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Sample records for ongoing pharmacological treatment

  1. [Pharmacological treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriola Manchola, Enrique; Álaba Trueba, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative and inflammatory process leading to synapticdysfunction and neuronal death. A review about the pharmacological treatment alternatives is made: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI), a nutritional supplement (Souvenaid) and Ginkgo biloba. A special emphasis on Ginkgo biloba due to the controversy about its use and the approval by the European Medicines Agency is made. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacological advances in addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Preston, K L; Bigelow, G E

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years significant advances in the pharmacological treatment of opioid dependence have been made, and research in this area is continuing. Therapeutic applications and current research in the use of pharmacological agents in maintenance therapy, treatment with narcotic antagonists, and narcotic detoxification are discussed. In addition, an overview is presented of recent developments in opioid pharmacology and of recently developed novel pharmacological agents which may prove useful in the future treatment and/or prevention of opioid dependence.

  3. Pharmacological treatment of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C; Uddin, Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the physiology and pharmacological treatment of vertigo and related disorders. Classes of medications useful in the treatment of vertigo include anticholinergics, antihistamines, benzodiazepines, calcium channel antagonists and dopamine receptor antagonists. These medications often have multiple actions. They may modify the intensity of symptoms (e.g. vestibular suppressants) or they may affect the underlying disease process (e.g. calcium channel antagonists in the case of vestibular migraine). Most of these agents, particularly those that are sedating, also have a potential to modulate the rate of compensation for vestibular damage. This consideration has become more relevant in recent years, as vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy is now often recommended in an attempt to promote compensation. Accordingly, therapy of vertigo is optimised when the prescriber has detailed knowledge of the pharmacology of medications being administered as well as the precise actions being sought. There are four broad causes of vertigo, for which specific regimens of drug therapy can be tailored. Otological vertigo includes disorders of the inner ear such as Ménière's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and bilateral vestibular paresis. In both Ménière's disease and vestibular neuritis, vestibular suppressants such as anticholinergics and benzodiazepines are used. In Ménière's disease, salt restriction and diuretics are used in an attempt to prevent flare-ups. In vestibular neuritis, only brief use of vestibular suppressants is now recommended. Drug treatments are not presently recommended for BPPV and bilateral vestibular paresis, but physical therapy treatment can be very useful in both. Central vertigo includes entities such as vertigo associated with migraine and certain strokes. Prophylactic agents (L-channel calcium channel antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, beta-blockers) are the mainstay of treatment

  4. Pharmacologic treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Anton, Raymond F; Schacht, Joseph P; Book, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Progress in understanding the neuroscience of addiction has significantly advanced the development of more efficacious medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUD). While several medications have been approved by regulatory bodies around the world for the treatment of AUD, they are not universally efficacious. Recent research has yielded improved understanding of the genetics and brain circuits that underlie alcohol reward and its habitual use. This research has contributed to pharmacogenetic studies of medication response, and will ultimately lead to a more "personalized medicine" approach to AUD pharmacotherapy. This chapter summarizes work on clinically available medications (both approved by regulatory bodies and investigational) for the treatment of alcohol dependence, as well as the psychiatric disorders that are commonly comorbid with AUD. Studies that have evaluated genetic influences on medication response and those that have employed neuroimaging to probe mechanisms of medication action or response are highlighted. Finally, new targets discovered in animal models for possible pharmacologic intervention in humans are overviewed and future directions in medications development provided. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pharmacological treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Gomis Barbará, R

    2004-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of obesity should be considered when cannot be achieved a 10% weight loss with diet therapy and physical activity. The drugs effective in obesity treatment may act by different mechanisms such as reduction in food intake, inhibition of fat absorption, increase of thermogenesis and stimulation of adipocyte apoptosis. At present, we only have two marketed drugs for obesity treatment. Sibutramine is an inhibitor of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonina reuptake which inhibits food intake and increases thermogenesis. Sibutramine administration for a year can induce a weight loss of 4-7%. Its main side effects are hypertension, headache, insomnia and constipation. Orlistat is an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase which is able to block the absorption of 30% of ingested fat. Its administration induces weight loss and reduction of ulterior weight regain. Also, this drug improves hypertension dyslipdaemia and helps to prevent diabetes in 52% of cases when administered over four years. The increase in frequency of stools and interference with vitamin absorption are its main side effects. Glucagon-like peptide 1, which increases insulin sensitivity and satiety, adiponectin and PPAR-gamma agonists which reduce insulin resistance and modulates adipocyte generation are the basis for future therapeutic approaches of obesity. Phosphatase inhibitors induce PPAR-gamma phosphorylation and UCP-1 expression leading to an increase in thermogenesis and reduction in appetite.

  6. Pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pinals, R S

    1992-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for osteoarthritis (OA) is aimed at relief of pain and functional disability. Although an inflammatory component may be found in some cases, there is little evidence that anti-inflammatory drugs commonly used in the treatment of OA provide more relief than simple analgesics. A growing body of knowledge about the pathophysiology of OA now offers opportunities to develop interventions aimed at retarding the progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. This is a function of an imbalance between cartilage matrix synthesis and breakdown. New and experimental treatments include oral, parenteral, and intra-articular agents, some of which are chemicals and others biological products. Their modes of action have generally not been established in humans, but may be inferred from in vitro culture systems and animal models. These mechanisms include inhibition of synovial cell-derived cytokines and chondrocyte-derived degradative enzymes, inactivation of superoxide free radicals, stimulation of matrix synthesis, and enhancement of synovial fluid lubrication. Many of these treatments have been shown to provide short- or long-term symptomatic improvement in clinical trials. Protection of cartilage or promotion of repair has been demonstrated in animal studies, but not convincingly in human OA studies.

  7. Pharmacologic treatment of autism.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Mark T; Curatolo, Paolo

    2004-03-01

    Autism is a chronic and lifelong pervasive developmental disorder for which there is yet no effective cure, and medical management remains a major challenge for clinicians. In spite of the possible similarities with conditions that have an established pharmacotherapy, and despite improvements in some associated "problematic behaviors" following the use of available medications, effective medical treatment for the core symptoms involving language and social cognition remains elusive. The purpose of the present article is to review current biologic knowledge about autism in an attempt to correlate clinical trials with known mechanisms of disease. In addition, the need for controlled studies and for the creation of homogeneous subgroups of patients based on clinical and genetic characteristics is emphasized. The application of molecular genetic investigations and pharmacogenetics in the diagnostic work-up of autistic patients can lead to more effective individualized medical care.

  8. Pharmacological treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Truini, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Unique among the different neuropathic pain conditions, trigeminal neuralgia frequently has an excellent response to some selected drugs, which, on the other hand, often entail disabling side effects. Physicians should be therefore acquainted with the management of these drugs and the few alternative options. Areas covered: This article, based on a systematic literature review, describes the pharmacological options, and indicates the future perspectives for treating trigeminal neuralgia. The article therefore provides current, evidence-based knowledge about the pharmacological treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, and suggests a practical approach to the various drugs, including starting dose, titration and side effects. Expert commentary: Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are the reference standard drugs for treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia. They are effective in most patients. The undesired effects however cause withdrawal from treatment or a dosage reduction to an insufficient level in many patients. Sodium channel blockers selective for the sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) receptor, currently under development, might be an alternative, better-tolerated pharmacological option in the next future.

  9. Pharmacological treatments in pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-02-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behaviour. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean dose of medication administered was documented in an effort to determine a preferred medication choice in this population. A variety of medication classes have been examined in the treatment of PG with varying results. Antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers have demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behaviour. Given that several studies have demonstrated their efficacy in treating the symptoms associated with PG, opioid antagonists should be considered the first line treatment for PG at this time. Most published studies, however, have employed relatively small sample sizes, are of limited duration and involve possibly non-representative clinical groups (e.g. those without co-occurring psychiatric disorders). Response measures have varied across studies. Heterogeneity of PG treatment samples may also complicate identification of effective treatments. Identification of factors related to treatment response will help inform future studies and advance treatment strategies for PG. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Pharmacological treatment of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Rm; Vieira, Cs; Ferriani, Ra; Candido-Dos-Reis, Fj; Brito, Lgo

    2014-09-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are common, benign gynecologic tumors, affecting one in three to four women, with estimates of up to 80%, depending on the population studied. Their etiology is not well established, but it is under the influence of several risk factors, such as early menarche, nulliparity and family history. More than 50% of affected women are asymptomatic, but the lesions may be related to bothersome symptoms, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and bloating or urinary symptoms. The treatment of UF is classically surgical; however, various medical options are available, providing symptom control while minimizing risks and complications. A large number of clinical trials have evaluated commonly used medical treatments and potentially effective new ones. Through a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus and Google Scholar databases, through which we included 41 studies out of 7658 results, we thoroughly explored the different pharmacological options available for management of UF, their indications, advantages and disadvantages.

  11. [Pharmacologic treatment of osteoporosis--2011].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Péter

    2011-08-14

    Osteoporosis affects approximately 9% of the population in Hungary resulting in about 100 000 osteoporotic fractures annually. Thirty-five percent of patients with hip fractures due to osteoporosis will die within 1 year. Direct costs of osteoporosis exceed 25 billion forints per year. Apparently, cost-effective reduction of bone loss and consequent fracture risk will add up to not only financial savings but improvement in quality of life, as well. A number of pharmacological modalities are available for this purpose. The mainstay of the treatment of osteoporosis is the bisphosphonate group that includes effective anti-resorptive compounds mitigating bone loss and fragility. The recently registered denosumab exhibits similar efficacy by neutralizing RANK ligand, however, marked differences can be observed between the two drug classes. Strontium has a unique mechanism of action by rebalancing bone turnover, and thus, providing an efficient treatment option for the not fast bone losers who are at high fracture risk. The purely anabolic teriparatide is available for the extremely severe osteoporotic patients and for those who do not respond to other types of therapy. Older treatment options such as hormone replacement therapy, raloxifene, tibolone or calcitonin may also have a restricted place in the management of osteoporosis.

  12. Early pharmacological treatment of autism: a rationale for developmental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Terrence C.; Sikich, Linmarie

    2007-01-01

    Autism is a dynamic neurodevelopmental syndrome in which disabilities emerge during the first three postnatal years and continue to evolve with ongoing development. We briefly review research in autism describing subtle changes in molecules important in brain development and neurotransmission, in morphology of specific neurons, brain connections and in brain size. We then provide a general schema of how these processes may interact with particular emphasis on neurotransmission. In this context, we present a rationale for utilizing pharmacologic treatments aimed at modifying key neurodevelopmental processes in young children with autism. Early treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is presented as a model for pharmacologic interventions because there is evidence in autistic children for reduced brain serotonin synthesis during periods of peak synaptogenesis; serotonin is known to enhance synapse refinement; and exploratory studies with these agents in autistic children exist. Additional hypothetical developmental interventions and relevant published clinical data are described. Finally, we discuss the importance of exploring early pharmacologic interventions within multiple experimental settings in order to develop effective treatments as quickly as possible while minimizing risks. PMID:17276749

  13. Alzheimer disease pharmacologic treatment and treatment research.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews marketed pharmacologic treatments for Alzheimer disease as well as their efficacy, effectiveness, adverse effects, and issues involved in their use, including duration of treatment, adverse events, and controversies. Current experimental drug development, including challenges to developing successful drugs for Alzheimer disease, are also reviewed and assessed. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the available pharmacologic treatment options. They show limited clinical effects over the shorter term for some patients, mild to moderate cholinergic adverse effects in a minority of patients, and potentially underappreciated toxicity over the longer term. No subsequent experimental drug in development has been successful thus far; there has not been a new drug marketed for Alzheimer disease since 2003. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are marketed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. Drug development programs aimed at new targets, including the amyloid-β cascade, have been unsuccessful thus far despite their designs to detect very small or minimal clinical effects from the experimental drugs. Marked advances in preclinical science nevertheless support a basis for considerable optimism that effective interventions will be found soon.

  14. [Non-pharmacological treatment of cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; Yubero, Raquel

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the effect of non-pharmacological therapies in persons with cognitive impairment, especially treatments aimed at brain stimulation and functional maintenance, since both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies affecting the cognitive and psychoaffective domains are reviewed in another article in this supplement. The article also discusses the close and reciprocal relationship between cognitive impairment, diet and nutritional status and describes the main nutritional risk factors and protective factors in cognitive decline. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    Substance use disorders represent a serious public health and social issue worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the addictive processes have led to the development of a growing number of pharmacological agents to treat addictions. Despite this progress, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for cocaine, methamphetamine and cannabis addiction. Moving treatment development to the next stage will require novel ways of approaching substance use disorders. One such novel approach is to target individual vulnerabilities, such as cognitive function, sex differences and psychiatric comorbidities. This review provides a summary of promising pharmacotherapies for alcohol, opiate, stimulant and nicotine addictions. Many medications that target positive and negative reinforcement of drugs, as well as individual vulnerabilities to addiction, are in different phases of development. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of these medications for substance use disorder are warranted. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of adult ADHD in Europe.

    PubMed

    Retz, Wolfgang; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Thome, Johannes; Rösler, Michael

    2011-09-01

    It is now widely accepted that ADHD is a frequent chronic condition with a lifelong perspective. Adult ADHD is a reliable and valid diagnosis. The disorder and the co-morbid conditions can place a severe burden on the patients, their families and their partners, requiring adequate treatment. A systematic literature search was conducted to review the available pharmacological treatment options for adults with ADHD in European countries. Supported by meta-analyses, stimulant medication is the first-line pharmacological therapy for adult ADHD. However, from a European perspective the pharmacological treatment options are very limited and only a minority of adults with ADHD in European countries receives adequate treatment. With reference to the epidemiological data, it seems very likely that the number of people with ADHD in Europe seeking multimodal treatment including pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, coaching or other therapeutic services will increase profoundly during the coming years.

