In this study, the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM.CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245-0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma.A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  19. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear. In this study, the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM. CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245–0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma. A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  20. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases. PMID:25767435

  1. [Dysthimia or chronic depression: what do we know about its pharmacological treatment?].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The term dysthymia is applied to a clinical picture characterized by depressive feelings of low intensity and chronic evolution. Psychiatric nosology includes it among the mood disorders or among neurosis and personality disorders. This ambiguity has empirical consequences, since bibliography examining the efficacy of the different treatments is relatively scarce, in particular if we consider the incidence of the dysthymic disorder, that rounds 3% of general population. In this work the history of the nosology of dysthimia, the efficacy of pharmacological approaches and a brief mention about the efficacy of adding psychotherapy are summarized. Current literature indicates that antidepressants, independently of the group they form part of, are better than placebo, that maintenance treatment should be recommended and that psychotherapy could bring an additional benefit.

  2. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 104) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the “true” PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  3. Pharmacologic vitreolysis.

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, Marc-André; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    It is now well recognized that vitreous plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various retinal disorders. In many instances it can be addressed with pars plana vitrectomy, although this approach, like any surgery, has its limitations. The search for alternatives or adjunct to surgery has led to the development of pharmacologic vitreolysis. The use of intravitreal agents to alter the vitreous in order to reduce or eliminate its role in disease seems promising. The purpose of this article is to summarize the present knowledge on pharmacologic vitreolysis. A review of the different agents used and of ongoing trials will be presented. Also, current understanding of vitreous structure and its interaction with the retina will be discussed.

  4. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases. PMID:27597117

  5. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases. PMID:27597117

  6. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  7. Secretory Phospholipase A2 Enzymes as Pharmacological Targets for Treatment of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Nhat D.; Arnold, Robert D.; Cummings, Brian S.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) cleave phospholipids preferentially at the sn-2 position, liberating free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are classified into six main groups based on size, location, function, substrate specificity and calcium requirement. These classes include secretory PLA2 (sPLA2), cytosolic (cPLA2), Ca2+-independent (iPLA2), platelet activating factor acetylhydrolases (PAF-AH), lysosomal PLA2 (LyPLA2) and adipose specific PLA2 (AdPLA2). It is hypothesized that PLA2 can serve as pharmacological targets for the therapeutic treatment of several diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, immune disorders and cancer. Special emphasis has been placed on inhibitors of sPLA2 isoforms as pharmacological moieties, mostly due to the fact that these enzymes are activated during inflammatory events and because their expression is increased in several diseases. This review focuses on understanding how sPLA2 isoform expression is altered during disease progression and the possible therapeutic interventions to specifically target sPLA2 isoforms, including new approaches using nano-particulate-based strategies. PMID:24907600

  8. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-09-06

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases.

  9. Poststroke motor dysfunction and spasticity: novel pharmacological and physical treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Stefan; Werner, Cordula

    2003-01-01

    Following stroke, approximately 90% of patients experience persistent neurological motor deficits that lead to disability and handicap. Both pharmacological and physical treatment strategies for motor rehabilitation may be considered. In terms of pharmacological treatment, drugs that may potentially promote motor recovery when added to a regimen of physical therapy include the stimulants amphetamine and methylphenidate, as well as levodopa and fluoxetine. Botulinum toxin A has proven effective and well tolerated in several placebo-controlled trials for the treatment of focal upper and lower limb spasticity, although it has not been shown to improve motor function. The focal injection of botulinum toxin A inhibits the release of acetylcholine into the synaptic cleft, resulting in a reversible paresis of the muscles relevant for the spastic deformity. Other drugs, such as benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs and antipsychotics, may have detrimental effects on motor function and should be avoided, if possible. With respect to physical strategies, modern concepts of motor learning favour a task-specific repetitive approach that induces skill-acquisition relevant to the patient's daily life. Constrained-induced movement therapy based on the concept of learned non-use, electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation of the wrist muscles, robot-assisted motor rehabilitation to increase therapy intensity and bilateral practice to facilitate the movement of the paretic extremity are examples in upper limb rehabilitation. Lower limb rehabilitation has been enriched by treadmill training with partial bodyweight support, enabling the practice of up to 1000 steps per session; automated gait rehabilitation to relieve the strenuous effort required of the therapist; and rhythmic auditory stimulation, applying individually adjusted music to improve walking speed and symmetry. PMID:14661987

  10. Review of Pharmacological Treatment in Mood Disorders and Future Directions for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Frye, Mark A; Shelton, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    After a series of serendipitous discoveries of pharmacological treatments for mania and depression several decades ago, relatively little progress has been made for novel hypothesis-driven drug development in mood disorders. Multifactorial etiologies of, and lack of a full understanding of, the core neurobiology of these conditions clearly have contributed to these development challenges. There are, however, relatively novel targets that have raised opportunities for progress in the field, such as glutamate and cholinergic receptor modulators, circadian regulators, and enzyme inhibitors, for alternative treatment. This review will discuss these promising new treatments in mood disorders, the underlying mechanisms of action, and critical issues of their clinical application. For these new treatments to be successful in clinical practice, it is also important to design innovative clinical trials that identify the specific actions of new drugs, and, ideally, to develop biomarkers for monitoring individualized treatment response. It is predicted that future drug development will identify new agents targeting the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. PMID:21900884

  11. Behavioural and new pharmacological treatments for constipation: getting the balance right

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E

    2011-01-01

    Chronic constipation affects almost one in six adults and is even more frequent in the elderly. In the vast majority of patients, there is no obstructive mucosal or structural cause for constipation and, after excluding relatively rare systemic diseases (commonest of which is hypothyroidism), the differential diagnosis is quickly narrowed down to three processes: evacuation disorder of the spastic (pelvic floor dyssynergia, anismus) or flaccid (descending perineum syndrome) varieties, and normal or slow transit constipation. Treatment of chronic constipation based on identifying the underlying pathophysiology is generally successful with targeted therapy. The aims of this review are to discuss targeted therapy for chronic constipation: behavioural treatment for outlet dysfunction and pharmacological treatment for constipation not associated with outlet dysfunction. In particular, we shall review the evidence that behavioural treatment works for evacuation disorders, describe the new treatment options for constipation not associated with evacuation disorder, and demonstrate how `targeting therapy' to the underlying diagnosis results in a balanced approach to patients with these common disorders. PMID:20801775

  12. Review of Clinical Pharmacology of Aloe vera L. in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Mancari, Ferdinando; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2015-05-01

    Aloe vera L., is a plant used worldwide as folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments, including skin disorders. Its gel is present in cosmetics, medicinal products and food supplements. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease, involving mainly the skin, affects about the 2-3% of general population. Conventional pharmacological treatments for psoriasis can have limited effectiveness and can cause adverse reactions. For this reason often psoriatic patients look for alternative treatments based on natural products containing Aloe vera. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of aloe for the treatment of psoriasis. Clinical studies published in English were considered; a total of four clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Studies were also evaluated by using the Jadad scale and Consort Statement in Reporting Clinical trials of Herbal Medicine Intervention. Quality and methodological accuracy of considered studies varied considerably, and some crucial information to reproduce clinical results was missing. We conclude that administration of aloe as cutaneous treatment is generally well tolerated, as no serious side effects were reported. Results on the effectiveness of Aloe vera are contradictory; our analysis reveals the presence of methodological gaps preventing to reach final conclusions.

  13. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment in a cessation trial among smokers in Aleppo, Syria

    PubMed Central

    Ben Taleb, Ziyad; Ward, Kenneth D; Asfar, Taghrid; Bahelah, Raed; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of evidence-based smoking cessation programs is in its infancy in developing countries, which continue to bear the main brunt of the tobacco epidemic. Adherence to treatment recommendations is an important determinant of the success of smoking cessation programs, but little is known about factors influencing adherence to either pharmacological or behavioral treatment in developing countries settings. Our study represents the first attempt to examine the predictors of adherence to cessation treatment in a low-income developing country. Methods Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment were identified by analyzing data from a multi-site, two-group, parallel-arm, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled smoking cessation trial in primary care clinics in Aleppo, Syria. Participants received 3 in-person behavioral counseling sessions plus 5 brief follow-up phone counseling sessions, and were randomized to either 6 weeks of nicotine or placebo patch. Results Of the 269 participants, 68% adhered to pharmacological treatment, while 70% adhered to behavioral counseling. In logistic regression modeling, lower adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment was associated with higher daily smoking at baseline, greater withdrawal symptoms, and perception of receiving placebo instead of active nicotine patch. Women showed lower adherence than men to behavioral treatment, while being assigned to placebo condition and baseline waterpipe use were associated with lower adherence to pharmacological treatment. Conclusion Adherence to cessation treatment for cigarette smokers in low-income countries such as Syria may benefit from integrated cessation components that provide intensive treatment for subjects with higher nicotine dependence, and address concurrent waterpipe use at all stages. PMID:26077603

  14. Pharmacological aversion treatment of alcohol dependence. I. Production and prediction of conditioned alcohol aversion.

    PubMed

    Howard, M O

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-two hospitalized alcoholics receiving pharmacological aversion therapy (PAT) over a 10-day treatment interval completed cognitive, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures evaluating conditioned aversion to alcohol. Pre-post assessments provided convergent support for the efficacy of PAT vis-à-vis production of conditioned aversion to alcohol. Positive alcohol-related outcome expectancies were significantly reduced, whereas confidence that drinking could be avoided in various high-risk situations for consumption was increased following PAT. Behavioral and cardiac rate assessments revealed significant changes following PAT that were specific to alcoholic beverages and potentially reflective of conditioned alcohol aversion. Patients with more extensive pretreatment experiences with alcohol-associated nausea and greater involvement in antisocial conduct appeared to be less susceptible to the PAT conditioning protocol.

  15. Preliminary study on combined pharmacological and laser treatment in optic pit serous maculopathy after literature review.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, M; Dapoto, L; Lenarduzzi, F; Belcaro, G; Malagola, R

    2012-12-01

    The pit of the optic nerve head (ON) is a rare congenital defect that sometimes presents itself with a maculopathy of various neuroretinal layers for unknown reason. This study was focused, before and after pharmacological and parasurgical treatment, on the structural and functional visual assessment in a patient with optic pit maculopathy (OPM). In order to achieve this the latest generation of hi-tech diagnostic tests were used, such as Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT), Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP), full-field Electroretinography (ERG), multifocal ERG (mfERG), Microperimetry (MP-1), Standard Automated Perimetry (SAP), Fluorescein Angiography (FA) and Indocyanine Green Angiography (ICG). The research was conducted through a review of past and recent literature. PMID:23241936

  16. Physical exercise as non-pharmacological treatment of chronic pain: Why and when

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Kirsten R.; Golightly, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain broadly encompasses both objectively defined conditions and idiopathic conditions that lack physical findings. Despite variance in origin or pathogenesis, these conditions are similarly characterized by chronic pain, poor physical function, mobility limitations, depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance and are treated alone or in combination by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches, such as physical activity (aerobic conditioning, muscle strengthening, flexibility training and movement therapies). Physical activity improves general health, disease risk and progression of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and obesity. When applied to chronic pain conditions within appropriate parameters (frequency, duration, intensity), physical activity significantly improves pain and related symptoms. For chronic pain, strict guidelines for physical activity are lacking, but frequent movement is preferable to sedentary behavior. This gives considerable freedom in prescribing physical activity treatments, which are most successful when tailored individually, progressed slowly and account for physical limitations, psychosocial needs and available resources. PMID:26267006

  17. [Clinical aspects of pharmacological treatment of diabetic neuropathy - cooperation with neurologists and diabetologists].

    PubMed

    Janíčková Žďárská, Denisa; Kvapil, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The development and progression of symptomatic diabetic neuropathy (SDN) is linked to hyperglycemia. The effort to improve compensation of diabetes mellitus during therapy is therefore very important. This is where the cooperation between the diabetologist and neurologist within therapy plays an important role. The pharmaco-logical therapy of symptomatic sensitive peripheral diabetic neuropathy is difficult and with a less than satisfactory effect. A variety of active substances is used in symptomatic therapy, primarily designed for intervention in other pathological conditions. The recommended guidelines include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opiates and their derivatives. However this therapy brings with it a relatively high incidence of adverse effects which detract from patients adherence to treatment. Very good results are reached by the therapy with thioctacid. PMID:27180665

  18. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  19. Pharmacologic doses of nicotinamide in the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions: a review.

    PubMed

    Niren, Neil M

    2006-01-01

    Various skin disorders with an inflammatory component often have been treated with steroids and/or oral antibiotics. However, long-term use of these agents has drawbacks: steroids may induce numerous serious side effects such as hypertension, immunosuppression, and osteoporosis, and overuse of oral antibiotics may contribute to the development of bacterial resistance, as well as to a host of nuisance side effects such as diarrhea, yeast infections, and photosensitivity. As a result, alternative oral treatments, such as nicotinamide, have been investigated. During the past 50 years, many clinical reports have identified nicotinamide as a beneficial agent in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin disorders; what's more, its exceptional safety profile at pharmacologic doses makes it a potentially ideal long-term oral therapy for patients with inflammatory skin diseases. A recent large study evaluating nicotinamide for the treatment of acne or rosacea has confirmed the potential benefits of oral nicotinamide as an alternative approach to managing inflammatory lesions associated with acne vulgaris and acne rosacea. This article reviews the substantial number of reports published over the past 50 years that document the clinical utility and safety of oral and topical formulations of nicotinamide for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin conditions.

  20. Ulipristal acetate: a novel pharmacological approach for the treatment of uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Carinelli, Silvestro; Maiorana, Antonio; D’Alonzo, Marta; Lo Monte, Giuseppe; Marci, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common benign tumors of the female genital tract. The management of symptomatic fibroids has traditionally been surgical; however, alternative pharmacological approaches have been proposed to control symptoms. To date, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs are the only available drugs for the preoperative treatment of fibroids. However, the US Food and Drug Administration recently authorized ulipristal acetate (UPA), an oral selective progesterone-receptor modulator, for the same indication. UPA is a new, effective, and well-tolerated option for the preoperative treatment of moderate and severe symptoms of uterine fibroids in women of reproductive age. According to clinical data, UPA shows several advantages: it is faster than leuprolide in reducing the fibroid-associated bleeding, it significantly improves hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in anemic patients, and it grants a significant reduction in the size of fibroids, which lasts for at least 6 months after the end of the treatment. Furthermore, UPA displays a better tolerability profile when compared to leuprolide; in fact, it keeps estradiol levels at mid follicular phase range, thereby reducing the incidence of hot flushes and exerting no impact on bone turnover. On the grounds of this evidence, the administration of 5 mg/day ulipristal acetate for 3 months is suggested for different patient categories and allows for planning a treatment strategy tailored to meet an individual patient’s needs. PMID:24591818

  1. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder. Part II: focus on pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with long-lasting psychological suffering, distressing psychosocial disability, markedly reduced health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality in a subgroup of individuals in the aftermath of serious traumatic events. Both etiopathogenesis and treatment modalities of PTSD are best conceptualized within a biopsychosotial model. Pharmacotherapy may lay claim to a major role in the multimodal treatment approaches. Here we outline two different pharmacotherapeutic trends that aim to modify the encoding, consolidation, and rehearsal of traumatic memory in order to reduce the risk of PTSD immediately after trauma exposure on the one hand, and that endeavor to treat the clinical state of PTSD on the other. The theoretical rationales of both pharmacological strategies are the complex neurobiological underpinnings that characterize traumatic memory organization and clinical PTSD. Meanwhile, promising data from randomized controlled trials have been obtained for both approaches. Empirical evidence may inform clinicians in their clinical efforts for this special group of patients. The efficacy of several classes of drugs that have been investigated within a context of research should be evaluated critically and still have to stand the test of effectiveness in daily clinical practice. From a patient perspective, empirical results may serve as a psychoeducative guideline to what pharmacotherapeutic approaches may realistically achieve, what their risks and benefits are, and what their limits are in contributing to reducing the often major chronic suffering caused by serious traumatic events. Ethical issues have to be considered, particularly in the context of pharmacological strategies projected to prevent PTSD in the aftermath of traumatic exposure.

  2. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder Part II: Focus on pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with long-lasting psychological suffering, distressing psychosocial disability, markedly reduced health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality in a subgroup of individuals in the aftermath of serious traumatic events. Both etiopathogenesis and treatment modalities of PTSD are best conceptualized within a biopsychosotial model. Pharmacotherapy may lay claim to a major role in the multimodal treatment approaches. Here we outline two different pharmacotherapeutic trends that aim to modify the encoding, consolidation, and rehearsal of traumatic memory in order to reduce the risk of PTSD immediately after trauma exposure on the one hand, and that endeavor to treat the clinical state of PTSD on the other. The theoretical rationales of both pharmacological strategies are the complex neurobiological underpinnings that characterize traumatic memory organization and clinical PTSD. Meanwhile, promising data from randomized controlled trials have been obtained for both approaches. Empirical evidence may inform clinicians in their clinical efforts for this special group of patients. The efficacy of several classes of drugs that have been investigated within a context of research should be evaluated critically and still have to stand the test of effectiveness in daily clinical practice. From a patient perspective, empirical results may serve as a psychoeducative guideline to what pharmacotherapeutic approaches may realistically achieve, what their risks and benefits are, and what their limits are in contributing to reducing the often major chronic suffering caused by serious traumatic events. Ethical issues have to be considered, particularly in the context of pharmacological strategies projected to prevent PTSD in the aftermath of traumatic exposure. PMID:25152660

  3. Ethnic variations in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment of hypertension: biopsychosocial perspective.

    PubMed

    Brownley, K A; Hurwitz, B E; Schneiderman, N

    1999-08-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a complex, dynamic process influenced by psychosocial, behavioral, and cultural factors. Integrative theories of cross-population differences in the prevalence of hypertension and response to treatment include physiological, social, and genetic perspectives. Ethnic differences in salt sensitivity, calcium regulation of sodium flux, vascular reactivity to psychosocial stress, and drug metabolism are integral components of observed cross-cultural variations in hypertension. In general, pharmacological treatment of hypertension in blacks is most consistently achieved through diuretics and calcium-channel blockers; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers are more efficacious in whites. These stereotypical patterns are consistent with the higher prevalence of salt sensitivity, stress-induced vasoconstriction and slower natriuresis, and alpha-adrenergic receptor mediated vascular reactivity observed in blacks compared with whites. Some antihypertensive agents produce adverse glucose metabolic side effects, thus contraindicating their use in individuals with high sympathetic tone, insulin resistance, or obesity. Cross-population differences in adopted guidelines for treating hypertension exist but are not likely a factor in observed ethnic differences in rate of treatment or control. Attitudes toward nontraditional treatment options (e.g., herbal medicine), political and individual responsibilities in health care, and adaptations to acculturation and urbanization stress differ between and within societies and thus play a role in observed cross-cultural differences in hypertension as well. The value of regular exercise in controlling hypertension is widely recognized, and reductions in blood pressure reactivity to behavioral stress following acute exercise have been documented; however, empirical studies of ethnic differences in exercise-related blood pressure control are lacking. Overall, increased awareness of the

  4. Validation of the AQT Color-Form Additive Model for Screening and Monitoring Pharmacological Treatment of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Niels Peter; Wiig, Elisabeth Hemmersam

    2013-01-01

    Objective:This retrospective study used A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) processing-speed and efficiency measures for evaluating sensitivity and monitoring effects during pharmacological treatment of adults with ADHD. Method: Color (C), form (F), and color-form (CF) combination naming were administered to 69 adults during outpatient…

  5. Differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and pharmacological treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a meta-analysis about the differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), pharmacological and combined treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature research and the application of the inclusion criteria enabled us to locate 18 studies, yielding a total of 24 independent comparisons between a treated (10 pharmacological, 11 CBT, and 3 combined interventions) and a control group. All types of interventions were efficacious in reducing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, with effect sizes adjusted by the type of control group of d=1.203 for CBT, d=0.745 for pharmacological treatments, and d=1.704 for mixed treatments. Depression, anxiety and other secondary responses were also improved, especially with CBT interventions. The analysis of moderator variables showed that the CBT protocol and the total of intervention hours exhibited a significant influence on the effect size. Within pharmacological treatment, clomipramine (d=1.305) was more efficacious than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (d=0.644), but its adverse effects were more severe. Finally, the clinical implications of the results are discussed.

  6. The Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Ulipristal Acetate for the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Oliver; Zobrist, R. Howard

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign hormone-sensitive tumors of uterine smooth muscle cells leading to heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is an emerging medical treatment of fibroids with the potential to be used for long-term treatment. In this context, the present article summarizes UPA’s main clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Ulipristal acetate has good oral bioavailability and a half-life allowing one single oral administration per day for the management of fibroids. As a steroid, UPA is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 but does not act as an inducer or inhibitor of the CYP system or transporter proteins. With the exception of drugs modulating CYP3A4 activity, risks of drug–drug interactions with UPA are unlikely. In conclusion, besides its pharmacodynamic characteristics, UPA shows favorable PK properties that contribute to a good efficacy–safety ratio for the long-term management of uterine fibroids in clinical practice. PMID:25228633

  7. Pharmacological treatment of opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Ramasubbu, Chitra; Gupta, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used to treat moderate to severe pain. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia is a paradoxical response to opioid agonists resulting in an increased perception of pain rather than an antinociceptive effect. Even though there is a debate regarding its clinical relevance, it is becoming a challenge in both acute and chronic pain settings. The study of opioid-induced hyperalgesia is an emerging field with multiple challenges faced by investigators with regard to defining the diagnosis and characterizing the findings. The objective of this study was to review the preliminary evidence related to the treatment and management of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Lack of data, small patient numbers, short-term follow-up, and variations in study design limited the review. With the literature on this subject being sparse, this study attempts to provide a preliminary look at the available data and to set the stage for an eventual meta-analysis. Case reports in the literature have shown success with various pharmacological interventions. Possible treatment regimens include ketamine, dextromethorphan, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid switching, amantadine, buprenorphine, α(2) agonists, and methadone. These agents are briefly discussed in this paper. Further well-designed, placebo-controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of the interventions investigated in this review.

  8.  NASH: A glance at the landscape of pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Brodosi, Lucia; Marchignoli, Francesca; Petroni, Maria Letizia; Marchesini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

     The role of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, namely nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), as risk factor for liver- and non-liver-related morbidity and mortality has been extensively reported. In addition to lifestyle changes, capable of removing the metabolic factors driving disease progression, there is an urgent need for drugs able to reduce hepatic necroinflammation without worsening of fibrosis. This goal is considered by regulatory agencies as surrogate marker to define the effectiveness in pharmacological compounds in NASH, and fast-track approval was granted by the Food and Drug Administration in consideration of disease severity and unmet medical needs. Several compounds are in the pipeline of pharmaceutical industries and are being studied in phase II trials, but only a few (obeticholic acid, elafibranor) have started phase III trials. This concise review is intended to offer a systematic analysis of the most promising therapeutic intervention in NASH. In conclusion, there is reasonable expectation that drug may help curb the burden of NASH, and we look forward to obtaining solid data on their long-term safety and effectiveness. However, we should not forget that behavioral interventions remain a mandatory background treatment, able to stop disease progression in compliant overweight/ obese patients, with results that compare favorably with - and add to - the beneficial effects of drug treatment. PMID:27493105

  9. Pharmacological approach to the treatment of long and short QT syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chinmay; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Inherited channelopathies have received increasing attention in recent years. The past decade has witnessed impressive progress in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of arrhythmogenesis associated with inherited channelopathies. An imbalance in ionic forces induced by these channelopathies affects the duration of ventricular repolarization and amplifies the intrinsic electrical heterogeneity of the myocardium, creating an arrhythmogenic milieu. Today, many of the channelopathies have been linked to mutations in specific genes encoding either components of ion channels or membrane or regulatory proteins. Many of the channelopathies are genetically heterogeneous with a variable degree of expression of the disease. Defining the molecular basis of channelopathies can have a profound impact on patient management, particularly in cases in which genotype-specific pharmacotherapy is available. The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is one of the first identified and most studied channelopathies where abnormal prolongation of ventricular repolarization predisposes an individual to life threatening ventricular arrhythmia called Torsade de Pointes. On the other hand of the spectrum, molecular defects favoring premature repolarization lead to Short QT syndrome (SQTS), a recently described inherited channelopathy. Both of these channelopathies are associated with a high risk of sudden cardiac death due to malignant ventricular arrhythmia. Whereas pharmacological therapy is first line treatment for LQTS, defibrillators are considered as primary treatment for SQTS. This review provides a comprehensive review of the molecular genetics, clinical features, genotype-phenotype correlations and genotype-specific approach to pharmacotherapy of these two mirror-image channelopathies, SQTS and LQTS. PMID:18378319

  10. Evolving Knowledge in Pharmacologic Treatments of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Soubrane Daguet, Gisèle; Risard-Gasiorowski, Sarah; Massamba, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Modern retinal drug therapy is a result of the recent challenges and breakthroughs in chemistry, physics, genetics, cell biology and biotechnologies. Specific pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a drug are of major importance and contribute to its ability to penetrate targeted ocular tissues in order to result in effective therapeutic concentrations. In addition, the drugs should maintain a prolonged time of activity and be safe with minimal local and systemic toxicity. The transporter vehicle or drug delivery system is crucial in order to enhance ocular tissue penetration and establish controlled drug release. Administration methods should be local, thereby reducing systemic side effects, and, ideally, treatment should be noninvasive. Within the group of so-called classic therapies, the use of pharmacologic treatments has become widespread for most severe retinal diseases. Thereby, ocular therapy of diseases like exudative age-related macular degeneration has improved markedly. Moreover, new metabolic pathways have been identified, new molecules have emerged, new synthesis technologies have been discovered, and new formulae conceived. These developments have opened new avenues for limiting disease progression.

  11. The clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of ulipristal acetate for the treatment of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Oliver; Zobrist, R Howard; Gotteland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign hormone-sensitive tumors of uterine smooth muscle cells leading to heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is an emerging medical treatment of fibroids with the potential to be used for long-term treatment. In this context, the present article summarizes UPA's main clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Ulipristal acetate has good oral bioavailability and a half-life allowing one single oral administration per day for the management of fibroids. As a steroid, UPA is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 but does not act as an inducer or inhibitor of the CYP system or transporter proteins. With the exception of drugs modulating CYP3A4 activity, risks of drug-drug interactions with UPA are unlikely. In conclusion, besides its pharmacodynamic characteristics, UPA shows favorable PK properties that contribute to a good efficacy-safety ratio for the long-term management of uterine fibroids in clinical practice.

  12. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Laurinda; Alegria, Carlos; Oliveira, Joana; Machado, Ana; Oliveira, Pedro; Almeida, Armando

    2011-01-01

    In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1) a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol]), (2) the association of gabapentin (GBP) and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP) (GBP+ROP protocol), and (3) a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol). Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols) from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22) due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug therapies, while after MDV surgery several patients showed important side effects. Data reinforce that, (1) TN patients should be carefully evaluated before choosing therapy for pain control, (2) different pharmacological approaches are available to initiate pain control at low costs, and (3) criteria for surgical interventions should be clearly defined due to important side effects, with the initial higher costs being strongly reduced with time. PMID:21941455

  13. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  14. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  15. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  16. Pharmacological Treatment of Sleep Disturbance in Developmental Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollway, Jill A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in children with developmental disabilities. Effective pharmacologic interventions are needed to ameliorate sleep problems that persist when behavior therapy alone is insufficient. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of the quantity and quality of pharmacologic research targeting sleep in…

  17. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Thomas R E

    2011-05-01

    These guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology address the scope and targets of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenia. A consensus meeting, involving experts in schizophrenia and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from the participants and interested parties, and cover the pharmacological management and treatment of schizophrenia across the various stages of the illness, including first-episode, relapse prevention, and illness that has proved refractory to standard treatment. The practice recommendations presented are based on the available evidence to date, and seek to clarify which interventions are of proven benefit. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to inform clinical decision making for practitioners, and perhaps also serve as a source of information for patients and carers. They are accompanied by a more detailed qualitative review of the available evidence. The strength of supporting evidence for each recommendation is rated.

  18. The role of dental therapists in pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of anxious and phobic patients.

    PubMed

    MacLeavey, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Dental Therapists are in a prime position to be involved with the management of anxious and phobic patients. They earn less than dentists and are therefore a more cost-effective way of providing specialised care for anxious patients. Dental Therapists can spend more time educating and acclimatising these patients, do most if not all of the patient's treatment, only referring back to the dentist for RCT, crown/bridgework/dentures and permanent extractions. Ultimately this means that the patient receives high quality continuity of care. Treating anxious and phobic patients is time-consuming but ultimately very rewarding. If handled correctly and sensitively the anxious and phobic patient will not always be anxious or phobic, in the same way that children won't always be children. Dental Therapists can now extend their duties to include Relative Analgesia. This should enhance their employability and role within the dental team especially in the management of anxious and phobic patients. Employing a therapist with a toolbox of techniques at their disposal can be seen as part of a long-term practice plan to ensure that anxious and phobic patients become rehabilitated, happy, compliant and loyal to the practice! In fact .... the sort of patients every dentist really wants to see. PMID:23544223

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 5. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy for mild to moderate dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.; Bailey, Peter; Black, Sandra; Carswell, Anne; Chertkow, Howard; Clarke, Barry; Cohen, Carole; Fisk, John D.; Forbes, Dorothy; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Lanctôt, Krista; Morgan, Debra; Thorpe, Lilian

    2008-01-01

    Background Practising physicians frequently seek advice on the most effective interventions for dementia. In this article, we provide practical guidance on nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions for the management of mild to moderate dementia based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia. Methods We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for the selection and quality assessment of articles, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected articles published from January 1996 to December 2005 that dealt with the management of mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia. Recommendations based on the literature review were drafted and voted on. Consensus required 80% or more agreement by participants. Subsequent to the conference, we searched for additional articles published from January 2006 to April 2008 using the same major keywords and secondary search terms. We graded the strength of the evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Results We identified 1615 articles, of which 954 were selected for further study. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 48 recommendations for the management of mild to moderate dementia (28) and dementia with a cerebrovascular component (8) as well as recommendations for addressing ethical issues (e.g., disclosure of the diagnosis) (12). The updated literature review did not change these recommendations. An exercise program is recommended for patients with mild to moderate dementia. Physicians should decide whether to prescribe a cholinesterase inhibitor on an individual basis, balancing anticipated benefits with the potential for harm. For mild mood and behavioural concerns, nonpharmacologic approaches should be considered first. Interpretation Although the available therapies for dementia can help

  20. Mortality among individuals accessing pharmacological treatment for opioid dependence in California, 2006 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Li, Libo; Min, Jeong; Huang, David; Urada, Darren; Liu, Lei; Hser, Yih-Ing; Nosyk, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Aims To estimate mortality rates among treated opioid-dependent individuals by cause and in relation to the general population, and to estimate the instantaneous effects of opioid detoxification and maintenance treatment (MMT) on the hazard of all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Design Population-based treatment cohort study. Setting Linked mortality data on all individuals first enrolled in publicly-funded pharmacological treatment for opioid dependence in California, USA from 2006 to 2010. Participants 32,322 individuals, among whom there were 1,031 deaths (3.2%) over a median follow-up of 2.6 years (interquartile range: 1.4 - 3.7). Measurements The primary outcome was mortality, indicated by time to death, crude mortality rates (CMR), and standardized mortality ratios (SMR). Findings Individuals being treated for opioid dependence had a more than four-fold increase of mortality risk compared with the general population (SMR 4.5 95% CI: 4.2, 4.8). Mortality risk was higher (1) when individuals were out-of-treatment (SMR 6.1, 95% CI: 5.7, 6.5) than in-treatment (SMR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.6, 2.1) and (2) during detoxification (SMR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 3.8) than during MMT (SMR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5, 2.1), especially in the two weeks post-treatment entry (SMR 5.5, 95% CI 2.7, 9.8 versus SMR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7, 4.9). Detoxification and MMT both independently reduced the instantaneous hazard of all-cause and drug-related mortality. MMT preceded by detoxification was associated with lower all-cause and other-cause-specific mortality than MMT alone. Conclusions In people with opiate dependence, detoxification and methadone maintenance treatment both independently reduce the instantaneous hazard of all-cause and drug-related mortality. PMID:25644938

  1. Regulated recycling of mutant CFTR is partially restored by pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Holleran, John P; Zeng, Jianxin; Frizzell, Raymond A; Watkins, Simon C

    2013-06-15

    Efficient trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to and from the cell surface is essential for maintaining channel density at the plasma membrane (PM) and ensuring proper physiological activity. The most common mutation, F508del, exhibits reduced surface expression and impaired function despite treatment with currently available pharmacological small molecules, called correctors. To gain more detailed insight into whether CFTR enters compartments that allow corrector stabilization in the cell periphery, we investigated the peripheral trafficking itineraries and kinetics of wild type (WT) and F508del in living cells using high-speed fluorescence microscopy together with fluorogen activating protein detection. We directly visualized internalization and accumulation of CFTR WT from the PM to a perinuclear compartment that colocalized with the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) markers Rab11 and EHD1, reaching steady-state distribution by 25 minutes. Stimulation by protein kinase A (PKA) depleted this intracellular pool and redistributed CFTR channels to the cell surface, elicited by reduced endocytosis and active translocation to the PM. Corrector or temperature rescue of F508del also resulted in targeting to the ERC and exhibited subsequent PKA-stimulated trafficking to the PM. Corrector treatment (24 hours) led to persistent residence of F508del in the ERC, while thermally destabilized F508del was targeted to lysosomal compartments by 3 hours. Acute addition of individual correctors, C4 or C18, acted on peripheral trafficking steps to partially block lysosomal targeting of thermally destabilized F508del. Taken together, corrector treatment redirects F508del trafficking from a degradative pathway to a regulated recycling route, and proteins that mediate this process become potential targets for improving the efficacy of current and future correctors.

  2. Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischaemia--pharmacologic approach and alternative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Erbe, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Raynaud's attacks and to minimize the related morbidity rather than to cure the underlying condition. Treatment strategies depend on whether Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is primary or secondary. All patients should be instructed about general measures to maintain body warmth and to avoid triggers of RP attacks. Pharmacologic intervention can be useful for patients with severe and frequent RP episodes that impair the patient's quality of life. Calcium channel blockers are currently the most prescribed and studied medications for this purpose. There has been limited evidence for the efficacy of alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, angiotensin receptor blockers, topical nitrates or fluoxetine to treat RP. The intravenously administered prostacyclin analogue iloprost can reduce the frequency and severity of RP attacks and is considered a second-line therapy in patients with markedly impaired quality of life, critical digital ischaemia and skin ulcers who are at risk for substantial tissue loss and amputation. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil) can also improve RP symptoms and ulcer healing whereas endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan) are mainly considered treatment options in secondary prevention for patients with digital skin ulcers related to systemic sclerosis. However, their use in clinical practice has been limited by their high cost. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin is recommended for all patients who suffer from secondary RP due to ischaemia caused by structural vessel damage. Anticoagulant therapy can be considered during the acute phase of digital ischaemia in patients with suspected vascular occlusive disease attributed to the occurrence of new thromboses. In patients with critical digital ischaemia, consideration should be given to hospitalisation, optimisation of medical treatment in accordance with the underlying disease and evaluation for a

  3. Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischaemia--pharmacologic approach and alternative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Erbe, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Raynaud's attacks and to minimize the related morbidity rather than to cure the underlying condition. Treatment strategies depend on whether Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is primary or secondary. All patients should be instructed about general measures to maintain body warmth and to avoid triggers of RP attacks. Pharmacologic intervention can be useful for patients with severe and frequent RP episodes that impair the patient's quality of life. Calcium channel blockers are currently the most prescribed and studied medications for this purpose. There has been limited evidence for the efficacy of alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, angiotensin receptor blockers, topical nitrates or fluoxetine to treat RP. The intravenously administered prostacyclin analogue iloprost can reduce the frequency and severity of RP attacks and is considered a second-line therapy in patients with markedly impaired quality of life, critical digital ischaemia and skin ulcers who are at risk for substantial tissue loss and amputation. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil) can also improve RP symptoms and ulcer healing whereas endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan) are mainly considered treatment options in secondary prevention for patients with digital skin ulcers related to systemic sclerosis. However, their use in clinical practice has been limited by their high cost. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin is recommended for all patients who suffer from secondary RP due to ischaemia caused by structural vessel damage. Anticoagulant therapy can be considered during the acute phase of digital ischaemia in patients with suspected vascular occlusive disease attributed to the occurrence of new thromboses. In patients with critical digital ischaemia, consideration should be given to hospitalisation, optimisation of medical treatment in accordance with the underlying disease and evaluation for a

  4. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment)

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Results Steady state was reached within 1–2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Conclusion Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3–9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26834462

  5. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  6. Potential Pharmacologic Treatments for Cystinuria and for Calcium Stones Associated with Hyperuricosuria

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, David S.

    2012-03-14

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to 'salt out' (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of L-cystine methyl ester and L-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, L-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  7. Tics and other stereotyped movements as side effects of pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Mir, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Tics and other stereotyped abnormal movements can be seen as adverse effects of some pharmacologic drugs. Among these drugs, antipsychotics may provoke tardive syndromes after a chronic exposure, primarily in the case of typical antipsychotics. These syndromes include tardive tics, tardive dyskinesia, or tardive akathisia, which present with tics or stereotyped movements as a clinical phenomenon. Psychostimulants (mainly methylphenidate) have traditionally been associated with the appearance of tics due to the increased dopamine activity caused by stimulants. Nevertheless, in recent years, several studies have concluded not only that methylphenidate does not exacerbate or reactivate tics but also that tics can improve with its use in patients with associated attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and tic disorder. Antiepileptic drugs, although infrequently, can also induce tics, with carbamazepine and lamotrigine described as tic inducers. Other antiepileptics, including levetiracetam and topiramate, have been proposed as a potential treatment for tic disorders due to a positive effect on tics, especially in those with associated epileptic disorder. Clinical and therapeutic approaches to tics and stereotyped movements after exposure to antipsychotics, stimulants, and antiepileptic drugs will be reviewed in this chapter.

  8. Current Pharmacological Treatment for Male LUTS due to BPH: Dutasteride or Finasteride?

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Luisella; Sountoulides, Petros; Castellan, Pietro; Presicce, Fabrizio; Lombardo, Riccardo; Romero, Marilena; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Schips, Luigi; Cindolo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a potentially progressive disease which is commonly associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and might result in complications, such as acute urinary retention and BPH-related surgery. In the current medical therapy scenario for LUTS attributed to BPH, only one class of drugs, 5-α reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), has been found to be effective in reducing the risk of disease progression. The two 5ARIs that are currently available include finasteride and dutasteride. These two drugs have different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Greater suppression of dehydrotestosterone is achieved by dutasteride (>90% dutasteride vs 70% finasteride) which theoretically should correlate with greater efficacy in alleviating urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, this hypothesis has not yet been clinically demonstrated. The pertinent literature is scarce and heterogeneous and produces low scientific levels of evidence. The present review article aims to evaluate the comparative head-to-head studies in order to evaluate if the hypothetical clinical differences between dutasteride and finasteride do exist. Pharmacological treatment with either drug results in similar symptom improvements; however dutasteride seems to have a better profile in reducing the risk of prostate surgery and acute urinary retention (AUR). More studies are necessary to better evaluate both the clinical and pharmacoeconomic profile of the two 5ARIs. PMID:25981606

  9. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  10. Potential pharmacologic treatments for cystinuria and for calcium stones associated with hyperuricosuria.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2011-08-01

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to "salt out" (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of l-cystine methyl ester and l-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, l-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  11. Medical treatment of cholestatic liver diseases: From pathobiology to pharmacological targets

    PubMed Central

    Paumgartner, Gustav

    2006-01-01

    Bile secretion is dependent on the coordinated functions of a number of hepatobiliary transport systems. Cholestasis may be caused by an impairment of bile secretion, an obstruction of bile flow or a combination of the two. The common consequence of all forms of cholestasis is retention of bile acids and other potentially toxic compounds in the hepatocytes leading to apoptosis or necrosis of hepatocytes and eventually to chronic cholestatic liver disease. In certain cholestatic disorders there is also leakage of bile acids into the peribiliary space causing portal inflammation and fibrosis. The following pharmacological targets for treatment of intrahepatic cholestasis can be identified: stimulation of orthograde biliary secretion and retrograde secretion of bile acids and other toxic cholephils into the systemic circulation for excretion via the kidneys to reduce their retention in the hepatocytes; stimulation of the metabolism of hydrophobic bile acids and other toxic compounds to more hydrophilic, less toxic metabolites; protection of injured cholangiocytes against toxic effects of bile; inhibition of apoptosis caused by elevated levels of cytotoxic bile acids; inhibition of fibrosis caused by leakage of bile acids into the peribiliary space. The clinical results of ursodeoxcholic acid therapy of primary biliary cirrhosis may be regarded as the first success of this strategy. PMID:16874853

  12. Interaction between behavioral and pharmacological treatment strategies to decrease cocaine choice in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic approaches constitute two prominent strategies for treating cocaine dependence. This study investigated interactions between behavioral and pharmacological strategies in a preclinical model of cocaine vs food choice. Six rhesus monkeys, implanted with a chronic indwelling double-lumen venous catheter, initially responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, FR 10 schedule) during continuous 7-day treatment periods with saline or the agonist medication phenmetrazine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h). Subsequently, the FR response requirement for cocaine or food was varied (food, FR 100; cocaine, FR 1-100; cocaine, FR 10; food, FR 10-300), and effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine vs food choice were redetermined. Decreases in the cocaine FR or increases in the food FR resulted in leftward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve, whereas increases in the cocaine FR or decreases in the food FR resulted in rightward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. The efficacy of phenmetrazine to decrease cocaine choice varied systematically as a function of the prevailing response requirements, such that phenmetrazine efficacy was greatest when cocaine choice was maintained by relatively low unit cocaine doses. These results suggest that efficacy of pharmacotherapies to modulate cocaine use can be influenced by behavioral contingencies of cocaine availability. Agonist medications may be most effective under contingencies that engender choice of relatively low cocaine doses. PMID:22968813

  13. Optimizing the Pharmacologic Treatment of Insomnia: Current Status and Future Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Minkel, Jared; Krystal, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications are available for treating patients with insomnia. These medications include agents approved as insomnia therapies by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), agents approved by the FDA for another condition that are used “off-label” to treat insomnia, and agents available “over-the-counter” that are taken by individuals with insomnia. These agents differ in their properties, their safety and efficacy when used for different insomnia patient subtypes, and the available data on their efficacy and safety in these subtypes. As a result, optimizing the medication treatment of insomnia for a given patient requires that the clinician select an agent for use which has characteristics that make it most likely to effectively and safely address the type of sleep difficulty experienced by that individual. This article is intended to assist clinicians and researchers in carrying out this optimization. It begins by reviewing the basic characteristics of the medications used to treat insomnia. This is followed by a review of the fundamental ways that individuals with insomnia may differ and affect the choice of medication therapy. This review includes discussions that illustrate how to best choose a medication based on the characteristics of the available medications, the key differences among insomnia patients, and the available research literature. Lastly, we discuss future directions for the optimizing pharmacologic management of insomnia. It is hoped that the treatment tailoring methods discussed herein serve as a means of improving the clinical management of insomnia and, thus, improve the lives of the many patients who suffer from this common and impairing condition. PMID:24015116

  14. [Non pharmacological treatment for Alzheimer's disease: comparison between musical and non-musical interventions].

    PubMed

    Narme, Pauline; Tonini, Audrey; Khatir, Fatiha; Schiaratura, Loris; Clément, Sylvain; Samson, Séverine

    2012-06-01

    On account of the limited effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a growing interest on nonpharmacological treatments, including musical intervention. Despite the large number of studies showing the multiple benefits of music on behavioral, emotional and cognitive disorders of patients with AD, only a few of them used a rigorous method. Finally, the specificity of musical as compared to non-musical and pleasant interventions has rarely been addressed. To investigate this issue, two randomized controlled trials were conducted contrasting the effects of musical to painting (Study 1) or cooking (Study 2) interventions on emotional state of 33 patients with AD. The patients' emotional state was assessed by analyzing professional caregivers' judgments of the patient's mood, then facial expressions and valence of the discourse from short-filmed interviews. In the first study (n=22), each intervention lasted 3 weeks (two sessions per week) and the patients' emotional state was assessed before, during and after intervention periods. After the interventions, the results showed that facial expression, discourse content and mood assessment improved (more positive than negative expressions) as compared to pre-intervention assessment. However, musical intervention was more effective and had longer effects as compared with painting. In the second study (n=11), we further examined long lasting effects of music as compared to cooking by adding evaluation of the patients' emotional state 2 and 4 weeks after the last intervention. Again, music was more effective to improve the emotional state. Music had positive effects that remained significant up to 4 weeks after the intervention, while cooking only produced short-term effect on mood. In both studies, benefits were significant in more than 80% of patients. Taken together, these findings show that music intervention has specific effects on patients' emotional well being, offering promising

  15. Regenerative pharmacology in the treatment of genetic diseases: The paradigm of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Minetti, Giulia; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Current evidence supports the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions that counter the progression of genetic disorders by promoting regeneration of the affected organs or tissues. The rationale behind this concept lies on the evidence that targeting key events downstream of the genetic defect can compensate, at least partially, the pathological consequence of the related disease. In this regard, the beneficial effect exerted on animal models of muscular dystrophy by pharmacological strategies that enhance muscle regeneration provides an interesting paradigm. In this review, we describe and discuss the potential targets of pharmacological strategies that promote regeneration of dystrophic muscles and alleviate the consequence of the primary genetic defect. Regenerative pharmacology provides an immediate and suitable therapeutic opportunity to slow down the decline of muscles in the present generation of dystrophic patients, with the perspective to hold them in conditions such that they could benefit of future, more definitive, therapies. PMID:18804548

  16. Pharmacological and nutritional treatment for McArdle disease (Glycogen Storage Disease type V).

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Rosaline; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Background McArdle disease (Glycogen Storage Disease type V) is caused by an absence of muscle phosphorylase leading to exercise intolerance,myoglobinuria rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. This is an update of a review first published in 2004.Objectives To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of pharmacological or nutritional treatments for improving exercise performance and quality of life in McArdle disease.Search methods We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE on 11 August 2014.Selection criteria We included RCTs (including cross-over studies) and quasi-RCTs. We included unblinded open trials and individual patient studies in the discussion. Interventions included any pharmacological agent or nutritional supplement. Primary outcome measures included any objective assessment of exercise endurance (for example aerobic capacity (VO2) max, walking speed, muscle force or power and fatigability). Secondary outcome measures included metabolic changes (such as reduced plasma creatine kinase and a reduction in the frequency of myoglobinuria), subjective measures (including quality of life scores and indices of disability) and serious adverse events.Data collection and analysis Three review authors checked the titles and abstracts identified by the search and reviewed the manuscripts. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of relevant studies, with comments from a third author. Two authors extracted data onto a specially designed form.Main results We identified 31 studies, and 13 fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. We described trials that were not eligible for the review in the Discussion. The included studies involved a total of 85 participants, but the number in each individual trial was small; the largest treatment trial included 19 participants and the smallest study included only one participant. There was no benefit with: D

  17. Effects of pharmacological treatment and photoinactivation on the directional responses of an insect neuron.

    PubMed

    Molina, Jorge; Stumpner, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    Soma-ipsilateral branches of the large segmental omega neuron of the phaneropterid bush cricket Ancistrura nigrovittata have smooth endings, which extend through most of the auditory neuropile. Correspondingly, it shows a broad frequency tuning. Large excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) are observed when recording from soma-ipsilateral branches. Stimulation from the soma-ipsilateral side leads to a strong excitation. Soma-contralateral branches have a strong, beaded appearance. IPSPs, which seem to be of soma-contralateral origin, can be recorded from these branches. Stimulation from the soma-contralateral side leads to a strong inhibition of the omega neuron. Soma-contralateral stimulation must be 30-40 dB more intense than soma-ipsilateral stimulation to evoke similar spike numbers in the omega neuron. The side-to-side difference is reduced to 10-15 dB after cutting the input from the soma-contralateral leg (tympanic nerve). The thresholds for eliciting IPSPs by soma-contralateral stimulation correspond roughly to excitatory thresholds of the mirror-image omega with the same stimuli. Pharmacological treatment with picrotoxin (PTX) or photoinactivation of the Lucifer Yellow filled mirror-image omega neuron reduces contralateral inhibition considerably and eliminates all visible IPSPs. Nevertheless, an additional contralateral inhibition survives both procedures and is only eliminated after cutting the soma-contralateral tympanic nerve. These results demonstrate that the mirror-image partners of the omega neuron mutually inhibit each other in bush crickets--as in crickets. This mutual inhibition is PTX-sensitive. At least one additional element exerts contralateral PTX-insensitive inhibition on the omega neuron.

  18. Pharmacologic Evidence to Support Clinical Decision Making for Peripartum Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, D. L.; Perel, J. M.; Helsel, J. C.; Hanusa, B. H.; Romkes, M.; Nukui, T.; Friedman, C. R.; Wisner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Limited pharmacological data are available to guide methadone treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Objectives Study goals were to: 1) Characterize changes in methadone dose across childbearing, 2) Determine enantiomer-specific methadone withdrawal kinetics from steady-state during late pregnancy, 3) Assess enantiomer-specific changes in methadone level/dose (L/D) ratios across childbearing, and 4) Explore relationships between CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 single nucleotide polymorphisms and maternal dose, plasma concentration and L/D. Methods Methadone dose changes and timed plasma samples were obtained for women on methadone (n=25) followed prospectively from third trimester of pregnancy to three months postpartum. Results Participants were primarily white, Medicaid insured and multiparous. All women increased their dose from first to end of second trimester (mean peak increase=23 mg/day); 71% of women increased from second trimester to delivery (mean peak increase=19 mg/day). Half took a higher dose 3 months postpartum than at delivery despite significantly larger clearance during late pregnancy. Third trimester enantiomer-specific methadone half-lives (range R-methadone 14.7-24.9 hours; S-methadone 8.02-18.9 hours) were about half of those reported in non-pregnant populations. In 3 women with weekly 24-hour methadone levels after delivery, L/D increased within 1-2 weeks after delivery. Women with the CYP2B6 Q172 variant GT genotype have consistently higher L/D values for S-methadone across both pregnancy and postpartum. Conclusions Most women require increases in methadone dose across pregnancy. Given the shorter half-life and larger clearances during pregnancy, many pregnant women may benefit from split methadone dosing. L/D increases quickly after delivery and doses should be lowered rapidly after delivery. PMID:22926004

  19. Mechanisms of penile erection and basis for pharmacological treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K-E

    2011-12-01

    Erection is basically a spinal reflex that can be initiated by recruitment of penile afferents, both autonomic and somatic, and supraspinal influences from visual, olfactory, and imaginary stimuli. Several central transmitters are involved in the erectile control. Dopamine, acetylcholine, nitric oxide (NO), and peptides, such as oxytocin and adrenocorticotropin/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, have a facilitatory role, whereas serotonin may be either facilitatory or inhibitory, and enkephalins are inhibitory. The balance between contractant and relaxant factors controls the degree of contraction of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa (CC) and determines the functional state of the penis. Noradrenaline contracts both CC and penile vessels via stimulation of α₁-adrenoceptors. Neurogenic NO is considered the most important factor for relaxation of penile vessels and CC. The role of other mediators, released from nerves or endothelium, has not been definitely established. Erectile dysfunction (ED), defined as the "inability to achieve or maintain an erection adequate for sexual satisfaction," may have multiple causes and can be classified as psychogenic, vasculogenic or organic, neurologic, and endocrinologic. Many patients with ED respond well to the pharmacological treatments that are currently available, but there are still groups of patients in whom the response is unsatisfactory. The drugs used are able to substitute, partially or completely, the malfunctioning endogenous mechanisms that control penile erection. Most drugs have a direct action on penile tissue facilitating penile smooth muscle relaxation, including oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors and intracavernosal injections of prostaglandin E₁. Irrespective of the underlying cause, these drugs are effective in the majority of cases. Drugs with a central site of action have so far not been very successful. There is a need for therapeutic alternatives. This requires identification of new

  20. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  1. Combination fluconazole/paroxetine treatment is neuroprotective despite ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication in an SIV model of HIV neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Meulendyke, Kelly A.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Engle, Elizabeth L.; Shirk, Erin N.; Liu, Jiayang; Steiner, Joseph P.; Nath, Avindra; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Graham, David R.; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Zink, M. Christine

    2014-01-01

    Effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV infected patients has made HIV a treatable condition; however, debilitating HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) can still affect up to 50% of HIV infected individuals even under cART. While cART has greatly reduced the prevalence of the most severe form of HAND, milder forms have increased in prevalence, leaving a the total proportion of HIV-infected individuals suffering from HAND relatively unchanged. In this study an in vitro drug screen identified fluconazole and paroxetine as protective compounds against HIV gp120 and Tat neurotoxicity. Using an accelerated, consistent SIV/macaque model of HIV-associated CNS disease, we tested the in vivo neuroprotective capabilities of combination fluconazole/paroxetine (FluPar) treatment. FluPar treatment protected macaques from SIV-induced neurodegeneration, as measured by neurofilament light chain in the CSF, APP accumulation in the axons, and CaMKIIα in the frontal cortex, but did not significantly reduce markers of neuroinflammation or plasma or CNS viral loads. Since HIV and SIV neurodegeneration is often attributed to accompanying neuroinflammation, this study provides proof of concept that neuroprotection can be achieved even in the face of ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication. PMID:25227932

  2. Combination fluconazole/paroxetine treatment is neuroprotective despite ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication in an SIV model of HIV neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Meulendyke, Kelly A; Queen, Suzanne E; Engle, Elizabeth L; Shirk, Erin N; Liu, Jiayang; Steiner, Joseph P; Nath, Avindra; Tarwater, Patrick M; Graham, David R; Mankowski, Joseph L; Zink, M Christine

    2014-12-01

    Effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected patients has made HIV a treatable infection; however, debilitating HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) can still affect approximately 50% of HIV-infected individuals even under cART. While cART has greatly reduced the prevalence of the most severe form of HAND, milder forms have increased in prevalence, leaving the total proportion of HIV-infected individuals suffering from HAND relatively unchanged. In this study, an in vitro drug screen identified fluconazole and paroxetine as protective compounds against HIV gp120 and Tat neurotoxicity. Using an accelerated, consistent SIV/macaque model of HIV-associated CNS disease, we tested the in vivo neuroprotective capabilities of combination fluconazole/paroxetine (FluPar) treatment. FluPar treatment protected macaques from SIV-induced neurodegeneration, as measured by neurofilament light chain in the CSF, APP accumulation in axons, and CaMKIIα in the frontal cortex, but did not significantly reduce markers of neuroinflammation or plasma or CNS viral loads. Since HIV and SIV neurodegeneration is often attributed to accompanying neuroinflammation, this study provides proof of concept that neuroprotection can be achieved even in the face of ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication.

  3. Prevalence, Pharmacological Treatment, and Control of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Older People in Central Stockholm: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Fratiglioni, Laura; Liang, Yajun; Welmer, Anna-Karin; Xu, Weili; Mangialasche, Francesca; Johnell, Kristina; Qiu, Chengxuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiometabolic risk factors and related cardiovascular diseases represent major threats to healthy aging. Objective We aimed to estimate distribution, pharmacological treatment, and control of main cardiometabolic risk factors among older people. Methods This population-based study included 3363 participants (age≥60 years, 64.9% women) in the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, in central Stockholm, Sweden (2001-2004). Data on demographics, cardiometabolic risk factors (hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and high cholesterol), and medication use were collected through face-to-face interviews, clinical examinations, laboratory tests, and the inpatient register. Cardiometabolic risk factors were defined following the most commonly used criteria. Prevalence was standardized using local census data. Results The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, and hypertension was 9.5%, 12.8%, 49.7%, and 74.9%, respectively. The prevalence of hypertension and diabetes increased with age, whereas the prevalence of obesity and high cholesterol decreased with age. Forty-nine percent of older adults had two or more cardiometabolic risk factors; 9.8% had three or more. Overall, 55.5% of people with hypertension, 50.3% with diabetes, and 25.0% with high cholesterol received pharmacological treatment. Of those treated pharmacologically, 49.4%, 38.1%, and 85.5% reached therapeutic goals for hypertension (blood pressure<150/90 mmHg), diabetes (glycated haemoglobin<7%), and high cholesterol (total cholesterol<6.22 mmol/l), respectively. Conclusions Hypertension, high cholesterol, and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors were common among older people in Stockholm, but pharmacological treatment and control of these major factors can be improved. Appropriate management of cardiometabolic profiles among older people may help improve cardiovascular health and achieve healthy aging. PMID:25799502

  4. The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Karin B.; Berna, Chantal; Loggia, Marco L.; Wasan, Ajay; Edwards, Robert R.; Gollub, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased painrelated activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of today’s experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments. PMID:22445888

  5. Fish Oil–Based Lipid Emulsions in the Treatment of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: An Ongoing Positive Experience123

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Muralidhar H.; Carter, Beth A.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; King, Kristi; Abrams, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas in the use of FOLE in treatment of PNALD as presented at the 2013 Experimental Biology meeting. We describe the findings of a single center, prospective, observational study of infants <6 mo of age with PNALD who received parenteral FOLE as monotherapy. A total of 97 infants received FOLE under the compassionate-use protocol for the treatment of PNALD. Eighty-three (86%) survived with resolution of cholestasis and 14 (14%) died. The median conjugated bilirubin (CB) concentration at the initiation of FOLE therapy was 4.8 mg/dL (range 2.1–26). The median time to resolution of cholestasis was 40 d (range 3–158). Compared with infants with mild cholestasis (CB of 2.1–5 mg/dL at the initiation of FOLE), nonsurvivors were significantly more premature and took longer to resolve their cholestasis. Gestational age at birth correlated inversely with CB at the beginning of FOLE and peak CB. Infants with an initial CB >10 mg/dL had a higher mortality rate than infants with an initial CB <5 mg/dL (35% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). Our experience with the use of FOLE in PNALD continues to be encouraging. Prematurity continues to be a major determinant in mortality and severity of cholestasis. This calls for further controlled studies designed to optimize dose and timing of intervention in the use of FOLE in neonates. PMID:24425724

  6. Cocaine: Pharmacology, Effects, and Treatment of Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, John, Ed.

    This monograph consists of eight papers which refer in one way or another to the pharmacology of cocaine. The papers are: (1) Cocaine 1984: Introduction and Overview" (John Grabowski); (2) "Cocaine: A Growing Public Health Problem" (Edgar H. Adams and Jack Durell); (3) "Neural Mechanisms of the Reinforcing Action of Cocaine" (Roy A. Wise); (4)…

  7. Practitioner Review: Non-Pharmacological Treatments for ADHD: A Lifespan Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan; Amarasinghe, J. Myanthi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and pervasive developmental disorder that is not restricted to the childhood years. Methods: This paper reviews non-pharmacological interventions that are available at present for preschoolers, school-age children, adolescents and adults. Results: The most appropriate…

  8. Systems Pharmacology Dissecting Holistic Medicine for Treatment of Complex Diseases: An Example Using Cardiocerebrovascular Diseases Treated by TCM

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Chunli; Huang, Chao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Boli

    2015-01-01

    Holistic medicine is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates all types of biological information (protein, small molecules, tissues, organs, external environmental signals, etc.) to lead to predictive and actionable models for health care and disease treatment. Despite the global and integrative character of this discipline, a comprehensive picture of holistic medicine for the treatment of complex diseases is still lacking. In this study, we develop a novel systems pharmacology approach to dissect holistic medicine in treating cardiocerebrovascular diseases (CCDs) by TCM (traditional Chinese medicine). Firstly, by applying the TCM active ingredients screened out by a systems-ADME process, we explored and experimentalized the signed drug-target interactions for revealing the pharmacological actions of drugs at a molecule level. Then, at a/an tissue/organ level, the drug therapeutic mechanisms were further investigated by a target-organ location method. Finally, a translational integrating pathway approach was applied to extract the diseases-therapeutic modules for understanding the complex disease and its therapy at systems level. For the first time, the feature of the drug-target-pathway-organ-cooperations for treatment of multiple organ diseases in holistic medicine was revealed, facilitating the development of novel treatment paradigm for complex diseases in the future. PMID:26101539

  9. Systems Pharmacology Dissecting Holistic Medicine for Treatment of Complex Diseases: An Example Using Cardiocerebrovascular Diseases Treated by TCM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Chunli; Huang, Chao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Boli

    2015-01-01

    Holistic medicine is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates all types of biological information (protein, small molecules, tissues, organs, external environmental signals, etc.) to lead to predictive and actionable models for health care and disease treatment. Despite the global and integrative character of this discipline, a comprehensive picture of holistic medicine for the treatment of complex diseases is still lacking. In this study, we develop a novel systems pharmacology approach to dissect holistic medicine in treating cardiocerebrovascular diseases (CCDs) by TCM (traditional Chinese medicine). Firstly, by applying the TCM active ingredients screened out by a systems-ADME process, we explored and experimentalized the signed drug-target interactions for revealing the pharmacological actions of drugs at a molecule level. Then, at a/an tissue/organ level, the drug therapeutic mechanisms were further investigated by a target-organ location method. Finally, a translational integrating pathway approach was applied to extract the diseases-therapeutic modules for understanding the complex disease and its therapy at systems level. For the first time, the feature of the drug-target-pathway-organ-cooperations for treatment of multiple organ diseases in holistic medicine was revealed, facilitating the development of novel treatment paradigm for complex diseases in the future.

  10. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  11. Pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of Sulcona(®), a traditional Siddha medicine used in the treatment of burns.

    PubMed

    Baskar Suresh Kumar, P; Yamuna Gowri, K; Revathy, M; Vijayaraghavan, M; Navaneethakrishnan, K R; Murugan, S S; Kumaravel, T S

    2014-03-01

    Sulcona, a Siddha proprietary medicine used for the treatment of burns, has been in practice for more than 50 years. This medicine has been successfully used on several burned patients with an excellent recovery and safety record. In this manuscript, we investigate some of its pharmacological and safety profiles. Treatment of cells with Sulcona induced a statistically significant increase in population doubling compared to concurrent controls in proliferating human lymphocytes as well as in Balb/c 3T3 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. Sulcona exhibited some antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus. Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema testing suggested that Sulcona has some anti-inflammatory properties. Patch testing showed that Sulcona has mild anesthetic effects. The above properties suggest Sulcona's pharmacological properties aidin treatment of burns. Sulcona did not show any skin irritation or sensitization or mutagenic potential suggesting that it is safe for use. Further work is necessary to elucidate its exact mechanisms of action.

  12. Pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of Sulcona(®), a traditional Siddha medicine used in the treatment of burns.