  17. Pharmacologic Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William D

    2002-01-01

    Penile erection occurs in response to cavernous smooth muscle relaxation, increased blood flow to the penis, and restriction of venous outflow. These events are regulated by a spinal reflex relying on visual, imaginative, and olfactory stimuli generated within the central nervous system (CNS) and on tactile stimuli to the penis. Drugs can have a facilitatory or inhibitory effect either on the nerves regulating this reflex or on the cavernous smooth muscle. A balance between contractile and relaxant factors governs flaccidity/rigidity within the penis. Drugs that raise cytosolic calcium either prevent or abort erection. Conversely, drugs that lower cytosolic calcium relax smooth muscle and can initiate penile erection. Efficacy in treating erectile dysfunction (ED) with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, especially type 5; α-adrenergic-receptor antagonists; and dopamine agonists exploit these mechanisms within the penis or CNS. Recent advances in our understanding of the pharmacology of penile erection are being translated into effective therapies for ED. PMID:16986010

  18. Evidence-Responsiveness and the Ongoing Autonomy of Treatment Preferences.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Steven

    2017-06-14

    To be an autonomous agent is to determine one's own path in life. However, this cannot plausibly be seen as a one-off affair. An autonomous agent does not merely set herself on a particular course and then lock the steering wheel in place, so to speak, but must maintain some form of ongoing control over her direction in life-must keep her eyes on the road and her hands on the wheel. Circumstances often change in important and unexpected ways, after all, and it is reasonable to think that a crucial part of autonomy consists of the ability and disposition to recognize and properly respond to such changes. This implies, I contend, that a patient whose initial decision to undergo a given treatment satisfied plausible requirements of autonomy, but who is now unable to recognize that available evidence indicates the need to reconsider her medical situation and options has come to lack autonomy with respect to her desire to continue that treatment. However, and despite its importance with respect to both theoretical understandings of autonomy and applications of the concept to clinical ethics, this ongoing aspect of autonomy has received little attention. This paper aims to go some way toward remedying that. I first critically review two of the few theories of autonomy that do address "evidence-responsiveness" so as to identify and elaborate what I take to be the most promising way in which to account for this aspect of autonomy. After considering and responding to a possible objection to the evidence-responsiveness condition I propose, I conclude by discussing its clinical implications. That condition, I argue, is not merely theoretically sound, but can and should be applied to clinical practice.

  19. The pharmacological treatment of nystagmus: a review.

    PubMed

    McLean, Rebecca Jane; Gottlob, Irene

    2009-08-01

    Nystagmus is an involuntary, to-and-fro movement of the eyes that can result in a reduction in visual acuity and oscillopsia. Mechanisms that cause nystagmus are better understood in some forms, such as acquired periodic alternating nystagmus, than in others, for example acquired pendular nystagmus, for which there is limited knowledge. Effective pharmacological treatment exists to reduce nystagmus, particularly in acquired nystagmus and, more recently, infantile nystagmus. However, as there are very few randomized controlled trials in the area, most pharmacological treatment options in nystagmus remain empirical.

  20. Pharmacological treatments in pathological gambling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behaviour. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean dose of medication administered was documented in an effort to determine a preferred medication choice in this population. A variety of medication classes have been examined in the treatment of PG with varying results. Antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers have demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behaviour. Given that several studies have demonstrated their efficacy in treating the symptoms associated with PG, opioid antagonists should be considered the first line treatment for PG at this time. Most published studies, however, have employed relatively small sample sizes, are of limited duration and involve possibly non-representative clinical groups (e.g. those without co-occurring psychiatric disorders). Response measures have varied across studies. Heterogeneity of PG treatment samples may also complicate identification of effective treatments. Identification of factors related to treatment response will help inform future studies and advance treatment strategies for PG. PMID:22979951

  1. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, John A; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer.

  2. The pharmacological treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Aucamp, A K

    1979-10-06

    A short classification and brief clinical description of epileptic seizures are presented. The pharmacokinetic principles underlying modern drug treatment of epileptic seizures are discussed and the drug(s) of choice for different seizure types are listed according to their clinical efficacy. The current view of using single-drug therapy rather than polypharmacy, whenever possible, is emphasized.

  3. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  4. Pharmacological treatment effects on eye movement control

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to learn about neurochemical systems relevant for identified disturbances, and to facilitate identification of oculomotor biomarkers of pharmacological effects. In this review, studies of pharmacologic treatment effects on eye movements in healthy individuals are summarized and the sensitivity of eye movements to a variety of pharmacological manipulations is established. Primary findings from these studies of healthy individuals involving mainly acute effects indicate that: (i) the most consistent finding across several classes of drugs, including benzodiazepines, first- and second-generation antipsychotics, anticholinergic agents, and anticonvulsant/mood stabilizing medications is a decrease in saccade and smooth pursuit velocity (or increase in saccades during pursuit); (ii) these oculomotor effects largely reflect the general sedating effects of these medications on central nervous system functioning and are often dose-dependent; (iii) in many cases changes in oculomotor functioning are more sensitive indicators of pharmacological effects than other measures; and (iv) other agents, including the antidepressant class of serotonergic reuptake inhibitors, direct serotonergic agonists, and stimulants including amphetamine and nicotine, do not appear to adversely impact oculomotor functions in healthy individuals and may well enhance aspects of saccade and pursuit performance. Pharmacological treatment effects on eye movements across several clinical disorders including schizophrenia, affective disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease are also reviewed. While greater

  5. Pharmacologic Treatments for Binge-Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    Binge-eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and is associated with poor physical and mental health outcomes. Psychological and behavioral interventions have been a mainstay of treatment for BED, but as understanding of this disorder has grown, pharmacologic agents have become promising treatment options for some patients. At this time, only one drug-the stimulant prodrug lisdexamfetamine-is approved for the treatment of BED. Numerous classes of medications including antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antiobesity drugs have been explored as off-label treatments for BED with variable success. Although not all patients with BED may be suitable candidates for pharmacotherapy, all patients should be considered for and educated about pharmacologic treatment options. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  7. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  8. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil I; Garner, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in community and clinical settings. The individual and societal burden associated with GAD is substantial, but many of those who could benefit from treatment are not recognized or treated. Recent evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of patients with GAD have recommended initial treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), on the basis of their proven efficacy and reasonable tolerability in randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, there is much room for improvement in both the efficacy and the tolerability of treatment. Response rates to first-line treatment can be disappointing and it is hard to predict reliably which patients will respond well and which will have only a limited treatment response. Many patients worry about becoming dependent on medication, a substantial proportion experience troublesome adverse effects, and these problems limit the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in clinical practice. The relative lack of longitudinal studies of clinical outcomes in GAD, and the small number of placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies lead to uncertainty about the optimal duration of treatment after a satisfactory initial response. There have been few investigations of the further management of patients who have not responded to first-line treatment and there is a pressing need for further augmentation studies in patients who have not responded to an SSRI or SNRI, or to other initial pharmacological approaches. Future treatment guidelines for GAD will be influenced by emerging data for established and novel pharmacological approaches, and possibly through the more accurate identification of certain patient subgroups who are likely to respond preferentially to particular interventions.

  9. [Pharmacological treatment of acute catatonia].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Delgado, Christian L

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome of psychomotor dysregulation that can be present in a broad spectrum of clinical situations. Advances made over the last decades have progressively contributed to its clinical differentiation and its conceptual delimitation. Both Benzodiazepines (BZD) and Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been consolidated as first-line therapy. In this regard, a BZD response rate ranging from 70 to 90 per cent has been reported in different case series. Furthermore, NMDA receptor antagonists represent an emerging strategy in the therapeutic approach to the disorder. Most of the evidence that supports the aforementioned treatment recommendations arises from descriptive observational studies. Traditionally, catatonia pathophysiological research focused on the study of subcortical brain structures. Currently there exists compelling evidence that supports a cortical origin of the syndrome, emphasizing the role of the prefrontal cortex. Neuropsychiatric catatonia models that integrate clinical, pathophysiological, and neurobiological findings have been postulated. The aim of the present review is to summarize up-to-date available evidence associated with the pharmacotherapeutic approach to acute catatonia as well as the neurochemical basis of its effectiveness. Likewise, general measures intended to prevent morbimortality are subject to discussion herein.

  10. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  11. Pharmacologic treatment of spasticity in children.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Ann; Vargus-Adams, Jilda; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2010-12-01

    Many clinicians frequently face the dilemma of whether and how to medically treat spasticity. When pharmacologic intervention is deemed appropriate, treatment decisions must first be based on accurate assessment using valid and reliable clinical instruments, and, importantly, specific, measurable, achievable, and realistic treatment goals should be delineated. For the treatment of localized or segmental spasticity, botulinum toxin (BoNT-A) is recommended as an effective and generally safe treatment. For more generalized spasticity, a number of useful oral agents and intrathecal baclofen are available, each with their positive and negative attributes. Fundamental knowledge of pharmacologic properties and toxicities of these medications is required for safe and appropriate use. To achieve optimum results, spasticity treatment should be part of an integrated therapeutic approach in which patients, caregivers, therapists, physicians, and surgeons have an open and clear communication about the overall rehabilitation process of the patient. This review summarizes the current pharmacologic approaches to spasticity treatment in children, critically evaluating published studies in the context of established evidence-based criteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammation and pharmacological treatment in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer.

  13. PTSD: from neurobiology to pharmacological treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kelmendi, Benjamin; Adams, Thomas G.; Yarnell, Stephanie; Southwick, Steven; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Krystal, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder characterized by symptoms of re-experience, avoidance, and hyperarousal that can arise immediately or many years after exposure to a traumatic event and injury. Although extensive research has been done over the past 30 years, the etiology of PTSD remains largely unknown. Several neurobiological systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology and vulnerability for developing PTSD; however, first-line pharmacotherapies are limited. Less than 30% achieve full remission, and even then, approved pharmacological treatments often take weeks for therapeutic effect. This article aims to review the pathophysiology of PTSD within multiple neurobiological systems and how these mechanisms are used as pharmacologic targets of treatment, as well as their potential for future targets of intervention. Highlights of the article We reviewed the neurobiological abnormalities in PTSD as they relate to well-established, preliminary, and future targets for pharmacological interventions. Abnormalities across different neurotransmitter systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology of PTSD but none of these systems function uniformly among all patients with PTSD First-line pharmacotherapy for PTSD provides a suboptimal response rates. Future pharmacological targets for PTSD include the cannabinoid and oxytocin systems, as well glutamatergic modulating agents. Drug development for PTSD should specifically address various dimensions of PTSD symptomatology. PMID:27837583

  14. Pharmacological Treatment of PTSD – Established and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Steckler, Thomas; Risbrough, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A large proportion of humans will experience a traumatic event at least once in their lifetime, with up to 10% then going on to developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this review we will discuss established pharmacological interventions for PTSD as well as highlight novel therapeutic strategies undergoing extensive preclinical research as well as ongoing clinical research. Such strategies include prophylactic treatments and use of pharmacotherapy as adjunctive treatment with established trauma-focused psychological therapies. These potential treatment approaches include modulation of stress effects on memory consolidation after trauma (e.g. glucocorticoid, corticotropin releasing factor and norepinephrine signalling modulators), as well as putative cognitive enhancers that target mechanisms of conditioned fear extinction and reconsolidation (e.g. glucocorticoid receptor modulators and modulators of glutamate signalling such as positive allosteric modulators of glutamate receptors, glycine transporter inhibitors, glycine agonists, autoreceptor antagonists). We will discuss evidence for and against these potential novel treatment strategies and their limitations. PMID:21736888

  15. Pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: new developments.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, stiffness, insomnia, fatigue and distress. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown moderate effectiveness of pharmacological therapies for fibromyalgia pain. Evidence from these trials suggests that pharmacological therapy can not only improve pain but also fatigue, function and well-being in patients with fibromyalgia. Duloxetine and milnacipran, two highly selective serotonin-norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitors, and the alpha(2)delta agonist pregabalin have been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. In general, about half of all treated patients seem to experience a 30% reduction of symptoms, suggesting that many patients with fibromyalgia will require additional therapies. Thus, other forms of treatment, including exercise, cognitive behavioural therapies and self-management strategies, may be necessary to achieve satisfactory treatment outcomes. Despite promising results of pilot trials, RCTs with dopamine receptor agonists and sodium channel antagonists have so far been disappointing for patients with fibromyalgia. However, new pharmacological approaches for the treatment of fibromyalgia pain and insomnia using sodium oxybate appear to be promising.

  16. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Csanádi, Zoltán; Fazekas, Tamás; Varró, András

    2003-06-29

    The authors provide an update on non-pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). They emphasize that although antiarrhythmic drugs continue to be first-line therapy for the arrhythmia considered to be a cardiovascular epidemic, clinical research to develop non-pharmacological means of treatment has been unprecedentally intensified during the last decade. Electrical cardioversion is the most successful non-pharmacological method to restore sinus rhythm, also the efficacy and safety of AV node ablation for palliative ventricular rate-controll is established. "Hybrid" therapeutic procedures, involving combinations of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have gained widespread use. Curative transcatheter ablation for arrhythmia prevention is to be considered in case of clinical suggestions that AF is initiated by a primary regular arrhythmia that is amenable to routine catheter ablation (secondary AF). Despite encouraging results, at this point in time, curative catheter ablation for primary AF may offer significant improvement or even cure only for a small subset of patients, mostly young individuals with normal heart, and paroxysmal AF with frequent, symptomatic episodes refractory to multiple antiarrhythmic drugs. These interventions are to be performed in the settings of a clinical research project in some institutions. Regarding pacemaker therapy in case of bradycardia indication, physiologic pacing (AAI or DDD) is associated with significantly lower incidence of atrial fibrillation than ventricular pacing. Large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the clinical value of specially designed implantable devices to prevent atrial fibrillation in patients with no conventional bradycardia indication. Also, technical optimization and proper clinical evaluation is needed for implantable atrioverters and implantable cardioverter defibrillators capable of atrial cardioversion therapy.

  17. PTSD: from neurobiology to pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Kelmendi, Benjamin; Adams, Thomas G; Yarnell, Stephanie; Southwick, Steven; Abdallah, Chadi G; Krystal, John H

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder characterized by symptoms of re-experience, avoidance, and hyperarousal that can arise immediately or many years after exposure to a traumatic event and injury. Although extensive research has been done over the past 30 years, the etiology of PTSD remains largely unknown. Several neurobiological systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology and vulnerability for developing PTSD; however, first-line pharmacotherapies are limited. Less than 30% achieve full remission, and even then, approved pharmacological treatments often take weeks for therapeutic effect. This article aims to review the pathophysiology of PTSD within multiple neurobiological systems and how these mechanisms are used as pharmacologic targets of treatment, as well as their potential for future targets of intervention.