    PubMed

    Baskar Suresh Kumar, P; Yamuna Gowri, K; Revathy, M; Vijayaraghavan, M; Navaneethakrishnan, K R; Murugan, S S; Kumaravel, T S

    2014-03-01

    Sulcona, a Siddha proprietary medicine used for the treatment of burns, has been in practice for more than 50 years. This medicine has been successfully used on several burned patients with an excellent recovery and safety record. In this manuscript, we investigate some of its pharmacological and safety profiles. Treatment of cells with Sulcona induced a statistically significant increase in population doubling compared to concurrent controls in proliferating human lymphocytes as well as in Balb/c 3T3 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. Sulcona exhibited some antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus. Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema testing suggested that Sulcona has some anti-inflammatory properties. Patch testing showed that Sulcona has mild anesthetic effects. The above properties suggest Sulcona's pharmacological properties aidin treatment of burns. Sulcona did not show any skin irritation or sensitization or mutagenic potential suggesting that it is safe for use. Further work is necessary to elucidate its exact mechanisms of action. PMID:23870453

  13. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  14. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of Multi-Scale Mechanisms of Action for Herbal Medicines in Stroke Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes. PMID:25093322

  15. African herbal medicines in the treatment of HIV: Hypoxis and Sutherlandia. An overview of evidence and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Edward; Cooper, Curtis; Seely, Dugald; Kanfer, Izzy

    2005-01-01

    In Africa, herbal medicines are often used as primary treatment for HIV/AIDS and for HIV-related problems. In general, traditional medicines are not well researched, and are poorly regulated. We review the evidence and safety concerns related to the use of two specific African herbals, which are currently recommended by the Ministry of Health in South Africa and member states for use in HIV: African Potato and Sutherlandia. We review the pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetics of these herbal medicines. Despite the popularity of their use and the support of Ministries of Health and NGOs in some African countries, no clinical trials of efficacy exist, and low-level evidence of harm identifies the potential for drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs. Efforts should be made by mainstream health professionals to provide validated information to traditional healers and patients on the judicious use of herbal remedies. This may reduce harm through failed expectations, pharmacologic adverse events including possible drug/herb interactions and unnecessary added therapeutic costs. Efforts should also be directed at evaluating the possible benefits of natural products in HIV/AIDS treatment. PMID:15927053

  16. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as "the world's first killer" of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment strategy for CVDs is still difficult. Here, we developed a system pharmacology approach with the purpose of revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms exemplified by a famous compound saffron formula (CSF) in treating CVDs. First, by systems ADME analysis combined with drug targeting process, 103 potential active components and their corresponding 219 direct targets were retrieved and some key interactions were further experimentally validated. Based on this, the network relationships among active components, targets and diseases were further built to uncover the pharmacological actions of the drug. Finally, a "CVDs pathway" consisted of several regulatory modules was incorporated to dissect the therapeutic effects of CSF in different pathological features-relevant biological processes. All this demonstrates CSF has multi-scale curative activity in regulating CVD-related biological processes, which provides a new potential way for modern medicine in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:26813334

  17. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as “the world’s first killer” of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment strategy for CVDs is still difficult. Here, we developed a system pharmacology approach with the purpose of revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms exemplified by a famous compound saffron formula (CSF) in treating CVDs. First, by systems ADME analysis combined with drug targeting process, 103 potential active components and their corresponding 219 direct targets were retrieved and some key interactions were further experimentally validated. Based on this, the network relationships among active components, targets and diseases were further built to uncover the pharmacological actions of the drug. Finally, a “CVDs pathway” consisted of several regulatory modules was incorporated to dissect the therapeutic effects of CSF in different pathological features-relevant biological processes. All this demonstrates CSF has multi-scale curative activity in regulating CVD-related biological processes, which provides a new potential way for modern medicine in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:26813334

  18. Systems Pharmacology Uncovers the Multiple Mechanisms of Xijiao Dihuang Decoction for the Treatment of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianling; Pei, Tianli; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Background. Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are a group of systemic diseases characterized by fever and bleeding, which have posed a formidable potential threat to public health with high morbidity and mortality. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulas have been acknowledged with striking effects in treatment of hemorrhagic fever syndromes in China's history. Nevertheless, their accurate mechanisms of action are still confusing. Objective. To systematically dissect the mechanisms of action of Chinese medicinal formula Xijiao Dihuang (XJDH) decoction as an effective treatment for VHF. Methods. In this study, a systems pharmacology method integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) screening, drug targeting, network, and pathway analysis was developed. Results. 23 active compounds of XJDH were obtained and 118 VHF-related targets were identified to have interactions with them. Moreover, systematic analysis of drug-target network and the integrated VHF pathway indicate that XJDH probably acts through multiple mechanisms to benefit VHF patients, which can be classified as boosting immune system, restraining inflammatory responses, repairing the vascular system, and blocking virus spread. Conclusions. The integrated systems pharmacology method provides precise probe to illuminate the molecular mechanisms of XJDH for VHF, which will also facilitate the application of traditional medicine in modern medicine. PMID:27239215

  19. Ongoing Pharmacological Management of Chronic Pain in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Reis, Margareta

    2016-06-01

    The article discusses possible effects of the use of analgesics during pregnancy. It summarizes the pertinent literature and reports some previously unpublished data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Most likely the use of analgesics does not cause spontaneous abortion. Only small malformation risk increases are seen after the use of opioids and perhaps non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. If possible, the latter should be avoided during the first trimester. If exposure has occurred there is no reason to consider an interruption of the pregnancy. Continued use of analgesics may increase the risk of preeclampsia and of preterm birth, especially valid for opioids. Use of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in late pregnancy should be avoided because of the risk of bleeding and (valid also for NSAIDs) premature closure of the ductus arteriosus. A small risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome may exist after the use of opioids for chronic pain, notably during the third trimester and long-lasting effects on child development can possibly occur. For a woman with chronic pain, adequate use of pain killers during pregnancy is needed. It is prudent to avoid ASA and NSAIDs towards the end of the pregnancy, while acetaminophen is an acceptable option all through pregnancy. If continued use of opioids is necessary, the associated risks are low. Triptans can be used for migraine during pregnancy. If possible sumatriptan is preferable to other triptans as data for the latter are largely lacking. Ergots are preferably avoided as not enough data are available. PMID:27154242

  20. Differential response of operant self-injury to pharmacologic versus behavioral treatment.

    PubMed

    Mace, F C; Blum, N J; Sierp, B J; Delaney, B A; Mauk, J E

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that self-injurious behavior (SIB) maintained by environmental factors will be more effectively treated by behavioral treatments than by haloperidol. Fifteen subjects were enrolled in this study. The efficacy of both haloperidol and a behavioral treatment was assessed. At the onset of treatment, subjects were randomized to receive either haloperidol or a placebo. During each day of treatment, data were collected during sessions with a behavioral treatment and sessions without a behavioral treatment. Behavioral treatment resulted in a statistically significant decrease in SIB, but haloperidol did not. Eighty-three percent of subjects were classified as responders to the behavioral treatment whereas only 25% of the subjects were responders to haloperidol (p = .019). We conclude that individuals with operant SIB are more likely to respond to behavioral treatments than to haloperidol.

  1. [Early diagnostics, prophylaxis, and non-pharmacological treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bykov, A T; Chernyshev, A V; Vartazaryan, M A; Lobastov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death in most countries, including Russia. Non-pharmacological-modalities intended for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease including hypertension and atherosclerosis currently acquire special significance. The objective of the present*study was to develop a system of methods for early diagnostics, prevention and treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and hypertension Another objective was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods. A total of 310 patients at risk-of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis or with pre-clinical stages of these conditions were examined during a two year observation period. The system of early diagnosis and non-pharmacological primary prevention of cardiovascular disease was developed and evaluated using climatotherapeutic and physiotherapeutic methods in combination with and personalized dietary therapy, hypoxic-hypercapnic factors and educational programs. The study has demonstrated that the proposed system allowed to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce cardiovascular morbidity. The patients of the main group experienced the reduction of abdominal obesity and blood pressure along with the improvement of the blood lipid profile and other indicators. These parameters remained unaltered in the patients comprising the control group. In the main group, the incidence of coronary heart disease and hypertension was 62.5% and 81.25% lower respectively than in the control group.

  2. [Early diagnostics, prophylaxis, and non-pharmacological treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bykov, A T; Chernyshev, A V; Vartazaryan, M A; Lobastov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death in most countries, including Russia. Non-pharmacological-modalities intended for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease including hypertension and atherosclerosis currently acquire special significance. The objective of the present*study was to develop a system of methods for early diagnostics, prevention and treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and hypertension Another objective was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods. A total of 310 patients at risk-of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis or with pre-clinical stages of these conditions were examined during a two year observation period. The system of early diagnosis and non-pharmacological primary prevention of cardiovascular disease was developed and evaluated using climatotherapeutic and physiotherapeutic methods in combination with and personalized dietary therapy, hypoxic-hypercapnic factors and educational programs. The study has demonstrated that the proposed system allowed to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce cardiovascular morbidity. The patients of the main group experienced the reduction of abdominal obesity and blood pressure along with the improvement of the blood lipid profile and other indicators. These parameters remained unaltered in the patients comprising the control group. In the main group, the incidence of coronary heart disease and hypertension was 62.5% and 81.25% lower respectively than in the control group. PMID:26852497

  3. Patient perspective of measuring treatment efficacy: the Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient Priorities for Pharmacological Interventions (RAPP-PI) outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, T; Morris, M; Calnan, M; Richards, P; Hewlett, S

    2010-01-01

    Background Collaboration with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) highlights that outcomes important to them include fatigue, coping and life enjoyment. However, these are not commonly measured in clinical trials. There is little evidence about which outcomes patients would prioritise, nor what factors influence patients’ prioritisation. Objective To develop a complementary core set with patients to promote inclusion of their priority outcomes in pharmacological interventions. Methods Nominal groups were conducted with RA patients to rank 63 outcomes generated from previous in-depth interviews. A multi-centre postal survey provided the final selection of core outcomes for the RAPP-PI, in which RA patients rated the importance of the priority outcomes from the nominal groups and ranked the top 6. Results 26 patients participated in 5 nominal group discussions, and reduced the 63 initial outcomes to 32 most important. 254 participants in the survey ranked priority treatment outcomes to form the RAPP-PI: pain, activities of daily living, joint damage, mobility, life enjoyment, independence, fatigue, and valued activities. The 8 priorities represent three domains of treatment outcomes: direct impact of RA, psychosocial well-being, and function/participation. Chi-squared tests showed that disease severity, disease duration, gender and patients’ perceptions of managing, self-efficacy and normality influenced the selection of priority treatment outcomes. Conclusion Collaboration with patients has captured their perspective of priority outcomes from pharmacological interventions. Whilst there is some overlap with professional core outcomes, the additional use of this complementary set will give a broader evaluation of effectiveness of interventions from the key stakeholders: patients. PMID:20461786

  4. [Antipsychotics of different clinical/pharmacological groups in treatment of negative disorders in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Danilov, D S

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of using different anti psychotics in treatment of negative disorders in schizophrenia is considered. Mechanisms of the development of "antinegative" effect during treatment with typical neuroleptics, atypical neuroleptics with dopamine-serotonin activity and atypical neuroleptics (partial dopamine receptor agonists) are analyzed. Their efficacy is discussed in the comparative context. In conclusion, a differential approach to schizophrenia treatment is suggested.

  5. The hyperactive syndrome: metanalysis of genetic alterations, pharmacological treatments and brain lesions which increase locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Davide

    2008-12-01

    The large number of transgenic mice realized thus far with different purposes allows addressing new questions, such as which animals, over the entire set of transgenic animals, show a specific behavioural abnormality. In the present study, we have used a metanalytical approach to organize a database of genetic modifications, brain lesions and pharmacological interventions that increase locomotor activity in animal models. To further understand the resulting data set, we have organized a second database of the alterations (genetic, pharmacological or brain lesions) that reduce locomotor activity. Using this approach, we estimated that 1.56% of the genes in the genome yield to hyperactivity and 0.75% of genes produce hypoactivity when altered. These genes have been classified into genes for neurotransmitter systems, hormonal, metabolic systems, ion channels, structural proteins, transcription factors, second messengers and growth factors. Finally, two additional classes included animals with neurodegeneration and inner ear abnormalities. The analysis of the database revealed several unexpected findings. First, the genes that, when mutated, induce hyperactive behaviour do not pertain to a single neurotransmitter system. In fact, alterations in most neurotransmitter systems can give rise to a hyperactive phenotype. In contrast, fewer changes can decrease locomotor activity. Specifically, genetic and pharmacological alterations that enhance the dopamine, orexin, histamine, cannabinoids systems or that antagonize the cholinergic system induce an increase in locomotor activity. Similarly, imbalances in the two main neurotransmitters of the nervous system, GABA and glutamate usually result in hyperactive behaviour. It is remarkable that no genetic alterations pertaining to the GABA system have been reported to reduce locomotor behaviour. Other neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, have a more complex influence. For instance, a decrease in norepinephrine

  6. Psychological and pharmacologic treatment of youth with posttraumatic stress disorder: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Keeshin, Brooks R; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the evidence for the treatment of children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Treatment strategies are discussed along with clinically relevant considerations with regard to choosing a modality, working with parents, and adaptations for specific populations. Current data suggest the efficacy of trauma-focused psychotherapies for the treatment of pediatric PTSD. Limited data from psychopharmacologic trials suggest that several classes of medications may have efficacy in youth with PTSD. The extant treatment studies in pediatric patients with PTSD and consensus recommendations suggest that treatment should be based on the individual child's most distressing and functionally impairing symptoms.

  7. A non-pharmacologic approach to the treatment of exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Schachter, E N; Lee, M; Gerhard, H; Brown, S

    1980-01-01

    We investigated the effects of breathing air warmed and fully saturated to body temperature (AWS) before, during, and after exercise in asthmatic subjects. Airway responses to submaximal exercise on a cycloergometer were measured on four separate days in 14 asthmatic volunteers. On day 1 the subjects exercised breathing ambient air (AA). On the subsequent three days exercise was performed with the subjects breathing AWS, (1) for five minutes preceding, (2) during, and (3) for five minutes following exercise. We showed complete protection against EIB by AWS during exercise, but no protection by AWS before or after exercise. On two subsequent days we examined the effects of partially warming and humidifying the subjects' inspired air by having them wear a mask during exercise. We found that with such protection bronchospasm was significantly but not completely blunted. We conclude that the physiologic changes initiated during exercise can be prevented by breathing AWS during exercise, but are not by AWS inhaled before or after exercise. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate the possibility of using masks as a non-pharmacologic means of controlling EIB.

  8. Evolving paradigms in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Huard, J; Mu, X; Lu, A

    2016-08-01

    Progressive muscle weakness and degeneration due to the lack of dystrophin eventually leads to the loss of independent ambulation by the middle of the patient's second decade, and a fatal outcome due to cardiac or respiratory failure by the third decade. More specifically, loss of sarcolemmal dystrophin and the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein (DAG) complex promotes muscle fiber damage during muscle contraction. This process results in an efflux of creatine kinase (CK), an influx of calcium ions, and the recruitment of T cells, macrophages, and mast cells to the damaged muscle, causing progressive myofiber necrosis. For the last 20 years, the major goal in the development of therapeutic approaches to alleviate muscle weakness in DMD has been centered on the restoration of dystrophin or proteins that are analogous to dystrophin, such as utrophin, through a variety of modalities including cell therapy, gene therapy, gene correction, and the highly promising techniques utilizing CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Despite the development of new therapeutic options, there still exist numerous challenges that we must face with regard to these new strategies and, consequently, we still do not have any feasible options available to ultimately slow the progression of this devastating disease. The purpose of this article is to highlight the current knowledge and advancements in the evolving paradigms in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics for this devastating musculoskeletal disease.

  9. [131I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the treatment of metastatic neuroblastoma. Clinical, pharmacological and dosimetric aspects.

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, T; Treuner, J; Ehninger, G; Keller, K D; Dopfer, R; Feine, U; Niethammer, D

    1989-01-01

    Ten children with stage III or IV neuroblastoma that had either relapsed or was refractory were treated with [131I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) from 1984 to 1986. The total dose ranged from 4,365 to 21,900 MBq and was given in one to five courses. Two patients achieved a complete remission (CR), two, a partial remission (PR), and three, an arrest of the disease. Pharmacological studies showed that 93% of detectable radioactivity was attributable to MIBG at the beginning of the infusion. However, by the end of the infusion this had decreased to 88%. The terminal half-life of MIBG was 37.0 h, whereas that of non-MIBG-bound iodine was 71.6 h. Therefore, the radioactivity-time product of non-MIBG-bound 131I was much higher than that of MIBG. Dosimetric studies showed a mean level of absorbed radiation for the total body of 160 microGy/MBq, a liver irradiation of 540 microGy/MBq and a mean tumour radiation of 10,500 microGy/MBq.

  10. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality. PMID:25830902

  11. Pharmacological Treatment of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence: What is the Evidence?

    PubMed

    Løvvik, Anja; Müller, Stig; Patel, Hitendra R H

    2016-08-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common and debilitating problem, and post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) is becoming an increasing problem, with a higher risk among elderly men. Current treatment options for PPI include pelvic floor muscle exercises and surgery. Conservative treatment has disputable effects, and surgical treatment is expensive, is not always effective, and may have complications. This article describes the prevalence and causes of PPI and the current treatment methods. We conducted a search of the PUBMED database and reviewed the current literature on novel medical treatments of PPI, with special focus on the aging man. Antimuscarinic drugs, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, duloxetine, and α-adrenergic drugs have been proposed as medical treatments for PPI. Most studies were small and used different criteria for quantifying incontinence and assessing treatment results. Thus, there is not enough evidence to recommend the use of these medications as standard treatment of PPI. To determine whether medical therapy is a viable option in the treatment of PPI, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed that also assess side effects in the elderly population. PMID:27554370

  12. Predictors of placebo response in pharmacological and dietary supplement treatment trials in pediatric autism spectrum disorder: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, A; Lampit, A; Glozier, N; Hickie, I B; Guastella, A J

    2015-01-01

    Large placebo responses in many clinical trials limit our capacity to identify effective therapeutics. Although it is often assumed that core behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) rarely remit spontaneously, there has been limited investigation of the size of the placebo response in relevant clinical trials. These trials also rely on caregiver and clinical observer reports as outcome measures. The objectives of this meta-analysis are to identify the pooled placebo response and the predictors of placebo response in pharmacological and dietary supplement treatment trials for participants with a diagnosis of ASD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in pediatric ASD, conducted between 1980 and August 2014, were identified through a search of Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and clinicaltrials.gov. RCTs of at least 14 days duration, comparing the treatment response for an oral active agent and placebo using at least one of the common outcome measures, were included. Analysis of 25 data sets (1315 participants) revealed a moderate effect size for overall placebo response (Hedges' g=0.45, 95% confidence interval (0.34–0.56), P<0.001). Five factors were associated with an increase in response to placebo, namely: an increased response to the active intervention; outcome ratings by clinicians (as compared with caregivers); trials of pharmacological and adjunctive interventions; and trials located in Iran. There is a clear need for the identification of objective measures of change in clinical trials for ASD, such as evaluation of biological activity or markers, and for consideration of how best to deal with placebo response effects in trial design and analyses. PMID:26393486

  13. Pharmacological Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 Signaling Is a Promising Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-01-01

    STAT3 activation is associated with poor prognosis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data demonstrated that regorafenib (Stivarga) is a pharmacological agonist of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) that enhances SHP-1 activity and induces apoptosis by targeting STAT3 signals in CRC. This study aimed to find a therapeutic drug that is more effective than regorafenib for CRC treatment. Here, we showed that SC-43 was more effective than regorafenib at inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. SC-43 significantly increased SHP-1 activity, downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 level, and induced apoptosis in CRC cells. An SHP-1 inhibitor or knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA both significantly rescued the SC-43–induced apoptosis and decreased p-STAT3Tyr705 level. Conversely, SHP-1 overexpression increased the effects of SC-43 on apoptosis and p-STAT3Tyr705 level. These data suggest that SC-43–induced apoptosis mediated through the loss of p-STAT3Tyr705 was dependent on SHP-1 function. Importantly, SC-43–enhanced SHP-1 activity was because of the docking potential of SC-43, which relieved the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 and inhibited p-STAT3Tyr705 signals. Importantly, we observed that a significant negative correlation existed between SHP-1 and p-STAT3Tyr705expression in CRC patients (P = .038). Patients with strong SHP-1 and weak p-STAT3Tyr705 expression had significantly higher overall survival compared with patients with weak SHP-1 and strong p-STAT3Tyr705 expression (P = .029). In conclusion, SHP-1 is suitable to be a useful prognostic marker and a pharmacological target for CRC treatment. Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 signaling by SC-43 may serve as a promising pharmacotherapy for CRC. PMID:26476076

  14. Genetic and Pharmacological Intervention for Treatment/Prevention of Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty years ago it was first demonstrated that birds could regenerate their cochlear hair cells following noise damage or aminoglycoside treatment. An understanding of how this structural and functional regeneration occurred might lead to the development of therapies for treatment of sensorineural hearing loss in humans. Recent experiments have…

  15. Combined Behavioral and Pharmacologic Treatment for Obesity: Predictors of Successful Weight Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodin, Judith; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Tested an anorectic agent, diethylpropion hydrochloride (Tenuate), with a 20-week cognitive-behavioral (CB) weight loss program. Demonstrated significant weight loss under all treatment conditions, with the Tenuate/CB group superior to placebo plus therapy and therapy alone, during the latter half of the drug treatment period. (Author/KS)

  16. Pharmacologic Treatments for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Howard Y.; Potter, Mona P.; Woodworth, K. Yvonne; Yorks, Dayna M.; Petty, Carter R.; Wozniak, Janet R.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A growing body of literature has documented pediatric bipolar disorder to be a severely impairing form of psychopathology. However, concerns remain as to the inadequacy of the extant literature on its pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, treatment studies have not been systematically reviewed for treatment effects on core and associated…

  17. The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Treatment of Selective Mutism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John S.; Mitchell, Angela D.; Segool, Natasha

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of evidence for the psychopharmacological treatment of children diagnosed with selective mutism within the context of its link to social anxiety disorder. An increased focus on potential medication treatment for this disorder has resulted from significant monetary and resource limitations in typical practice,…

  18. Therapeutic targeting of autophagy in cancer. Part II: pharmacological modulation of treatment-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy, the catabolic pathway in which cells recycle organelles and other parts of their own cytoplasm, is increasingly recognised as an important cytoprotective mechanism in cancer cells. Several cancer treatments stimulate the autophagic process and when autophagy is inhibited, cancer cells show an enhanced response to multiple treatments. These findings have nourished the theory that autophagy provides cancer cells with a survival advantage during stressful conditions, including exposure to therapeutics. Therefore, interference with the autophagic response can potentially enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy. In this review we examine two approaches to modulate autophagy as complementary cancer treatment: inhibition and induction. Inhibition of autophagy during cancer treatment eliminates its cytoprotective effects. Conversely, induction of autophagy combined with conventional cancer therapy exerts severe cytoplasmic degradation that can ultimately lead to cell death. We will discuss how autophagy can be therapeutically manipulated in cancer cells and how interactions between the conventional cancer therapies and autophagy modulation influence treatment outcome.

  19. The Role of Visceral Hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Pharmacological Targets and Novel Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad H; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common disorder referred to gastroenterologists and is characterized by altered bowel habits, abdominal pain, and bloating. Visceral hypersensitivity (VH) is a multifactorial process that may occur within the peripheral or central nervous systems and plays a principal role in the etiology of IBS symptoms. The pharmacological studies on selective drugs based on targeting specific ligands can provide novel therapies for modulation of persistent visceral hyperalgesia. The current paper reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying therapeutic targeting for providing future drugs to protect or treat visceroperception and pain sensitization in IBS patients. There are a wide range of mediators and receptors participating in visceral pain perception amongst which substances targeting afferent receptors are attractive sources of novel drugs. Novel therapeutic targets for the management of VH include compounds which alter gut-brain pathways and local neuroimmune pathways. Molecular mediators and receptors participating in pain perception and visceroperception include histamine-1 receptors, serotonin (5-hydrodytryptamine) receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid type I, tachykinins ligands, opioid receptors, voltage-gated channels, tyrosine receptor kinase receptors, protease-activated receptors, adrenergic system ligands, cannabinoid receptors, sex hormones, and glutamate receptors which are discussed in the current review. Moreover, several plant-derived natural compounds with potential to alleviate VH in IBS have been highlighted. VH has an important role in the pathology and severity of complications in IBS. Therefore, managing VH can remarkably modulate the symptoms of IBS. More preclinical and clinical investigations are needed to provide efficacious and targeted medicines for the management of VH. PMID:27431236

  20. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. The pharmacological and surgical options.

    PubMed

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W

    2015-04-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines.

  1. Pharmacological interventions for ADHD: how do adolescent and adult patient beliefs and attitudes impact treatment adherence?

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to medication can be problematic for patients, especially so for patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Effective medications are available for the treatment of ADHD; however, nonadherence rates for ADHD medication range from 13.2%–64%. The reasons for nonadherence can be complex. This review aims to look at how the beliefs and attitudes of adolescents and adults impact ADHD treatment adherence. PMID:25284990

  2. The efficacy and tolerability of pharmacologic treatment options for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Montouris, Georgia D; Wheless, James W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2014-09-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe epileptic encephalopathy that appears in childhood. LGS is characterized by a slow spike-wave pattern on electroencephalogram (EEG), cognitive impairment, and multiple seizure types. This mixture of seizure types, along with the need to use more than one type of medication, makes LGS one of the most complicated epilepsies to treat successfully. Recent developments in approved therapies for the treatment of LGS offer physicians more options, but also make developing a treatment strategy that minimizes adverse events more challenging. There are currently 5 treatment options for LGS: felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate, rufinamide, and clobazam, and several others that are used off-label, each of which has benefits and limitations. There are several factors that must be considered when determining which medication to use when treating patients with LGS, including efficacy, which is assessed by seizure frequency, tolerability, and the anticipated duration of treatment. In this article, data supporting current treatment options are discussed, and important considerations about the treatment of LGS are reviewed. PMID:25284033

  3. The efficacy and tolerability of pharmacologic treatment options for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Montouris, Georgia D; Wheless, James W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2014-09-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe epileptic encephalopathy that appears in childhood. LGS is characterized by a slow spike-wave pattern on electroencephalogram (EEG), cognitive impairment, and multiple seizure types. This mixture of seizure types, along with the need to use more than one type of medication, makes LGS one of the most complicated epilepsies to treat successfully. Recent developments in approved therapies for the treatment of LGS offer physicians more options, but also make developing a treatment strategy that minimizes adverse events more challenging. There are currently 5 treatment options for LGS: felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate, rufinamide, and clobazam, and several others that are used off-label, each of which has benefits and limitations. There are several factors that must be considered when determining which medication to use when treating patients with LGS, including efficacy, which is assessed by seizure frequency, tolerability, and the anticipated duration of treatment. In this article, data supporting current treatment options are discussed, and important considerations about the treatment of LGS are reviewed.

  4. Safe pharmacologic treatment strategies for osteoarthritis pain in African Americans with hypertension, and renal and cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jerry; Weinryb, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a degenerative joint disease affecting both whites and African Americans similarly. African Americans have a high incidence rate of comorbidities, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and diabetes. Treatment of osteoarthritic pain in patients with comorbidities is often complicated by potential safety concerns. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) specific NSAIDs have been shown to increase blood pressure in hypertensive patients taking antihypertensive medications. Patients with CVD risk factors taking low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention may be at increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs. Diabetics face an increased risk of renal complications. Because NSAIDs are associated with adverse renal effects, they should be used cautiously in patients with advanced renal disease. Acetaminophen is the most appropriate initial analgesic for African Americans with chronic osteoarthritic pain and concurrent hypertension, CVD risk factors or diabetes, and is recommended by the American College of Rheumatology as first-line treatment. Many of the adverse effects commonly associated with NSAIDs are not associated with acetaminophen. Safety concerns surrounding pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis in African Americans are reviewed. PMID:16895283

  5. Novel pharmacologic approaches to the prevention and treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoming; Szabo, Sandor; Khomenko, Tetyana; Tolstanova, Ganna; Paunovic, Brankica; French, Samuel W; Sandor, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    UC. The increased VP is initiated by early release of histamine and maintained/aggravated by VEGF, leading to perivascular edema, vascular stasis, hypoxia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and colonic erosions/ulcers. Inhibition of increased VP prevents or reduces development and progression of UC. In this review, we discuss novel pharmacologic approaches to prevent UC, differential actions of angiogenic growth factors in UC pathogenesis and blocking the early increase in VP in UC development, these new findings may provide new insights into the regulation of angiogenesis in UC and may lead to development of VP-related drugs to accelerate the healing of UC. PMID:22950505

  6. Preclinical pharmacological evaluation of letrozole as a novel treatment for gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dave, Nimita; Chow, Lionel M L; Gudelsky, Gary A; LaSance, Kathleen; Qi, Xiaoyang; Desai, Pankaj B

    2015-04-01

    We present data that letrozole, an extensively used aromatase inhibitor in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors in postmenopausal women, may be potentially used in the treatment of glioblastomas. First, we measured the in vitro cytotoxicity of letrozole and aromatase (CYP19A1) expression and activity in human LN229, T98G, U373MG, U251MG, and U87MG, and rat C6 glioma cell lines. Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells served as controls. Cytotoxicity was determined employing the MTT assay, and aromatase activity using an immunoassay that measures the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. Second, in vivo activity of letrozole was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats orthotopically implanted with C6 gliomas. The changes in tumor volume with letrozole treatment (4 mg/kg/day) were assessed employing μPET/CT imaging, employing [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) as the radiotracer. Brain tissues were collected for histologic evaluations. All glioma cell lines included here expressed CYP19A1 and letrozole exerted considerable cytotoxicity and decrease in aromatase activity against these cells (IC50, 0.1-3.5 μmol/L). Imaging analysis employing F18-FDG μPET/CT demonstrated a marked reduction of active tumor volume (>75%) after 8 days of letrozole treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed marked reduction in aromatase expression in tumoral regions of the brain after letrozole treatment. Thus, employing multifaceted tools, we demonstrate that aromatase may be a novel target for the treatment of gliomas and that letrozole, an FDA-approved drug with an outstanding record of safety may be repurposed for the treatment of such primary brain tumors, which currently have few therapeutic options. PMID:25695958

  7. Single-day treatment for orolabial and genital herpes: a brief review of pathogenesis and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sapna; Van, Livia; Gewirtzman, Aron; Mendoza, Natalia; Bartlett, Brenda; Tremaine, Anne Marie; Tyring, Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a highly prevalent condition responsible for significant morbidity and occasional mortality each year. Approximately half of all patients infected by HSV will experience at least one recurrence in their lifetime. For these recurrences, traditional therapy has included both suppressive and episodic treatment with nucleoside analogs. In regards to episodic treatment, 2- to 5-day oral regimens are best studied and most commonly reported. As with any medical condition having a well-understood mechanism of action and targeted treatment, therapeutic intervention is only as effective as allowed by patient compliance. Based on these concerns, recent studies have focused on shorter, less complicated, and more affordable options. This review delineates the evidence for single-day treatments of orolabial and genital herpes. Randomized, double-blind studies of both valacyclovir and famciclovir as single-day episodic therapy for HSV have been reported in the literature. Although no head-to-head studies between the drugs have been performed, both regimens produced significant improvement in healing time and symptom resolution over placebo. Single-day therapy for HSV infection is appealing for multiple reasons. First, it simplifies the regimen, increasing likelihood of patient compliance. Additionally, it allows complete delivery of the medication at the onset of symptoms, when viral replication is highest and intervention has greatest effect. Lastly, the reduced number of pills necessary for single versus multiple day therapy decreases the overall cost of treatment per episode, an important factor in modern-day healthcare.

  8. [Studies of cost/effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological treatment of anxiety disorders: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Poirier-Bisson, Joannie; Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, André; Grégoire, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on economic studies of evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatment and pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders. Articles were identified through electronic search of medical and psychological databases between 1980 and 2008. Seven studies were identified and included panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia and social phobia. Results show that evidence-based cognitive-behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy are cost-effective, usually more than usual care. Although the evidence base needs to be strengthened, it appears beneficial in increasing access to evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders from a societal perspective.

  9. Oral pharmacological treatments for parasitic diseases of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. I: Hexamita salmonis.

    PubMed

    Tojo, J L; Santamarina, M T

    1998-05-14

    Various drugs were evaluated as regards efficacy for the treatment of Hexamita salmonis infection in rainbow trout. The results confirm the efficacy of nitroimidazoles: infection was completely eradicated not only by metronidazole (which has been recommended previously for the treatment of hexamitosis), but also by benznidazole, ronidazole and secnidazole, which have not been assayed previously. The non-nitroimidazoles albendazole, aminosidine, diethylcarbamazine and nitroscanate also completely eliminated infection. The remaining non-nitroimidazoles tested (amprolium, bithionol, febantel, flubendazole, levamisole, netobimin, niclosamide, nitroxynil, oxibendazole, parbendazole, piperazine, praziquentel, tetramisole, thiophanate, toltrazuril, trichlorfon and triclabendazole) were not effective. PMID:9653458

  10. [Pharmacological treatment of dementia: when, how and for how long. Recommendations of the Working Group on Dementia of the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Daniel; Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Robles, María José; Barranco, Elena; Cubí, Dolors

    2012-01-01

    Dementia in general--and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular--are bound to loom large among the most acute healthcare, social, and public health problems of the 21st century. AD shows a degenerative progression that can be slowed down--yet not halted--by today's most widely accepted specific treatments (those based on cholinesterase inhibitors as well as those using memantine). There is enough evidence to consider these treatments advisable for the mild, moderate and severe phases of the illness. However, in the final stage of the disease, a decision has to be made on whether to withdraw such treatment or not. In this paper, the Working Group on Dementia for the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology reviews the use of these specific pharmacological treatments for AD, and, drawing on the scientific evidence thus gathered, makes a series of recommendations on when, how, and for how long, the currently existing specific pharmacological treatments should be used. PMID:22633250

  11. [Pharmacological treatment of dementia: when, how and for how long. Recommendations of the Working Group on Dementia of the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Daniel; Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Robles, María José; Barranco, Elena; Cubí, Dolors

    2012-01-01

    Dementia in general--and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular--are bound to loom large among the most acute healthcare, social, and public health problems of the 21st century. AD shows a degenerative progression that can be slowed down--yet not halted--by today's most widely accepted specific treatments (those based on cholinesterase inhibitors as well as those using memantine). There is enough evidence to consider these treatments advisable for the mild, moderate and severe phases of the illness. However, in the final stage of the disease, a decision has to be made on whether to withdraw such treatment or not. In this paper, the Working Group on Dementia for the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology reviews the use of these specific pharmacological treatments for AD, and, drawing on the scientific evidence thus gathered, makes a series of recommendations on when, how, and for how long, the currently existing specific pharmacological treatments should be used.