  18. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  19. Pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H

    2014-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects up to 2.5% of the population of the course of a lifetime and produces substantial morbidity. Approximately 70% of patients can experience significant symptomatic relief with appropriate pharmacotherapy. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment. These drugs are typically used at higher doses and for longer periods than in depression. Proven second-line treatments include the tricyclic clomipramine and the addition of low-dose neuroleptic medications. OCD refractory to available treatments remains a profound clinical challenge.

  20. Pharmacological treatment of tardive dyskinesia: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Caroff, Stanley N; Campbell, E Cabrina; Carroll, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) occurs in patients receiving antipsychotic treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists. Despite the prevalence of TD and its negative impact on patients' lives, there has been a lack of approved treatments and limited evidence from controlled trials of pharmacological treatment. Areas covered: PubMed was searched for English-language papers published during 2007-2016 using terms 'tardive dyskinesia' or 'drug-induced movement disorder', and 'treatment'. Studies evaluating pharmacological agents for the treatment of TD were selected. A total of 26 studies (five meta-analyses, twelve randomized controlled trials, and nine open-label observational studies) are reviewed. Expert commentary: Treatment of TD necessitates a stepwise approach. Optimization of antipsychotic therapy should be considered before initiation of antidyskinetic therapies. Data from some recent studies indicate possible improvements in TD after switching antipsychotics or with the use of amantadine, levetiracetam, piracetam, zonisamide, propranolol, vitamin B6, or certain unregulated herbal medicines; although significance of these improvements is unclear and require further investigation in randomized controlled trials. By contrast, recent evidence from Phase III trials of novel vesicular monoamine transporter-2 inhibitors demonstrates they could have a significant effect on TD symptom severity and suggests these agents may have the potential to transform treatment of TD in coming years.

  1. Protein misfolding diseases: prospects of pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Alejandra; Yuste-Checa, Patricia; Brasil, Sandra; Briso-Montiano, Álvaro; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Pérez, Belén

    2017-07-03

    Protein misfolding has been linked to numerous inherited diseases. Loss- and gain-of-function mutations (common features of genetic diseases) may cause the destabilization of proteins, leading to alterations in their properties and/or cellular location, resulting in their incorrect functioning. Misfolded proteins can, however, be rescued via the use of proteostasis regulators and/or pharmacological chaperones, suggesting that treatments with small molecules might be developed for a range of genetic diseases. This work describes the potential of these small molecules in this respect, including for the treatment of PMM2-CDG. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectrum of anxiety disorders: diagnosis and pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Karsnitz, Deborah Brandt; Ward, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 30% of women experience an anxiety disorder at some time during their lives, and there is increasing evidence that anxiety disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Despite increased media coverage regarding anxiety disorders, women are reluctant to discuss signs and symptoms of anxiety with family or health care providers. Additionally, despite ongoing research and improved educational curricula, primary care and women's health care providers find diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders challenging. This article reviews the diagnostic features and pharmacologic treatment options for the most common anxiety disorders including generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The impact of anxiety disorders on pregnancy and guidelines for management are presented. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  3. Pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects up to 2.5% of the population of the course of a lifetime and produces substantial morbidity. Approximately 70% of patients can experience significant symptomatic relief with appropriate pharmacotherapy. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main stay of pharmacological treatment. These are typically used at higher doses and for longer periods than in depression. Remission is, unfortunately, uncommon. Proven second-line treatments include the tricyclic clomipramine and the addition of low-dose neuroleptic medications. Other augmentation strategies have been explored for patients refractory to proven interventions, but they are not as of yet robustly supported by controlled studies. The combination of medication with psychotherapy is often used, though careful studies have not documented synergistic benefit in adult patients. OCD refractory to available treatments remains a profound clinical challenge. PMID:25150568

  4. Perspectives of pharmacological treatment in otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liktor, Balázs; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Batta, Tamás József; Sziklai, István; Karosi, Tamás

    2013-03-01

    To review our current knowledge of the pathologic bone metabolism in otosclerosis and to discuss the possibilities of non-surgical, pharmacological intervention. Otosclerosis has been suspected to be associated with defective measles virus infection, local inflammation and consecutive bone deterioration in the human otic capsule. In the early stages of otosclerosis, different pharmacological agents may delay the progression or prevent further deterioration of the disease and consecutive hearing loss. Although effective anti-osteoporotic drugs have become available, the use of sodium fluoride and bisphosphonates in otosclerosis has not yet been successful. Bioflavonoids may relieve tinnitus due to otosclerosis, but there is no data available on long-term application and effects on sensorineural hearing loss. In the initial inflammatory phase, corticosteroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be effective; however, extended systemic application may lead to serious side effects. Vitamin D administration may have effects on the pathological bone loss, as well as on inflammation. No information has been reported on the use of immunosuppressive drugs. Anti-cytokine targeted biological therapy, however, may be feasible. Indeed, one study on the local administration of infliximab has been reported. Potential targets of future therapy may include osteoprotegerin, RANK ligand, cathepsins and also the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. Finally, anti-measles vaccination may delay the progression of the disease and potentially decrease the number of new cases. In conclusion, stapes surgery remains to be widely accepted treatment of conductive hearing loss due to otosclerosis. Due to lack of solid evidence, the place of pharmacological treatment targeting inflammation and bone metabolism needs to be determined by future studies.

  5. Non-pharmacological interventions for alleviating pain during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Strydom, Hardus; Katsaros, Christos; MacDonald, Lci; Curatolo, Michele; Fudalej, Piotr; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2016-12-23

    Pain is prevalent during orthodontics, particularly during the early stages of treatment. To ensure patient comfort and compliance during treatment, the prevention or management of pain is of major importance. While pharmacological means are the first line of treatment for alleviation of orthodontic pain, a range of non-pharmacological approaches have been proposed recently as viable alternatives. To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions to alleviate pain associated with orthodontic treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 6 October 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 6 October 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 6 October 2016) and EThOS (to 6 October 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-pharmacological orthodontic pain intervention to a placebo, no intervention or another non-pharmacological pain intervention were eligible for inclusion. We included any type of orthodontic treatment but excluded trials involving the use of pre-emptive analgesia or pain relief following orthognathic (jaw) surgery or dental extractions in combination with orthodontic treatment. We excluded split-mouth trials (in which each participant receives two or more treatments, each to a separate section of the mouth) and cross-over trials. At least two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We used the random-effects model and expressed results as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We investigated heterogeneity with reference to both clinical and methodological factors. We included 14

  6. Multifaceted individualities in pharmacological treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Boban, Marko

    2013-05-01

    Simply put, there is no cure for obesity. Pharmaceuticals that induce weight loss of extent of at least 5% from baseline are applied and tested as the weight loosing drugs. Available guidelines include recommendations that pharmacologic treatment of obesity may be offered to patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2; or BMI >27 kg/m2 and obesity related comorbidity. Both categories cumulatively include essential boundary condition of failing to achieve clinically significant weight loss through diet and exercise alone. In despite the exceedingly growing number of investigations and approaches, overall achievements in pharmacological treatments of obesity are limited. Antiobesity drugs are typically burdened with issues concerning the sustainability of lost weight, besides limitations in short term efficiency. Another important problem lays in the fact that the drug induced weight loss could be annihilated or reversed if patient does not adhere to personal lifestyle changes. Later include adjustments in behaviour sphere, dietary habits and physical activity. Recently, focus of clinical interests came to prevention of obesity epidemic through optimization of chronic pharmacotherapies, especially ones associated with weight gain side-effect. This review presents the most important representatives of antiobesity drugs and essential principles that ought to be taken in to count in order to treat obesity more successfully.

  7. Non-pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    In selected patients with atrial fibrillation and severe symptoms, non-pharmacological treatment may be an alternative or supplement to drug therapy. Atrioventricular nodal radiofrequency ablation (requires pacemaker implantation), or atrial pacing for sick sinus syndrome, are established treatment modalities. All other non-pharmacological therapies for atrial fibrillation are still experimental. After the Maze operation, atrial depolarization has to follow one specific path determined by surgical scars in the myocardium. This prevents new episodes of atrial fibrillation, but at a cost of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Catheter-based "Maze-like" radiofrequency ablation is technically difficult, and thrombo-embolic complications may occur. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation sometimes is initiated by spontaneous depolarizations in a pulmonary vein inlet. Radio frequency ablation against such focal activity has been reported with high therapeutic success, but the results await confirmation from several centres. For ventricular rate control, most electrophysiologists presently prefer ablation to induce a complete atrioventricular conduction block (with pacemaker) rather than trying to modify conduction by incomplete block. Atrial or dual chamber pacing may prevent atrial fibrillation induced by bradycardia. It remains to confirm that biatrial or multisite right atrial pacing prevents atrial fibrillation more efficiently than ordinary right atrial pacing. An atrial defibrillator is able to diagnose and convert atrial fibrillation. The equipment is expensive, and therapy without sedation may be unpleasant beyond tolerability.

  8. Non-pharmacological Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation†

    PubMed Central

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    In selected patients with atrial fibrillation and severe symptoms, non-pharmacological treatment may be an alternative or supplement to drug therapy. Atrioventricular nodal radiofrequency ablation (requires pacemaker implantation), or atrial pacing for sick sinus syndrome, are established treatment modalities. All other non-pharmacological therapies for atrial fibrillation are still experimental. After the Maze operation, atrial depolarization has to follow one specific path determined by surgical scars in the myocardium. This prevents new episodes of atrial fibrillation, but at a cost of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Catheter-based "Maze-like" radiofrequency ablation is technically difficult, and thrombo-embolic complications may occur. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation sometimes is initiated by spontaneous depolarizations in a pulmonary vein inlet. Radio frequency ablation against such focal activity has been reported with high therapeutic success, but the results await confirmation from several centres. For ventricular rate control, most electrophysiologists presently prefer ablation to induce a complete atrioventricular conduction block (with pacemaker) rather than trying to modify conduction by incomplete block. Atrial or dual chamber pacing may prevent atrial fibrillation induced by bradycardia. It remains to confirm that biatrial or multisite right atrial pacing prevents atrial fibrillation more efficiently than ordinary right atrial pacing. An atrial defibrillator is able to diagnose and convert atrial fibrillation. The equipment is expensive, and therapy without sedation may be unpleasant beyond tolerability. PMID:17006572

  9. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: Current treatments and future directions✩

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Frank J.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Jun, Janie J.; Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments: the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23023162

  10. [Non pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Laurent, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Nondrug treatments of neuropathic pain should always begin at the same time as pharmacologic treatment. There are three types of nondrug treatment for neuropathic pain: physical, surgical, and "psychocorporal" and psychotherapeutic treatment. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a simple physical treatment that strengthens local inhibitory controls and is indicated in focal neuropathic pain when upstream stimulation is possible for a superficial sensitive nerve trunk. Destructive surgery is represented today by "DREZotomy", destruction of nociceptive fibers and their dorsal root entry zones. It is indicated essentially in intractable pain due to plexus avulsion. Functional surgery is implanted electric stimulation--either spinal or central (encephalic)--of structures that exert inhibitory control on the pain pathways. Spinal stimulation is performed at the level of the posterior spinal cord and is indicated essentially in segmental mononeuropathies refractory to drug treatment. Central stimulation is performed at the motor cortex and is indicated for refractory central pain. "Psychocorporal" techniques (relaxation, sophrology, hypnosis) are useful to reduce anxiety and neurovegetative hypertonicity, both factors that aggravate neuropathic pain.

  11. [Pharmacologic treatment of the ischaemic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Cisneros, Noé

    2007-01-01

    The term acute coronary syndromes includes a phantom of symptomatic clinical pictures that represent the acute occlusion of the coronary arteries by diverse degrees of plate of cholesterol, clot and spasm. They are divided in acute coronary ischemic syndromes without elevation of the ST (instable angina). And with elevation of the ST (acute infarct to the myocardium). The pharmacologic therapy includes a treatment in common for the syndromes before diagnosing the tipe of syndrome, this called therapy attached treatment includes the administration of oxygen, morphine, aspirin, nitrates, betablock, astatines and laxatives. The treatment for the acute coronary ischemic syndromes without elevation of the ST is with a preservative strategy where plaquetary antithrombotic drugs are used, while in the treatment of the acute coronary ischemic syndromes with elevation of the ST the strategy is of repercussion with the fibrinolytic drugs use like streptokinase anda rt-PA. The participation of infirmary is essential during the evolution and treatment of the individual dividing in four sections its interventions according to the clinical situation and time of intervention.

  12. Ongoing Cerebral Vasculitis During Treatment of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lisa R; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Yeshokumar, Anusha K; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a tickborne infection that produces a systemic small-vessel vasculitis; its prognosis is excellent if appropriate treatment is initiated early. Because the advent of effective antirickettsial therapies predates the widespread use of brain magnetic resonance imaging, there are limited data on the effect of untreated Rocky Mountain spotted fever infection on neuroimaging studies. We describe a 7-year-old girl with delayed treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever who suffered severe neurological impairment. Serial brain magnetic resonance images revealed a progressive "starry sky appearance," which is proposed to result from the same small vessel vasculitis that causes the characteristic skin rash of this infection. Neurological injury can continue to occur despite specific antirickettsial therapy in Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This child's clinical features raise questions about the optimal management of this infection, particularly the utility of immune modulating therapies in cases of delayed treatment and neurological involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Bell, James

    2014-02-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been 'programmatic', with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some 'nonresponders' and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy.

  14. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James

    2014-01-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been ‘programmatic’, with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some ‘nonresponders’ and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy. PMID:23210630

  15. Pharmacological treatment of the obese diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Lefebvre, P J

    1993-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for non-insulin-dependent (or Type 2) diabetes mellitus. Consequently, reduction of weight excess comes to the front line in the prevention and management of NIDDM. It is only when diet and physical exercise fail that drug treatment should be considered. Pharmacological treatment of obesity should favour drugs which not only promote weight loss, by reducing caloric intake and/or increasing thermogenesis and energy expenditure, but also, and especially, improve insulin sensitivity. Serotoninergic anorectic compounds (dexfenfluramine, fluoxetine) appear to possess, to some extent, all these properties. Metformin significantly reduces insulin resistance and improves glycaemic control without inducing weight gain, and even favouring some weight loss. This biguanide is now considered as the first line drug for the obese diabetic patient. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors may help to reduce post-prandial glucose excursions but do not promote weight loss per se. Sulfonylureas can be prescribed to an obese patient when hyperglycaemia persists despite diet and the above-mentioned oral agents, but their use should be associated with reinforcement of dietary advices in order to prevent further weight increase; it is also the case for insulin therapy. Finally, drugs specifically stimulating thermogenesis and energy expenditure, new agents sensitizing tissues to the action of insulin and various compounds interfering with lipid metabolism are currently under extensive investigation with promising preliminary results in the obese diabetic patient. In conclusion, obesity remains a major problem in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus and this justifies the search for new, safe and effective, pharmacological approaches.

  16. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for nightmare disorder.

    PubMed

    Nadorff, Michael R; Lambdin, Karen K; Germain, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Interest in the treatment of nightmares has greatly increased over the last several years as research has demonstrated the clinical significance of nightmare disorder. This paper provides an overview of nightmare disorder, its clinical relevance, and the leading treatments that are available. In particular, the paper defines nightmare disorder and then summarize the recent literature examining the clinical relevance of nightmare disorder, including its relation to post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychiatric conditions. The relation between nightmares and suicidality is also discussed. Recent findings on the treatment of nightmare with imagery rehearsal therapy and prazosin are then summarized. Lastly, the paper comments on potential future uses of nightmare treatment including using imagery rehearsal therapy or prazosin as a first-line intervention for post-traumatic stress disorder and using these treatments as an adjunctive therapy to reduce suicide risk in those at risk of suicide with nightmares.

  17. Pharmacological treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation.

    PubMed

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Newton-Howes, Giles; Clarke, Mike J

    2017-01-24

    Antipsychotic-related constipation is a common and serious adverse effect, especially for people taking clozapine. Clozapine has been shown to impede gastrointestinal motility, leading to constipation, and has been reported in up to 60% of patients receiving clozapine. In rare cases, complications can be fatal. Appropriate laxatives should be prescribed to treat constipation in people taking antipsychotics, but there is a lack of guidance on the comparative effectiveness and harms of different agents in this population. An understanding of the effectiveness and safety of treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation is important for clinicians and patients alike. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatment (versus placebo or compared against another treatment) for antipsychotic-related constipation (defined as constipated patients of any age, who are treated with antipsychotics, regardless of dose, in which constipation is considered to be an antipsychotic-related side effect). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (15 June 2015), which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, PubMed, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials, grey literature, and conference proceedings. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in this register. We also handsearched bibliographies and contacted relevant authors for additional information. We included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of pharmacological treatments in patients with antipsychotic-related constipation. Pharmacological treatments included laxatives and other medicines that could reasonably be used to combat constipation in this population (e.g. anticholinergic agents, like bethanecol). Two review authors independently extracted data from all included studies and assessed trials for risk of bias. A third author reviewed

  18. [Pharmacological treatment of the premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Jurado López, A R

    2014-07-01

    Biomedical approach to premature ejaculation (PE) has permited a better phisiopatologycal knowledge and so the use of pharmacological agents for the treatment of this sexual dysfuncion. Most of the studies to evaluate the eficacy of these drugs were not carried at all the parameters which actually define PE: intravaginal ejaculatory latencie time (IELT) tested with watch, ejaculation control self perception cuantification (questionaries) and cuantification of generated consequences in patient and partner, if it existes. For this reason, it is difficult to analyse the scientific evidence and we use medicines with no approved indication for PE ("off label"). This text is a review of pharmacologycal agents with no approved indication (PDE type 5 inhibitors, α-blockers, tramadol, SSRI, clomipramine), and pharmacologycal agents developed to be used in the treatment of PE and having got indication in this sexual dysfunction or "on label" drugs (topic anesthesics, dapoxetine). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  19. Functional daytime incontinence: non-pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    van Gool, J D; Vijverberg, M A; Messer, A P; Elzinga-Plomp, A; de Jong, T P

    1992-01-01

    In children with 'functional incontinence', defined as any form of (daytime) wetting caused by non-neuropathic bladder/sphincter dysfunction, most signs and symptoms are rooted in habitual non-physiological responses to signals from bladder and urethra. These responses develop at toddler age, when children learn how to remain dry. Once they have become a habit, incomplete bladder emptying and recurrent urinary tract infections come into play, reiterating the non-physiological responses into fixed patterns of bladder/sphincter dysfunction with functional incontinence as the leading symptom. Non-pharmacological treatment of functional incontinence implies relearning and training the normal responses to signals from bladder and urethra: a cognitive process, with perception of the signals reinforced by biofeedback. This type of treatment is best combined with long-term chemoprophylaxis. Severe cases will benefit from anticholinergic drugs, as adjuvants to the training programme. Urodynamics play a crucial role in documenting the specific patterns of incontinence and in providing biofeedback. For a successful programme, psychological screening of the children is indispensable.

  20. Past and Present Progress in the Pharmacologic Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kane, John M.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite treatment advances over the past decades, schizophrenia remains one of the most severe psychiatric disorders that is associated with a chronic relapsing course and marked functional impairment in a substantial proportion of patients. Methods A historical overview of the pharmacologic advances in the treatment of schizophrenia over the past 50 years is presented. This is followed by a review of the current developments in optimizing the treatment and outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Methodological challenges, potential solutions, and areas of particular need for further research are highlighted. Results Although treatment goals of response, remission and recovery have been defined more uniformly, a good “effectiveness” measure mapping onto functional outcomes is still lacking. Moreover, the field has to advance in transferring measurement based approaches from research to clinical practice. There is an ongoing debate whether and which first- or second-generation antipsychotics should be used. However, especially, when considering individual adverse effect profiles, the differentiation into first- and second-generation antipsychotics as unified classes can not be upheld and a more differentiated view and treatment selection is required. The desired, individualized treatment approach needs to consider current symptoms, comorbid conditions, past therapeutic response and adverse effects, as well as patient choice and expectations. Acute and long-term goals and effects of medication treatment need to be balanced. To date, clozapine is the only evidence based treatment for refractory patients, and the role of antipsychotic polypharmacy and other augmentation strategies remains unclear, at best. Conclusions To discover novel treatments with enhanced/broader efficacy and improved tolerability, and to enable personalized treatment, the mechanisms underlying illness development and progression, symptomatic improvement and side effect development

  1. Past and present progress in the pharmacologic treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2010-09-01

    Despite treatment advances over the past decades, schizophrenia remains one of the most severe psychiatric disorders that is associated with a chronic relapsing course and marked functional impairment in a substantial proportion of patients. In this article, a historical overview of the pharmacologic advances in the treatment of schizophrenia over the past 50 years is presented. This is followed by a review of the current developments in optimizing the treatment and outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Methodological challenges, potential solutions, and areas of particular need for further research are highlighted. Although treatment goals of response, remission, and recovery have been defined more uniformly, a good "effectiveness" measure mapping onto functional outcomes is still lacking. Moreover, the field must advance in transferring measurement-based approaches from research to clinical practice. There is an ongoing debate regarding whether and which first- or second-generation antipsychotics should be used. However, especially when considering individual adverse effect profiles, the differentiation into first- and second-generation antipsychotics as unified classes cannot be upheld, and a more differentiated view and treatment selection are required. The desired, individualized treatment approach needs to consider current symptoms, comorbid conditions, past therapeutic response, and adverse effects, as well as patient choice and expectations. Acute and long-term goals and effects of medication treatment should be balanced. To date, clozapine is the only evidence-based treatment for refractory patients, and the role of antipsychotic polypharmacy and other augmentation strategies remains unclear, at best. To discover novel treatments with enhanced/broader efficacy and improved tolerability, and to enable personalized treatment, the mechanisms underlying illness development and progression, symptomatic improvement, and side effect development need to be

  2. [Pharmacologic treatment of fibromyalgia: Towards chemical neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Collado, Antonio; Conesa, Arantxa

    2009-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pathology and its main symptom is pain which usually does not respond to traditional analgesia. Its clinical characteristics and the diverse neurophysiologic findings in these patients point to a central sensitization process of the nociceptive system as the central physiopathologic axis in this disease. The knowledge of the nociceptive system functioning and its behavior in this disease has led, in the past few years, to new possibilities for the therapeutic approach. In that way, drugs with a differential mechanism of action, allowing a modulation of the nociceptive system capable of producing analgesia where other medications have failed are being developed. Different drugs with the capacity increasing the activity of biologically active amines implicated in the nociceptive inhibition process and others which are destined to reduce the excitability of the system through ion channels, are being tested with some benefit in Fibromyalgia patients and may constitute a more rational neuromodulating drug profile for this disease. This article reviews the different pharmacological strategies supported by scientific evidence and points to some future research lines that fortifies the therapeutic change taking place in the treatment approach of these patients. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. [Non-pharmacological treatment of insomnia].

    PubMed

    Riemann, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Chronic insomnia, i. e. complaints about prolonged sleep onset, difficulties in maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and associated impairments of daytime functioning afflicts approximately 10 % of the population in most Western industrialized countries. Chronic insomnia can be due to somatic disorders, mental disorders, intake of medications, legal or illicit drugs. One third of all patients with chronic insomnias suffers from primary insomnia, a diagnosis which is given when none of the above mentioned factors can be identified as a causal factor. In medical practice, insomnia usually is treated with hypnotic drugs or other sedative drugs such as antidepressants. In the last 20 years it was shown that cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia can be applied successfully independent of causal factors. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) encompasses psychoeducation about sleep and sleep hygiene, relaxation techniques, i. e. progressive muscle relaxation, specific behavioral techniques like stimulus control or sleep restriction and cognitive techniques to reduce nocturnal ruminations. Several published meta-analyses from the last two decades showed that these techniques, especially in their combined form, can be considered as evidence-based. It was shown that they are as effective as pharmacological therapy in the short-term and in the long-run even superior to pharmacotherapy. Cognitive-behavioral techniques for the therapy of insomnia can be used very successfully by trained physicians and psychotherapists.

  4. Cerebral vasospasm pharmacological treatment: an update.

    PubMed

    Siasios, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z; Fountas, Kostas N

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage- (aSAH-) associated vasospasm constitutes a clinicopathological entity, in which reversible vasculopathy, impaired autoregulatory function, and hypovolemia take place, and lead to the reduction of cerebral perfusion and finally ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm begins most often on the third day after the ictal event and reaches the maximum on the 5th-7th postictal days. Several therapeutic modalities have been employed for preventing or reversing cerebral vasospasm. Triple "H" therapy, balloon and chemical angioplasty with superselective intra-arterial injection of vasodilators, administration of substances like magnesium sulfate, statins, fasudil hydrochloride, erythropoietin, endothelin-1 antagonists, nitric oxide progenitors, and sildenafil, are some of the therapeutic protocols, which are currently employed for managing patients with aSAH. Intense pathophysiological mechanism research has led to the identification of various mediators of cerebral vasospasm, such as endothelium-derived, vascular smooth muscle-derived, proinflammatory mediators, cytokines and adhesion molecules, stress-induced gene activation, and platelet-derived growth factors. Oral, intravenous, or intra-arterial administration of antagonists of these mediators has been suggested for treating patients suffering a-SAH vasospam. In our current study, we attempt to summate all the available pharmacological treatment modalities for managing vasospasm.

  5. Cerebral Vasospasm Pharmacological Treatment: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z.; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage- (aSAH-) associated vasospasm constitutes a clinicopathological entity, in which reversible vasculopathy, impaired autoregulatory function, and hypovolemia take place, and lead to the reduction of cerebral perfusion and finally ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm begins most often on the third day after the ictal event and reaches the maximum on the 5th–7th postictal days. Several therapeutic modalities have been employed for preventing or reversing cerebral vasospasm. Triple “H” therapy, balloon and chemical angioplasty with superselective intra-arterial injection of vasodilators, administration of substances like magnesium sulfate, statins, fasudil hydrochloride, erythropoietin, endothelin-1 antagonists, nitric oxide progenitors, and sildenafil, are some of the therapeutic protocols, which are currently employed for managing patients with aSAH. Intense pathophysiological mechanism research has led to the identification of various mediators of cerebral vasospasm, such as endothelium-derived, vascular smooth muscle-derived, proinflammatory mediators, cytokines and adhesion molecules, stress-induced gene activation, and platelet-derived growth factors. Oral, intravenous, or intra-arterial administration of antagonists of these mediators has been suggested for treating patients suffering a-SAH vasospam. In our current study, we attempt to summate all the available pharmacological treatment modalities for managing vasospasm. PMID:23431440

  6. Current and future pharmacologic treatment of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Onder, Graziano; Morley, John E; Gillette-Guyonet, Sophie; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Sarcopenia is a complex multifactorial condition that can by treated with multimodal approaches. No pharmacologic agent to prevent or treat sarcopenia has been as efficacious as exercise (mainly resistance training) in combination with nutritional intervention (adequate protein and energy intake). However, performing resistance training sessions and following nutritional advice can be challenging, especially for frail, sarcopenic, elderly patients, and results remain only partial. Therefore, new pharmacologic agents may substantially reduce the functional decline in older people. This article reviews the new pharmacologic agents currently being assessed for treating sarcopenia.

  7. Treatment of maladaptive aggression in youth: CERT guidelines II. Treatments and ongoing management.

    PubMed

    Scotto Rosato, Nancy; Correll, Christoph U; Pappadopulos, Elizabeth; Chait, Alanna; Crystal, Stephen; Jensen, Peter S

    2012-06-01

    To develop guidelines for management and treatment of maladaptive aggression in youth in the areas of psychosocial interventions, medication treatments, and side-effect management. Evidence was assembled and evaluated in a multistep process, including systematic reviews of published literature; an expert survey of recommended practices; a consensus conference of researchers, policymakers, clinicians, and family advocates; and review by the steering committee of successive drafts of the recommendations. The Center for Education and Research on Mental Health Therapeutics Treatment of Maladaptive Aggression in Youth guidelines reflect a synthesis of the available evidence, based on this multistep process. This article describes the content, rationale, and evidence for 11 recommendations. Key treatment principles include considering psychosocial interventions, such as evidence-based parent and child skills training as the first line of treatment; targeting the underlying disorder first following evidence-based guidelines; considering individual psychosocial and medical factors, including cardiovascular risk in the selection of agents if medication treatment (ideally with the best evidence base) is initiated; avoiding the use of multiple psychotropic medications simultaneously; and careful monitoring of treatment response, by using structured rating scales, as well as close medical monitoring for side effects, including metabolic changes. Treatment of children with maladaptive aggression is a "moving target" requiring ongoing assimilation of new evidence as it emerges. Based on the existing evidence, the Treatment of Maladaptive Aggression in Youth guidelines provide a framework for management of maladaptive aggression in youth, appropriate for use by primary care clinicians and mental health providers.