  12. Current and potential pharmacological treatment options for maintenance therapy in opioid-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Tetrault, Jeanette M; Fiellin, David A

    2012-01-22

    Opioid dependence, manifesting as addiction to heroin and pharmaceutical opioids is increasing. Internationally, there are an estimated 15.6 million illicit opioid users. The global economic burden of opioid dependence is profound both in terms of HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission, direct healthcare costs, and indirectly through criminal activity, absenteeism and lost productivity. Opioid agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine, that stabilize neuronal systems and provide narcotic blockade are the most effective treatments. Prolonged provision of these medications, defined as maintenance treatment, typically produces improved outcomes when compared with short-duration tapers and withdrawal. The benefits of opioid agonist maintenance include decreased illicit drug use, improved retention in treatment, decreased HIV risk behaviours and decreased criminal behaviour. While regulations vary by country, these medications are becoming increasingly available internationally, especially in regions experiencing rapid transmission of HIV due to injection drug use. In this review, we describe the rationale for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, discuss emerging uses of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone and buprenorphine, and provide a description of the experimental therapies.

  13. Do Pharmacological and Behavioral Interventions Differentially Affect Treatment Outcome for Children with Social Phobia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Rendon Finnell, Laura; Distler, Aaron; Carter, Nathan T.

    2011-01-01

    In a randomized trial for children with social phobia (SP), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C; a treatment consisting of exposure and social skills training) and fluoxetine were more effective than pill placebo in reducing social distress and behavioral avoidance, but only SET-C demonstrated significantly improved overall social…

  14. Effects of FDA Advisories on the Pharmacologic Treatment of ADHD, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Rachel; Watson, Sydeaka; Higashi, Ashley S.; Conti, Rena M.; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Garfield, Craig F.; Dorsey, E. Ray; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Alexander, G. Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the effect of public health advisories issued between 2005 and 2007 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on treatments of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician prescribing practices. Methods Data obtained from the IMS Health National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative audit of ambulatory physicians, were used to examine trends in office visits by children and adolescents (under age 18) during which ADHD was treated with Adderall, other psychostimulants, or atomoxetine. Segmented time series regressions were conducted to determine changes in use associated with three advisories issued between 2005 and 2007. Results In 2004, before the first FDA advisory, Adderall accounted for 36% of ADHD pharmacotherapy treatment visits. Other stimulants accounted for 46%, and atomoxetine accounted for 19%. Overall pharmacotherapy treatment rates were stable over the study period, but by 2008 the treatment visits accounted for by Adderall (that is, market share) declined to 24%, and the market share for atomoxetine declined to 8%. The market share for substitute therapies—clonidine, guanfacine, and bupropion—was stable over this period, ranging from 5% to 7%. Despite the declines in the use of Adderall and atomoxetine over the study period, results from the regression models suggest that the advisories did not have a statistically significant effect on ADHD medication prescribing. Conclusions FDA advisories regarding potential cardiovascular and other risks of ADHD medications had little discernible incremental effect on the use of these medicines in this nationally representative ambulatory audit. PMID:23318985

  15. A risk-benefit assessment of pharmacological treatments for panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J A; Moioffer, M; Stanton, S P; Dwight, M; Keck, P E

    1998-06-01

    Panic disorder, a psychiatric disorder characterised by frequent panic attacks, is the most common anxiety disorder, affecting 2 to 6% of the general population. No one line of treatment has been found to be superior, making a risk-benefit assessment of the treatments available useful for treating patients. Choice of treatment depends on a number of issues, including the adverse effect profile, efficacy and the presence of concomitant syndromes. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are beneficial in the treatment of panic disorder. They have a proven efficacy, are affordable and are conveniently administered. Adverse effects, including jitteriness syndrome, bodyweight gain, anticholinergic effects and orthostatic hypotension are commonly associated with TCAs, but can be managed successfully. Selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) reuptake inhibitors are also potential first line agents and are well tolerated and effective, with a favourable adverse effects profile. There is little risk in overdose or of anticholinergic effects. Adverse effects include sedation, dyspepsia and headache early in treatment, and sexual dysfunction and increased anxiety, but these can be effectively managed with proper dosage escalation and management. Benzodiazepines are an effective treatment, providing short-term relief of panic-related symptoms. Patients respond to treatment quickly, providing rapid relief of symptoms. Adverse effects include ataxia and drowsiness, and cognitive and psycho-motor impairment. There are reservations over their first-line use because of concerns regarding abuse and dependence. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, because of their adverse effects profile, potential drug interactions, dietary restrictions, gradual onset of effect and overdose risk, are not considered to be first-line agents. They are effective however, and should be considered for patients with refractory disease. Valproic acid (valproate sodium), while not intensively studied, shows

  16. A critical review of the pharmacology of the plant extract of Pygeum africanum in the treatment of LUTS.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Alan D; Levin, Robert; Constantinou, Christos E; Denis, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Despite an unremitting increase in the number of patients presenting symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), the viable treatment options remain relatively limited when compared to other disorders of aging. This has spurred an interest in so-called alternative medicines, many of which continue to be used in spite of the more recent emergence of rationally targeted therapies. Nonetheless, in the case of plant extracts, the vast majority of these have not been subjected to the same rigorous pre-clinical pharmacological testing and large-scale clinical trials now required by health authorities. Furthermore, demonstration of their clinical efficacy in BPH has been hindered by trials of limited duration with a high placebo response. Beginning with a preliminary demonstration of in vitro inhibition of growth factor-mediated fibroblast proliferation with Pygeum africanum extract, a detailed series of in vitro and in vivo studies on prostate growth and bladder function were undertaken. These studies, reviewed herein, have permitted the identification of putative molecular targets of Pygeum africanum extract affecting both growth factor-mediated prostate growth as well as specific parameters of bladder function. These results, corroborated in part by short-term clinical efficacy, set the stage for a large-scale clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of Pygeum africanum extract in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms.

  17. Pharmacological treatment with mirtazapine rescues cortical atrophy and respiratory deficits in MeCP2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Bittolo, Tamara; Raminelli, Carlo Antonio; Deiana, Chiara; Baj, Gabriele; Vaghi, Valentina; Ferrazzo, Sara; Bernareggi, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Loss of MeCP2 (Methyl CpG binding protein 2) in Rett syndrome (RTT) causes brain weight decrease, shrinkage of the cortex with reduced dendritic arborization, behavioral abnormalities, seizures and cardio-respiratory complications. The observed monoamine neurotransmitters reduction in RTT suggested antidepressants as a possible therapy. We treated MeCP2-null mice from postnatal-day 28 for two weeks with desipramine, already tested in RTT, or mirtazapine, an antidepressant with limited side-effects, known to promote GABA release. Mirtazapine was more effective than desipramine in restoring somatosensory cortex thickness by fully rescuing pyramidal neurons dendritic arborization and spine density. Functionally, mirtazapine treatment normalized heart rate, breath rate, anxiety levels, and eliminated the hopping behavior observed in MeCP2-null mice, leading to improved phenotypic score. These morphological and functional effects of mirtazapine were accompanied by reestablishment of the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptor activity recorded in cortex and brainstem tissues. Thus, mirtazapine can represent a new potential pharmacological treatment for the Rett syndrome. PMID:26806603

  18. Magnetoencephalographic Correlates of Emotional Processing in Major Depression Before and After Pharmacological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Domschke, Katharina; Zwanzger, Peter; Rehbein, Maimu A; Steinberg, Christian; Knoke, Kathrin; Dobel, Christian; Klinkenberg, Isabelle; Kugel, Harald; Kersting, Anette; Arolt, Volker; Pantev, Christo

    2016-01-01

    Background: In major depressive disorder (MDD), electrophysiological and imaging studies suggest reduced neural activity in the parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex regions. In the present study, neural correlates of emotional processing in MDD were analyzed for the first time in a pre-/post-treatment design by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG), allowing for detecting temporal dynamics of brain activation. Methods: Twenty-five medication-free Caucasian in-patients with MDD and 25 matched controls underwent a baseline MEG session with passive viewing of pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral pictures. Fifteen patients were followed-up with a second MEG session after 4 weeks of antidepressant monopharmacotherapy with mirtazapine. The corresponding controls received no intervention between the measurements. The clinical course of depression was assessed using the Hamilton Depression scale. Results: Prior to treatment, an overall neocortical hypoactivation during emotional processing, particularly at the parietal regions and areas at the right temporoparietal junction, as well as abnormal valence-specific reactions at the right parietal and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) regions were observed in patients compared to controls. These effects occurred <150ms, suggesting dysfunctional processing of emotional stimuli at a preconscious level. Successful antidepressant treatment resulted in a normalization of the hypoactivation at the right parietal and right temporoparietal regions. Accordingly, both dlPFC regions revealed an increase of activity after therapy. Conclusions: The present study provides neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional emotional processing in a fronto-parieto-temporal network, possibly contributing to the pathogenesis of MDD. These activation patterns might have the potential to serve as biomarkers of treatment success. PMID:26259960

  19. A Review of New Pharmacologic Treatments for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elaine; Weeda, Erin R; White, C Michael

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) impacts an estimated 5.7 million Americans, and its prevalence is projected to increase to more than 8 million Americans in the next 15 years. Key clinical trials have established an evidence-based foundation for treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan, which inhibit the f-channel and the angiotensin receptor and neprilysin, respectively, were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for HFrEF. In systolic heart failure, treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine significantly reduced the combined endpoint of cardiovascular mortality or heart failure hospital admission vs placebo (P < .05). In the Prospective Comparison of angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure trial, sacubitril/valsartan significantly reduced the combined endpoint of cardiovascular death or heart failure hospitalization vs enalapril (P < .001). The place of therapy with ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan is defined by these trials and their interplay with guideline-directed medical therapy. Ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan increase pharmacotherapy options for the treatment of HFrEF but are not yet first-line agents. Clinical application will be better defined in the coming years as practitioners increase their familiarity with ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan.

  20. Factors characterizing access and latency to first pharmacological treatment in Italian patients with schizophrenia, mood, and anxiety spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Cremaschi, Laura; Palazzo, Carlotta; Suardi, Neva; Spagnolin, Gregorio; Camuri, Giulia; Benatti, Beatrice; Oldani, Lucio; Dobrea, Cristina; Arici, Chiara; Pace, Giovanna; Tiseo, Alessandra; Nahum, Ester Sembira; Castellano, Filippo; D'Urso, Nazario; Clerici, Massimo; Primavera, Diego; Carpiniello, Bernardo; Altamura, A Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Latency to first pharmacological treatment [duration of untreated illness (DUI)] in psychiatric disorders can be measured in years, with differences across diagnostic areas and relevant consequences in terms of socio-occupational functioning and outcome. Within the psychopathological onset of a specific disorder, many factors influence access and latency to first pharmacotherapy and the present study aimed to investigate such factors, through an ad-hoc developed questionnaire, in a sample of 538 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (SZ), mood disorder (MD), and anxiety disorder (AD). Patients with SZs showed earlier ages at onset, first diagnosis and treatment, as well as shorter DUI compared with other patients (43.17 months vs. 58.64 and 80.43 months in MD and AD; F=3.813, P=0.02). Patients with MD and AD reported more frequently onset-related stressful events, benzodiazepines as first treatment, and autonomous help seeking compared with patients with SZs. In terms of first therapist, psychiatrist referral accounted for 43.6% of the cases, progressively decreasing from SZ to MD and AD (57.6, 41.8, and 38.3%, respectively). The opposite phenomenon was observed for nonpsychiatrist clinician referrals, whereas psychologist referrals remained constant. The present findings confirm the presence of a relevant DUI in a large sample of Italian patients with different psychiatric disorders (5 years, on average), pointing out specific differences, in terms of treatment access and latency, between psychotic and affective patients. Such aspects are relevant for detection of at-risk patients and implement early intervention programs.

  1. Efficacy of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ulcer pharmacological treatment in systemic sclerosis patients: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    García de la Peña Lefebvre, Paloma; Nishishinya, María Betina; Pereda, Claudia Alejandra; Loza, Estíbaliz; Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Román Ivorra, José Andrés; Carreira, Patricia; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo; Pego-Reigosa, Jose María; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of current treatments for the Raynaud phenomenon (RP) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a systematic literature search was performed using Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (from 1961 to October 2011). We included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, clinical trials, and high-quality cohort studies published in English or Spanish. Patient populations had to include adults diagnosed with limited cutaneous or diffuse SSc who had associated RP and/or digital ulcers under pharmacological treatment. Efficacy of treatments was evaluated based on: number of RP episodes, RP severity, episode-free time, ulcer improvement/healing, and appearance of new ulcers. We used the Jadad scale of methodological quality to evaluate the quality of randomized clinical trials, and the 2009 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine classification for other studies. Of a total of 1617 studies identified, only 27 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Drugs received the following grade recommendations: Grade A for nifedipine, nicardipine, quinapril, IV iloprost, bosentan, tadalafil, and MQx-503; Grade B for beraprost, cicaprost, DMSO, cyclofenil, and atorvastatin; and Grade C for misoprostol, prazosin, OPC-2826, enalapril, sildenafil, antioxidant, and stanazolol. Calcium channel blockers, prostanoids, tadalafil, and bosentan received the highest recommendation level for their effectiveness. However, most systematic reviews reviewed just a handful of studies with small sample sizes and short follow-ups. Our review shows that the existing evidence on the efficacy of RP treatment in SSc patients is inconclusive which calls for further research, especially in the form of prospective studies of high quality with long-term follow-ups.

  2. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Álvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. KEY RESULTS According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q10 effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. PMID:22747838

  3. Treatment of uncommon sites of focal primary hyperhidrosis: experience with pharmacological therapy using oxybutynin

    PubMed Central

    Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Wolosker, Nelson; Krutman, Mariana; Kauffman, Paulo; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Puech-Leão, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Primary hyperhidrosis usually affects the hands, armpits, feet and cranio-facial region. Sweating in other areas is common in secondary hyperhidrosis (after surgery or in specific clinical conditions). Oxybutynin has provided good results and is an alternative for treating hyperhidrosis at common sites. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of oxybutynin as a treatment for primary sweating at uncommon sites (e.g., the back and groin). METHODS: This retrospective study analyzed 20 patients (10 females) who received oxybutynin for primary focal hyperhidrosis at uncommon sites. The subjects were evaluated to determine quality of life before beginning oxybutynin and six weeks afterward and they were assigned grades (on a scale from 0 to 10) to measure their improvement at each site of excessive sweating after six weeks and at the last consult. RESULTS: The median follow-up time with oxybutynin was 385 days (133-1526 days). The most common sites were the back (n = 7) and groin (n = 5). After six weeks, the quality of life improved in 85% of the subjects. Dry mouth was very common and was reported by 16 patients, 12 of whom reported moderate/severe dry mouth. Five patients stopped treatment (two: unbearable dry mouth, two: excessive somnolence and one: palpitations). At the last visit, 80% of patients presented with moderate/great improvement at the main sites of sweating. CONCLUSION: After six weeks, more than 80% of the patients presented with improvements in their overall quality of life and at the most important site of sweating. Side effects were common (80% reported at least one side effect) and caused 25% of the patients to discontinue treatment. Oxybutynin is effective for treating bothersome hyperhidrosis, even at atypical locations and most patients cope well with the side effects. PMID:25318092

  4. Pharmacological approaches to the treatment of oxidative stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Pedro L; Villamena, Frederick A

    2013-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a growing major global health problem. Our understanding of the mechanisms of pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases has been gaining significant advances and a wealth of knowledge implicates oxidative stress as a key causative agent. However, to date, most efforts to treat heart failure using conventional antioxidant therapies have been less than encouraging. With increasing incidences of cardiovascular disease in young as well as in aging populations, and the problem of long-term diminishing efficacy of conventional therapeutics, the need for new treatments has never been greater. In this review, [corrected] a variety of therapeutic targets and compounds applied to treat cardiovascular diseases via inhibition of oxidative stress are presented.

  5. Evaluation of the endometriosis treatment success rate by the laparoscopic-pharmacological method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutrynowski, Andrzej; Zabielska, Renata; Smolarczyk, Roman

    1996-03-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the success rate of the operative laparoscopy assisted by electrocoagulation and laser as well as danazol and lynestrenol in the endometriosis treatment. One-hundred-ninety women with the recognized endometriosis were included into the study. In the I degree(s) endometriosis the operative or hormonal therapy was applied, in the II-IV degree(s) the combined therapy was used. The complete cure was achieved in 159 of the patients (84%): 28 women conceived, in 131 of the cases remission was recognized during the second laparoscopy. Eighteen women found improvement (9%) while 13 women (7%) reported the lack of improvement.

  6. Oral pharmacological treatments for parasitic diseases of rainbow trout oncorhynchus mykiss. III. Ichthyobodo necator.

    PubMed

    Tojo, J L; Santamarina, M T

    1998-07-30

    A total of 32 drugs were evaluated as regards their efficacy for oral treatment of Ichthyobodo necator infestation of rainbow trout. In preliminary trials, all drugs were supplied to infected fish at 40 g per kg of feed for 10 d. The majority of the drugs tested (1,3-di-6-quinolylurea, aminosidine, amprolium, benznidazole, bithionol, chloroquine, diethylcarbamazine, dimetridazole, diminazene aceturate, febantel, flubendazole, ketoconazole, levamisole, mebendazole, netobimin, niclosamide, niridazole, nitroscanate, nitroxynil, oxibendazole, parbendazole, piperazine, praziquantel, ronidazole, sulphaquinoxaline, tetramisole, thiophanate, toltrazuril and trichlorfon) were ineffectdive. Metronidazole and secnidazole were 100% effective (unlike the other nitroimidazoles tested, namely dimetridazole, benznidazole and ronidazole). The non-carbamate benzimidazole triclabendazole was likewise 100% effective. PMID:9745716

  7. Pharmacological management of binge eating disorder: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; O’Melia, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pharmacotherapy may be beneficial for some patients with binge eating disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of uncontrollable consumption of abnormally large amounts of food without inappropriate weight loss behaviors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of BED and review the rationales and data supporting the effectiveness of specific medications or medication classes in treating patients with BED. We conclude by summarizing these data, discussing the role of pharmacotherapy in the BED treatment armamentarium, and suggesting future areas for research. PMID:22654518

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of quorum sensing for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that aim to kill or inhibit bacterial growth. A major concern with this approach is the frequently observed development of resistance to antimicrobial compounds. The discovery of bacterial-communication systems (quorum-sensing systems), which orchestrate important temporal events during the infection process, has afforded a novel opportunity to ameliorate bacterial infection by means other than growth inhibition. Compounds able to override bacterial signaling are present in nature. Herein we discuss the known signaling mechanisms and potential antipathogenic drugs that specifically target quorum-sensing systems in a manner unlikely to pose a selective pressure for the development of resistant mutants. PMID:14597754

  9. The Role of Changes in Activity as a Function of Perceived Available and Expended Energy in Non-Pharmacological Treatment Outcomes for ME/CFS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Molly; Khorana, Neha; Jason, Leonard A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-pharmacological interventions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) often emphasize gradual increases in activity to promote improvement in physical functioning and fatigue. The energy envelope theory may provide a framework for understanding the relationship between changes in activity level and outcomes for patients with ME/CFS. This study examined the relationship between energy envelope and changes in activity after non-pharmacological interventions in a sample of 44 adults with ME/CFS. Results showed that those who were within their energy envelope before treatment showed more improvement in physical functioning and fatigue compared to those outside of their energy envelope. These findings suggest that an assessment of perceived available and expended energy could help guide the development of individualized non-pharmacological interventions for people with ME/CFS. PMID:21254053

  10. Aggressive experience affects the sensitivity of neurons towards pharmacological treatment in the hypothalamic attack area.

    PubMed

    Haller, J; Abrahám, I; Zelena, D; Juhász, G; Makara, G B; Kruk, M R

    1998-09-01

    Early investigators of brain stimulation-evoked complex behaviours (attack, escape, feeding, self-grooming, sexual behaviour) reported that experience may affect the behavioural outcome of brain stimulation. This intriguing example of functional neuronal plasticity was later totally neglected. The present experiment investigated the behavioural outcome of in vivo microdialysis perfusion of the glutamate agonist kainate and/or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the hypothalamic attack area (HAA) of (1) animals naive to dyadic encounters; (2) animals with a recent aggressive experience (the probe being implanted 6-24 h after the last of a series of dyadic encounters); and (3) animals with an earlier aggressive experience (probe being implanted 2 weeks after the last aggressive experience). On the experimental day, rats received two 5-min infusions during a dyadic encounter lasting 35 min with an unknown opponent. Flow rate was 1.5-2 microliters/min, drug concentrations were 1.8 x 10(-5) and 1.5 x 10(-5) M for kainate and bicuculline, respectively. Behaviour was analysed before, during and after perfusions. Only the combined kainate + bicuculline treatment had significant effects on behaviour at the doses studied. A significant increase in aggressive behaviour was elicited only in animals with a recent aggressive experience, while naive animals and with an earlier experience responded to the treatments by grooming. These results appear to support early observations indicating that one important aspect of brain stimulation effects is previous experience. PMID:9832932

  11. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed. PMID:27244599

  12. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed. PMID:27244599

  13. Thalidomide treatment for refractory Crohn's disease: a review of the history, pharmacological mechanisms and clinical literature.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, P M; Dassopoulos, T; Ehrenpreis, E D

    2001-11-01

    Several recent case reports and clinical trials have demonstrated that thalidomide is emerging as an efficacious alternative in the treatment of selected patients with refractory Crohn's disease. The effects of thalidomide are at least partly mediated by down-regulation of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a potent proinflammatory cytokine. However, thalidomide is also known to inhibit angiogenesis, and it has several other well-described immunomodulatory properties. Clinical studies have confirmed that previously refractory Crohn's disease patients respond to thalidomide, and many enter clinical remission. Efficacy usually occurs within 4 weeks. Thalidomide also has steroid-sparing properties, and it is particularly useful in treating oral and fistulous complications of Crohn's disease. Although it is usually tolerable, careful monitoring is recommended to prevent toxicities, such as birth defects and peripheral neuropathy. This review provides a detailed summary of the literature to date on the use of thalidomide treatment for Crohn's disease. Special attention is directed towards its history, mechanisms, and proposed role. The recent development of thalidomide analogues is also discussed briefly.

  14. [Microbiological and pharmacological data useful for the treatment of Lyme disease. Treatment and follow up of early Lyme disease (erythema migrans)].

    PubMed

    Martinot, M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review was first to analyze the microbiological and pharmacological criteria used to choose a treatment for Lyme disease. The determination of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato susceptibility to antibiotics is difficult, especially because of the lack of standardization in the methods used. In vitro data is helpful to determine Lyme treatment but discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results highlight the need to confirm this data by clinical trials. The second part is an analysis of the literature made to evaluate the current strategies of treatment and follow up of early Lyme disease characterized by erythema migrans (EM). beta-lactams (penicillin G and V, amoxicillin, cefuroxime axetil, ceftriaxone), tetracyclines (doxycycline), and macrolides (mainly azithromycin) are the drugs most frequently used during clinical trials. The comparison between treatments is difficult because of the lack of reliable clinical and biological criteria to identify complete recovery. However the prognosis of treated EM is good in most trials. If a clinical follow-up remains necessary after the treatment of an EM, prolonged antibody production among asymptomatic patients reduces the interest of a serological follow-up.

  15. Cancer Stem and Progenitor-Like Cells as Pharmacological Targets in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Valéria B.; Schenka, André A.

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focused on the current role of neoplastic stem and progenitor-like cells as primary targets in the pharmacotherapy of cancer as well as in the development of new anticancer drugs. We begin by summarizing the main characteristics of these tumor-initiating cells and key concepts that support their participation in therapeutic failure. In particular, we discuss the differences between the major carcinogenesis models (ie, clonal evolution vs cancer stem cell (CSC) model) with emphasis on breast cancer (given its importance to the study of CSCs) and their implications for the development of new treatment strategies. In addition, we describe the main ways to target these cells, including the main signaling pathways that are more activated or altered in CSCs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive compilation of the most recently tested drugs. PMID:26609237

  16. [From symptomatic stability to functional recovery in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and unipolar depression].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the chronic course of schizophrenia and unipolar depresion. It is aimed to answer three questions: does it cure these diseases? Does it exert any significant effect on the symptomatic presentation of the disorders? Which is its action on the social dysfunction provoked by schizophrenia or depression? A conceptual analysis of available bibliography was performed. It could be concluded that antypsychotics improve the symptomatic course of schizophrenia, although their efficacy is limited, and that these drugs does not act on the social dysfunction provoked by the disease. With respect to depression, it could be concluded that a significant proportion of patients remain symptomatic despite receiveng adequate treatments. No data about efficacy of pharmacotherapy on the dysfunction resultant from unipolar depression is available.

  17. Oral pharmacological treatments for parasitic diseases of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. II. Gyrodactylus sp.

    PubMed

    Tojo, J L; Santamarina, M T

    1998-07-30

    A total of 24 drugs were evaluated as regards their efficacy for oral treatment of gyrodactylosis in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In preliminary trials, all drugs were supplied to infected fish at 40 g per kg of feed for 10 d. Twenty-two of the drugs tested (aminosidine, amprolium, benznidazole, bithionol, chloroquine, diethylcarbamazine, flubendazole, levamisole, mebendazole, metronidazole, niclosamide, nitroxynil, oxibendazole, parbendazole, piperazine, praziquantel, ronidazole, secnidazole, tetramisole, thiophanate, toltrazuril and trichlorfon) were ineffective. Triclabendazole and nitroscanate completely eliminated the infection. Triclabendazole was effective only at the screening dosage (40 g per kg of feed for 10 d), while nitroscanate was effective at dosages as low as 0.6 g per kg of feed for 1 d. PMID:9745715

  18. [From symptomatic stability to functional recovery in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and unipolar depression].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the chronic course of schizophrenia and unipolar depresion. It is aimed to answer three questions: does it cure these diseases? Does it exert any significant effect on the symptomatic presentation of the disorders? Which is its action on the social dysfunction provoked by schizophrenia or depression? A conceptual analysis of available bibliography was performed. It could be concluded that antypsychotics improve the symptomatic course of schizophrenia, although their efficacy is limited, and that these drugs does not act on the social dysfunction provoked by the disease. With respect to depression, it could be concluded that a significant proportion of patients remain symptomatic despite receiveng adequate treatments. No data about efficacy of pharmacotherapy on the dysfunction resultant from unipolar depression is available. PMID:20038986

  19. [Long-term outcome of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for ventricular arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, S; Kasanuki, H

    2000-03-01

    Recent advances of nonpharmacological therapy such as catheter ablation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator and lessons from the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial(CAST) have changed the strategy for ventricular arrhythmias. The safety and efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation of symptomatic sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia without structural heart disease has made ablation the firstline curative therapy. In idiopathic ventricular fibrillation such as Brugada syndrome, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death. In patients with asymptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmias in heart failure, class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided due to proarrhythmic and negative inotropic effects that may be responsible for increased mortality in some trials. In such patients, amiodarone and beta-blocker may reduce sudden cardiac death. For patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in heart failure, amiodarone or implantable cardioverter defibrillator should be considered. In comparison with amiodarone, implantable cardioverter defibrillator markedly reduced sudden death in ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation survivors in Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibriltors(AVID). Although better patient selection and clarification of mapping criteria improved the successful ablation rate in patients with structural heart disease, candidates of ablation are few. In patients with extensive structural heart disease, multiple ventricular tachycardias are often present. Catheter ablation of a single ventricular tachycardia may be only palliative. Therefore, implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death, with amiodarone and ablation as the adjunctive therapy to prevent frequent ventricular tachycardia. Furthermore, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator improved survival in selected

  20. Prevalence and Pharmacologic Treatment of Patients with Low Back Pain Treated at Kosovo Energetic Corporation

    PubMed Central

    Ibraimi, Zana; Murtezani, Ardiana; Haxhiu, Bekim; Mustafa, Aziz; Martinaj, Merita

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint among the general population with a subgroup developing chronic and disabling symptoms generating large societal costs. Recurrences and functional limitations can be minimized with appropriate conservative management, including medications, physical therapy modalities, exercise and patient education. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of low back complaints in industrial workers, to investigate whether individual risk factors involved in the occurrence of LBP, and to determine the most frequent used drug in LBP treatment. Materials and Methods: Data for this study were provided from Kosovo Energetic Corporation. A cross-sectional study design was utilized. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among 228 industrial workers. Patient with LBP underwent a comprehensive clinical, radiological and biochemical evaluation. Results: showed that LBP occurred in 63.5% of workers. Individual factors did not show significant associations with LBP. Age (OR=0.99/95% Cl 0.95-1.03), weight (OR=1.13/95% Cl 0.99-1.06), height (OR=0.97/95% Cl 0.91-1.02), and work experience (OR=1.01/95% Cl 0.97-1.05) increase odds for LBP but not significantly. The most frequently used drugs in patients included in this study are NSAIDs. In 33 (55.0%) patients for the treatment of LBP two types of drugs are administered. Conclusion: Increased physical activity, health promotion and reduced body weight can prevent morbidity from LBP. A continuous consultation with the Clinical Pharmacist demonstrates effective way of dosage and drug re-evaluation for the patients with LBP. PMID:25568510

  1. Signs of cyclosarin-induced neurotoxicity and its pharmacological treatment with quaternary pyridinium-oximes reactivators.