  8. [Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension: current situation].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J

    2012-11-01

    A permanent and successful treatment of high blood pressure is based on a combination of non-pharmacological treatment measures and pharmacological therapy. The most proven non-pharmacological measures are physical and sports activities, weight reduction, dietary adaption and reduction of salt intake as well as nicotine abstinence and moderate alcohol consumption. A blood pressure reducing effect of evidence grade A was demonstrated for these 4 pillars of non-pharmacological therapy in studies. For pharmacological treatment five main substance groups are available: thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, AT1 blockers, calcium channel blockers and beta blockers. A very good blood pressure reducing effect with an advantageous side effect profile has been proven for all substances. The initial high blood pressure therapy can be carried out with monotherapy but therapy with several antihypertensives is often necessary for the very varied combination of compounds which are available in a meaningful combination and dosage of effective ingredients. For the treatment of comorbid hypertensive patients recommendations are available for an individualized pharmacological treatment corresponding to the specific cardiovascular risk and comorbidity. High blood pressure therapy must be continuously carried out over many years. For permanent success of the therapy good compliance is indispensible which can be encouraged by integration in the therapy and should be regularly controlled.

  9. Non-pharmacological treatment of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Afton L; Williams, David A

    2011-04-01

    Individuals with chronic widespread pain, including those with fibromyalgia, pose a particular challenge to treatment, given the modest effectiveness of pharmacological agents for this condition. The growing consensus indicates that the best approach to treatment involves the combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Several non-pharmacological interventions, particularly exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), have garnered good evidence of effectiveness as stand-alone, adjunctive treatments for patients with chronic pain. In this article, evidenced-based, non-pharmacological management techniques for chronic widespread pain are described by using two broad categories, exercise and CBT. The evidence for decreasing pain, improving functioning and changing secondary symptoms is highlighted. Lastly, the methods by which exercise and CBT can be combined for a multi-component approach, which is consistent with the current evidence-based guidelines of several American and European medical societies, are addressed.

  10. Current concepts and pharmacologic treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses and reason for hospitalization in the United States. Ace inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers and digitalis are the leading agents in pharmacologic management of heart failure. In order to improve patient outcomes, adult-health nurses need to understand the diagnosis, pathophysiology, nursing interventions, and pharmacologic treatment of this common disorder.

  11. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  12. Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: Pharmacological treatment of 30 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Gherzi, Marcella; Stagnaro, Michela; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Giannotta, Melania; Vavassori, Maria Rosaria; Veneselli, Edvige; De Grandis, Elisa

    2017-06-01

    Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood (AHC) is a severe disorder. Several drugs have been administered as prophylaxis for paroxysmal attacks, however, no therapy is completely effective. Our aim is to review the pharmacological data related to the prophylactic and acute treatment of a cohort of 30 patients (16M, 14F, age range 5-42years) and to correlate them with the clinical and genetic data collected through the Italian Biobank and Clinical Registry for AHC. Flunarizine was the most commonly used long-term treatment in the cohort; it reduced duration and frequency of attacks in 50% of patients and decreased intensity in 32.1%. In younger patients, flunarizine seemed significantly more effective in reducing intensity. We found no correlation between the effectiveness of flunarizine and genotype, or between developmental outcome and duration of treatment. In particular, 3 of our patients affected by E815K mutation presented rapid neurological deterioration despite ongoing treatment. Among the other administered prophylactic therapies, few proved to be effective (benzodiazepines, niaprazine, acetazolamide, melatonin, olanzapine, ketogenic diet). No clear rationale exists regarding their use, but these therapies may work by reducing the triggering factors. The presented data are retrospective, but they are aimed at filling a gap given the rarity of the disease and the lack of randomized and controlled studies. Besides their usefulness in clarifying the pathophysiology of the disease, prospective studies involving larger cohorts of ATP1A3 mutated AHC patients are needed to provide a rationale for testing other molecules. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Vlak, Tonko; Aljinović, Jure

    2014-01-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is a mandatory part of all algorithms and recommendations for dealing with this disease. However, the belief that pharmacological therapy is much more superior to treating osteoporosis than non-pharmacological treatment is still common in the medical community. The probable reason is that pharmacological treatment can be measured and statistically analyzed, and that's why the abundance of data from controlled randomized trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews are available. Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is not so much represented in evidence based medicine (EBM) because there are a lot of different exercise protocols, different machines with different setups for applying the same models of physical therapy. So the main problem are inclusion criteria in meta-analyses or systematic reviews of patients whose data is collected using different protocols. Non-pharmacological treatment ofosteoporosis: myth or reality? Maybe we did not answer this question in fullness, but by analyzing data from the scientifically relevant data bases we can conclude that non-pharmacological treatment is an important factor in prevention of osteoporosis and part of all treatment protocols available today--almost as equally significant as pharmacological treatment. Cochrane library database and PEDro database provide EBM information that can help to identify the best types of ex- ercises and physical procedures for bone mineral density and prevention of falls. The best result in non-pharmaco- logical treatment of osteoporosis showed a combination of exercise programs that include muscle strengthening exercises, aerobic exercises, exercises with progressive resistance increase, and high-impact exercises. As for individual exercises, a non-weight-bearing high force exercise showed small but statistically significant increase in bone mineral density in femoral neck, in some scientific papers. Exercises for balance and

  14. [Clinical report on pharmacological treatment of autism].

    PubMed

    Thivierge, J

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacology of autism and briefly overviews its use, history and novelties. "Autism" does not refer to any pathophysiology currently known. And no drug or class of drugs can cure this illness which includes many. Before using drugs, efficient in relieving symptoms, it is important to consider the potential benefit of behavioral approaches. Developments in research give hope that drugs will cure or prevent this brain illness.

  15. Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Allergic Rhinitis (Neglected Treatments).

    PubMed

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad Ebrahim; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common diseases affecting people in industrialized society. However, this is not a new disease and it was clinically described and treated for the first time by Rhazes (865-925 CE). The disease was also mentioned in "The Canon of Medicine" by Avicenna (980-1037). We searched in Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed for "allergic rhinitis", "interactions", "non-prescription", "prescription", and in electronic copies of ITM sources the "canon" and "Al-Havi". Both Persian pioneers of Medicine recommended non-pharmacologic management as an important phase of the therapy. Their recommendations consisted of avoiding overeating and polydipsia, massage of the lower extremities, adjusting the duration and time of sleep, sleeping in the supine position, avoiding exposure of the head to cold air and taking a shower early in the morning. Although some aspects of their recommendations, such as massage of the lower extremities, avoiding of overeating and adjusting of sleep pattern were approved, but further cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to confirm other non-pharmacological treatments.

  16. Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Allergic Rhinitis (Neglected Treatments)

    PubMed Central

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad Ebrahim; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common diseases affecting people in industrialized society. However, this is not a new disease and it was clinically described and treated for the first time by Rhazes (865-925 CE). The disease was also mentioned in “The Canon of Medicine” by Avicenna (980–1037). Methods: We searched in Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed for “allergic rhinitis”, “interactions”, “non-prescription”, “prescription”, and in electronic copies of ITM sources the “canon” and “Al-Havi”. Results: Both Persian pioneers of Medicine recommended non-pharmacologic management as an important phase of the therapy. Their recommendations consisted of avoiding overeating and polydipsia, massage of the lower extremities, adjusting the duration and time of sleep, sleeping in the supine position, avoiding exposure of the head to cold air and taking a shower early in the morning. Conclusion: Although some aspects of their recommendations, such as massage of the lower extremities, avoiding of overeating and adjusting of sleep pattern were approved, but further cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to confirm other non-pharmacological treatments. PMID:27840512

  17. Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Allergic Rhinitis (Neglected Treatments)

    PubMed Central

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad Ebrahim; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common diseases affecting people in industrialized society. However, this is not a new disease and it was clinically described and treated for the first time by Rhazes (865-925 CE). The disease was also mentioned in “The Canon of Medicine” by Avicenna (980–1037). Methods: We searched in Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed for “allergic rhinitis”, “interactions”, “non-prescription”, “prescription”, and in electronic copies of ITM sources the “canon” and “Al-Havi”. Results: Both Persian pioneers of Medicine recommended non-pharmacologic management as an important phase of the therapy. Their recommendations consisted of avoiding overeating and polydipsia, massage of the lower extremities, adjusting the duration and time of sleep, sleeping in the supine position, avoiding exposure of the head to cold air and taking a shower early in the morning. Conclusion: Although some aspects of their recommendations, such as massage of the lower extremities, avoiding of overeating and adjusting of sleep pattern were approved, but further cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to confirm other non-pharmacological treatments. PMID:27516678

  18. Pharmacologic treatment of sex offenders with paraphilic disorder.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Frederico Duarte; Delavenne, Heloise Garcia; Assumpção, Alessandra de Fátima Almeida; Thibaut, Florence

    2013-05-01

    Sexual offending is both a social and a public health issue. Evidence demonstrates that a combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches may reduce or even eliminate deviant sexual behavior in sex offenders with paraphilic disorders. In this article, we will review pharmacological treatment options for sex offenders with paraphilias. Both serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and antiandrogen treatments have been used with reported success in decreasing recidivism. SSRIs have been used in mild types of paraphilias and juvenile paraphilias. Antiandrogen treatments seem to be effective in severe sex offenders with paraphilic disorders in order to reduce victimization. Combined pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with better efficacy. Imaging studies may improve the knowledge of paraphilic disorders and the mechanisms of action of current treatments. In spite of existing evidence, there is a need for independent, large-scale and good quality studies assessing the long-term efficacy and tolerance of treatments.

  19. Pharmacological treatment of neonatal seizures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Laurel A; Patel, Anup D; Slaughter, Jonathan L

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacologic treatment options for neonatal seizures have expanded over the past 2 decades, and there is no consensus on optimal treatment strategy. We systematically reviewed the published literature to determine which medication(s) are most effective for treating neonatal seizures, by retrieving trials and observational investigations via PubMed (through August 2011) that focused on pharmacological seizure treatment of neonates (≤ 28 days old) and utilized continuous or amplitude-integrated EEG to confirm seizure diagnosis and cessation. Our search identified 557 initial articles and 14 additional studies after reference reviews, with 16 meeting inclusion criteria. Of these, 2 were randomized trials and only 3 additional investigations included comparison groups. We found limited evidence regarding the best pharmacologic treatment for neonatal seizures, but were able to devise a treatment algorithm from available data. These findings have the potential to serve as a clinical reference and to inform the design of comparative effectiveness investigations for neonatal antiepileptics.

  20. Pharmacologic Treatment of Opioid Addiction During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Keough, Lori; Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    Opioid addiction during pregnancy presents a treatment challenge to clinicians and women alike. Untreated addiction can lead to poor maternal and fetal health outcomes. Medication-assisted treatment is the standard of care, and methadone is the current drug of choice for treatment. Emerging evidence also supports the use of buprenorphine during pregnancy. Both methadone and buprenorphine have risks and benefits that should be explored before initiating treatment. Clinicians who work in obstetrics and in addiction treatment can collaborate and coordinate treatment to ensure optimal maternal and fetal outcomes. Women undergoing treatment will require frequent monitoring, particularly in the third trimester. Neonates born to women receiving treatment may have withdrawal symptoms and require additional treatment. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  1. [Pharmacology].

    PubMed

    González, José; Orero, Ana; Olmo, Vicente; Martínez, David; Prieto, José; Bahlsen, Jose Antonio; Zaragozá, Francisco; Honorato, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Two of the main characteristics of western societies in the last fifty years have been the medicalization of the human life and the environmental degradation. The first one has forced human being to consider medicines use related to what would be rational, reasonable and well-reasoned. The second one brought us to a new ecologist conscience. In relation to the "human social system", the effects of medication can be considered very positive as a whole, particularly those related to the amazing increase of expectative and quality of life. But, along with those unquestionable beneficial effects, medicines have also caused some negative effects for other biotic and abiotic systems, such as microbian alterations and their undesirable consequences which have involved the massive use of antibiotics in medicine and veterinary, the uncontrolled elimination of millions of doses of all kind of drugs, additives and excipients, etc., as well as atmospheric contamination and degradation of forests and deep oceans which can have been caused by investigation and production of determinated drugs. In this context Pharmacology appears as a scientific discipline that studies the research (R), development (D), production (P), and utilization (U) of drugs and medical substances in relation to the environment. From a farmaecologic perspective the drugs utilization has its development in three main contexts, all of them closely related: prescription quality, farmaceutical care, and patient's active participation in his own disease and treatment.

  2. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder.

  3. Neuroscience of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Marc N.; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although substantial advances have been made in behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions, moving treatment development to the next stage may require novel ways of approaching addictions, particularly those derived from new findings regarding of the neurobiological underpinnings of addictions, while assimilating and incorporating relevant information from earlier approaches. In this review, we first briefly review theoretical and biological models of addiction and then describe existing behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for the addictions within this framework. We then propose new directions for treatment development and targets that are informed by recent evidence regarding the heterogeneity of addictions and the neurobiological contributions to these disorders. PMID:21338880

  4. Pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetic dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yong S K; Kashyap, Moti L

    2004-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have a higher risk for cardiovascular heart disease (CHD) than does the general population, and once they develop CHD, mortality is higher. Good glycemic control will reduce CHD only modestly in patients with diabetes. Therefore, reduction in all cardiovascular risks such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and smoking is warranted. The focus of this article is on therapy for dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance) share similarities with patients with type 2 diabetes and may have a comparable cardiovascular risk profile. Diabetic patients tend to have higher triglyceride, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and similar low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels compared with those levels in nondiabetic patients. However, diabetic patients tend to have a higher concentration of small dense LDL particles, which are associated with higher CHD risk. Current recommendations are for an LDL goal of less than 100 mg/dl (an option of < 70 mg/dl in very high-risk patients), an HDL goal greater than 40 mg/dl for men and greater than 50 mg/dl for women, and a triglyceride goal less than 150 mg/dl. Nonpharmacologic interventions (diet and exercise) are first-line therapies and are used with pharmacologic therapy when necessary. Lowering LDL levels is the first priority in treating diabetic dyslipidemia. Statins are the first drug choice, followed by resins or ezetimibe, then fenofibrate or niacin. If a single agent is inadequate to achieve lipid goals, combinations of the preceding Drugs may be used. For elevated triglyceride levels, hyperglycemia must be controlled first. If triglyceride or HDL levels remain uncontrolled, pharmacologic agents should be considered. Fibrates are slightly more effective than niacin in lowering triglyceride levels, but niacin increases HDL levels appreciably more than do fibrates. Unlike gemfibrozil, niacin selectively increases

  5. Interns' knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics after undergraduate and on-going internship training in Nigeria: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Senbanjo, Idowu O; Amole, Olufemi O

    2009-07-28

    A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of a disease and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of a drug is required for safe and rational prescribing. The aim of this study was therefore to assess how adequately the undergraduate CPT teaching had prepared interns in Nigeria for safe and rational prescribing and retrospectively, to know how they wanted the undergraduate curriculum to be modified so as to improve appropriate prescribing. The effect of internship training on the prescribing ability of the interns was also sought. A total of 100 interns were randomly selected from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja; Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Idiaraba; General Hospital Lagos (GHL); the EKO Hospital, Ikeja; and Havana Specialist Hospital, Surulere. A structured questionnaire was the instrument of study. The questionnaire sought information about the demographics of the interns, their undergraduate CPT teaching, experience of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug interactions since starting work, confidence in drug usage and, in retrospect; any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate CPT teaching. The response rate was 81%. All the respondents graduated from universities in Nigeria. The ability of the interns to prescribe rationally (66, 81.4%) and safely (47, 58%) was provided by undergraduate CPT teaching. Forty two (51.8%) respondents had problems with prescription writing. The interns would likely prescribe antibiotics (71, 87.6%), nonsteroidal analgesics (66, 81.4%), diuretics (55, 67.9%), sedatives (52, 62.9%), and insulin and oral hypoglycaemics (43, 53%) with confidence and unsupervised. The higher the numbers of clinical rotations done, the more confident were the respondents to prescribe unsupervised (chi2 = 19.98, P < 0.001). Similarly, respondents who had rotated through the four major clinical rotations and at least a special posting (chi2 = 11.57, P < 0.001) or four major clinical rotations only (chi2

  6. Interns' knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics after undergraduate and on-going internship training in Nigeria: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Senbanjo, Idowu O; Amole, Olufemi O

    2009-01-01

    Background A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of a disease and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of a drug is required for safe and rational prescribing. The aim of this study was therefore to assess how adequately the undergraduate CPT teaching had prepared interns in Nigeria for safe and rational prescribing and retrospectively, to know how they wanted the undergraduate curriculum to be modified so as to improve appropriate prescribing. The effect of internship training on the prescribing ability of the interns was also sought. Methods A total of 100 interns were randomly selected from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja; Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Idiaraba; General Hospital Lagos (GHL); the EKO Hospital, Ikeja; and Havana Specialist Hospital, Surulere. A structured questionnaire was the instrument of study. The questionnaire sought information about the demographics of the interns, their undergraduate CPT teaching, experience of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug interactions since starting work, confidence in drug usage and, in retrospect; any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate CPT teaching. Results The response rate was 81%. All the respondents graduated from universities in Nigeria. The ability of the interns to prescribe rationally (66, 81.4%) and safely (47, 58%) was provided by undergraduate CPT teaching. Forty two (51.8%) respondents had problems with prescription writing. The interns would likely prescribe antibiotics (71, 87.6%), nonsteroidal analgesics (66, 81.4%), diuretics (55, 67.9%), sedatives (52, 62.9%), and insulin and oral hypoglycaemics (43, 53%) with confidence and unsupervised. The higher the numbers of clinical rotations done, the more confident were the respondents to prescribe unsupervised (χ2 = 19.98, P < 0.001). Similarly, respondents who had rotated through the four major clinical rotations and at least a special posting (χ2 = 11.57, P < 0.001) or four major

  7. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs.

  8. Present and Future: Pharmacologic Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Glandt, Mariela; Raz, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    Obesity now presents one of the biggest health problems of our times. Diet and exercise are best for both prevention and treatment; unfortunately, both require much discipline and are difficult to maintain. Medications offer a possible adjunct, but their effect is modest, they are limited by side effects, and the weight loss lasts only as long as the drug is being taken, since as soon as treatment is stopped, the weight is regained. Sibutramine, a sympathomimetic medication which was available for long-term treatment, is the most recent of the drugs to be withdrawn from the market due to side effects; in this case it was an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This paper reviews those medications which are available for treatment of obesity, including many of those recently taken off the market. It also discusses some of the newer treatments that are currently being investigated. PMID:21331293

  9. [Pharmacological possibilities in treatment hypoacusis in children].

    PubMed

    Pruszewicz, A; Obrebowski, A; Woźnica, B; Swidziński, P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present the dynamics of hearing thresholds and the progress in rehabilitation of hearing and speech according to the treatment applied and probable etiological factor of hypoacusis. Two groups of children were examined. The first group consisted of children with deep sensorineural hypoacusis together with central component of hypoacusis, whereas the second group included children with sudden occurrence of hypoacusis or detorioration of diminished hearing ability. The first group received a treatment with a drug stimulating the function of central nervous system, Cerebrolysin (Minden, D), whereas the other one underwent typical therapy applied in case of sudden deafness (mannitol, hydrocortison, vitamins, enzymes). Both the groups were subjected to objective examination of hearing before and after the treatment. The improvement in examination results in the first group was observed in 36%. In patients suffering from sudden deafness the improvement in hearing after treatment was found respectively in 30%.

  10. Pharmacological treatment of Parkinson disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Barbara S; Lang, Anthony E

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Although no available therapies alter the underlying neurodegenerative process, symptomatic therapies can improve patient quality of life. To provide an evidence-based review of the initial pharmacological management of the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson disease; describe management of medication-related motor complications (such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesia), and other medication adverse effects (nausea, psychosis, and impulse control disorders and related behaviors); and discuss the management of selected nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, cognitive impairment, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and sialorrhea. References were identified using searches of PubMed between January 1985 and February 2014 for English-language human studies and the full database of the Cochrane Library. The classification of studies by quality (classes I-IV) was assessed using the levels of evidence guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the highest-quality data for each topic. Although levodopa is the most effective medication available for treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease, in certain instances (eg, mild symptoms, tremor as the only or most prominent symptom, aged <60 years) other medications (eg, monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors [MAOBIs], amantadine, anticholinergics, β-blockers, or dopamine agonists) may be initiated first to avoid levodopa-related motor complications. Motor fluctuations may be managed by modifying the levodopa dosing regimen or by adding several other medications, such as MAOBIs, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or dopamine agonists. Impulse control disorders are typically managed by reducing or withdrawing dopaminergic medication, particularly dopamine agonists. Evidence-based management of some nonmotor symptoms is limited by a paucity of high-quality positive studies

  11. Current and future pharmacological treatment strategies with regard to aortic disease in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Groenink, Maarten; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2012-04-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystemic connective tissue disorder caused mainly by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. The entire cardiovascular system is affected in patients with Marfan syndrome. Aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation or - the most feared and life-threatening symptom - aortic root dissection are the most common manifestations. Therapeutic strategies, such as prophylactic aortic root surgery and pharmacological therapy, focus on the prevention of aortic dissection. Currently, the standard medicinal treatments targeting aortic dilatation and dissection consist of agents generally used to lower blood pressure and/or the inotropic state of the heart. By these means, the cyclic repetitive forces exerted on the aortic wall are diminished and thus the onset of aortic dilatation is potentially prevented. Although these pharmacological agents may offer some benefit in reduction of aortic aneurysm expansion rate, they do not target the underlying cause of the progressive aortic degradation. This review discusses the effectiveness of frequently prescribed medications used to prevent and delay aortic complications in Marfan syndrome. New insights on the biochemical pathways leading to aortic disease are also discussed to highlight new targets for pharmacological therapy. Recent insights in the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway and inflammatory mechanisms in a well-established mouse model of Marfan syndrome, have led to studies exploring new pharmacological treatment strategies with doxycycline, statins and angiotensin II receptor blockers. Pharmacological therapy is focused more on prevention than on delay of aortic wall pathology in Marfan syndrome. Of the new pharmacological treatment strategies targeting aortic pathology in Marfan syndrome, angiotensin receptor type 1 blockers are promising candidates, with several clinical trials currently ongoing.

  12. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Treatment Options for Depression and Depressive Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriou, Stefania S.; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental disorder with a high prevalence among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). It is reported that depression afflicts approximately 20-30% of this patient population, being associated, amongst other, with high mortality rate, low adherence to medication and low perceived quality of life. There is a variety of medications known to be effective for the treatment of depression but due to poor adherence to treatment as well as due to the high need for medications addressing other ESRD comorbidities, depression often remains untreated. According to the literature, depression is under-diagnosed and undertreated in the majority of the patients with chronic kidney disease. In the current review the main pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches and research outcomes for the management of depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients are discussed. PMID:26973957

  13. Social anxiety disorder: designing a pharmacologic treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Pollack, M H

    1999-01-01

    Growing appreciation of the prevalence of and morbid sequelae associated with social anxiety disorder has focused increasing interest on the development of effective treatment strategies. A number of pharmacologic interventions, including the monoamine oxidase inhibitors, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A, beta-blockers, benzodiazepines, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of social anxiety disorder. The choice of initial treatment depends on a variety of factors including comorbidity, prior treatment history, patient preference, and adverse effect profile. This article will examine the effectiveness of various pharmacologic agents for the treatment of social anxiety disorder, discuss considerations for long-term management, and review strategies for optimizing treatment in patients who are partially responsive or unresponsive to initial therapy.

  14. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  15. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  16. Pharmacologic treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dormandy, J A

    1995-01-01

    In terms of prevalence, total cost and morbidity, venous leg ulcers are probably by far the most important type of ulcerations in the leg. The macrocirculatory defect leading to a raised ambulatory venous pressure is now accepted as a common initial pathologic pathway. Most current treatment modalities, such as surgery or external compression, are designed to control the macrovascular defect. However, it is the microcirculatory consequences of the venous hypertension that give rise to the trophic skin changes and ultimately to ulceration. At this microcirculatory level, pharmacotherapy may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. The microcirculatory pathophysiologic changes include decreased fibrinolytic activity, elevated plasma fibrinogen, microcirculatory thrombi, and inappropriate activation of the white blood cells. The oxidative burst from the activated white cells probably plays a key role by releasing locally leukocyte-derived free radicals, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, platelet-activating factor, and a number of other noxious mediators. An important additional component in recalcitrant venous ulcers is co-existing arterial disease, which is probably present in 15-20% of cases. Decreased arterial perfusion pressure will further aggravate the ischemic changes caused by the venous hypertension. Pentoxifylline downregulates leukocyte activation, reduces leukocyte adhesion, and also has fibrinolytic effects. A number of clinical studies have therefore been carried out to examine the clinical efficacy of pentoxifylline in treatment of venous leg ulcers. Probably the largest published placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized study was reported in 1990. In this study, 80 patients received either pentoxifylline 400 mg three times a day orally or matching placebo for 6 months or until their reference ulcer healed if this occurred sooner. Complete healing of the reference ulcer occurred in 23 of the 38 patients treated with pentoxifylline

  17. The pharmacologic basis for the treatment of endocrinopathic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andy

    2010-08-01

    Although the treatment and management of laminitis in the horse requires a holistic and often multidisciplinary approach from the veterinarian, farrier, and nutritionist, this review focuses on pharmacologic interventions that might have prophylactic benefit, specifically in the horse with laminitis as a result of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction and equine metabolic syndrome.

  18. Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Methods of Treatment for Fragile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    and autism spectrum disorder . The Child Development Unit, Center for Neurosciences, and Division of Genetics at the Children’s Hospital of...behavioral responses to stress. Affected males may suffer from learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders , mental retardation, or autism ... spectrum disorders . We seek to address the most effective methods of treatment (pharmacological and behavioral) for the symptoms and behavioral problems

  19. Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Methods of Treatment for Fragile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    deficit disorders , mental retardation, or autism spectrum disorders . We seek to address the most effective methods of treatment (pharmacological and...program will feature the recruitment of children with this disorder to conduct physiological and behavioral testing, with the goal of identifying...aberrant behavioral responses to stress. Affected males may suffer learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders , mental retardation, and autism

  20. Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Methods of Treatment for Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    disorders , mental retardation, or autism spectrum disorders . We seek to address the most effective methods of treatment (pharmacological and behavioral...Affected males may suffer learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders , mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder . The Child Development...associated with Fragile X (FX) syndrome. This program will feature the recruitment of children with this disorder in order to conduct physiological and

  1. Treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma: ongoing trials, critical issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Blanchard, P; Moreau, F; Guigay, J; Hartl, D M; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-04-01

    Due to the generally poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treatment has been intensified, these last decades, leading to an increase of serious side effects. High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been recently etiologically linked to a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is on the increase. These tumors are different, at the clinical and molecular level, when compared to tumors caused by traditional risk factors. Additionally, their prognosis is much more favorable which has led the medical community to consider new treatment strategies. Indeed, it is possible that less intensive treatment regimens could achieve similar efficacy with less toxicity and improved quality of life. Several clinical trials, investigating different ways to de-escalate treatment, are currently ongoing. In this article, we review these main approaches, discuss the rationale behind them and the issues raised by treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive OPSCC.