    PubMed

    Krejcova-Kunesova, Gabriela; Bartosova, Lucie; Kuca, Kamil

    2005-12-01

    Cyclosarin (GF-agent; O-cyclohexylmethylfluorophosphonate) belongs to highly toxic organophosphorus compounds. Potential for exposure to chemical warfare organophosphosphorus nerve agents, such as cyclosarin exists on the battlefield, or in the civilian sector as a threat by a terrorist group, as well as an accident as part of current demilitarization efforts. Cyclosarin was not in a front of scientific interest for long time. The research interest was increased after Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm with the possibility (later confirmed by the UN special commission) that cyclosarin constituted the Iraqi chemical agent inventory. In this study, the neurotoxicity of cyclosarin and therapeutic efficacy of three oximes [HI-6(1-(2-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-3-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)-2-oxa-propane dichloride), BI-6(2-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-4-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)-but-2-ene dibromide), HS-6(2-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-3-(3-carbamoylpyridinium)-2-oxa-propane dichloride)] as acetylcholinesterase reactivators in combination with atropine was studied in rats. The therapy was administered intramusculary (i.m.) 1 min after i.m. GF-agent challenge (1 LD50). Testing of cyclosarin-induced neurotoxicity progress was carried out using the method of Functional observational battery (FOB). The experimental animals were observed at 24 h and 7 days following cyclosarin administration. The results were compared to the condition of control rats that received physiological solution instead of cyclosarin and treatment. All tested antidotal compounds induced neuroprotective efficacy, because decrease of neurotoxicity signs was recorded. There were no poisoned experimental group treated with atropine only, because our preliminary study showed no therapeutical effect of atropine alone. Cyclosarin caused a marked statistically significant change in most of the neurobehavioral parameters (FOB) at 24 h and 7 days after exposure, compared to the saline control group

  2. Pharmacological Characterization of Memoquin, a Multi-Target Compound for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Valeria; Busquet, Perrine; Lopes, Joao Pedro; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Tarozzo, Glauco; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Piomelli, Daniele; Reggiani, Angelo; Cavalli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, dementia and altered behavior. Over 30 million people worldwide suffer from AD and available therapies are still palliative rather than curative. Recently, Memoquin (MQ), a quinone-bearing polyamine compound, has emerged as a promising anti-AD lead candidate, mainly thanks to its multi-target profile. MQ acts as an acetylcholinesterase and β-secretase-1 inhibitor, and also possesses anti-amyloid and anti-oxidant properties. Despite this potential interest, in vivo behavioral studies with MQ have been limited. Here, we report on in vivo studies with MQ (acute and sub-chronic treatments; 7–15 mg/kg per os) carried out using two different mouse models: i) scopolamine- and ii) beta-amyloid peptide- (Aβ-) induced amnesia. Several aspects related to memory were examined using the T-maze, the Morris water maze, the novel object recognition, and the passive avoidance tasks. At the dose of 15 mg/kg, MQ was able to rescue all tested aspects of cognitive impairment including spatial, episodic, aversive, short and long-term memory in both scopolamine- and Aβ-induced amnesia models. Furthermore, when tested in primary cortical neurons, MQ was able to fully prevent the Aβ-induced neurotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress. The results support the effectiveness of MQ as a cognitive enhancer, and highlight the value of a multi-target strategy to address the complex nature of cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:23441223

  3. Pharmacological Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Current Approaches, Unsolved Issues, and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Michael; Bonella, Francesco; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Maher, Toby M.; Spagnolo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating condition with a 5-year survival of approximately 20%. The disease primarily occurs in elderly patients. IPF is a highly heterogeneous disorder with a clinical course that varies from prolonged periods of stability to episodes of rapid deterioration. In the last decade, improved understanding of disease mechanisms along with a more precise disease definition has allowed the design and completion of a number of high-quality clinical trials. Yet, until recently, IPF was essentially an untreatable disease. Finally, pirfenidone and nintedanib, two compounds with antifibrotic properties, have consistently proven effective in reducing functional decline and disease progression in IPF. This is a major breakthrough for patients and physicians alike, but there is still a long way to go. In fact, neither pirfenidone nor nintedanib is a cure for IPF, and most patients continue to progress despite treatment. As such, comprehensive care of patients with IPF, including management of comorbidities/complications and physical debility and timely referral for palliative care or, in a small number of highly selected patients, lung transplantation, remains essential. Several agents with high potential are currently being tested and many more are ready to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26779535

  4. Pharmacological treatment and prevention of cerebral small vessel disease: a review of potential interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Small vessel disease encompasses lacunar stroke, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes and microbleeds. It causes a quarter of all ischemic strokes, is the commonest cause of vascular dementia, and the cause is incompletely understood. Vascular prophylaxis, as appropriate for large artery disease and cardioembolism, includes antithrombotics, and blood pressure and lipid lowering; however, these strategies may not be effective for small vessel disease, or are already used routinely so precluding further detailed study. Further, intensive antiplatelet therapy is known to be hazardous in small vessel disease through enhanced bleeding. Whether acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which delay the progression of Alzheimer's dementia, are relevant in small vessel disease remains unclear. Potential prophylactic and treatment strategies might be those that target brain microvascular endothelium and the blood brain barrier, microvascular function and neuroinflammation. Potential interventions include endothelin antagonists, neurotrophins, nitric oxide donors and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator‐activated receptor‐gamma agonists, and prostacyclin mimics and phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors. Several drugs that have relevant properties are licensed for other disorders, offering the possibility of drug repurposing. Others are in development. Since influencing multiple targets may be most effective, using multiple agents and/or those that have multiple effects may be preferable. We focus on potential small vessel disease mechanistic targets, summarize drugs that have relevant actions, and review data available from randomized trials on their actions and on the available evidence for their use in lacunar stroke. PMID:25727737

  5. A Systematic Review of Non-Invasive Pharmacologic Neuroprotective Treatments for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena; Hillyer, Jessica; Mann, Cody; Baptiste, Darryl; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI) are emerging from the laboratory and seeking translation into human clinical trials. Many of these are administered as soon as possible after injury with the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing the extent of spared neurologic tissue. In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical research on such neuroprotective therapies that are administered in a non-invasive manner for acute SCI. Specifically, we review treatments that have a relatively high potential for translation due to the fact that they are already used in human clinical applications, or are available in a form that could be administered to humans. These include: erythropoietin, NSAIDs, anti-CD11d antibodies, minocycline, progesterone, estrogen, magnesium, riluzole, polyethylene glycol, atorvastatin, inosine, and pioglitazone. The literature was systematically reviewed to examine studies in which an in-vivo animal model was utilized to assess the efficacy of the therapy in a traumatic SCI paradigm. Using these criteria, 122 studies were identified and reviewed in detail. Wide variations exist in the animal species, injury models, and experimental designs reported in the pre-clinical literature on the therapies reviewed. The review highlights the extent of investigation that has occurred in these specific therapies, and points out gaps in our knowledge that would be potentially valuable prior to human translation. PMID:20146558

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes: Current Role of Lifestyle, Natural Product, and Pharmacological Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Nicholas P.; Galassetti, Pietro R.; Coker, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Common complications of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are eye, kidney and nerve diseases, as well as an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The overwhelming influence of these conditions contributes to a decreased quality of life and life span, as well as significant economic consequences. Although obesity once served as a surrogate marker for the risk of T2D, we know now that excess adipose tissue secretes inflammatory cytokines that left unchecked, accelerate the progression to insulin resistance and T2D. In addition, excess alcohol consumption may also increase the risk of T2D. From a therapeutic standpoint, lifestyle interventions such as dietary modification and/or exercise training have been shown to improve glucose homeostasis but may not normalize the disease process unless weight loss is achieved and increased physical activity patterns are established. Furthermore, utilization of natural products may serve as a significant adjunct in the fight against insulin resistance but further research is needed to ascertain their validity. Since it is clear that pharmaceutical therapy plays a significant role in the treatment of insulin resistance, this review will also discuss some of the newly developed pharmaceutical therapies that may work in conjunction with lifestyle interventions, and lessen the burden of behavioral change as the only strategy against the development of T2D. PMID:18423879

  7. Pharmacology and metabolism of infliximab biosimilars - A new treatment option in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Fichna, Jakub; Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Biological therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was shown in large clinical trials to be effective in inducing and maintaining clinical remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Infliximab, the first anti-TNF-α biologic drug, has significantly improved inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment outcomes by preventing structural damage progression, thereby reducing complications and the need for surgery and hospitalization. The major concern associated with the use of biologics is their high cost. However, as these therapies lose patent protection, cheaper biosimilar versions of the originator products are being developed, such as the infliximab biosimilar CT-P13. Position statements from several scientific societies and some experts in their reviews have expressed concerns to the concept of extrapolation without direct IBD clinical evidence, whereas European Medicines Agency (EMA) experts have supported extrapolation. In this review, we focus on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics properties and comparative effectiveness of anti-TNF-α biosimilars, related to their use in IBD. PMID:27162107

  8. Healthspan Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahtab

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present the case for shifting the focus of research on aging and anti-aging from lifespan pharmacology to what I like to call healthspan pharmacology, in which the desired outcome is the extension of healthy years of life rather than lifespan alone. Lifespan could be influenced by both genetic and epigenetic factors, but a long lifespan may not be a good indicator of an optimal healthspan. Without improving healthspan, prolonging longevity would have enormous negative socioeconomic outcomes for humans. Therefore, the goal of aging and anti-aging research should be to add healthy years to life and not merely to increase the chronological age. This article summarizes and compares two categories of pharmacologically induced lifespan extension studies in animal model systems from the last two decades-those reporting the effects of pharmacological interventions on lifespan extension alone versus others that include their effects on both lifespan and healthspan in the analysis. The conclusion is that the extrapolation of pharmacological results from animal studies to humans is likely to be more relevant when both lifespan and healthspan extension properties of pharmacological intervention are taken into account.

  9. New insights into the pharmacological chaperone activity of c2-substituted glucoimidazoles for the treatment of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghua; Li, Tiehai; Dai, Shaoxing; Xie, Xiaoli; Ma, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Jing; Wang, Peng George

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in acid β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) lead to the accumulation of the sphingolipid glucosylceramide, thereby resulting in Gaucher disease (GD). Active-site-specific competitive GCase inhibitors are effective pharmacological chaperones (PCs) that act as folding agents for mutant GCase folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we prepared a series of glucoimidazole C2-substituent derivatives, and evaluated their inhibition and PC properties with GCase. A cell-based assay with patient-derived lymphoblasts (N370S or L444P mutations) demonstrated that administration of these compounds can significantly increase GCase activity. Interestingly, the 3,3-dimethyl-N-phenyl-4-amide-1-butyl-substituted moderate inhibitor 11 had the greatest effect on activity: 2.1-fold increase in N370S lymphoblasts at 2.5 μM and 1.2-fold increase in L444P at 0.5 μM following a three-day incubation. Computer docking studies and a protease protection assay were used to elucidate the ligand-enzyme interactions responsible for the chaperone activity of 11. Western blot and immuno-fluorescence assays verified restoration of GCase trafficking to the lysosome. Together, these results indicate that 11 is a promising PC for GD treatment and provide direct evidence of the mechanism of GCase chaperoning. PMID:23775891

  10. [Evidence on the key role of the metabotrobic glutamatergic receptors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia: a "breakthrough" in pharmacological treatment].

    PubMed

    Pannese, Rossella; Minichino, Amedeo; Pignatelli, Marco; Delle Chiaie, Roberto; Biondi, Massimo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2012-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are expressed pre- and post synaptically throughout the nervous system where they serve as modulators of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. The glutamatergic system is involved in a wide range of physiological processes in the brain, and its dysfunction plays an important role in the etiology and pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. This paper reviews the neurodevelopmental origin and genetic susceptibility of schizophrenia relevant to NMDA receptor neurotransmission, and discusses the relationship between NMDA hypofunction and different domains of symptom in schizophrenia as well as putative treatment modality for the disorder. mGlu receptors have been hypothesizes as attractive therapeutic targets for the development of novel interventions for psychiatric disorders. Group II of mGlu receptors are of particular interest because of their unique distribution and the regulatory roles they have in neurotransmission. The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia predicts that agents that restore the balance in glutamatergic neurotransmission will ameliorate the symptomatology associated with this illness. Development of potent, efficacious, systemically active drugs will help to address the antipsychotic potential of these novel therapeutics. This review will discuss recent progress in elucidating the pharmacology and function of group II receptors in the context of current hypotheses on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the need for new and better antipsychotics.

  11. Selective pharmacological modulation of renal peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding by treatment with diuretic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lukeman, D.S.; Vaughn, D.A.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have assessed the effects of in vivo administration of different classes of diuretic drugs on the expression of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) in crude membranes derived from the cortex and outer medulla of rat kidney by saturation analysis with the PBBS-selective ligands (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PH 11195 in cortex and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 in outer medulla. Administration for 14-15 days of furosemide, a drug that blocks NaCl-KCl coupled transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, produced a significant doubling in the PBBS density (B/sub max/) in outer medulla, a region of the kidney rich in thick ascending limbs, and produced a lesser but significant increase in PBBS density in the cortex. Conversely, administration for 14-15 days of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide, which acts predominantly in the proximal tubule, and hydrochlorothiazide, which acts predominantly in the early distal tubule, elicited statistically significant increases in PBBS density in renal cortex but not in renal outer medulla. Furthermore, all drug treatments were without effect on the equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/s) of (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 binding to cortical and outer medullary membrane preparations. These findings demonstrate that the PBBS can be selectively up-regulated in different regions of the kidney by diuretic drugs with different modes/sites of action. 50 references, 1 table.

  12. A review of phytotherapy of gout: perspective of new pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Ling, X; Bochu, W

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this review article is to outline plants currently used and those with high promise for the development of anti-gout products. All relevant literature databases were searched up to 25 March 2013. The search terms were 'gout', 'gouty arthritis', 'hyperuricemia', 'uric acid', 'xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor', 'uricosuric', 'urate transporter 1(URAT1)' and 'glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9)'. Herbal keywords included 'herbal medicine', 'medicinal plant', 'natural products', 'phytomedicine' and 'phytotherapy'. 'antiinflammatory effect' combined with the words 'interleukin-6 (IL-6)', 'interleukin-8 (IL-8)', 'interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)', and 'tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)'. XO inhibitory effect, uricosuric action, and anti-inflammatory effects were the key outcomes. Numerous agents derived from plants have anti-gout potential. In in vitro studies, flavonoids, alkaloids, essential oils, phenolic compounds, tannins, iridoid glucosides, and coumarins show the potential of anti-gout effects by their XO inhibitory action, while lignans, triterpenoids and xanthophyll are acting through their anti-inflammatory effects. In animal studies, essential oils, lignans, and tannins show dual effects including reduction of uric acid generation and uricosuric action. Alkaloids reveal inhibit uric acid generation, show anti-inflammatory effects, or a combination of the two. Phenolic compounds and flavonoids inhibit uric acid production, show uricosuric anti-inflammatory effects. In the rare human studies, colchicine from Colchicum autumnale showed anti-inflammatory effects while for other plant extracts, although revealing anti-gout potential, further phytochemical investigations are needed to identify their active constituents. Besides, the plants which give antioxidant activities are much potent in the management of gout and need to be further investigated. The current review is a detailed discussion of the potential of medicinal plants for treatment of gout

  13. Pharmacological Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: Is it Progressing Adequately?

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Between 1993 and 2000 four acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were marketed as a symptomatic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), as well as memantine in 2003. Current research is focused on finding drugs that favorably modify the course of the disease. However, their entrance into the market does not seem to be imminent. Research Development: The aim of AD research is to find substances that inhibit certain elements of the AD pathogenic chain (beta- and gamma-secretase inhibitors, alpha-secretase stimulants, beta-amyloid aggregability reducers or disaggregation and elimination inductors, as well as tau-hyperphosphorylation, glutamate excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage reducers, among other action mechanisms). Demonstrating a disease’s retarding effect demands longer trials than those necessary to ascertain symptomatic improvement. Besides, a high number of patients (thousands of them) is necessary, all of which turns out to be difficult and costly. Furthermore, it would be necessary to count on diagnosis and progression markers in the disease’s pre-clinical stage, markers for specific phenotypes, as well as high-selectivity molecules acting only where necessary. In order to compensate these difficulties, drugs acting on several defects of the pathogenic chain or showing both symptomatic and neuroprotective action simultaneously are being researched. Conclusions: There are multiple molecules used in research to modify AD progression. Although it turns out to be difficult to obtain drugs with sufficient efficacy so that their marketing is approved, if they were achieved they would lead to a reduction of AD prevalence. PMID:19461897

  14. [How I treat...Recommendations for controlling and optimizing a pharmacological therapy].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2014-11-01

    Any pharmacological treatment should ideally be effective and safe. The supervision of an ongoing therapy should control that individualized goals are reached while tolerance and safety are present. In case of not reaching the predefined objectives, the causes of failure should first be screened (for instance, exclusion of poor patient compliance), and the treatment should be then optimized: dose adjustment, add-on of another drug (if possible synergistic combination) and/or shift to a more effective pharmacological therapy. In some cases, therapeutic monitoring may be useful or even mandatory in order to better adjust drug dosing and thus guarantee both efficacy and safety.

  15. Pharmacological Analysis of Vorinostat Analogues as Potential Anti-tumor Agents Targeting Human Histone Deacetylases: an Epigenetic Treatment Stratagem for Cancers.

    PubMed

    Praseetha, Sugathan; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Sureshkumar, Sivanpillai

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of the acetylation status of chromatin and other non-histone proteins by HDAC inhibitors has evolved as an excellent epigenetic strategy in treatment of cancers. The present study was sought to identify compounds with positive pharmacological profiles targeting HDAC1. Analogues of Vorinostat synthesized by Cai et al, 2015 formed the test compounds for the present pharmacological evaluation. Hydroxamte analogue 6H showed superior pharmacological profile in comparison to all the compounds in the analogue dataset owing to its better electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding patterns. In order to identify compounds with even better high affinity and pharmacological profile than 6H and Vorinostat, virtual screening was performed. A total of 83 compounds similar to Vorinostat and 154 compounds akin to analogue 6H were retrieved. SCHEMBL15675695 (PubCid: 15739209) and AKOS019005527 (PubCid: 80442147) similar to Vorinostat and 6H, were the best docked compounds among the virtually screened compounds. However, in spite of having good affinity, none of the virtually screened compounds had better affinity than that of 6H. In addition SCHEMBL15675695 was predicted to be a carcinogen while AKOS019005527 is Ames toxic. From, our extensive analysis involving binding affinity analysis, ADMET properties predictions and pharmacophoric mappings, we report Vorinostat hydroxamate analogue 6H to be a potential candidate for HDAC inhibition in treatment of cancers through an epigenetic strategy. PMID:27039807

  16. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and it is correlated with various comorbidities, among which the most relevant are diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Obesity management is a modern challenge because of the rapid evolution of unfavorable lifestyles and unfortunately there are no effective treatments applicable to the large majority of obese/overweight people. The current medical attitude is to treat the complications of obesity (e.g. dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases). However, the potential of treating obesity is enormous, bearing in mind that a volitional weight loss of 10 kg is associated with important risk factor improvement: blood pressure -10 mmHg, total cholesterol -10%, LDL cholesterol -15%, triglycerides -30%, fasting glucose -50%, HDL cholesterol +8%. Drug treatment for obesity is an evolving branch of pharmacology, burdened by severe side effects and consequences of the early drugs, withdrawn from the market, and challenged by the lack of long-term data on the effect of medications on obesity-related morbidity and mortality, first of all cardiovascular diseases. In Europe three antiobesity drugs are currently licensed: sibutramine, orlistat, and rimonabant; important trials with clinical endpoints are ongoing for sibutramine and rimonabant. While waiting for their results, it is convenient to evaluate these drugs for their effects on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors. Sibutramine is a centrally acting serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that mainly increases satiety. At the level of brown adipose tissue, sibutramine can also facilitate energy expenditure by increasing thermogenesis. The long-term studies (five) documented a mean differential weight reduction of 4.45 kg for sibutramine vs placebo. Considering the principal studies, attrition rate was 43%. This drug not only reduces body weight and waist circumference, but it decreases triglycerides and

  17. Protons, Photons, and the Prostate – Is There Emerging Evidence in the Ongoing Discussion on Particle Therapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Kilian C.; Habl, Gregor; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is actively and repeatedly discussed within the framework of particle therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer (PC). The argument in favor of treating the prostate with protons is partly financial: given that small volumes are treated, treatment times are low, resulting in a hypothetical high patient throughput. However, such considerations should not form the basis of medical decision-making. There are also physical and biological arguments which further support the use of particle therapy for PC. The only relevant randomized data currently available is the study by Zietman and colleagues, comparing a high to a low proton boost, resulting in a significant increase in PSA-free survival in the experimental (high dose) arm (1). With modern photon treatments and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), equally high doses can be applied with photons and, thus, a randomized trial comparing high-end photons to protons is warranted. For high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles, such as carbon ions, the increase in relative biological effectiveness could potentially convert into an improvement in outcome. Additionally, through the physical differences of protons and carbon ions, the steeper dose gradient with carbon ions and the lack of beam broadening in the carbon beam lead to a superior dose distribution supporting the idea of hypofractionation. Biological and clinical data are emerging, however, has practice-changing evidence already arrived? PMID:26858936

  18. Getting better, getting well: understanding and managing partial and non-response to pharmacological treatment of non-psychotic major depression in old age.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Henry C; Karp, Jordan F; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F

    2007-01-01

    In general, the pharmacological treatment of non-psychotic major depressive disorder in old age is only partially successful, with only approximately 50% of older depressed adults improving with initial antidepressant monotherapy. Many factors may predict a more difficult-to-treat depression, including coexisting anxiety, low self-esteem, poor sleep and a high coexisting medical burden. Being aware of these and other predictors of a difficult-to-treat depression gives the clinician more reasonable expectations about a patient's likely treatment course. If an initial antidepressant trial fails, the clinician has two pharmacological options: switch or augment/combine antidepressant therapies. About 50% of patients who do not improve after initial antidepressant therapy will respond to either strategy. Switching has several advantages including fewer adverse effects, improved treatment adherence and reduced expense. However, as a general guideline, if patients are partial responders at 6 weeks, they will likely be full responders by 12 weeks. Thus, changing medication is not indicated in this context. However, if patients are partial responders at 12 weeks, switching to a new agent is advised. If the clinician treats vigorously and if the patient and clinician persevere, up to 90% of older depressed patients will respond to pharmacological treatment. Furthermore, electroconvulsive therapy is a safe and effective non-pharmacological strategy for non-psychotic major depression that fails to respond to pharmacotherapy. Getting well and staying well is the goal; thus, clinicians should treat to remission, not merely to response. Subsequently, maintenance treatment with the same regimen that has been successful in relieving the depression strongly improves the patient's chances of remaining depression free. PMID:17896830

  19. A network pharmacology approach to discover active compounds and action mechanisms of San-Cao Granule for treatment of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shizhang; Niu, Ming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jiabo; Su, Haibin; Luo, Shengqiang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Guo, Yanlei; Liu, Liping; Liu, Fengqun; Zhao, Qingguo; Chen, Hongge; Xiao, Xiaohe; Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance San-Cao Granule (SCG) has been used in patients with liver fibrosis for many years and has shown good effect. However, its mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear because of its complex chemical system. The purpose of our study is to establish a comprehensive and systemic method that can predict the mechanism of action of SCG in antihepatic fibrosis. Materials and methods In this study, a “compound–target–disease” network was constructed by combining the SCG-specific and liver fibrosis–specific target proteins with protein–protein interactions, and network pharmacology was used to screen out the underlying targets and mechanisms of SCG for treatment of liver fibrosis. Then, some key molecules of the enriched pathway were chosen to verify the effects of SCG on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA). Results This systematic approach had successfully revealed that 16 targets related to 11 SCG compounds were closely associated with liver fibrosis therapy. The pathway-enrichment analysis of them showed that the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway is relatively important. Animal experiments also proved that SCG could significantly ameliorate liver fibrosis by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. Conclusion SCG could alleviate liver fibrosis through the molecular mechanisms predicted by network pharmacology. Furthermore, network pharmacology could provide deep insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of Chinese herbal formulas. PMID:26929602

  20. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty. PMID:26960103

  1. Effects of pharmacological treatments on hippocampal NCAM1 and ERK2 expression in epileptic rats with cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingxia; Min, Xia; Sun, Ran; Gao, Jianying; Liang, Ruqing; Li, Lei; Chu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of various pharmacological agents on the hippocampal expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) in epileptic rats with cognitive dysfunction. The experiments were conducted using 120 Wistar rats: 20 controls and 100 with pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). The SE rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n=20/group) that received daily treatments for 1 month with one of the following: (i) saline (no effect on epilepsy); (ii) carbamazepine (an anticonvulsant); (iii) oxcarbazepine (an anticonvulsant); (iv) aniracetam (a nootropic); or (v) donepezil (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor). Spatial learning and memory were assessed using a Morris Water Maze (MWM). Hippocampal tissue was assessed for NCAM1 and ERK2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunochemistry. The results revealed that SE rats had significantly poorer MWM performances compared with controls (P<0.01). Performance in SE rats was improved with donepezil treatment (P<0.01), but declined with carbamazepine (P<0.01). Compared with controls, saline-treated SE rats exhibited increased hippocampal NCAM1 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Among SE rats, NCAM1 mRNA expression was highest in those treated with donepezil, followed by aniracetam-, saline-, oxcarbazepine- and carbamazepine-treated rats. Compared to controls, saline-treated SE rats exhibited decreased hippocampal ERK2 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Among SE rats, ERK2 mRNA expression was highest in those treated with donepezil, followed by aniracetam, saline, oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine. NCAM1 and ERK2 protein expression levels were parallel to those of the mRNA. In saline-treated SE rats, hippocampal ERK2 expression was decreased and NCAM1 expression was increased; thus, these two molecules may be involved in the impairment of spatial memory. Carbamazepine augmented

  2. Ongoing Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus after 25 Years of Annual Ivermectin Mass Treatments in the Vina du Nord River Valley, in North Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbarth, Albert; Achukwi, Mbunkah Daniel; Renz, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports of transmission interruption of Onchocerca volvulus, the causing agent of river blindness, in former endemic foci in the Americas, and more recently in West and East Africa, raise the question whether elimination of this debilitating disease is underway after long-term treatment of the population at risk with ivermectin. The situation in Central Africa has not yet been clearly assessed. Methods and findings Entomologic data from two former endemic river basins in North Cameroon were generated over a period of 43 and 48 months to follow-up transmission levels in areas under prolonged ivermectin control. Moreover, epidemiologic parameters of animal-borne Onchocerca spp. transmitted by the same local black fly vectors of the Simulium damnosum complex were recorded and their impact on O. volvulus transmission success evaluated. With mitochondrial DNA markers we unambiguously confirmed the presence of infective O. volvulus larvae in vectors from the Sudan savannah region (mean Annual Transmission Potential 2009–2012: 98, range 47–221), but not from the Adamawa highland region. Transmission rates of O. ochengi, a parasite of Zebu cattle, were high in both foci. Conclusions/significance The high cattle livestock density in conjunction with the high transmission rates of the bovine filaria O. ochengi prevents the transmission of O. volvulus on the Adamawa plateau, whereas transmission in a former hyperendemic focus was markedly reduced, but not completely interrupted after 25 years of ivermectin control. This study may be helpful to gauge the impact of the presence of animal-filariae for O. volvulus transmission in terms of the growing human and livestock populations in sub-Saharan countries. PMID:26926855

  3. Systems pharmacology-based dissection of mechanisms of Chinese medicinal formula Bufei Yishen as an effective treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiansheng; Zhao, Peng; Li, Ya; Tian, Yange; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    The present work adopted a systems pharmacology-based approach to provide new insights into the active compounds and therapeutic targets of Bufei Yishen formula (BYF) for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, we established a rat model of cigarette smoke- and bacterial infection-induced COPD to validate the mechanisms of BYF action that were predicted in systems pharmacology study. The systems pharmacology model derived 216 active compounds from BYF and 195 potential targets related to various diseases. The compound-target network showed that each herbal drug in the BYF formula acted on similar targets, suggesting potential synergistic effects among these herbal drugs. The ClueGo assay, a Cytoscape plugin, revealed that most targets were related to activation of MAP kinase and matrix metalloproteinases. By using target-diseases network analysis, we found that BYF had great potential to treatment of multiple diseases, such as respiratory tract diseases, immune system, and cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, we found that BYF had the ability to prevent COPD and its comorbidities, such as ventricular hypertrophy, in vivo. Moreover, BYF inhibited the inflammatory cytokine, and hypertrophic factors expression, protease-antiprotease imbalance and the collagen deposition, which may be the underlying mechanisms of action of BYF. PMID:26469778

  4. Systems pharmacology-based approach for dissecting the active ingredients and potential targets of the Chinese herbal Bufei Jianpi formula for the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Li, Jiansheng; Li, Ya; Tian, Yange; Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Chunli

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chinese herbal Bufei Jianpi formula (BJF) provides an effective treatment option for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the systems-level mechanism underlying the clinical effects of BJF on COPD remains unknown. Methods In this study, a systems pharmacology model based on absorption filtering, network targeting, and systems analyses was applied specifically to clarify the active compounds and therapeutic mechanisms of BJF. Then, a rat model of cigarette smoke- and bacterial infection-induced COPD was used to investigate the therapeutic mechanisms of BJF on COPD and its comorbidity. Results The pharmacological system successfully identified 145 bioactive ingredients from BJF and revealed 175 potential targets. There was a significant target overlap between the herbal constituents of BJF. These results suggested that each herb of BJF connected with similar multitargets, indicating potential synergistic effects among them. The integrated target–disease network showed that BJF probably was efficient for the treatment of not only respiratory tract diseases but also other diseases, such as nervous system and cardiovascular diseases. The possible mechanisms of action of BJF were related to activation of inflammatory response, immune responses, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BJF treatment could effectively prevent COPD and its comorbidities, such as ventricular hypertrophy, by inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, matrix metalloproteinases expression, and other cytokine production in vivo. Conclusion This study using the systems pharmacology method, in combination with in vivo experiments, helped us successfully dissect the molecular mechanism of BJF for the treatment of COPD and predict the potential targets of the multicomponent BJF, which provides a new approach to illustrate the synergetic mechanism of the complex prescription and discover more effective drugs against COPD

  5. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-02-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination.

  6. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-02-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination. PMID:24118014

  7. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination. PMID:24118014

  8. Challenges for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders: Implications of the Ca(2+)/cAMP intracellular signalling interaction.

    PubMed

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Caricati-Neto, Afonso

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the entitled "calcium paradox" phenomenon, which means a paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by l-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), used in antihypertensive therapy, is due to interaction between the intracellular signalling pathways mediated by Ca(2+) and cAMP (Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction). In 2015, we proposed that the pharmacological manipulation of this interaction could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by CCBs, several clinical studies have been demonstrating pleiotropic effects of CCBs, including neuroprotective effects. CCBs genuinely exhibit cognitive-enhancing abilities and reduce the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson´s disease and others. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects remain under debate. Our recent discovery that the "calcium paradox" phenomenon is due to Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction may provide new insights for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including enhancement of current therapies mainly by reducing adverse effects, and improving effectiveness of modern medicines. Whether Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction is involved in CCBs pleiotropic effects also deserves special attention. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction could be a more efficient therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, in this review we summarize the current knowledge of this field, making new directions and future perspectives. PMID:27349146

  9. Challenges for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders: Implications of the Ca(2+)/cAMP intracellular signalling interaction.

    PubMed

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Caricati-Neto, Afonso

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the entitled "calcium paradox" phenomenon, which means a paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by l-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), used in antihypertensive therapy, is due to interaction between the intracellular signalling pathways mediated by Ca(2+) and cAMP (Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction). In 2015, we proposed that the pharmacological manipulation of this interaction could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by CCBs, several clinical studies have been demonstrating pleiotropic effects of CCBs, including neuroprotective effects. CCBs genuinely exhibit cognitive-enhancing abilities and reduce the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson´s disease and others. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects remain under debate. Our recent discovery that the "calcium paradox" phenomenon is due to Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction may provide new insights for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including enhancement of current therapies mainly by reducing adverse effects, and improving effectiveness of modern medicines. Whether Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction is involved in CCBs pleiotropic effects also deserves special attention. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction could be a more efficient therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, in this review we summarize the current knowledge of this field, making new directions and future perspectives.

  10. Development and pharmacological evaluation of in vitro nanocarriers composed of lamellar silicates containing copaiba oil-resin for treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Borges, Vinícius Raphael; da Silva, Julianna Henriques; Barbosa, Samantha Soares; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira

    2016-07-01

    In this work, newly developed nanocomposites based upon lamellar silicates are evaluated to determine their potential in controlling endometriosis. The preparation of the new nanocarriers is detailed, properties characterized and in vitro pharmacological evaluation performed. The nanocomposites in this study were obtained from the reaction of copaiba oil-resin (COPA) with the polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K-30). COPA was selected due to its antiinflammatory and anticancer activities along with the organophilic derivatives of sodium montmorillonite, Viscogel B8, S7 and S4. The results indicated that it was feasible to obtain a good yield of a COPA nanocomposite using a simple process. Intercalation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In vitro release experiments demonstrated that COPA was released from the nanocomposite in a delayed fashion. Whereas, in vitro pharmacological studies showed a reduction in viability and proliferation of endometriotic cell cultures upon COPA nanocomposite treatment, suggesting that the system developed here can be a promising alternative therapy for the oral treatment of endometriosis. PMID:27127058

  11. [The contingency of the therapeutic effectiveness with the peculiarities of the non-pharmacological treatment of the patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Poddubnaya, O A

    2016-01-01

    The elaboration of new technologies for the medical rehabilitation of the patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis in combination with chronic opisthorchiasis is a topical problem facing modern clinical gastroenterology. The application of up-to-date non-pharmacological therapeutic modalities, such as ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) therapy concomitantly with group chronophysiotherapy makes it possible to significantly improve the final outcome of the treatment. The results of clinical studies give evidence of the favourable influence of the combined chronorehabilitative treatment including UHF therapy on the characteristics of the functional state of the biliary-hepatic system and of the organism as a whole. The positive dynamics of these characteristics is suggestive of the high (up to 87,5%) therapeutic effectiveness of the proposed treatment. The investigations into the relationship between this effect and the peculiarities of the combined therapeutic modalities have demonstrated their correlation (χ2=104,13; p=0,0001; V-Kramer´s coefficient =0,35) and showed that the use of combined chronorehabilitation including UHF therapy based on the application of phone resonance radiation guarantees (and is a predictor of) high therapeutic effect (percent concordance =95,6%; standard coefficient=2,13; p=0,001) of the treatment of the patients with chronic cholecystitis in combination with chronic opisthorchiasis. The statistical analysis of the results of application of the modern non-pharmacological therapeutic modalities and the chronobiological approach for the purpose of the combined treatment of patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis in combination with opisthorchiasis with the use of contingency table and logit regression, allowed not only to estimate the interdependence and interrelation between the characteristics of interest but also to reveal predictors of therapeutic effectiveness. These findings are of great practical importance since they can be

  12. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate for the treatment of breakthrough pain in cancer patients: an overview of its pharmacological and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Katsouda, Emmanuela; Parpa, Efi; Tsiatas, Marinos L; Vlahos, Lambros

    2005-01-01

    Breakthrough pain is a transitory flare of pain occurring in most cancer patients against a background of otherwise controlled persistent pain. Treatment of breakthrough pain is a challenging phenomenon. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC; brand name Actiq, Chephalon Inc., West Chester, PA), a new opioid formulation with a unique delivery system, reflects the characteristics of breakthrough pain (rapid onset of action and short duration), making it an effective treatment for cancer patients who already receive opioids and experience flares of pain. This review article aims to present the role of oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate in the management of breakthrough pain in cancer patients. In particular, it is going to discuss the synthesis, clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, toxicity, and clinical efficacy of this novel agent.

  13. Pharmacological facilitation of fear extinction and the search for adjunct treatments for anxiety disorders--the case of yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Quirk, Gregory J

    2010-01-01

    There is current interest in identifying drugs that facilitate fear extinction, as this form of learning is the basis of certain cognitive therapies for anxiety disorders. Following an initial report several years ago that the alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist yohimbine facilitated extinction in mice, more recent studies have shown mixed effects or even impairment. It has become clear that the effect of yohimbine on extinction depends on a number of factors, including genetic background, contextual variables and the presence of competing behaviors. To what extent theses effects of yohimbine are mediated through the alpha2-adrenoreceptor, as opposed to other sites of action, is also uncertain. More work is needed before this drug can be approved as a pharmacological adjunct for extinction-based therapies. More generally, the case of yohimbine may serve as a model for the development of other extinction facilitators.