  2. Pharmacologic Options for the Treatment of Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia is now clinically defined as a loss of muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration (either walking speed or distance or grip strength). Based on the FRAX studies suggesting that the questions without bone mineral density can be used to screen for osteoporosis, there is now a valid simple questionnaire to screen for sarcopenia, i.e., the SARC-F. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of sarcopenia. These include genetic factors, mitochondrial defects, decreased anabolic hormones (e.g., testosterone, vitamin D, growth hormone and insulin growth hormone-1), inflammatory cytokine excess, insulin resistance, decreased protein intake and activity, poor blood flow to muscle and deficiency of growth derived factor-11. Over the last decade, there has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of muscle, resulting in a marked increase in potential future targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. At present, resistance exercise, protein supplementation, and vitamin D have been established as the basic treatment of sarcopenia. High-dose testosterone increases muscle power and function, but has a number of potentially limiting side effects. Other drugs in clinical development include selective androgen receptor molecules, ghrelin agonists, myostatin antibodies, activin IIR antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, beta antagonists, and fast skeletal muscle troponin activators. As sarcopenia is a major predictor of frailty, hip fracture, disability, and mortality in older persons, the development of drugs to treat it is eagerly awaited.

  3. Cranial neuralgias: from physiopathology to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Roberto; Ranieri, Angelo; Bilo, Leonilda; Fiorillo, Chiara; Bonavita, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Cranial neuralgias are paroxysmal painful disorders of the head characterised by some shared features such as unilaterality of symptoms, transience and recurrence of attacks, superficial and "shock-like" quality of pain and the presence of triggering factors. Although rare, these disorders must be promptly recognised as they harbour a relatively high risk for underlying compressive or inflammatory disease. Nevertheless, misdiagnosis is frequent. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias are sustained in most cases by a neurovascular conflict in the posterior fossa resulting in a hyperexcitability state of the trigeminal circuitry. If the aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and other typical neuralgias must be brought back to the peripheral injury, their pathogenesis could involve central allodynic mechanisms, which, in patients with inter-critical pain, also engage the nociceptive neurons at the thalamic-cortical level. Currently available medical treatments for TN and other cranial neuralgias are reviewed.

  4. [Non pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Mirabel-Sarron, Christine; Giachetti, Raphaël

    2012-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic and recurring disorder associated with significant psychosocial impairment. A number of psychosocial interventions have been developed to address impairment. The consensus makes mood stabilizer the treatment of bipolar disorder. However, numerous patients are not in complete remission despite a controlled observance. Every patient can follow a psycho educational program. What this paper adds. The review identifies that a range of interventions have demonstrated efficacy in extended periods of euthymia, improved social and occupational functioning and alleviation of subsyndromal symptoms. Adjunctive, short-term psychotherapies have been shown to offer fairly consistent benefits to bipolar disorder patients. Cognitive-behavioural therapy, family-focused therapy, and psychoeducation offer the most robust efficacy in regard to relapse prevention. The most complex situations including comorbidities can be helped by behavioral and cognitive therapy for bipolar disorder. Evaluations emphasize positive impact. The psychosocial interventions reviewed provide mental health nurses with evidence-based approaches to improving mental health care for patients with bipolar disorder. There is a need for mental health nurses to conduct high quality trials of the clinical effectiveness of these interventions.

  5. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Becker, Philip M

    2005-11-01

    Insomnia in its chronic form is present in high numbers of patients presenting to physicians. As older women who have medical problems have the highest rates of chronic insomnia, physicians must have a high index of suspicion and be prepared to explore various etiologic factors that might be operative. Treatment should focus on setting specific goals, with patients using strategies that combine lifestyle changes, behavioral interventions, and appropriate medications. OTC agents, sedating antidepressants at low dosages (trazodone, doxepin, amitriptyline, and others), and nonhypnotic benzodiazepines are insufficiently studied to provide evidence-based support for their use to treat chronic insomnia. Particularly in the elderly, close monitoring is needed to prevent falls, accidents, and cognitive impairment from these agents. FDA-labeled hypnotic agents are efficacious, but long-term studies have not been available until the recent release of eszopiclone in the United States. Recent work encourages the use of CBT even in patients who have used sleeping pills for several years, although the success of CBT has been less encouraging when applied to chronic insomnia sufferers who have concurrent psychiatric disorders and who have taken hypnotics for years.

  6. QUALITY-CONSTANT “PRICES” FOR THE ONGOING TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY*

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Richard G.; Berndt, Ernst R.; Busch, Alisa B.; Lehman, Anthony F.

    2007-01-01

    Health care expenditures have been increasing sharply in the last ten years, with spending on mental health disorders being particularly prominent. Over the same time period, a number of new antipsychotic medications have been added to the armamentarium for treatment of persons diagnosed with schizophrenia. Due in part to the sharply increased expenditures by Medicaid on mental health disorders such as schizophrenia, controversies have arisen as to the use of these more costly innovative medications, particularly their impact on the annualized cost of treating patients. Using Medicaid data on 12,864 person years from two counties in Florida over the 1994-95 to 1999-2000 time period, in this study we address three issues: (i) On a per person year basis, what is happening over time to the mental health-related costs of treating schizophrenia? (ii) How is the composition and quality of care changing over time? and (iii) Holding quality of care constant, on a per person year basis, by how much are the costs for the ongoing treatment of schizophrenia changing? We find that unadjusted for changes in quality of care over time, the annualized costs for the ongoing treatment of schizophrenia per person have increased about 0.5% per year. The composition of treatments for schizophrenia has changed substantially over this six-year time period, toward more intensive use of atypical antipsychotics, and away from psychosocial treatments. Holding treatment quality type and patient characteristics constant over time, mean treatment costs have fallen about 5.5% per year between 1994-1995 and 1999-2000. PMID:17710196

  7. Non-pharmacological treatments for pain relief: TENS and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Coutaux, Anne

    2017-02-20

    Acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are non-pharmacological methods that have been used for millennia to relieve pain. As with all complementary treatments, efficacy evaluations face two hurdles: the non-feasibility of double-blinding and the difficulty in identifying the optimal control population or treatment. Nevertheless, recent studies of good methodological quality have demonstrated benefits in many types of pain compared to conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action of acupuncture and TENS, which are increasingly well understood, involve endogenous pain control systems, cerebral plasticity, and nonspecific effects (e.g., expectations and placebo effect). No serious adverse effects have been reported. These data support the more widespread use of non-pharmacological pain management, most notably in patients with chronic pain inadequately relieved by medications alone.

  8. Pharmacological treatment of depression. Consulting with Dr Oscar.

    PubMed Central

    Berber, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the pharmacological treatment of depression and to evaluate current strategies for treatment to maximize the benefits of antidepressant medications. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched to January 1999, using the headings depression, combination, augmentation, lithium, triiodothyronine, pindolol, buspirone, methylphenidate, and electroconvulsive therapy, for randomized controlled trials, systematic overviews, and consensus reports. Recent high-quality reviews were often found. References from papers retrieved were scrutinized for other relevant reports. Preference was given to more recent articles and well-designed studies. Recommendations from academic groups were analyzed. MAIN MESSAGE: Optimization of antidepressant therapy is the cornerstone of pharmacological treatment of depression. When symptoms persist despite optimization, further strategies include substitution, combination, augmentation, and reviewing and sometimes referring. Decisions are based on the evidence supporting the various strategies. CONCLUSIONS: Antidepressants will work only if prescribed correctly. Awareness of the strategies for using antidepressants and evaluating their effectiveness improves primary care physicians' ability to treat this common disorder. PMID:10587774

  9. Music therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huan; Jiang, Guohui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. Currently, the primary methods of treatment include pharmacological and surgical treatment. However, approximately one-third of patients exhibit refractory epilepsy. Therefore, a novel approach to epilepsy treatment is necessary. Several studies have confirmed that music therapy can be effective at reducing seizures and epileptiform discharges, thus providing a new option for clinicians in the treatment of epilepsy. Although the underlying mechanism of music therapy is unknown, it may be related to resonance, mirror neurons, dopamine pathways and parasympathetic activation. Large sample, multicenter, randomized double-blind and more effectively designed studies are needed for future music therapy studies.

  10. A Systematic Review on the Pharmacological Treatment of Delusional Disorder.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Negro, José Eduardo; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the criterion standard in delusional disorder (DD). No second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) is specifically authorized for the treatment of DD. To evaluate the evidence available on pharmacological treatments in adults with DD and to compare first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) versus SGA. A systematic review on pharmacological treatment of DD following the PRISMA methodology was conducted. We selected the best evidence available and analyzed it critically assessing both, biases and quality, to finally perform a narrative and quantitative synthesis. The evidence available was mainly limited to observational studies and case series. There were no randomized clinical trials. Three hundred eighty-five DD cases were included (177 of which were on SGAs). Overall, antipsychotics achieved a good response in 33.6%% of the patients. As a group, FGAs showed significant superiority compared to SGAs (good response rates were 39% vs 28%, respectively). We did not find superiority of any specific antipsychotic over another. There is no strong evidence to make definite recommendations, although antipsychotics in general seem to be an effective treatment for DD with a slight superiority in favor of FGAs as compared with SGAs. Existent data are, albeit, scarce and specific clinical trials on DD, are strongly recommended.

  11. Optimising pharmacological maintenance treatment for COPD in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rupert; Østrem, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-faceted disease that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and is a significant burden in terms of healthcare resource utilisation and cost. Despite the availability of national and international guidelines, and effective, well-tolerated pharmacological treatments, COPD remains substantially under-diagnosed and under-treated within primary care. As COPD is both preventable and treatable there is an urgent need to raise the awareness and profile of the disease among primary care physicians and patients. Increasing evidence suggests that initiation of long-acting bronchodilator treatment at an early stage can significantly improve the patient's long-term health and quality of life (QoL). Recent large-scale trials in COPD have confirmed the longterm benefits of maintenance treatment with long-acting bronchodilators. A wide range of benefits have been shown in selected patient groups including improved lung function and QoL, reduced exacerbations and, in some studies, delayed disease progression and improved survival. In this review, we consider recent developments in our understanding of COPD, including current and emerging pharmacological treatment options, and identify steps for optimising early diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of COPD within the primary care environment.

  12. Integrated pharmacologic treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Horst, Robert O; Hendren, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    This article is a review of what is currently known about optimal treatments for patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It begins with a description of assessment techniques and the differential diagnosis, which includes learning disorders, anxiety disorders, and bipolar disorder. The high rate of comorbidity in patients with ADHD and the impact of comorbidity on treatment decisions are also discussed. Detailed descriptions of various pharmacologic treatments are provided, including a description of the role of combination pharmacotherapy and the integration of nonpharmacologic therapy. A decision-making model for selecting the most appropriate pharmacologic therapy versus combining pharmacotherapy with psychosocial interventions is described. The advantages and disadvantages of various pharmacologic agents--including long-acting stimulants and atomoxetine--are examined. Particular attention is paid to the recent Multimodal Treatment Study of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health, which includes a comparison of long-term pharmacotherapy, behavioral therapy, or a combination thereof, as well as an evaluation of the role of community-based therapy (i.e., treatment as usual). This article focuses on children and adolescents, because most of the research on ADHD has been conducted in this age group. However, a brief section on adults is also provided.

  13. Neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Linares, Ila M; Chags, Marcos H N; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2014-01-01

    Specific phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by irrational fear and avoidance of specific things or situations, interfering significantly with the patients' daily life. Treatment for the disorder consists of both pharmacological and psychological approaches, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Neuroimaging techniques have been used in an attempt to improve our understanding of the neurobiology of SP and of the effects of treatment options available. This review describes the design and results of eight articles investigating the neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for SP. The studies show that CBT is effective in SP, leading to a reduction of anxiety symptoms that is accompanied by functional alterations in the brain. The results of pharmacological interventions for SP are less uniform, but suggest that the partial agonist of the NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptor DCS (D-cycloserine) can be used in combination with psychotherapy techniques for the achievement of quicker treatment response and that DCS modulates the function of structures implicated in the neurobiology of SP. Further research should explore the augmentation of CBT treatment with DCS in controlled trials.

  14. Flow diverters for treatment of intracranial aneurysms: current status and ongoing clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wong, George K C; Kwan, Marco C L; Ng, Rebecca Y T; Yu, Simon C H; Poon, W S

    2011-06-01

    The ultimate treatment goal for intracranial aneurysms is to reconstruct the vessel wall and correct the hemodynamic disturbance. A flow diverter is a stent placed in the parent artery to reduce blood flow in the aneurysm sac to the point of stagnation, gradual thrombosis, and neointimal remodeling to maintain outflow in the side branches and perforators. Here, we review the two commercially available flow diverters, the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) and the SILK flow diverter (SFD). The rates of severe hemorrhagic complications have been reported to be 2% for the PED and 0.8% for the SFD. The results of studies completed thus far show that endovascular reconstruction with flow diverters is an effective treatment of wide-necked, fusiform, large, and giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms, with 5% to 10% of patients experiencing permanent major morbidity and mortality. The results of ongoing studies may resolve whether flow diverters can replace coil embolization for the treatment of all, or selected, intracranial aneurysms.