  14. Molecular and Physiological Factors of Neuroprotection in Hypoxia-tolerant Models: Pharmacological Clues for the Treatment of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Thomas I; Soyinka, Julius O; Adedeji, Adekunle; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola

    2015-01-01

    The naked mole-rat possesses several unique physiological and molecular features that underlie their remarkably and exceptional resistance to tissue hypoxia. Elevated pattern of Epo, an erythropoietin (Epo) factor; c-fos; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α) contribute to the adaptive strategy to cope with hypoxic stress. Moreover, the naked mole-rat has a lower metabolic rate than any other eutherian mammal of comparable size that has been studied. The ability to actively reduce metabolic rate represents a strategy widely used in the face of decreased tissue oxygen availability. Understanding the different molecular and physiological factors that induce metabolic suppression could guide the development of pharmacological agents for the clinical management of stroke patient. PMID:25780340

  15. Molecular and Physiological Factors of Neuroprotection in Hypoxia-tolerant Models: Pharmacological Clues for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nathaniel, Thomas I; Soyinka, Julius O; Adedeji, Adekunle; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola

    2015-01-01

    The naked mole-rat possesses several unique physiological and molecular features that underlie their remarkably and exceptional resistance to tissue hypoxia. Elevated pattern of Epo, an erythropoietin (Epo) factor; c-fos; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α) contribute to the adaptive strategy to cope with hypoxic stress. Moreover, the naked mole-rat has a lower metabolic rate than any other eutherian mammal of comparable size that has been studied. The ability to actively reduce metabolic rate represents a strategy widely used in the face of decreased tissue oxygen availability. Understanding the different molecular and physiological factors that induce metabolic suppression could guide the development of pharmacological agents for the clinical management of stroke patient. PMID:25780340

  16. Epigenetic pathway targets for the treatment of disease: accelerating progress in the development of pharmacological tools: IUPHAR Review 11

    PubMed Central

    Tough, David F; Lewis, Huw D; Rioja, Inmaculada; Lindon, Matthew J; Prinjha, Rab K

    2014-01-01

    The properties of a cell are determined both genetically by the DNA sequence of its genes and epigenetically through processes that regulate the pattern, timing and magnitude of expression of its genes. While the genetic basis of disease has been a topic of intense study for decades, recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and a growing appreciation that epigenetic misregulation makes a significant contribution to human disease. Several large protein families have been identified that act in different ways to control the expression of genes through epigenetic mechanisms. Many of these protein families are finally proving tractable for the development of small molecules that modulate their function and represent new target classes for drug discovery. Here, we provide an overview of some of the key epigenetic regulatory proteins and discuss progress towards the development of pharmacological tools for use in research and therapy. PMID:25060293

  17. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  18. Recent treatment advances and novel therapeutic approaches in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review recent advances in the treatment of epilepsy. It includes five antiepileptic drugs that have been recently added to the pharmacologic armamentarium and surgical techniques that have been developed in the last few years. Finally, we review ongoing research that may have a potential role in future treatments of epilepsy. PMID:26097734

  19. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  20. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus.

  1. A Systems-Pharmacology Analysis of Herbal Medicines Used in Health Improvement Treatment: Predicting Potential New Drugs and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianling; Pei, Mengjie; Zheng, Chunli; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Yang, Ling

    2013-01-01

    For thousands of years, tonic herbs have been successfully used all around the world to improve health, energy, and vitality. However, their underlying mechanisms of action in molecular/systems levels are still a mystery. In this work, two sets of tonic herbs, so called Qi-enriching herbs (QEH) and Blood-tonifying herbs (BTH) in TCM, were selected to elucidate why they can restore proper balance and harmony inside body, organ and energy system. Firstly, a pattern recognition model based on artificial neural network and discriminant analysis for assessing the molecular difference between QEH and BTH was developed. It is indicated that QEH compounds have high lipophilicity while BTH compounds possess high chemical reactivity. Secondly, a systematic investigation integrating ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) prediction, target fishing and network analysis was performed and validated on these herbs to obtain the compound-target associations for reconstructing the biologically-meaningful networks. The results suggest QEH enhance physical strength, immune system and normal well-being, acting as adjuvant therapy for chronic disorders while BTH stimulate hematopoiesis function in body. As an emerging approach, the systems pharmacology model might facilitate to understand the mechanisms of action of the tonic herbs, which brings about new development for complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:24369484

  2. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating. PMID:15992683

  3. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers. PMID:23627476

  4. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  5. Level of response and safety of pharmacological monotherapy in the treatment of acute bipolar I disorder phases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Jorge M.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Vieta, Eduard; Vázquez, Gustavo; Tohen, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, combinations of pharmacological treatments have become common for the treatment of bipolar disorder type I (BP I); however, this practice is usually not evidence-based and rarely considers monotherapy drug regimen (MDR) as an option in the treatment of acute phases of BP I. Therefore, we evaluated comparative data of commonly prescribed MDRs for both manic and depressive phases of BP I. Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the ClinicalStudyResults.org and other data sources were searched from 1949 to March 2009 for placebo and active controlled randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Risk ratios (RRs) for response, remission, and discontinuation rates due to adverse events (AEs), lack of efficacy, or discontinuation due to any cause, and the number needed to treat or harm (NNT or NNH) were calculated for each medication individually and for all evaluable trials combined. The authors included 31 RCTs in the analyses comparing a MDR with placebo or with active treatment for acute mania, and 9 RCTs comparing a MDR with placebo or with active treatment for bipolar depression. According to the collected evidence, most of the MDRs when compared to placebo showed significant response and remission rates in acute mania. In the case of bipolar depression only quetiapine and, to a lesser extent, olanzapine showed efficacy as MDR. Overall, MDRs were well tolerated with low discontinuation rates due to any cause or AE, although AE profiles differed among treatments. We concluded that most MDRs were efficacious and safe in the treatment of manic episodes, but very few MDRs have demonstrated being efficacious for bipolar depressive episodes. PMID:20128953

  6. The pharmacology of neurotrophic treatment with Cerebrolysin: brain protection and repair to counteract pathologies of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Masliah, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2012-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors are considered as part of the therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders like dementia, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation which mimics the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors on brain protection and repair. In dementia models, Cerebrolysin decreases β-amyloid deposition and microtubule-associated protein tau phosphorylation by regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity, increases synaptic density and restores neuronal cytoarchitecture. These effects protect integrity of the neuronal circuits and thus result in improved cognitive and behavioral performance. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, the basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental studies in stroke animal models have shown that Cerebrolysin stabilizes the structural integrity of cells by inhibition of calpain and reduces the number of apoptotic cells after ischemic lesion. Cerebrolysin induces restorative processes, decreases infarct volume and edema formation and promotes functional recovery. Stroke-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was also promoted by Cerebrolysin, thus supporting the brain's self-repair after stroke. Both, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury conditions stimulate the expression of natural neurotrophic factors to promote repair and regeneration processes -axonal regeneration, neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis- that is considered to be crucial for the future recovery. Neuroprotective effects of Cerebrolysin on experimentally induced traumatic spinal cord injury have shown that Cerebrolysin prevents apoptosis of lesioned motoneurons and promotes functional recovery. This section summarizes the most relevant data on the pharmacology of Cerebrolysin obtained from in vitro assays (biochemical and cell cultures) and in vivo animal models of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

  7. Antihypertensive Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, John G.; Freed, Curt R.; Nies, Alan S.

    1980-01-01

    Although drug treatment of hypertension is associated with improved survival and decreased vascular complications, drug compliance is a major problem in the control of hypertension. All antihypertensive medications are associated with side effects; thus, it is a physician's responsibility to explain to each patient the side effects of the drugs he prescribes to treat hypertension, and to instill in the patient a sense of necessity for the treatment of hypertension. The choice of antihypertensive drug should be made based on each patient's lifestyle, overall health and ability to tolerate the drug. Ideally, the antihypertensive regimen should be simple, effective, convenient to take and have very few side effects. PMID:6992462

  8. Neuroimmune pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Hassan, Ahmed; Jain, Piyush; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is a major health problem which impairs the quality of life, impacts mental health and is exacerbated by stress and psychiatric disturbances which, in turn, can affect disease prognosis and response to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that the immune system is an important interface between intestinal inflammation and the enteric, sensory, central and autonomic nervous systems. In addition, the neuroimmune interactions originating from the gastrointestinal tract are orchestrated by the gut microbiota. This article reviews some major insights into this complex homeostatic network that have been achieved during the past two years and attempts to put these advances into perspective with novel opportunities of pharmacological intervention. PMID:26426677

  9. Developmental Pharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Anker, Johannes N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs used in psychopharmacology across the pediatric age spectrum from infants to adolescents represents a major challenge for clinicians. In pediatrics, treatment protocols use either standard dose reductions for these drugs for children below a certain age or use less conventional…

  10. A dose-ranging study of behavioral and pharmacological treatment in social settings for children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Pelham, William E; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Fabiano, Gregory A; Coles, Erika K; Wymbs, Brian T; Chacko, Anil; Walker, Kathryn S; Wymbs, Frances; Garefino, Allison; Hoffman, Martin T; Waxmonsky, James G; Waschbusch, Daniel A

    2014-08-01

    Placebo and three doses of methylphenidate (MPH) were crossed with 3 levels of behavioral modification (no behavioral modification, NBM; low-intensity behavioral modification, LBM; and high-intensity behavior modification, HBM) in the context of a summer treatment program (STP). Participants were 48 children with ADHD, aged 5-12. Behavior was examined in a variety of social settings (sports activities, art class, lunch) that are typical of elementary school, neighborhood, and after-school settings. Children received each behavioral condition for 3 weeks, order counterbalanced across groups. Children concurrently received in random order placebo, 0.15 mg/kg/dose, 0.3 mg/kg/dose, or 0.6 mg/kg/dose MPH, 3 times daily with dose manipulated on a daily basis in random order for each child. Both behavioral and medication treatments produced highly significant and positive effects on children's behavior. The treatment modalities also interacted significantly. Whereas there was a linear dose-response curve for medication in NBM, the dose-response curves flattened considerably in LBM and HBM. Behavior modification produced effects as large as moderate doses, and on some measures, high doses of medication. These results replicate and extend to social-recreational settings previously reported results in a classroom setting from the same sample (Fabiano et al., School Psychology Review, 36, 195-216, 2007). Results illustrate the importance of taking dosage/intensity into account when evaluating combined treatments; there were no benefits of combined treatments when the dosage of either treatment was high but combination of the low-dose treatments produced substantial incremental improvement over unimodal treatment. PMID:24429997

  11. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs – provision of due diligence in the treatment process

    PubMed Central

    Zajdel, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on “off-label use”. The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug. PMID:24592133

  12. In vivo pharmacological evaluations of novel olanzapine analogues in rats: a potential new avenue for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Somayeh; Huang, Xu-Feng; Andrews, Jessica L; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    and OlzEt. Overall, OlzEt and OlzHomo may offer a better pharmacological profile than Olz for treating patients with schizophrenia. Clinical trials are needed to test this hypothesis.

  13. Pharmacological and haematological results of rat skin burn injury treatment with Cu(II)2(3,5-diisopropylsalicylate)4.

    PubMed

    Malakyan, Margarita H; Bajinyan, Sergey A; Abrahamyan, Armenuhi K; Petrosyan, Zhasmena H; Harutyunyan, Nektar K; Badiryan, Vardush A; Sorenson, John R J

    2004-01-01

    This research was performed to determine whether or not treatment of burn-injured rats with Cu(II)2(3,5-diisopropylsalicylate)4(Cu(II)2(3,5-DIPS)4) facilitated recovery from burn-injury. Four groups of adult male rats received a standard skin burn 1 h before an initial subcutaneous treatment which was continued daily for three days with either 0, 5, 10 or 20micromol Cu(II)2(3,5-DIPS)4/kg body mass. A fifth group was given no treatment. A sixth group served as a non-burn-injured non-treated normal control group. At 3 h and on days 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 post-burn-injury blood samples were obtained from rats in all groups for the determination of leukocyte, platelet and erythrocyte counts, clotting times, hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Total protein and middle mass peptides in plasma, as well as plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane peroxidation products were determined on days 7 and 14. Burn wound healing and body mass were determined daily from day 0 to 6 with a notation of crust rejection by day 14. Treatment with Cu(II)2(3,5-DIPS)4 produced effects consistent with a facilitation of Cu-dependent immune-mediated physiological inflammatory responses to burn injury. It is concluded that treatment of burn injury with Cu(II)2(3,5-DIPS)4 supports Cu-dependent physiological responses involved in overcoming burn injury, which may have been further optimized by continued treatment beyond day 2, the last day of treatment. PMID:15901413

  14. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials on Safety and Efficacy of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Marta; Mantelli, Flavio; Merlo, Daniela; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Several treatments have been proposed to slow down progression of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal degenerative condition leading to severe visual impairment. The aim of this study is to systematically review data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating safety and efficacy of medical interventions for the treatment of RP. Methods. Randomized clinical trials on medical treatments for syndromic and nonsyndromic RP published up to December 2014 were included in the review. Visual acuity, visual field, electroretinogram, and adverse events were used as outcome measures. Results. The 19 RCTs included in this systematic review included trials on hyperbaric oxygen delivery, topical brimonidine tartrate, vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid, gangliosides, lutein, oral nilvadipine, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and valproic acid. All treatments proved safe but did not show significant benefit on visual function. Long term supplementation with vitamin A showed a significantly slower decline rate in electroretinogram amplitude. Conclusions. Although all medical treatments for RP appear safe, evidence emerging from RCTs is limited since they do not present comparable results suitable for quantitative statistical analysis. The limited number of RCTs, the poor clinical results, and the heterogeneity among studies negatively influence the strength of recommendations for the long term management of RP patients. PMID:26339504

  15. Pharmacology in space: pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pavy-Le Traon, A; Saivin, S; Soulez-LaRivière, C; Pujos, M; Güell, A; Houin, G

    1997-01-01

    This chapter summarized the information available on the pharmacological kits onboard spacecraft and on the use of drugs in space, while the next chapter is dedicated to the impacts of weightlessness on drug pharmacokinetics. The need of a selected group of drugs for the use of astronauts during short-term and long-term spaceflights has been discussed. Recommendations are made for a Space Pharmacopoeia as well as for the areas of research needed to adapt medication to the weightlessness of the space environment. Although the usefulness of these drugs has been clearly demonstrated, their use also raises several problems. Physiological changes due to weightlessness may induce changes in pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs and influence their dosage regimen. Inflight data obtained by salivary drug monitoring have shown changes in the distribution of scopolamine and a significant change in the disposition of the common pain-relief agent acetaminophen taken inflight, in both drug concentration and time course. The authors of this study emphasize, however, that their data are preliminary and as yet incomplete. Further simulation studies and, if possible, inflight experiments are required. In vitro studies of the antibacterial activity of antibiotics under space conditions have shown an increased resistance of Escherichia Coli to colistin and kanamycin, and a lowered resistance of Staphylococcus Aureus to oxacillin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. The possible consequences of these findings for the treatment of infections contracted by astronauts are yet to be elucidated. There is still a lack of pharmacological countermeasures, particularly for preventing the progressive bone demineralization occurring in weightlessness. The treatment of space motion sickness with drugs carries with it the problem of undesirable side-effects on psychomotor performance. In order to arrive at the most appropriate medical kit for a particular mission, the best trade-off of risk versus

  16. Systems Pharmacology Approach Toward the Design of Inhaled Formulations of Rifampicin and Isoniazid for Treatment of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cilfone, N A; Pienaar, E; Thurber, G M; Kirschner, D E; Linderman, J J

    2015-03-01

    Conventional oral therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis are limited by poor antibiotic distribution in granulomas, which contributes to lengthy treatment regimens and inadequate bacterial sterilization. Inhaled formulations are a promising strategy to increase antibiotic efficacy and reduce dose frequency. We develop a multiscale computational approach that accounts for simultaneous dynamics of a lung granuloma, carrier release kinetics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Using this computational platform, we predict that a rationally designed inhaled formulation of isoniazid given at a significantly reduced dose frequency has better sterilizing capabilities and reduced toxicity than the current oral regimen. Furthermore, we predict that inhaled formulations of rifampicin require unrealistic carrier antibiotic loadings that lead to early toxicity concerns. Lastly, we predict that targeting carriers to macrophages has limited effects on treatment efficacy. Our platform can be extended to account for additional antibiotics and provides a new tool for rapidly prototyping the efficacy of inhaled formulations. PMID:26225241

  17. Systems Pharmacology Approach Toward the Design of Inhaled Formulations of Rifampicin and Isoniazid for Treatment of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cilfone, NA; Pienaar, E; Thurber, GM; Kirschner, DE; Linderman, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Conventional oral therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis are limited by poor antibiotic distribution in granulomas, which contributes to lengthy treatment regimens and inadequate bacterial sterilization. Inhaled formulations are a promising strategy to increase antibiotic efficacy and reduce dose frequency. We develop a multiscale computational approach that accounts for simultaneous dynamics of a lung granuloma, carrier release kinetics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Using this computational platform, we predict that a rationally designed inhaled formulation of isoniazid given at a significantly reduced dose frequency has better sterilizing capabilities and reduced toxicity than the current oral regimen. Furthermore, we predict that inhaled formulations of rifampicin require unrealistic carrier antibiotic loadings that lead to early toxicity concerns. Lastly, we predict that targeting carriers to macrophages has limited effects on treatment efficacy. Our platform can be extended to account for additional antibiotics and provides a new tool for rapidly prototyping the efficacy of inhaled formulations. PMID:26225241

  18. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of preservative-free tafluprost in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ermiş, Sıtkı Samet

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic disease requiring lifelong treatment. Discomfort due to medications may affect patients’ quality of life and may cause poor compliance, which leads to poor intraocular pressure control. To minimize the side effects of long-term treatment, preparations with lower benzalkonium chloride concentrations, preservative-free preparations and alternative preservatives have been developed and reported to have a lower rate of side effects. Tafluprost, launched on the ophthalmic market in 2008, is a new 16-phenoxy analogue of prostaglandin F2α, clinically used as an ocular hypotensive agent for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The safety and intraocular pressure-lowering efficacy of tafluprost has been demonstrated in various preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:22654492

  19. Recent advances in the development of novel pharmacological agents for the treatment of cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert W; Freedman, Robert; Javitt, Daniel C; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2007-09-01

    Wayne Fenton was a major driving force behind the establishment of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) and Treatment Units for Research on Neurocognition and Schizophrenia (TURNS) project mechanisms. These projects were designed to facilitate the development of new drugs for the treatment of cognitive impairments in people with schizophrenia. The MATRICS project identified 3 drug mechanisms of particular interest: cholinergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic. The TURNS project is designed to select potential cognitive-enhancing agents and evaluate their potential efficacy in the context of proof of concept or clinical efficacy trials. This article reviews the rationale for these 3 approaches and provides an update on the development of therapeutic agents, which act through one of these 3 mechanisms.

  20. Physical, Mental, and Social Catastrophic Cognitions as Prognostic Factors in Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Thomas V.; Leitenberg, Harold; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, Katherine M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    The authors explored the prognostic value of 3 different types of catastrophic cognitions in the treatment of panic disorder with and without mild-to-moderate agoraphobia using a sample of 143 participants who received either cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or imipramine in a randomized controlled trial. Stronger fears of social catastrophes…

  1. Epilepsy Surgery: Current Status and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    KAWAI, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of surgical treatment of epilepsy and introduces the ongoing challenges. Seizure outcome of resective surgery for focal seizures associated with focal lesions is satisfactory. Particularly for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, surgical treatment should be considered from the earlier stage of the disease. Meanwhile, surgical outcome in nonlesional extratemporal lobe epilepsy is still to be improved using various approaches. Disconnective surgeries reduce surgical complications of extensive resections while achieving equivalent or better seizure outcomes. Multiple subpial transection is still being modified expecting a better outcome by transection to the vertical cortices along the sulci- and multi-directional transection from a single entry point. Hippocampal transection is expected to preserve memory function while interrupting the abnormal epileptic synchronization. Proper selection or combination of subdural and depth electrodes and a wide-band analysis of electroencephalography may improve the accurate localization of epileptogenic region. Patients for whom curative resective surgery is not indicated because of generalized or bilateral multiple nature of their epilepsies, neuromodulation therapies are options of treatment which palliate their seizures. PMID:25925752

  2. Principles of antidote pharmacology: an update on prophylaxis, post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, S; Liu, CQ; Tran, H; Gubala, A; Gauci, P; McAllister, J; Vo, T

    2010-01-01

    The use of biological agents has generally been confined to military-led conflicts. However, there has been an increase in non-state-based terrorism, including the use of asymmetric warfare, such as biological agents in the past few decades. Thus, it is becoming increasingly important to consider strategies for preventing and preparing for attacks by insurgents, such as the development of pre- and post-exposure medical countermeasures. There are a wide range of prophylactics and treatments being investigated to combat the effects of biological agents. These include antibiotics (for both conventional and unconventional use), antibodies, anti-virals, immunomodulators, nucleic acids (analogues, antisense, ribozymes and DNAzymes), bacteriophage therapy and micro-encapsulation. While vaccines are commercially available for the prevention of anthrax, cholera, plague, Q fever and smallpox, there are no licensed vaccines available for use in the case of botulinum toxins, viral encephalitis, melioidosis or ricin. Antibiotics are still recommended as the mainstay treatment following exposure to anthrax, plague, Q fever and melioidosis. Anti-toxin therapy and anti-virals may be used in the case of botulinum toxins or smallpox respectively. However, supportive care is the only, or mainstay, post-exposure treatment for cholera, viral encephalitis and ricin – a recommendation that has not changed in decades. Indeed, with the difficulty that antibiotic resistance poses, the development and further evaluation of techniques and atypical pharmaceuticals are fundamental to the development of prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment options. The aim of this review is to present an update on prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents in the open literature from 2007 to 2009. PMID:20860656

  3. Comparative Safety of Pharmacologic Treatments for Persistent Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Ramona; von Wolff, Alessa; Mohr, Hannes; Härter, Martin; Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Hölzel, Lars; Kriston, Levente

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the safety of antidepressants for the treatment of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) with each other and with placebo. We conducted a systematic electronic search and included randomized controlled trials that investigated antidepressants for the treatment of PDD in adults. Outcomes were the incidence of experiencing any adverse event, specific adverse events and related treatment discontinuations. We analyzed the data using traditional and network meta-analyses. Thirty-four studies that comprised 4,769 patients and examined 20 individual agents in nine substance classes were included. Almost all analyzed substance classes were associated with higher discontinuation rates than placebo including tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), antipsychotics, and the serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI) trazodone. The odds of experiencing any adverse event were significantly higher for TCAs and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) compared to placebo. Pairwise comparisons among the substance classes revealed that more patients receiving TCAs or SNRIs experienced any adverse event and that more patients receiving TCAs or the SARI trazodone discontinued treatment. The complementary treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine showed lower rates of experiencing any adverse event and related discontinuations than all other comparators. TCAs were primarily associated with (anti-)cholinergic and sedating adverse events. SSRIs primarily showed gastrointestinal adverse events. Patients treated with the antipsychotic amisulpride were more likely to manifest weight gain and endocrine adverse events. The comparative evidence for further agents was insufficient or lacking. The identified safety differences may be used to inform the selection among the antidepressants. PMID:27187783

  4. Combining non-pharmacological treatments with pharmacotherapies for neurological disorders: a unique interface of the brain, drug-device, and intellectual property.

    PubMed

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries. PMID:25071711

  5. Combining Non-Pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: A Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug–Device, and Intellectual Property

    PubMed Central

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug–device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent–independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries. PMID:25071711

  6. Combining non-pharmacological treatments with pharmacotherapies for neurological disorders: a unique interface of the brain, drug-device, and intellectual property.

    PubMed

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  7. Pharmacological treatments of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's disease: role of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine.

    PubMed

    Desmidt, Thomas; Hommet, Caroline; Camus, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are frequent in Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are associated with disability and suffering for both the patients and their caregivers. Even if BPSD are now well diagnosed and characterized by standardized tools, their treatment remains often challenging in clinical setting because of the frequent and severe side effects of the psychotropic drugs when used in this indication. Evidence-based data confirm that antipsychotics and antidepressants are efficient for the treatment of BPSD but have a poor tolerance profile and their use is problematic. Use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, whom French authorities have questioned the relevance in 2008, also have a significant efficacy on non-cognitive symptoms of AD. Therefore, and although their tolerance profile is considered unsatisfying, they keep an indication in patients with AD and BPSD. PMID:27651011

  8. Pharmacological Alternatives for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Wasp and Bee Venoms and Their Components as New Neuroactive Tools

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Juliana; Monge-Fuentes, Victoria; Gomes, Flávia; Lopes, Kamila; dos Anjos, Lilian; Campos, Gabriel; Arenas, Claudia; Biolchi, Andréia; Gonçalves, Jacqueline; Galante, Priscilla; Campos, Leandro; Mortari, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are relentlessly progressive, severely impacting affected patients, families and society as a whole. Increased life expectancy has made these diseases more common worldwide. Unfortunately, available drugs have insufficient therapeutic effects on many subtypes of these intractable diseases, and adverse effects hamper continued treatment. Wasp and bee venoms and their components are potential means of managing or reducing these effects and provide new alternatives for the control of neurodegenerative diseases. These venoms and their components are well-known and irrefutable sources of neuroprotectors or neuromodulators. In this respect, the present study reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of action and future prospects regarding the use of new drugs derived from wasp and bee venom in the treatment of major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PMID:26295258

  9. [Pharmaceutical formulations and adherence to pharmacological treatment in psychiatry: the example of oral disintegrating tablet of olanzapine].

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Cristiana; Canonico, Pier Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to treatment in psychiatric as in other chronic or recurrent conditions, is often suboptimal. A high proportion of relapses is due to non-adherence to prescribed treatment. Adherence to treatment is a potent predictor of effectiveness, both in clinical trials and cohort studies, therefore is a very relevant area where any improving tool is looked forward. Orally Disintegrating Tablets (ODT) were developed with the aim to improve patient's compliance due to their fast oral absorption. They are particularly useful in psychiatric patients who often simulate drug assumption or experience difficulties in taking pills. ODT formulations have been developed for many antypsychotics including olanzapine. The ODT formulations of olanzapine show to be significantly different one from the other in the dissolution time, thus having a potential impact on compliance. In this review, the results of different studies consistently highlight the positive risk/benefit profile, the contribution to patient's compliance and their preference while using ODT formulation of olanzapine produced throughout the ZYDIS technology (Velotab). Moreover, the differences between olanzapine ODT (Velotab) and the standard formulation of olanzapine and other antipsychotics are described focusing on in efficacy, safety, patient acceptance and health economic impact. The ODT formulation of olanzapine (Velotab) seems to ameliorate patient's adherence thus improving psychiatrist/caregiver/patient alliance.

  10. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of emerging combination treatments in the management of COPD – role of umeclidinium/vilanterol

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Mario; Morjaria, Jaymin Bhagwanji; Radaeli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. Bronchodilator therapy is the cornerstone in COPD treatment. Bronchodilation in COPD is mainly achieved via administration of long- and ultralong-acting β2-agonists and with long-acting muscarinic antagonists. New combinations of bronchodilators with dual-acting muscarinic antagonist and β2-agonist properties have been licensed, and others are currently being developed with the aim of achieving once-daily dosing, and therefore may improve the likelihood of treatment compliance. These combination bronchodilators include glycopyrronium bromide/indacaterol maleate, umeclidinium (UMEC) bromide/vilanterol trifenatate (VI), aclidinium bromide/formoterol and tiotropium bromide/olodaterol (Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany). This review will focus mainly on studies and clinical trials involving the novel fixed-dose combination of UMEC/VI at doses of 125/25 μg and 62.5/25 μg in patients with COPD. Data from large clinical trials involving more than 4,500 COPD patients indicate that UMEC/VI is an effective once-daily treatment in COPD with improved pulmonary function. Future studies assessing the impact of this combination on exacerbations, delay in disease progression, and health status in patients with COPD are warranted. PMID:25061288

  11. Do baseline estrogen and testosterone affect lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) prior to or after pharmacologic treatment with tadalafil?

    PubMed

    Egan, K B; Miner, M M; Suh, M; McVary, K; Ni, X; Roehrborn, C G; Wittert, G; Wong, D G; Rosen, R C

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how total testosterone and estradiol-17β influence lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). We analyzed data from a subset of men aged ≥18 years randomized to tadalafil 5 mg once-daily or placebo who had ≥6 month history of LUTS and an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS)≥13 enrolled in one of three randomized, placebo-controlled tadalafil clinical trials (N = 958). Three specific aims were addressed, as follows: (i) To characterize enrolled men by treatment randomization and testosterone level; (ii) to assess cross-sectional associations of estradiol-17β, testosterone, and LUTS prior to treatment with tadalafil; and, (iii) to assess longitudinal associations between baseline estradiol-17β and testosterone and improvements or worsening of LUTS during a 12-week period of tadalafil or placebo administration. LUTS were assessed by total IPSS, IPSS voiding sub-score (IPSS-V) and IPSS storage sub-score (IPSS-S) for cross-sectional analyses, and change in total IPSS (ΔIPSS), ΔIPSS-V, and ΔIPSS-S between baseline and 12-week visit for longitudinal analyses. Correlation analyses and linear regression examined associations. Baseline testosterone was not significantly associated with IPSS. In contrast, estradiol-17β was inversely correlated with IPSS (r = -0.08; p < 0.05) and IPSS-S (r = -0.14; p < 0.05). Tadalafil treatment resulted in greater IPSS improvements in men with lower baseline estradiol-17β versus those with higher baseline estradiol-17β. Lower baseline estradiol-17β was significantly associated with modestly improved ΔIPSS-V (p = 0.04) and Δtotal IPSS (p = 0.05) but not with ΔIPSS-S, following treatment which may substantiate the role of bladder dysfunction because of nerve and smooth muscle changes in the bladder in addition to benign prostatic enlargement in LUTS. Circulating baseline testosterone did not predict ΔIPSS. Men with lower baseline estradiol-17β levels

  12. Managing patients with psoriatic disease: the diagnosis and pharmacologic treatment of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip J; Armstrong, April W

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease. Up to 40 % of patients with psoriasis will go on to develop PsA, usually within 5-10 years of cutaneous disease onset. Both conditions share common pathogenic mechanisms involving genetic and environmental factors. Because psoriasis is typically present for years before PsA-related joint symptoms emerge, dermatologists are in a unique position to detect PsA earlier in the disease process through regular, routine screening of psoriasis patients. Distinguishing clinical features of PsA include co-occurrence of psoriatic skin lesions and nail dystrophy, as well as dactylitis and enthesitis. Patients with PsA are usually seronegative for rheumatoid factor, and radiographs may reveal unique features such as juxta-articular new bone formation and pencil-in-cup deformity. Early treatment of PsA with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs has the potential to slow disease progression and maintain patient quality of life. Optimally, a single therapeutic agent will control both the skin and joint psoriatic symptoms. A number of traditional treatments used to manage psoriasis, such as methotrexate and cyclosporine, are also effective for PsA, but these agents are often inadequately effective, temporary in benefit and associated with significant safety concerns. Biologic anti-tumour necrosis factor agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, are effective for treating patients who have both psoriasis and PsA. However, a substantial number of patients may lose efficacy, have adverse effects or find intravenous or subcutaneous administration inconvenient. Emerging oral treatments, including phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, such as apremilast, and new biologics targeting interleukin-17, such as secukinumab, brodalumab and ixekizumab, have shown encouraging clinical results in the treatment of psoriasis and/or PsA. Active and regular collaboration of dermatologists with rheumatologists in managing

  13. Chemical and biological properties of toxic metals and use of chelating agents for the pharmacological treatment of metal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Amantea, Diana; Caruso, Anna; Saturnino, Carmela

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to toxic metals is a well-known problem in industrialized countries. Metals interfere with a number of physiological processes, including central nervous system (CNS), haematopoietic, hepatic and renal functions. In the evaluation of the toxicity of a particular metal it is crucial to consider many parameters: chemical forms (elemental, organic or inorganic), binding capability, presence of specific proteins that selectively bind metals, etc. Medical treatment of acute and chronic metal toxicity is provided by chelating agents, namely organic compounds capable of interacting with metal ions to form structures called chelates. The present review attempts to provide updated information about the mechanisms, the cellular targets and the effects of toxic metals.

  14. Pain management in children: Part 1 — Pain assessment tools and a brief review of nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cecile; Lau, Elaine; Palozzi, Lori; Campbell, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    If pain is not treated quickly and effectively in children, it can cause long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Therefore, it is important for all health care providers to understand the importance of effective pain control in children. This article is divided into 2 parts: Part 1 reviews the pharmacotherapy of pain management in children and Part 2 will review the problems relating to the use of codeine in children, and the rationale for recommending morphine as the opioid of choice in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. There has been growing concern about codeine's lack of efficacy and increased safety concerns in its use in children. Due to the variability of codeine metabolism and unpredictable effects on efficacy and safety, The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, no longer includes codeine or codeine-containing products on the regular hospital formulary and now recommends oral morphine as the agent of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in children. A knowledge translation (KT) strategy was developed and implemented by the hospital's Pain Task Force to support this practice change. PMID:23509570

  15. [Uroselectivity of alpha-1 antagonism in the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy: on the pharmacologic concept of the clinical approach].

    PubMed

    Jolliet, P; Bourin, M

    1998-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is the most common cause of voiding dysfunction in men. It becomes symptomatic from the fifth decade of life and needs treatment in 50 per cent of patients. Hyperplastic prostatic tissue and the smooth involuntary sphincter have a high density of alpha 1-adrenoceptors, thus alpha 1-blockers can decrease sphincter tone and reduce the tension exerted by the prostatic muscular component. Attempts have been made to find alpha 1-antagonists that have a selective effect on the prostate (alfuzosin), are long acting (tamsulosin, terazosin, doxazosin) or present specificity on the alpha 1A prostatic adrenoceptors (tamsulosin), in order to maintain efficacy without affecting blood pressure. Finasteride, a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor without hypotensive side-effect may be more effective in men with a predominantly glandular component to their benign hyperplasia or with very large prostate glands, but has a longer onset of action and produces more adverse sexual effects. Thus, alpha-1 antagonists can be considered as an appropriate treatment option in patients with troublesome symptoms of BPH and who have not developed serious complications indicating surgery.

  16. Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Drug Free Work Place Program (DFWP) has now matured to the point of being able to return employees to sensitive testing designated positions (TDP) after completion of treatment of their addiction. The known tendency of addicted individuals to suffer multiple relapses prior to their final recovery has resulted in several positive urine tests (relapses) occurring among those Federal employees who have already completed treatment and who have been returned to TDP's. The very real potential for further relapses occurring after additional employees return to TDP's will be a critical factor in the ultimate success of the DFWP and in the public's impression of the program's effectiveness. In response to this concern, NASA has begun development of its Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT) instrument. The aim of the NASA ORBIT is to provide Employee Assistance Program (EAP) professionals with an advanced clinical tool which will be helpful in supporting recovery from substance abuse and which will allow more accurate determinations of when clients may be successfully returned to sensitive positions.

  17. Pharmacology of topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs and their place in the treatment of glaucoma in small animals.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, T

    2015-04-01

    A distinguishing feature of the most common types of glaucoma is an increased intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which has a damaging effect on optic nerve axons, leading to the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells. Therefore, IOP-lowering medications are the mainstay of glaucoma therapy. Topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs (PGAs) are a relatively new class of ocular hypotensive drugs, which have made a huge impact on the treatment of glaucoma in dogs. This study summarizes the current state of knowledge on the mechanism of action of these agents and their effect on IOP in dogs and cats. It also discusses potential harmful side effects of PGAs and presents contemporary opinions about their role and place in the medical management of glaucoma in small animals.

  18. Efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions in second- or later-line treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend anthracycline-based chemotherapy primarily with doxorubicin either as monotherapy or in combination with ifosfamide as the first-line treatment for most advanced STS subtypes. Therapeutic options after failure of doxorubicin and/or ifosfamide are limited. This study aimed to comprehensively review available data on the activity and safety of interventions in second- or later-line treatment of advanced STS. Methods Electronic literature databases (Embase®, MEDLINE®, MEDLINE® In-Process, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) were searched from 1980 to 01 March 2012 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies (both prospective and retrospective) evaluating pharmacological interventions in patients with advanced STS pre-treated with anthracycline- and/or ifosfamide-based therapy. Results The review identified six RCTs (one phase III and five phase II trials) and 94 non-randomised studies. Based on the primary trial endpoints, RCTs demonstrated favourable efficacy for pazopanib over placebo (PFS: 4.6 months vs. 1.6 months), gemcitabine plus dacarbazine over dacarbazine monotherapy (3-month PFS rate: 54.2% vs. 35.2%), and trabectedin 3-weekly schedule over weekly schedule (TTP: 3.7 months vs. 2.3 months. The non-randomised studies demonstrated heterogeneity in efficacy and safety results. Conclusions Across the RCTs, pazopanib over placebo, gemcitabine-dacarbazine over dacarbazine, and trabectedin 3-weekly over weekly regimen clearly demonstrated a PFS advantage in the second- and later-line treatment of advanced STS. With only one phase III trial in this setting, there is a clear need for additional comparative trials to better understand the risk: benefit ratios of available agents and combinations. PMID:23937858

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Action and Therapeutic Uses of Pharmacological Inhibitors of HIF–Prolyl 4-Hydroxylases for Treatment of Ischemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Adluri, Ram Sudheer; Goldman, Joshua W.; Hussain, Naveed; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In this review, we have discussed the efficacy and effect of small molecules that act as prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitors (PHDIs). The use of these compounds causes upregulation of the pro-angiogenic factors and hypoxia inducible factor-1α and -2α (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) to enhance angiogenic, glycolytic, erythropoietic, and anti-apoptotic pathways in the treatment of various ischemic diseases responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Recent Advances: Sprouting of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and surgical intervention, such as coronary bypass and stent insertion, have been shown to be effective in attenuating ischemia. However, the initial reentry of oxygen leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress and result in ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. This apparent “oxygen paradox” must be resolved to combat IR injury. During hypoxia, decreased activity of PHDs initiates the accumulation and activation of HIF-1α, wherein the modulation of both PHD and HIF-1α appears as promising therapeutic targets for the pharmacological treatment of ischemic diseases. Critical Issues: Research on PHDs and HIFs has shown that these molecules can serve as therapeutic targets for ischemic diseases by modulating glycolysis, erythropoiesis, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Efforts are underway to identify and synthesize safer small-molecule inhibitors of PHDs that can be administered in vivo as therapy against ischemic diseases. Future Directions: This review presents a comprehensive and current account of the existing small-molecule PHDIs and their use in the treatment of ischemic diseases with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action in animal models. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2631–2665. PMID:23992027

  20. The pharmacology of extinction.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, R J

    1992-08-01

    It is impossible to predict what compounds of pharmacological interest may be present in an unexamined species. The extinction of such species may result, therefore, in the loss of therapeutically significant compounds. The fact that science will never know what has been lost does not lessen the significance of the loss. A number of species are discussed to exemplify the potential loss. Ginkgo biloba is an ancient plant, apparently saved from a natural extinction by human intervention. From this tree, the ginkgolides have been isolated. These are potent inhibitors of platelet activating factor and hold promise in the treatment of cerebral ischemia and brain edema. Two species, the tree Taxus brevifolia and the leech Hirudo medicinalis, are threatened as a result of human activity. Both have recently yielded complex compounds of therapeutic importance. The antitumor agent, taxol, is obtained from T. brevifolia and the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, is found in H. medicinalis. Catharanthus roseus, source of the anticancer agents vincristine and vinblastine, although not threatened, derives from a largely unexamined but severely stressed ecosystem of some 5000 plant species. In other examples, ethnobotanical knowledge of certain plants may be lost while the species survive, as exemplified by the suppression of the Aztec ethnobotany of Mesoamerica by the invading Spanish. Finally, the fallacy of the 'snail darter syndrome', where species may be viewed as too insignificant to worry about, is exposed by consideration of the pharmacological activities of a sea hare (a shell-less marine mollusc) and various leeches.

  1. Pharmacological and clinical profile of recently approved second-generation antipsychotics: implications for treatment of schizophrenia in older patients.

    PubMed

    Rado, Jeffrey; Janicak, Philip G

    2012-10-01

    Antipsychotics are frequently used in elderly patients to treat a variety of conditions, including schizophrenia. While extensively studied for their impact in younger populations, there is comparatively limited evidence about the effectiveness of these agents in older patients. Further complicating this situation are the high comorbidity rates (both psychiatric and medical) in the elderly; age-related changes in pharmacokinetics that lead to a heightened proclivity for adverse effects; and the potential for multiple, clinically relevant drug interactions. With this background in mind, we review diagnostic and treatment-related issues specific to elderly patients suffering from schizophrenia. We then focus on the potential role of the most recently approved second-generation antipsychotics, paliperidone (both the extended-release oral formulation and the long-acting injectable formulation), iloperidone, asenapine and lurasidone, given the limited clinical experience with these agents in the elderly. While there is limited data to support their safety, tolerability and efficacy in older patients with schizophrenia, each has unique characteristics that should be considered when used in this population.

  2. Unlock the Thermogenic Potential of Adipose Tissue: Pharmacological Modulation and Implications for Treatment of Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Rong; Gennemark, Peter; O’Mahony, Gavin; Bartesaghi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is considered an interesting target organ for the treatment of metabolic disease due to its high metabolic capacity. Non-shivering thermogenesis, once activated, can lead to enhanced partitioning and oxidation of fuels in adipose tissues, and reduce the burden of glucose and lipids on other metabolic organs such as liver, pancreas, and skeletal muscle. Sustained long-term activation of BAT may also lead to meaningful bodyweight loss. In this review, we discuss three different drug classes [the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of PPARγ agonists, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) analogs] that have been proposed to regulate BAT and beige recruitment or activation, or both, and which have been tested in both rodent and human. The learnings from these classes suggest that restoration of functional BAT and beige mass as well as improved activation might be required to fully realize the metabolic potential of these tissues. Whether this can be achieved without the undesired cardiovascular side effects exhibited by the TZD PPARγ agonists and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists remains to be resolved. PMID:26635723

  3. Generalized and specific neurocognitive deficits in psychotic disorders: utility for evaluating pharmacological treatment effects and as intermediate phenotypes for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Reilly, James L; Sweeney, John A

    2014-05-01

    A growing body of research suggests that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share overlapping clinical, neurobiological, and genetic features, raising important questions about the boundaries and distinctiveness of these 2 major psychiatric disorders. A generalized cognitive impairment has long been understood to be a core feature of schizophrenia. More recently, it has become apparent that cognitive impairment also occurs in bipolar disorder, particularly in those patients with a history of psychotic symptoms. Whether a generalized deficit exists across a spectrum of psychotic disorders is less clearly established. Additionally, in the context of a broad impairment, it remains a significant challenge to identify deficits in specific cognitive processes that may have distinct neurochemical or regional brain substrates and linkages to particular risk-associated genetic factors. In this article, we review the findings from neuropsychological studies across a spectrum that includes schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders, and conclude the available evidence strongly supports that a generalized deficit is present across psychotic disorders that differs in severity more so than form. We then consider the implications of generalized and specific deficits in psychosis for 2 areas of research--the evaluation of pharmacological treatments targeting cognitive deficits, and the investigation of cognitive intermediate phenotypes in family genetic studies. Examples from the literature that touch on the relevance of the generalized deficit in these contexts are provided, as well as consideration for the continued need to identify specific impairments that are separable from the generalized deficit in order to advance drug and gene discovery.

  4. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease.

    PubMed

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2015-06-05

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N'-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD.

  5. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  6. Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

    This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

  7. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  8. Constellation pharmacology: a new paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Russell W; Schmidt, Eric W; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2015-01-01

    Constellation pharmacology is a cell-based high-content phenotypic-screening platform that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate the cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types. Heterogeneous populations of native cells, in which the different individual cell types have been identified and characterized, are the foundation for this screening platform. Constellation pharmacology is useful for screening small molecules or for deconvoluting complex mixtures of biologically active natural products. This platform has been used to purify natural products and discover their molecular mechanisms. In the ongoing development of constellation pharmacology, there is a positive feedback loop between the pharmacological characterization of cell types and screening for new drug candidates. As constellation pharmacology is used to discover compounds with novel targeting-selectivity profiles, those new compounds then further help to elucidate the constellations of specific cell types, thereby increasing the content of this high-content platform.

  9. GHB pharmacology and toxicology: acute intoxication, concentrations in blood and urine in forensic cases and treatment of the withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco P; Jones, Alan W

    2015-01-01

    The illicit recreational drug of abuse, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a potent central nervous system depressant and is often encountered during forensic investigations of living and deceased persons. The sodium salt of GHB is registered as a therapeutic agent (Xyrem®), approved in some countries for the treatment of narcolepsy-associated cataplexy and (Alcover®) is an adjuvant medication for detoxification and withdrawal in alcoholics. Trace amounts of GHB are produced endogenously (0.5-1.0 mg/L) in various tissues, including the brain, where it functions as both a precursor and a metabolite of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Available information indicates that GHB serves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the GABAergic system, especially via binding to the GABA-B receptor subtype. Although GHB is listed as a controlled substance in many countries abuse still continues, owing to the availability of precursor drugs, γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (BD), which are not regulated. After ingestion both GBL and BD are rapidly converted into GHB (t½ ~1 min). The Cmax occurs after 20-40 min and GHB is then eliminated from plasma with a half-life of 30-50 min. Only about 1-5% of the dose of GHB is recoverable in urine and the window of detection is relatively short (3-10 h). This calls for expeditious sampling when evidence of drug use and/or abuse is required in forensic casework. The recreational dose of GHB is not easy to estimate and a concentration in plasma of ~100 mg/L produces euphoria and disinhibition, whereas 500 mg/L might cause death from cardiorespiratory depression. Effective antidotes to reverse the sedative and intoxicating effects of GHB do not exist. The poisoned patients require supportive care, vital signs should be monitored and the airways kept clear in case of emesis. After prolonged regular use of GHB tolerance and dependence develop and abrupt cessation of drug use leads to unpleasant

  10. Topical mometasone. A review of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic use in the treatment of dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Benfield, P

    1998-01-01

    Mometasone, a synthetic 16 alpha-methyl analogue of beclomethasone, is classified as a 'potent' glucocorticoid for dermatological use. It is available as 0.1% cream, ointment and lotion formulations for the treatment of patients with inflammatory glucocorticoid-responsive dermatoses. In patients with atopic dermatitis, the effect of mometasone 0.1% applied once daily over 2 to 3 weeks were similar to those of other glucocorticoids of similar potency, such as betamethasone dipropionate 0.05% twice daily and methylprednisolone aceponate 0.1% once daily. Mometasone 0.1% was significantly superior to twice-daily application of less potent glucocorticoids such as clobetasone 0.05%, hydrocortisone 1.0%, hydrocortisone butyrate and hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%. In patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis, mometasone 0.1% was more effective than ketoconazole 2.0% and hydrocortisone 1.0% in trials lasting 4 or 6 weeks. In the management of scalp psoriasis and psoriasis vulgaris, mometasone 0.1% applied once daily for 2 to 8 weeks was generally more effective than other glucocorticoids of similar or weaker potency such as betamethasone valerate 0.1%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.025%, fluticasone propionate 0.005%, triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% and hydrocortisone 1.0% and as effective as diflucortolone valerate 0.1%. Alternate day application of mometasone 0.1% for 2 weeks was as effective as once-daily application in maintaining symptom control in a small number of patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Although mometasone demonstrates greater anti-inflammatory activity and a longer duration of action than betamethasone, it has low potential to cause adverse systemic effects such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Moreover, its atrophogenic potential is low and no greater than that of other glucocorticoids in its class, such as betamethasone valerate. Transient, mild to moderate, local adverse effects such as burning, stinging, folliculitis, dryness

  11. Topical mometasone. A review of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic use in the treatment of dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Benfield, P

    1998-01-01

    Mometasone, a synthetic 16 alpha-methyl analogue of beclomethasone, is classified as a 'potent' glucocorticoid for dermatological use. It is available as 0.1% cream, ointment and lotion formulations for the treatment of patients with inflammatory glucocorticoid-responsive dermatoses. In patients with atopic dermatitis, the effect of mometasone 0.1% applied once daily over 2 to 3 weeks were similar to those of other glucocorticoids of similar potency, such as betamethasone dipropionate 0.05% twice daily and methylprednisolone aceponate 0.1% once daily. Mometasone 0.1% was significantly superior to twice-daily application of less potent glucocorticoids such as clobetasone 0.05%, hydrocortisone 1.0%, hydrocortisone butyrate and hydrocortisone valerate 0.2%. In patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis, mometasone 0.1% was more effective than ketoconazole 2.0% and hydrocortisone 1.0% in trials lasting 4 or 6 weeks. In the management of scalp psoriasis and psoriasis vulgaris, mometasone 0.1% applied once daily for 2 to 8 weeks was generally more effective than other glucocorticoids of similar or weaker potency such as betamethasone valerate 0.1%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.025%, fluticasone propionate 0.005%, triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% and hydrocortisone 1.0% and as effective as diflucortolone valerate 0.1%. Alternate day application of mometasone 0.1% for 2 weeks was as effective as once-daily application in maintaining symptom control in a small number of patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Although mometasone demonstrates greater anti-inflammatory activity and a longer duration of action than betamethasone, it has low potential to cause adverse systemic effects such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Moreover, its atrophogenic potential is low and no greater than that of other glucocorticoids in its class, such as betamethasone valerate. Transient, mild to moderate, local adverse effects such as burning, stinging, folliculitis, dryness

  12. GHB Pharmacology and Toxicology: Acute Intoxication, Concentrations in Blood and Urine in Forensic Cases and Treatment of the Withdrawal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Busardò, Francesco P.; Jones, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    The illicit recreational drug of abuse, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a potent central nervous system depressant and is often encountered during forensic investigations of living and deceased persons. The sodium salt of GHB is registered as a therapeutic agent (Xyrem®), approved in some countries for the treatment of narcolepsy-associated cataplexy and (Alcover®) is an adjuvant medication for detoxification and withdrawal in alcoholics. Trace amounts of GHB are produced endogenously (0.5-1.0 mg/L) in various tissues, including the brain, where it functions as both a precursor and a metabolite of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Available information indicates that GHB serves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the GABAergic system, especially via binding to the GABA-B receptor subtype. Although GHB is listed as a controlled substance in many countries abuse still continues, owing to the availability of precursor drugs, γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (BD), which are not regulated. After ingestion both GBL and BD are rapidly converted into GHB (t½ ~1 min). The Cmax occurs after 20-40 min and GHB is then eliminated from plasma with a half-life of 30-50 min. Only about 1-5% of the dose of GHB is recoverable in urine and the window of detection is relatively short (3-10 h). This calls for expeditious sampling when evidence of drug use and/or abuse is required in forensic casework. The recreational dose of GHB is not easy to estimate and a concentration in plasma of ~100 mg/L produces euphoria and disinhibition, whereas 500 mg/L might cause death from cardiorespiratory depression. Effective antidotes to reverse the sedative and intoxicating effects of GHB do not exist. The poisoned patients require supportive care, vital signs should be monitored and the airways kept clear in case of emesis. After prolonged regular use of GHB tolerance and dependence develop and abrupt cessation of drug use leads to unpleasant

  13. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  14. Distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-double knockout mice subjected to dietary and pharmacological treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Banaś, Agnieszka; Banaś, Krzysztof; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kostogrys, Renata B.; Mateuszuk, łukasz; ChŁopicki, Stefan; Litwin, Jan A.; Appel, Karen

    2011-10-01

    Gene-targeted, apolipoprotein E and LDL receptor-double knockout (apoE/LDLR -/-) mice represent a new animal model that displays severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to show changes in histomorphology and in distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR -/- mice fed egg-rich proatherosclerotic diet (5% egg-yolk lyophilisate) supplemented or not with perindopril (inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme; 2 mg/kg b.w.). Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was combined with histological stainings to determine distribution and concentration of trace and essential elements in atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced atherosclerotic lesions expressed by total area occupied by lipids (oil red-O staining) and by macrophages (CD68 immunohistochemistry) were observed in animals fed egg-rich diet. The perindopril treatment attenuated these effects. No significant differences were observed in the number of intimal smooth muscle cells (smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry). In animals fed egg-rich diet significantly higher concentrations of Ca and significantly lower contents of S, Cl, , Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in atheromas were seen in comparison to chow diet-fed animals. After pharmacological treatment, concentrations of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se showed the tendency to achieve levels like in animals fed normal diet. K level differed only in group treated with perindopril. Concentration of P did not significantly vary in all experimental groups. Perindopril showed its potency to reduce atherosclerosis, as estimated by the size of the atheroma and content of pro- and antiatherogenic elements.

  15. Deciphering the pharmacological mechanism of the Chinese formula Huanglian-Jie-Du decoction in the treatment of ischemic stroke using a systems biology-based strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-qiong; Wang, Song-song; Zhu, Wei-liang; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Fang-bo; Liang, Ri-xin; Xu, Hai-yu; Yang, Hong-jun

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Huanglian-Jie-Du decoction (HLJDD) is an important multiherb remedy in TCM, which is recently demonstrated to be effective to treat ischemic stroke. Here, we aimed to investigate the pharmacological mechanisms of HLJDD in the treatment of ischemic stroke using systems biology approaches. Methods: Putative targets of HLJDD were predicted using MetaDrug. An interaction network of putative HLJDD targets and known therapeutic targets for the treatment of ischemic stroke was then constructed, and candidate HLJDD targets were identified by calculating topological features, including 'Degree', 'Node-betweenness', 'Closeness', and 'K-coreness'. The binding efficiencies of the candidate HLJDD targets with the corresponding compositive compounds were further validated by a molecular docking simulation. Results: A total of 809 putative targets were obtained for 168 compositive compounds in HLJDD. Additionally, 39 putative targets were common to all four herbs of HLJDD. Next, 49 major nodes were identified as candidate HLJDD targets due to their network topological importance. The enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation system and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway demonstrated that candidate HLJDD targets were more frequently involved in G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways, neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions and gap junctions, which all played important roles in the progression of ischemic stroke. Finally, the molecular docking simulation showed that 170 pairs of chemical components and candidate HLJDD targets had strong binding efficiencies. Conclusion: This study has developed for the first time a comprehensive systems approach integrating drug target prediction, network analysis and molecular docking simulation to reveal the relationships between the herbs contained in HLJDD and their putative targets and ischemic stroke-related pathways. PMID:25937634

  16. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-01

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  17. Pharmacological Study of Cefoxitin as an Alternative Antibiotic Therapy to Carbapenems in Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections Due to Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guet-Revillet, H.; Emirian, A.; Groh, M.; Nebbad-Lechani, B.; Weiss, E.; Join-Lambert, O.; Bille, E.; Jullien, V.

    2014-01-01

    Cefoxitin could be an alternative to carbapenems in extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) infections. However, pharmacological and clinical data regarding cefoxitin are limited. Using a recent pharmacological model and the MICs of ESBL-EC collected from pyelonephritis, we determined the probabilities to reach four pharmacological targets: free cefoxitin concentrations above the MIC during 50% and 100% of the administration interval (T>MIC = 50% and T>MIC = 100%, respectively) and free cefoxitin concentrations above 4× MIC during 50% and 100% of the administration interval (T>4MIC = 50% and T>4MIC = 100%, respectively). Cefoxitin could be used to treat ESBL-EC pyelonephritis, but administration modalities should be optimized according to MICs in order to reach pharmacological targets. PMID:24777104

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of FTO

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Fiona; Demetriades, Marina; Aik, WeiShen; Merkestein, Myrte; Kramer, Holger; Andrew, Daniel S.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Hough, Tertius A.; Wells, Sara; Ashcroft, Frances M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells) and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO’s demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25830347

  19. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological characterization of SVT-40776, a novel M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist, for the treatment of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, C; Davalillo, S; Cabellos, J; Lagunas, C; Balsa, D; Pérez-del-Pulgar, S; Ballarín, M; Fernández, AG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Highly selective M3 muscarinic receptor antagonists may represent a better treatment for overactive bladder syndrome, diminishing side effects. Cardiac side effects of non-selective antimuscarinics have been associated with activity at M2 receptors as these receptors are mainly responsible for muscarinic receptor-dependent bradycardia. We have investigated a novel antimuscarinic, SVT-40776, highly selective for M3 over M2 receptors (Ki = 0.19 nmol·L−1 for M3 receptor affinity). This study reports the functional activity of SVT-40776 in the bladder, relative to its activity in atria. Experimental approach: In vitro and ex vivo (oral dosing) inhibition of mouse detrusor and atrial contractile responses to carbachol were used to study the functional activity of SVT-40776. The in vivo efficacy of SVT-40776 was characterized by suppression of isovolumetric spontaneous bladder contractions in anaesthetized guinea pigs after intravenous administration. Key results: SVT-40776 was the most potent in inhibiting carbachol-induced bladder contractions of the anti-cholinergic agents tested, without affecting atrial contractions over the same range of concentrations. SVT-40776 exhibited the highest urinary versus cardiac selectivity (199-fold). In the guinea pig in vivo model, SVT-40776 inhibited 25% of spontaneous bladder contractions at a very low dose (6.97 µg·kg−1 i.v), without affecting arterial blood pressure. Conclusions and implications: SVT-40776 is a potent inhibitor of M3 receptor-related detrusor contractile activity. The absence of effects on isolated atria preparations represents an interesting characteristic and suggests that SVT-40776 may lack unwanted cardiac effects; a feature especially relevant in a compound intended to treat mainly elderly patients. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00082.x PMID:19222482

  20. [Pharmacologic therapy in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pettenati, C

    2001-05-01

    The pharmacological treatment in the older people should be carefully considered: older patients are at the same time the greatest consumers of drugs and the population with the greatest risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR). The ADR are in the old patient more frequent and serious for the greater number of concurrent drugs. The incorrect drug's use consists in prescribing too much or too little, for an excessive period, without a defined diagnosis and an appropriate selection of the better compound. Moreover, beneficial drugs may be frequent underused, some chronic conditions do not receive adequate pharmacologic treatment, and an ADR may be misinterpreted as a new pathological condition that requires a new prescription. The unusual presentation of many diseases in elderly play a role to complicate the clinical process necessary to optimising the drug treatment. About the risks and the benefits of pharmacological treatment, adequate data in older patients are in general lacking for the poor inclusion in clinical trials of the elderly subjects, especially frail persons. PMID:11413893

  1. Studies in neuroendocrine pharmacology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maickel, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The expertise and facilities available within the Medical Sciences Program section on Pharmacology were used along with informational input from various NASA sources to study areas relevant to the manned space effort. Topics discussed include effects of drugs on deprivation-induced fluid consumption, brain biogenic amines, biochemical responses to stressful stimuli, biochemical and behavioral pharmacology of amphetamines, biochemical and pharmacological studies of analogues to biologically active indole compounds, chemical pharmacology: drug metabolism and disposition, toxicology, and chemical methodology. Appendices include a bibliography, and papers submitted for publication or already published.

  2. Low back pain: pharmacologic management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Adequate treatment of low back pain is essential, but has been challenging for many primary care physicians. Most patients with low back pain can be treated in the primary care environment, provided the physician has enough knowledge of the medications used to treat low back pain. The main treatment goal for acute low back pain is to control the pain and maintain function. For patients with chronic back pain, the goal is continual pain management and prevention of future exacerbations. This article reviews current pharmacological options for the treatment of low back pain, and possible future innovations. PMID:22958559

  3. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  4. Prevention of Post-operative Delirium in the Elderly Using Pharmacological Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Patrice; Gold, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-operative delirium (POD) is a serious surgical complication that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. It is associated with prolonged hospital stay, delayed admission to rehabilitation programs, persistent cognitive deficits, marked health-care costs, and more. The pathophysiology is multi-factorial and not completely understood, which complicates the optimal management. Non-pharmacological measures have been the mainstay of treatment, but there has been an ongoing interest in the medical literature on the prevention of post-operative delirium using medications. The purpose of this review is to critically analyze the current evidence on pharmacological prevention of POD. Methods A literature review was conducted using PubMed and Embase databases, using the following search terms: delirium, anti-psychotics, cholinesterase inhibitors, and statins. Results A total of 1,152 articles were screened and 25 articles were reviewed. Fourteen articles found a reduced incidence of post-operative delirium using pharmacological agents: eight with antipsychotics, two with statins, one with melatonin, one with dexamethasone, one with gabapentin, and one with diazepam. However, study designs, methodological issues, or authors’ interpretations raise questions on these conclusions. Conclusions Further double-blinded randomized clinical trials should be conducted before administering pharmacological agents to reduce POD in a non-research setting. PMID:27729950

  5. Experimental production of peptic ulcer, gastric damage and cancer models and their use in pathophysiological studies and pharmacological treatment--Polish achievements.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T

    2003-12-01

    The common acid related diseases of the upper GI tract could be considered as primarily due to the defect in barrier function either of the gastric mucosal or duodenal epithelium leading to the formation of gastric or duodenal ulcers. An attempt was made in this chapter to discuss the history of peptic ulcer disease in humans and methods for the production of acute gastric lesions and ulcers in experimental animals with the special attention focused to the contribution of Polish scientists and investigators into this field. Early surgical advances in the management of peptic ulcers were emphasized that were then subsequently replaced by pharmacological treatment (histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors) and considered as the major strategy against the acid disorders. This included the immense body of work performed by numerous group of investigators, including Polish researchers, to identify the effects of acid, bile salts, aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), stress, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, prostaglandins (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) on the integrity of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which all were discussed in this chapter. The concept of major defensive mechanism in the stomach called "cytoprotection", originally proposed by Andre Robert is recalled in the relevance to the great contribution of Polish scientist working at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. These experimental studies gave a new insight into the mechanism of action of arachidonate cascade products such as PGs, tromboxanes and leukotrienes and had opened the new therapeutic avenues for the gastroprotective treatment of the acute gastric mucosal damage. Detailed studies revealed, however, that PG-induced cytoprotection offers a short-term protection against gastric lesions induced by corrosive agents but unfortunately this phenomenon gives a little, if any, impact to the process of ulcer healing. The experimental studies on healing

  6. Pharmacology for the Psychotherapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Myron Michael

    This book covers those areas of pharmacology that are of importance and interest to the psychotherapist. The 1st chapter introduces the various types of drugs. The 2nd chapter presents an overview of pharmacology and its principles. The 3rd chapter reviews aspects of the human body of importance to understanding the workings of psychotropic drugs.…

  7. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  8. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  10. Pharmacology of myocardial calcium-handling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Disturbed myocardial calcium (Ca(+)) handling is one of the pathophysiologic hallmarks of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy, and certain types of tachyarrhythmias. Pharmacologic treatment of these diseases thus focuses on restoring myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis by interacting with Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. In this article, we review the currently used pharmacologic agents that are able to restore or maintain myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis and their mechanism of action as well as emerging new substances.

  11. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological management of delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Dustin M; Ely, E Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is a common yet under-diagnosed syndrome of acute brain dysfunction, which is characterized by inattention, fluctuating mental status, altered level of consciousness, or disorganized thinking. Although our recognition of risk factors for delirium has progressed, our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms remains limited. Improvements in monitoring and assessment for delirium (particularly in the intensive care setting) have resulted in validated and reliable tools such as arousal scales and bedside delirium monitoring instruments. Once delirium is recognized and the modifiable risk factors are addressed, the next step in management (if delirium persists) is often pharmacological intervention. The sedatives, analgesics, and hypnotics most often used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to achieve patient comfort are all too frequently deliriogenic, resulting in a longer duration of ICU and hospital stay, and increased costs. Therefore, identification of safe and efficacious agents to reduce the incidence, duration, and severity of ICU delirium is a hot topic in critical care. Recognizing that there are no medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention or treatment of delirium, we chose anti-psychotics and alpha-2 agonists as the general pharmacological focus of this article because both were subjects of relatively recent data and ongoing clinical trials. Emerging pharmacological strategies for addressing delirium must be combined with nonpharmacological approaches (such as daily spontaneous awakening trials and spontaneous breathing trials) and early mobility (combined with the increasingly popular approach called: Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium Monitoring, Early Mobility, and Exercise [ABCDE] of critical care) to develop evidence-based approaches that will ensure safer and faster recovery of the sickest patients in our healthcare system. PMID:22270810

  12. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  14. Clinical Pharmacology in Sleep Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Ashley; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2012-01-01

    The basic treatment goals of pharmacological therapies in sleep medicine are to improve waking function by either improving sleep or by increasing energy during wakefulness. Stimulants to improve waking function include amphetamine derivatives, modafinil, and caffeine. Sleep aids encompass several classes, from benzodiazepine hypnotics to over-the-counter antihistamines. Other medications used in sleep medicine include those initially used in other disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric disorders. As these medications are prescribed or encountered by providers in diverse fields of medicine, it is important to recognize the distribution of adverse effects, drug interaction profiles, metabolism, and cytochrome substrate activity. In this paper, we review the pharmacological armamentarium in the field of sleep medicine to provide a framework for risk-benefit considerations in clinical practice. PMID:23213564

  15. Croatian Meteor Network: ongoing work 2014 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Andreić, Ž.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing work mainly between 2014-2015 International Meteor Conferences (IMC) has been presented. Current sky coverage, software updates, orbit catalogues updates, shower search updates, international collaboration as well as new fields of research and educational efforts made by the Croatian Meteor Network are described.

  16. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  17. Creating a virtual pharmacology curriculum in a problem-based learning environment: one medical school's experience.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Vrana, Kent E

    2013-02-01

    Integrating pharmacology education into a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum has proven challenging for many medical schools, including the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine (Penn State COM). In response to pharmacology content gaps in its PBL-intensive curriculum, Penn State COM in 2003 hired a director of medical pharmacology instruction to oversee efforts to improve the structure of pharmacology education in the absence of a stand-alone course. In this article, the authors describe the ongoing development of the virtual pharmacology curriculum, which weaves pharmacology instruction through the entire medical school curriculum with particular emphasis on the organ-based second year. Pharmacology is taught in a spiraling manner designed to add to and build upon students' knowledge and competency. Key aspects of the virtual curriculum (as of 2011) include clearly stated and behaviorally oriented pharmacology learning objectives, pharmacology study guides that correspond to each PBL case, pharmacology review sessions that feature discussions of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)-type questions, and pharmacology questions for each PBL case on course examinations to increase student accountability. The authors report a trend toward improved USMLE Step 1 scores since these initiatives were introduced. Furthermore, graduates' ratings of their pharmacology education have improved on the Medical School Graduation Questionnaire. The authors suggest that the initiatives they describe for enhancing pharmacology medical education are relevant to other medical schools that are also seeking ways to better integrate pharmacology into PBL-based curricula.

  18. Clinical pharmacology of bimatoprost.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Louis B

    2005-06-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan), Allergan) is a highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent that provides good diurnal control of intraocular pressure in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients. Bimatoprost is a synthetic molecule that is structurally and pharmacologically similar to prostamide F(2), and appears to mimic the activity of the prostamides. Consistent with prostamide-mimetic activity, bimatoprost has potent inherent pharmacological activity in prostamide-sensitive preparations and essentially remains intact in the living primate eye. This is sufficient to explain its potent and efficacious ocular hypotensive activity, and suggests that bimatoprost is a pharmacologically unique compound. PMID:16922657

  19. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  20. Pharmacological profile of sulodexide.

    PubMed

    Hoppensteadt, D A; Fareed, J

    2014-06-01

    Since its introduction, sulodexide has been used on and off for several indications. More recently this agent has become revitalized and tested in newer indications. Sulodexide is composed of glycosaminoglycan that includes a mixture of fast-moving heparin and dermatan sulfate. It exerts its anticoagulant and antithrombotic action through interactions with both AT and HCII. Sulodexide has been proven to have effects on the fibrinolytic system, platelets, endothelial cells, inflammation and more recently metalloproteases. The administration of sulodexide results in the release of lipoprotein lipase and has been shown to reduce the circulating level of lipids. It has also shown to decrease the viscosity of both whole blood and plasma. Sulodexide differs from heparin in its oral bioavailability and longer half-life. There is also less bleeding associated with sulodexide. In addition, oral administration of sulodexide does not interfere with the pharmacologic actions of commonly used agents. Similar to heparin, sulodexide releases TFPI which contributes to its antithrombotic effect and anti-inflammatory properties. Sulodexide has been proven to be effective in peripheral arterial thrombosis and venous thrombosis. It is also clinically active in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and intermittent claudication. More recent data suggest that sulodexide can be used in tinnitus and in vascular vertigo. Additional studies in these indications are required. Sulodexide was generally safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials, without any severe bleeding complications. Therefore sulodexide appears to be a good treatment for all arterial and venous diseases and for the prevention of progression of disease. PMID:24936531

  1. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a revision of the 2005 guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Anderson, Ian M; Nutt, David J; Allgulander, Christer; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan A; Christmas, David M; Davies, Simon; Fineberg, Naomi; Lidbetter, Nicky; Malizia, Andrea; McCrone, Paul; Nabarro, Daniel; O'Neill, Catherine; Scott, Jan; van der Wee, Nic; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    This revision of the 2005 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines for the evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders provides an update on key steps in diagnosis and clinical management, including recognition, acute treatment, longer-term treatment, combination treatment, and further approaches for patients who have not responded to first-line interventions. A consensus meeting involving international experts in anxiety disorders reviewed the main subject areas and considered the strength of supporting evidence and its clinical implications. The guidelines are based on available evidence, were constructed after extensive feedback from participants, and are presented as recommendations to aid clinical decision-making in primary, secondary and tertiary medical care. They may also serve as a source of information for patients, their carers, and medicines management and formulary committees.

  2. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Determine Active Compounds and Action Mechanisms of Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian Decoction for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Zhao, Linhua; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Yuyu; Wang, Xu; Guo, Yun; Liu, Hongxing; Li, Shao; Tong, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal formulae can be valuable therapeutic strategies and drug discovery resources. However, the active ingredients and action mechanisms of most TCM formulae remain unclear. Therefore, the identification of potent ingredients and their actions is a major challenge in TCM research. In this study, we used a network pharmacology approach we previously developed to help determine the potential antidiabetic ingredients from the traditional Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian decoction (GGQLD) formula. We predicted the target profiles of all available GGQLD ingredients to infer the active ingredients by clustering the target profile of ingredients with FDA-approved antidiabetic drugs. We also applied network target analysis to evaluate the links between herbal ingredients and pharmacological actions to help explain the action mechanisms of GGQLD. According to the predicted results, we confirmed that a novel antidiabetic ingredient from Puerariae Lobatae radix (Ge-Gen), 4-Hydroxymephenytoin, increased the insulin secretion in RIN-5F cells and improved insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The network pharmacology strategy used here provided a powerful means for identifying bioactive ingredients and mechanisms of action for TCM herbal formulae, including Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian decoction. PMID:24527048

  3. Integrating Behavioral and Pharmacological Therapeutic Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Samuel F.

    1986-01-01

    Fear of dental procedures and associated anxiety are widely accepted as important deterents to optimal oral health. Such health care-related fears and anxieties are also common in many areas of medicine. For both medical and dental care a large body of psychologically derived therapeutic modalities have evolved. These methods have been shown to interact positively with pharmacological therapies also designed to help patients better tolerate medical and dental treatment. Despite these findings, behavioral interventions have not found widespread acceptance in medical and dental practice. A multidimensional model which emphasizes the simultaneous consideration of pharmacologic, psychologic, and clinical dental factors is suggested in order to arrive at therapeutic decisions. Further research could address more powerful behavioral modalities, safer pharmacologic methods, and behavioral and pharmacologic combinations which interact optimally for particular clinical conditions. PMID:3458386

  4. The pharmacology of psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Passie, Torsten; Seifert, Juergen; Schneider, Udo; Emrich, Hinderk M

    2002-10-01

    Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is the major psychoactive alkaloid of some species of mushrooms distributed worldwide. These mushrooms represent a growing problem regarding hallucinogenic drug abuse. Despite its experimental medical use in the 1960s, only very few pharmacological data about psilocybin were known until recently. Because of its still growing capacity for abuse and the widely dispersed data this review presents all the available pharmacological data about psilocybin.

  5. Pharmacologic management of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Baker, Britain; Arango, Maria-Teresa; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus affects above 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and may span from mild symptoms to acute devastating life-threatening ones. Owing to the clinical variability, most pharmacological data rely on small, uncontrolled trials and case reports. The mainstay of therapy relies on immune-suppression by glucocorticoids, in adjunction with cyclophosphamide or anti-B-cell therapy, in moderate to severe cases. In selected scenarios (e.g., chorea) intravenous immunoglobulin or plasmapheresis may be effective. Anticoagulation is warranted if anti-phospholipid antibodies are present. In parallel there may be a need for symptomatic treatment such as anti-epileptic or anti-depressive treatments, etc. In the future, more studies addressed to assess pathogenesis and preferred treatments of specific manifestations are needed in order to personalize treatments.

  6. Pharmacotherapy of Traumatic Brain Injury: State of the Science and the Road Forward: Report of the Department of Defense Neurotrauma Pharmacology Workgroup

    PubMed Central

    Kochanek, Patrick M.; Bergold, Peter; Kenney, Kimbra; Marx, Christine E.; Grimes, Col. Jamie B.; Loh, LTC Yince; Adam, LTC Gina E.; Oskvig, Devon; Curley, Kenneth C.; Salzer, Col. Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite substantial investments by government, philanthropic, and commercial sources over the past several decades, traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains an unmet medical need and a major source of disability and mortality in both developed and developing societies. The U.S. Department of Defense neurotrauma research portfolio contains more than 500 research projects funded at more than $700 million and is aimed at developing interventions that mitigate the effects of trauma to the nervous system and lead to improved quality of life outcomes. A key area of this portfolio focuses on the need for effective pharmacological approaches for treating patients with TBI and its associated symptoms. The Neurotrauma Pharmacology Workgroup was established by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) with the overarching goal of providing a strategic research plan for developing pharmacological treatments that improve clinical outcomes after TBI. To inform this plan, the Workgroup (a) assessed the current state of the science and ongoing research and (b) identified research gaps to inform future development of research priorities for the neurotrauma research portfolio. The Workgroup identified the six most critical research priority areas in the field of pharmacological treatment for persons with TBI. The priority areas represent parallel efforts needed to advance clinical care; each requires independent effort and sufficient investment. These priority areas will help the USAMRMC and other funding agencies strategically guide their research portfolios to ensure the development of effective pharmacological approaches for treating patients with TBI. PMID:23968241

  7. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  8. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  9. Pharmacology of sexually compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Codispoti, Victoria L

    2008-12-01

    In a meta-analysis on controlled outcomes evaluations of 22,000 sex offenders, Losel and Schmucker found 80 comparisons between treatment and control groups. The recidivism rate averaged 19% in treated groups, and 27% in controls. Most other reviews reported a lower rate of sexual recidivism in treated sexual offenders. Of 2039 citations in this study (including literature in five languages), 60 studies held independent comparisons. Problematic issues included the control groups; various hormonal, surgical, cognitive behavioral, and psychotherapeutic treatments; and sample sizes. In the 80 studies compared after the year 2000, 32% were reported after 2000, 45% originated in the United States, 45% were reported in journals, and 36% were unpublished. Treatment characteristics showed a significant lack of pharmacologic treatment (7.5%), whereas use cognitive and classical behavioral therapy was 64%. In 68% of the studies, no information was available on the integrity of the treatment implementation; 36% of the treatment settings were outpatient only, 31% were prison settings, and 12% were mixed settings (prison, hospital, and outpatient). Integrating research interpretations is complicated by the heterogeneity of sex offenders, with only 56% being adult men and 17.5% adolescents. Offense types reported included 74% child molestation, 48% incest, and 30% exhibitionism. Pedophilia was not singled out. Follow-up periods varied from 12 months to greater than 84 months. The definition of recidivism ran the gamut from arrest (24%), conviction (30%), charges (19%), and no indication (16%). Results were difficult to interpret because of the methodological problems with this type of study. Overall, a positive outcome was noted with sex offender treatment. Cognitive-behavioral and hormonal treatment were the most promising. Voluntary treatment led to a slightly better outcome than mandatory participation. When accounting for a low base rate of sexual recidivism, the reduction

  10. Pharmacological profile of droxicam.

    PubMed

    Esteve, J; Farré, A J; Roser, R

    1988-01-01

    In Studies of anti-inflammatory activity, droxicam has shown itself to be as active as piroxicam and much more active than phenylbutazone, isoxicam and suprofen, both in acute studies such as carrageenin oedema, nystatin oedema and ultraviolet erythema, and in longer-term tests such as that of the cotton pellet. In the studies of anti-arthritic activity, which require long-term treatment, droxicam was as effective as piroxicam, both on primary and on secondary lesions. The study of analgaesic activity, conducted by means of the tests of protective activity against writhing induced by phenylbenzoquinone and acetylcholine bromide in the mouse and by acetic acid in the rat, droxicam activity was superior to that of acetylsalicylic acid, dipyrone, isoxicam and phenylbutazone. Droxicam also showed antipyretic activity in the rat, greater than that of acetylsalicylic acid, dipyrone and 4-aminoantipyrine, in the brewer's yeast and Salmonella typhi tests. Droxicam also acts as an ex vivo platelet aggregation inhibitor in the dog. In the study of inhibition of peritoneal capillary permeability in the mouse, droxicam was considerably more potent than isoxicam or phenylbutazone. Studies of general pharmacology have demonstrated that droxicam, at high doses, has no cardiovascular or respiratory effects, and that neither does it modify behaviour in rats and mice, determined by the Irwin test. Gastrointestinal tolerance of droxicam has been compared with that of piroxicam, and it has been found that droxicam is far better tolerated. The study of induction of gastrointestinal lesions in the rat demonstrated that the gastrolesive potential of droxicam is 10 times inferior to that of piroxicam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3278945

  11. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum; Hilas, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy.

  12. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Understanding the Mechanisms of Action of Traditional Medicine: Bushenhuoxue Formula for Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-yong; Cao, Dong-sheng; Ye, Fa-qing; Xiang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has unique therapeutic effects for complex chronic diseases. However, for the lack of an effective systematic approach, the research progress on the effective substances and pharmacological mechanism of action has been very slow. In this paper, by incorporating network biology, bioinformatics and chemoinformatics methods, an integrated approach was proposed to systematically investigate and explain the pharmacological mechanism of action and effective substances of TCM. This approach includes the following main steps: First, based on the known drug targets, network biology was used to screen out putative drug targets; Second, the molecular docking method was used to calculate whether the molecules from TCM and drug targets related to chronic kidney diseases (CKD) interact or not; Third, according to the result of molecular docking, natural product-target network, main component-target network and compound-target network were constructed; Finally, through analysis of network characteristics and literature mining, potential effective multi-components and their synergistic mechanism were putatively identified and uncovered. Bu-shen-Huo-xue formula (BSHX) which was frequently used for treating CKD, was used as the case to demonstrate reliability of our proposed approach. The results show that BSHX has the therapeutic effect by using multi-channel network regulation, such as regulating the coagulation and fibrinolytic balance, and the expression of inflammatory factors, inhibiting abnormal ECM accumulation. Tanshinone IIA, rhein, curcumin, calycosin and quercetin may be potential effective ingredients of BSHX. This research shows that the integration approach can be an effective means for discovering active substances and revealing their pharmacological mechanisms of TCM. PMID:24598793

  13. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  14. Circulating Myeloid‐Related Protein–8/14 is Related to Thromboxane‐Dependent Platelet Activation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome, With and Without Ongoing Low‐Dose Aspirin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Santilli, Francesca; Paloscia, Leonardo; Liani, Rossella; Di Nicola, Marta; Di Marco, Massimo; Lattanzio, Stefano; La Barba, Sara; Pascale, Silvia; Mascellanti, Marco; Davì, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is involved in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Incomplete suppression by low‐dose aspirin treatment of thromboxane (TX) metabolite excretion (urinary 11‐dehydro‐TXB2) is predictive of vascular events in high‐risk patients. Myeloid‐related protein (MRP)‐8/14 is a heterodimer secreted on activation of platelets, monocytes, and neutrophils, regulating inflammation and predicting cardiovascular events. Among platelet transcripts, MRP‐14 has emerged as a powerful predictor of ACS. Methods and Results We enrolled 68 stable ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 63 ACS patients, undergoing coronary angiography, to evaluate whether MRP‐8/14 release in the circulation is related to TX‐dependent platelet activation in ACS and IHD patients and to residual TX biosynthesis in low‐dose aspirin–treated ACS patients. In ACS patients, plasma MRP‐8/14 and urinary 11‐dehydro‐TXB2 levels were linearly correlated (r=0.651, P<0.001) but significantly higher than those in IHD patients (P=0.012, P=0.044) only among subjects not receiving aspirin. In aspirin‐treated ACS patients, MRP‐8/14 and 11‐dehydro‐TXB2 were lower versus those not receiving aspirin (P<0.001) and still significantly correlated (r=0.528, P<0.001). Higher 11‐dehydro‐TXB2 significantly predicted higher MRP‐8/14 in both all ACS patients and ACS receiving aspirin (P<0.001, adj R2=0.463 and adj R2=0.497) after multivariable adjustment. Conversely, plasma MRP‐8/14 (P<0.001) and higher urinary 8‐iso‐prostaglandin F2α (P=0.050) levels were significant predictors of residual, on‐aspirin, TX biosynthesis in ACS (adjusted R2=0.384). Conclusions Circulating MRP‐8/14 is associated with TX‐dependent platelet activation in ACS, even during low‐dose aspirin treatment, suggesting a contribution of residual TX to MRP‐8/14 shedding, which may further amplify platelet activation. Circulating MRP‐8/14 may be a target to test different antiplatelet

  15. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    PubMed

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory. PMID:12929791

  16. Ongoing SETI Observation Programs at the ATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array is designed for commensal observing with multiple users making spectral images at multiple freqeuncies and forming real time single-pixel beams in multiple directions at the same time. At the ATA, most SETI observations use beamforming and very high spectral resolution to perform targeted and wide area surveys of the sky, sometimes sharing the observing time with conventional astronomical observations with the imaging correlator. We shall briefly review several ongoing SETI programs as demonstrations of the capabilities of the ATA.

  17. Safety Pharmacology Evaluation of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Engwall, Michael J; Vargas, Hugo M

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals or biopharmaceuticals (BPs) are molecules such as monoclonal antibodies, soluble/decoy receptors, hormones, enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors that are produced in various biological expression systems and are used to diagnose, treat, or prevent various diseases. Safety pharmacology (SP) assessment of BPs has evolved since the approval of the first BP (recombinant human insulin) in 1982. This evolution is ongoing and is informed by various international harmonization guidelines. Based on these guidelines, the potential undesirable effect of every drug candidate (small molecule or BP) on the cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems, referred to as the "core battery," should be assessed prior to first-in-human administration. However, SP assessment of BPs poses unique challenges such as choice of test species and integration of SP parameters into repeat-dose toxicity studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of SP assessment of BPs using the approval packages of marketed BPs and discusses the past, current, and new and upcoming approach and methods that can be used to generate high-quality data for the assessment of SP of BPs.

  18. Clinical pharmacology in Russia-historical development and current state.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnikova Goryachkina, Ksenia; Burbello, Aleksandra; Sychev, Dmitry; Frolov, Maxim; Kukes, Vladimir; Petrov, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology in Russia has long history and is currently active, but rather unrecognized internationally. It is governmentally approved as a teaching/scientific specialty since 1983 and as a medical specialty since 1997. Courses of clinical pharmacology are included in the undergraduate curricula in the 5th and/or 6th year of education at all medical schools in the Russian Federation. Postgraduate education includes initial specialization in internal medicine with further residency in clinical pharmacology. Governmental legislation recommends that every healthcare institution has either a department or a single position of clinical pharmacologist. Major routine duties include information about and monitoring of medication use, consultations in difficult clinical situations, pharmacogenetic counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacovigilance, and participation in drug and therapeutics (formulary) committees. There are official experts in clinical pharmacology in Russia responsible for coordinating relevant legislative issues. The chief expert clinical pharmacologist represents the discipline directly at the Ministry of Health. Research in clinical pharmacology in Russia is extensive and variable, but only some of it is published internationally. Russia is a participant of international societies of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics and collaboration is actively ongoing. There are still certain problems related to the development of the discipline in Russia-some healthcare institutions do not see the need for clinical pharmacology. However, the number of clinical pharmacologists in Russia is increasing as well as their role in physicians' education, national healthcare, and research.

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    diseases do not have exclusively a mitochondrial origin but they might have an important mitochondrial component both on their onset and on their development. This is the case of type 2 diabetes or neurodegenerative diseases. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a peripheral insulin resistance accompanied by an increased secretion of insulin as a compensatory system. Among the explanations about the origin of insulin resistance Mónica Zamora and Josep A. Villena (Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra / Laboratory of Metabolism and Obesity, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain) [5] consider the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, e.g. impaired (mitochondrial) oxidative capacity of the cell or tissue, is one of the main underlying causes of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Although this hypothesis is not free of controversy due to the uncertainty on the sequence of events during type 2 diabetes onset, e.g. whether mitochondrial dysfunction is the cause or the consequence of insulin resistance, it has been widely observed that improving mitochondrial function also improves insulin sensitivity and prevents type 2 diabetes. Thus restoring oxidative capacity by increasing mitochondrial mass appears as a suitable strategy to treat insulin resistance. The effort made by researchers trying to understand the signaling pathways mediating mitochondrial biogenesis has uncovered new potential pharmacological targets and opens the perspectives for the design of suitable treatments for insulin resistance. In addition some of the current used strategies could be used to treat insulin resistance such as lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction and endurance exercise) and pharmacological interventions (thiazolidinediones and other PPAR agonists, resveratrol and other calorie restriction mimetics, AMPK activators, ERR activators). Mitochondrial biogenesis is of special importance in modern neurochemistry because of the broad spectrum

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    diseases do not have exclusively a mitochondrial origin but they might have an important mitochondrial component both on their onset and on their development. This is the case of type 2 diabetes or neurodegenerative diseases. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a peripheral insulin resistance accompanied by an increased secretion of insulin as a compensatory system. Among the explanations about the origin of insulin resistance Mónica Zamora and Josep A. Villena (Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra / Laboratory of Metabolism and Obesity, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain) [5] consider the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, e.g. impaired (mitochondrial) oxidative capacity of the cell or tissue, is one of the main underlying causes of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Although this hypothesis is not free of controversy due to the uncertainty on the sequence of events during type 2 diabetes onset, e.g. whether mitochondrial dysfunction is the cause or the consequence of insulin resistance, it has been widely observed that improving mitochondrial function also improves insulin sensitivity and prevents type 2 diabetes. Thus restoring oxidative capacity by increasing mitochondrial mass appears as a suitable strategy to treat insulin resistance. The effort made by researchers trying to understand the signaling pathways mediating mitochondrial biogenesis has uncovered new potential pharmacological targets and opens the perspectives for the design of suitable treatments for insulin resistance. In addition some of the current used strategies could be used to treat insulin resistance such as lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction and endurance exercise) and pharmacological interventions (thiazolidinediones and other PPAR agonists, resveratrol and other calorie restriction mimetics, AMPK activators, ERR activators). Mitochondrial biogenesis is of special importance in modern neurochemistry because of the broad spectrum

  1. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people’s overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today’s increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  2. Pharmacology. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based course in pharmacology for practical nursing. The following are covered in the five instructional units: calculating medication dosages, documenting medications, identifying classification and effects of medications, administering medications, and assisting with…

  3. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe. PMID:27214552

  4. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  5. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe.

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder under ongoing threat: a review of neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings

    PubMed Central

    Fragkaki, Iro; Thomaes, Kathleen; Sijbrandij, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have investigated the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after single finished trauma, studies on PTSD under ongoing threat are scarce and it is still unclear whether these individuals present similar abnormalities. Objective The purpose of this review is to present the neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings on PTSD under ongoing threat. Ongoing threat considerably affects PTSD severity and treatment response and thus disentangling its neurobiological and neuroendocrine differences from PTSD after finished trauma could provide useful information for treatment. Method Eighteen studies that examined brain functioning and cortisol levels in relation to PTSD in individuals exposed to intimate partner violence, police officers, and fire fighters were included. Results Hippocampal volume was decreased in PTSD under ongoing threat, although not consistently associated with symptom severity. The neuroimaging studies revealed that PTSD under ongoing threat was not characterized by reduced volume of amygdala or parahippocampal gyrus. The neurocircuitry model of PTSD after finished trauma with hyperactivation of amygdala and hypoactivation of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was also confirmed in PTSD under ongoing threat. The neuroendocrine findings were inconsistent, revealing increased, decreased, or no association between cortisol levels and PTSD under ongoing threat. Conclusions Although PTSD under ongoing threat is characterized by abnormal neurocircuitry patterns similar to those previously found in PTSD after finished trauma, this is less so for other neurobiological and in particular neuroendocrine findings. Direct comparisons between samples with ongoing versus finished trauma are needed in future research to draw more solid conclusions before administering cortisol to patients with PTSD under ongoing threat who may already exhibit increased endogenous cortisol levels. Highlights of

  7. Strychnos potatorum: Phytochemical and pharmacological review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Kavita N.; Kadam, Prasad V.; Patel, Jigna A.; Patil, Manohar J.

    2014-01-01

    In traditional system of medicine, the seeds of Strychnos potatorum Linn. (family: Loganiaceae) are used in the treatment of gonorrhea, leukorrhea leukeorrhea, gastropathy, bronchitis, chronic diarrhea, dysentery, renal and vesicle calculi, diabetes, conjunctivitis, scleritis, ulcers and other eye disease. An attempt has been made to highlight this medicinal seeds through phytochemical and pharmacological study. The present review deals with the phytochemical and pharmacological screening of therapeutic importance from Strychnos potatorum L., an important medicinal plant. This study includes the collective information of different medicinal uses of Strychnos potatorum. The generated data has provided the basis for its wide use as the therapeutant both in the traditional and folk medicines. PMID:24600197

  8. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  10. An Ongoing Randomized Clinical Trial in Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, JoAnne; Hind, Jackie; Logemann, Jerilyn

    2004-01-01

    Most of us who have clinical practices firmly contend that the treatments we provide cause beneficial changes in the lives of our patients. Indeed, our clinical experience engenders strong convictions to the point of believing that withholding treatment creates ethical violations. Intellectually, however, we must recognize that the value of…

  11. Pharmacologic management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hue Jung; Moon, Dong Eon

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain is a multifactorial condition with both physical and psychological symptoms, and it affects around 20% of the population in the developed world. In spite of outstanding advances in pain management over the past decades, chronic pain remains a significant problem. This article provides a mechanism- and evidence-based approach to improve the outcome for pharmacologic management of chronic pain. The usual approach to treat mild to moderate pain is to start with a nonopioid analgesic. If this is inadequate, and if there is an element of sleep deprivation, then it is reasonable to add an antidepressant with analgesic qualities. If there is a component of neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia, then a trial with one of the gabapentinoids is appropriate. If these steps are inadequate, then an opioid analgesic may be added. For moderate to severe pain, one would initiate an earlier trial of a long term opioid. Skeletal muscle relaxants and topicals may also be appropriate as single agents or in combination. Meanwhile, the steps of pharmacologic treatments for neuropathic pain include (1) certain antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), calcium channel alpha(2)-delta ligands (gabapentin and pregabalin) and topical lidocaine, (2) opioid analgesics and tramadol (for first-line use in selected clinical circumstances) and (3) certain other antidepressant and antiepileptic medications (topical capsaicin, mexiletine, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists). It is essential to have a thorough understanding about the different pain mechanisms of chronic pain and evidence-based multi-mechanistic treatment. It is also essential to increase the individualization of treatment. PMID:20556211

  12. A Repurposing Approach Identifies Off-Patent Drugs with Fungicidal Cryptococcal Activity, a Common Structural Chemotype, and Pharmacological Properties Relevant to the Treatment of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Arielle; DiDone, Louis; Koselny, Kristy; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Chabrier-Rosello, Yeissa; Wellington, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    New, more accessible therapies for cryptococcosis represent an unmet clinical need of global importance. We took a repurposing approach to identify previously developed drugs with fungicidal activity toward Cryptococcus neoformans, using a high-throughput screening assay designed to detect drugs that directly kill fungi. From a set of 1,120 off-patent medications and bioactive molecules, we identified 31 drugs/molecules with fungicidal activity, including 15 drugs for which direct antifungal activity had not previously been reported. A significant portion of the drugs are orally bioavailable and cross the blood-brain barrier, features key to the development of a widely applicable anticryptococcal agent. Structural analysis of this set revealed a common chemotype consisting of a hydrophobic moiety linked to a basic amine, features that are common to drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier and access the phagolysosome, two important niches of C. neoformans. Consistent with their fungicidal activity, the set contains eight drugs that are either additive or synergistic in combination with fluconazole. Importantly, we identified two drugs, amiodarone and thioridazine, with activity against intraphagocytic C. neoformans. Finally, the set of drugs is also enriched for molecules that inhibit calmodulin, and we have confirmed that seven drugs directly bind C. neoformans calmodulin, providing a molecular target that may contribute to the mechanism of antifungal activity. Taken together, these studies provide a foundation for the optimization of the antifungal properties of a set of pharmacologically attractive scaffolds for the development of novel anticryptococcal therapies. PMID:23243064

  13. Distribution of phosphorylated protein kinase C alpha in goldfish retinal bipolar synaptic terminals: control by state of adaptation and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Uwe D; Borde, Johannes; Mack, Andreas F; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a signalling enzyme critically involved in many aspects of synaptic plasticity. In cyprinid retinae, the PKC alpha isoform is localized in a subpopulation of depolarizing bipolar cells that show adaptation-related morphological changes of their axon terminals. We have studied the subcellular localization of phosphorylated PKC alpha (pPKC alpha) in retinae under various conditions by immunohistochemistry with a phosphospecific antibody. In dark-adapted retinae, pPKC alpha immunoreactivity is weak in the cytoplasm of synaptic terminals, labelling being predominantly associated with the membrane compartment. In light-adapted cells, immunoreactivity is diffusely distributed throughout the terminal. Western blot analysis has revealed a reduction of pPKC alpha immunoreactivity in cytosolic fractions of homogenized dark-adapted retinae compared with light-adapted retinae. Pharmacological experiments with the isoform-specific PKC blocker Goe6976 have shown that inhibition of the enzyme influences immunolabelling for pPKC alpha, mimicking the effects of light on the subcellular distribution of immunoreactivity. Our findings suggest that the state of adaptation modifies the subcellular localization of a signalling molecule (PKC alpha) at the ribbon-type synaptic complex. We propose that changes in the subcellular distribution of PKC alpha immunoreactivity might be one component regulating the strength of the signal transfer of the bipolar cell terminal.

  14. Distribution of phosphorylated protein kinase C alpha in goldfish retinal bipolar synaptic terminals: control by state of adaptation and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Uwe D; Borde, Johannes; Mack, Andreas F; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a signalling enzyme critically involved in many aspects of synaptic plasticity. In cyprinid retinae, the PKC alpha isoform is localized in a subpopulation of depolarizing bipolar cells that show adaptation-related morphological changes of their axon terminals. We have studied the subcellular localization of phosphorylated PKC alpha (pPKC alpha) in retinae under various conditions by immunohistochemistry with a phosphospecific antibody. In dark-adapted retinae, pPKC alpha immunoreactivity is weak in the cytoplasm of synaptic terminals, labelling being predominantly associated with the membrane compartment. In light-adapted cells, immunoreactivity is diffusely distributed throughout the terminal. Western blot analysis has revealed a reduction of pPKC alpha immunoreactivity in cytosolic fractions of homogenized dark-adapted retinae compared with light-adapted retinae. Pharmacological experiments with the isoform-specific PKC blocker Goe6976 have shown that inhibition of the enzyme influences immunolabelling for pPKC alpha, mimicking the effects of light on the subcellular distribution of immunoreactivity. Our findings suggest that the state of adaptation modifies the subcellular localization of a signalling molecule (PKC alpha) at the ribbon-type synaptic complex. We propose that changes in the subcellular distribution of PKC alpha immunoreactivity might be one component regulating the strength of the signal transfer of the bipolar cell terminal. PMID:17043793

  15. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  16. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. PMID:26546163

  17. Coping with Selfish On-Going Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupferman, Orna; Tamir, Tami

    A rational and selfish environment may have an incentive to cheat the system it interacts with. Cheating the system amounts to reporting a stream of inputs that is different from the one corresponding to the real behavior of the environment. The system may cope with cheating by charging penalties to cheats it detects. In this paper, we formalize this setting by means of weighted automata and their resilience to selfish environments. Automata have proven to be a successful formalism for modeling the on-going interaction between a system and its environment. In particular, weighted finite automata (WFAs), which assign a cost to each input word, are useful in modeling an interaction that has a quantitative outcome. Consider a WFA A over the alphabet Σ. At each moment in time, the environment may cheat A by reporting a letter different from the one it actually generates. A penalty function η:Σ×Σ→IR ≥ 0 maps each possible false-report to a penalty, charged whenever the false-report is detected. A detection-probability function p:Σ×Σ→[0,1] gives the probability of detecting each false-report. We say that A is (η,p)-resilient to cheating if <η,p> ensures that the minimal expected cost of an input word is achieved with no cheating. Thus, a rational environment has no incentive to cheat A.

  18. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy.

  19. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  20. [Pharmacological biomodulation in cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, F; Merentes, E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the P-glycoprotein as a mediator of multidrug resistance (MDR) represents one of the most important research accomplishments in antineoplastic pharmacology during the last decade. Demonstration of Pgp in epithelial tissues, untreated and chemotherapeutically pretreated human malignancies, and identification of various agents capable of reversing in vitro resistance has generated enthusiasm for clinical studies throughout the world. This review discusses recent developments of experimental and clinical investigations of MDR reversing agents in cancer.