  15. Pharmacological treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Mark; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Hayen, Andrew; Munro, Alasdair; Beattie, R Mark

    2014-11-24

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a common disorder, characterised by regurgitation of gastric contents into the oesophagus. GOR is a very common presentation in infancy in both primary and secondary care settings. GOR can affect approximately 50% of infants younger than three months old (Nelson 1997). The natural history of GOR in infancy is generally that of a functional, self-limiting condition that improves with age; < 5% of children with vomiting or regurgitation continue to have symptoms after infancy (Martin 2002). Older children and children with co-existing medical conditions can have a more protracted course. The definition of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and its precise distinction from GOR are debated, but consensus guidelines from the North American Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN guidelines 2009) define GORD as 'troublesome symptoms or complications of GOR.' This Cochrane review aims to provide a robust analysis of currently available pharmacological interventions used to treat children with GOR by assessing all outcomes indicating benefit or harm. We sought to identify relevant published trials by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966 to 2014), the Centralised Information Service for Complementary Medicine (CISCOM), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Science Citation Index (on BIDS-UK General Science Index) and the ISI Web of Science. We also searched for ongoing trials in the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com).Reference lists from trials selected by electronic searching were handsearched for relevant paediatric studies on medical treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux, as were published abstracts from conference proceedings (published in Gut and Gastroenterology) and reviews published over the past five years.No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were

  16. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: a critical review of the pharmacology and clinical effects of current and future therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Miyake, N; Jarskog, L F; Fleischhacker, W W; Lieberman, J A

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of chlorpromazine and throughout the development of the new-generation antipsychotic drugs (APDs) beginning with clozapine, the D(2) receptor has been the target for the development of APDs. Pharmacologic actions to reduce neurotransmission through the D(2) receptor have been the only proven therapeutic mechanism for psychoses. A number of novel non-D(2) mechanisms of action of APDs have been explored over the past 40 years but none has definitively been proven effective. At the same time, the effectiveness of treatments and range of outcomes for patients are far from satisfactory. The relative success of antipsychotics in treating positive symptoms is limited by the fact that a substantial number of patients are refractory to current medications and by their lack of efficacy for negative and cognitive symptoms, which often determine the level of functional impairment. In addition, while the newer antipsychotics produce fewer motor side effects, safety and tolerability concerns about weight gain and endocrinopathies have emerged. Consequently, there is an urgent need for more effective and better-tolerated antipsychotic agents, and to identify new molecular targets and develop mechanistically novel compounds that can address the various symptom dimensions of schizophrenia. In recent years, a variety of new experimental pharmacological approaches have emerged, including compounds acting on targets other than the dopamine D(2) receptor. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to whether drugs selective for singe molecular targets (that is, 'magic bullets') or drugs selectively non-selective for several molecular targets (that is, 'magic shotguns', 'multifunctional drugs' or 'intramolecular polypharmacy') will lead to more effective new medications for schizophrenia. In this context, current and future drug development strategies can be seen to fall into three categories: (1) refinement of precedented mechanisms of action to provide drugs

  17. Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ya-Mei; Chang, Ching-Jui; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Li, Cheng-Ta; Tu, Peichi; Chang, Shang-Wen; Shen, Winston W; Su, Tung-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Bipolar disorder is an important psychiatric disorder with different disease phases. The pharmacological treatment is complicated, and is updated frequently as new research evidence emerges. For the purpose of international collaboration, research, and education, the Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorders was initiated by the Taiwanese Society of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology (TSBPN) - the Bipolar Chapter, which was established in August 2010 and approved as a member of International Society of Bipolar Disorder. TSBPN is the country member of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The development of the Taiwan consensus for bipolar disorder was mainly based on the template of WFSBP Guidelines, with references to other international guidelines including the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, and British Association for Psychopharmacology. We have also added Taiwanese experts' experience, Taiwan national health insurance data, and the indications for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder given by the Taiwan Department of Health, to emphasize the balance between efficacy and safety, and to make this consensus a concise, empirical, and important reference for clinical psychiatric practice.

  18. The Pathophysiology and Pharmacological Treatment of Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pidgeon, Connie; Rickards, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition characterised by motor, cognitive and behavioural dysfunction, and has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. As there is currently no treatment to delay progression of the disease, pharmacological intervention is aimed at symptomatic relief. Methods: We set out to assess the current evidence on the pharmacological treatment of motor and non-motor symptoms in HD by carrying out a systematic literature review across five large scientific databases. Results: The search generated 23 original studies meeting our search criteria. Studies on the following drug classes were obtained: dopamine (DA) depleting agents, neuroleptics, anti-glutamatergic agents, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, GABA agonists, cannabinoids, antidepressants and potential neuroprotective agents. Tetrabenazine (TBZ), a DA depleting agent, was the only pharmacotherapy shown to have a clinically meaningful, statistically significant effect on chorea. The majority of the reviewed studies focussed on the treatment of motor symptoms of HD. Discussion: Overall, the evidence base for the pharmacological management of HD is poor. There is a clear need for future high quality randomised controlled trials on the symptomatic treatment of HD, particularly on the pharmacotherapy of non-motor symptoms of HD. PMID:22713409

  19. Adding a treatment arm to an ongoing clinical trial: a review of methodology and practice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dena R; Todd, Susan; Gregory, Walter M; Brown, Julia M

    2015-04-22

    Incorporating an emerging therapy as a new randomisation arm in a clinical trial that is open to recruitment would be desirable to researchers, regulators and patients to ensure that the trial remains current, new treatments are evaluated as quickly as possible, and the time and cost for determining optimal therapies is minimised. It may take many years to run a clinical trial from concept to reporting within a rapidly changing drug development environment; hence, in order for trials to be most useful to inform policy and practice, it is advantageous for them to be able to adapt to emerging therapeutic developments. This paper reports a comprehensive literature review on methodologies for, and practical examples of, amending an ongoing clinical trial by adding a new treatment arm. Relevant methodological literature describing statistical considerations required when making this specific type of amendment is identified, and the key statistical concepts when planning the addition of a new treatment arm are extracted, assessed and summarised. For completeness, this includes an assessment of statistical recommendations within general adaptive design guidance documents. Examples of confirmatory ongoing trials designed within the frequentist framework that have added an arm in practice are reported; and the details of the amendment are reviewed. An assessment is made as to how well the relevant statistical considerations were addressed in practice, and the related implications. The literature review confirmed that there is currently no clear methodological guidance on this topic, but that guidance would be advantageous to help this efficient design amendment to be used more frequently and appropriately in practice. Eight confirmatory trials were identified to have added a treatment arm, suggesting that trials can benefit from this amendment and that it can be practically feasible; however, the trials were not always able to address the key statistical considerations

  20. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with “n = 1 case study research”. Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient’s sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  1. [Pharmacological treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Allain, Yves-Marie; Giraud, Frédérique; Huchon, Gérard; Roche, Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly improve quality of life by reducing exacerbations, dyspnea and exercise intolerance, thereby limiting the degree of handicap and improving daily activities. Recently, large randomised trials showed that some treatments can alter the decline in FEV1, which was previously only accessible to smoking cessation, and maybe reduce mortality. Bronchodilators are the first-line pharmacological treatment of COPD. Their clinical efficacy cannot be predicted by the inconstant changes in FEV(1.) Their main mechanism of action is the reduction in lung hyperinflation. Theophylline has a lower efficacy/tolerance ratio than inhaled bronchodilators. In symptomatic patients with FEV1 <50/60% predicted and repeated exacerbations despite bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids combined with long acting beta-agonists can be used. Several other approaches targeting inflammation and oxidative stress, remodelling and lung regeneration are also being studied. Medications must be associated with non-pharmacological measures (including help towards smoking cessation, education, exercise training...). Systemic manifestations of COPD must also be taken into account.

  2. Effects of non-pharmacological pain treatments on brain states

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Askew, Robert L.; Fregni, Felipe; Witkop, Gregory; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To (1) evaluate the effects of a single session of four non-pharmacological pain interventions, relative to a sham tDCS procedure, on pain and electroencephalogram- (EEG-) assessed brain oscillations, and (2) determine the extent to which procedure-related changes in pain intensity are associated with changes in brain oscillations. Methods 30 individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain were given an EEG and administered measures of pain before and after five procedures (hypnosis, meditation, transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS], and neurofeedback) and a control sham tDCS procedure. Results Each procedure was associated with a different pattern of changes in brain activity, and all active procedures were significantly different from the control procedure in at least three bandwidths. Very weak and mostly non-significant associations were found between changes in EEG-assessed brain activity and pain. Conclusions Different non-pharmacological pain treatments have distinctive effects on brain oscillation patterns. However, changes in EEG-assessed brain oscillations are not significantly associated with changes in pain, and therefore such changes do not appear useful for explaining the benefits of these treatments. Significance The results provide new findings regarding the unique effects of four non-pharmacological treatments on pain and brain activity. PMID:23706958

  3. Effects of non-pharmacological pain treatments on brain states.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Sherlin, Leslie H; Askew, Robert L; Fregni, Felipe; Witkop, Gregory; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D; Hakimian, Shahin

    2013-10-01

    To (1) evaluate the effects of a single session of four non-pharmacological pain interventions, relative to a sham tDCS procedure, on pain and electroencephalogram- (EEG-) assessed brain oscillations, and (2) determine the extent to which procedure-related changes in pain intensity are associated with changes in brain oscillations. 30 individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain were given an EEG and administered measures of pain before and after five procedures (hypnosis, meditation, transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS], neurofeedback, and a control sham tDCS procedure). Each procedure was associated with a different pattern of changes in brain activity, and all active procedures were significantly different from the control procedure in at least three bandwidths. Very weak and mostly non-significant associations were found between changes in EEG-assessed brain activity and pain. Different non-pharmacological pain treatments have distinctive effects on brain oscillation patterns. However, changes in EEG-assessed brain oscillations are not significantly associated with changes in pain, and therefore such changes do not appear useful for explaining the benefits of these treatments. The results provide new findings regarding the unique effects of four non-pharmacological treatments on pain and brain activity. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacological treatment of tic disorders and Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roessner, Veit; Schoenefeld, Katja; Buse, Judith; Bender, Stephan; Ehrlich, Stefan; Münchau, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    The present review gives an overview of current pharmacological treatment options of tic disorders and Tourette Syndrome (TS). After a short summary on phenomenology, clinical course and comorbid conditions we review indications for pharmacological treatment in detail. Unfortunately, standardized and large enough drug trials in TS patients fulfilling evidence based medicine standards are still scarce. Treatment decisions are often guided by individual needs and personal experience of treating clinicians. The present recommendations for pharmacological tic treatment are therefore based on both scientific evidence and expert opinion. As first-line treatment of tics risperidone (best evidence level for atypical antipsychotics) or tiapride (largest clinical experience in Europe and low rate of adverse reactions) are recommended. Aripiprazole (still limited but promising data with low risk for adverse reactions) and pimozide (best evidence of the typical antipsychotics) are agents of second choice. In TS patients with comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) atomoxetine, stimulants or clonidine should be considered, or, if tics are severe, a combination of stimulants and risperidone. When mild to moderate tics are associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression or anxiety sulpiride monotherapy can be helpful. In more severe cases the combination of risperidone and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor should be given. In summary, further studies, particularly randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials including larger and/or more homogenous patient groups over longer periods are urgently needed to enhance the scientific basis for drug treatment in tic disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bailly, D

    2017-05-01

    To review the options for acute and maintenance pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. A comprehensive literature review of randomized clinical trials and open-label studies was conducted. Published data from randomized controlled trials show that antipsychotics are significantly more effective than mood stabilizers in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes. Few data are available related to the treatment of depressive episodes. No trials of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been conducted. Only open trials suggest that lithium and lamotrigine may be effective, whereas quetiapine did not demonstrate efficacy relative to placebo in two studies. Studies regarding the effectiveness of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers for the comorbid disorders are also few and inconclusive. Although long-term treatment is a core aspect of the management of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, there is a lack of consistent efficacy data. If non-controlled trials suggest that lithium, lamotrigine, quetiapine, ziprazidone, and the combination of risperidone and divalproex or lithium may be useful in some conditions, only aripiprazole has shown efficacy relative to placebo for long-term symptom reduction and relapse prevention. Safety data show that the most frequently reported adverse events in children and adolescents treated with mood stabilizers are gastrointestinal and neurological, whereas use of antipsychotics is mainly related to weight gain and sedation. Lastly, while results from studies having evaluated the impact of pharmacological treatment on neuropsychological functioning are inconsistent, some of them nevertheless suggest that treatment with mood stabilizers may be associated with specific impairments. Despite recent developments in identifying effective pharmacological interventions, numerous critical gaps remain. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic review of pharmacological treatments in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Jose-Ramon; Ballesteros, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is considered the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. Affected people have mental impairment that can include Attention Deficit and/or Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism disorder, and speech and behavioural disorders. Several pharmacological interventions have been proposed to treat those impairments. Methods Systematic review of the literature and summary of the evidence from clinical controlled trials that compared at least one pharmacological treatment with placebo or other treatment in individuals with diagnosis of FXS syndrome and assessed the efficacy and/or safety of the treatments. Studies were identified by a search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Databases using the terms fragile X and treatment. Risk of bias of the studies was assessed by using the Cochrane Collaboration criteria. Results The search identified 276 potential articles and 14 studies satisfied inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 studies on folic acid (9 with crossover design, only 1 of them with good methodological quality and low risk of bias) did not find in general significant improvements. A small sample size trial assessed dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD and found some improvements in those taking methylphenidate, but the length of follow-up was too short. Two studies on L-acetylcarnitine, showed positive effects and no side effects in patients with an additional diagnosis of ADHD. Finally, one study on patients with an additional diagnosis of autism assessed ampakine compound CX516 and found no significant differences between treatment and placebo. Regarding safety, none of the studies that assessed that area found relevant side effects, but the number of patients included was too small to detect side effects with low incidence. Conclusion Currently there is no robust evidence to support recommendations on pharmacological treatments in patients with FXS in general or in those

  7. Alcohol use disorder: pathophysiology, effects, and pharmacologic options for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wackernah, Robin C; Minnick, Matthew J; Clapp, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) continue to be a concerning health issue worldwide. Harmful alcohol use leads to 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide. Multiple options exist for the management of dependence on alcohol, not all of which are approved by drug-regulating agencies. Current practice in treating AUD does not reflect the diversity of pharmacologic options that have potential to provide benefit, and guidance for clinicians is limited. Few medications are approved for treatment of AUD, and these have exhibited small and/or inconsistent effects in broad patient populations with diverse drinking patterns. The need for continued research into the treatment of this disease is evident in order to provide patients with more specific and effective options. This review describes the neurobiological mechanisms of AUD that are amenable to treatment and drug therapies that target pathophysiological conditions of AUD to reduce drinking. In addition, current literature on pharmacologic (both approved and non-approved) treatment options for AUD offered in the United States and elsewhere are reviewed. The aim is to inform clinicians regarding the options for alcohol abuse treatment, keeping in mind that not all treatments are completely successful in reducing craving or heavy drinking or increasing abstinence. PMID:24648792

  8. Approaches to the pharmacological treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salem, Victoria; Bloom, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a global health crisis resulting in major morbidity and premature death. The need for safe and efficacious drug therapies is great, and presently unmet. The two drugs currently licensed in the USA for the long-term treatment of obesity, orlistat and sibutramine, provide only modest weight-loss benefits and are associated with high attrition rates owing to side effects. This review summarizes current concepts in the neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis and major pharmacological treatments for obesity in the pipeline.

  9. Pharmacological treatment of combat-induced PTSD: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Debra Lynn

    Historically, soldiers have returned from war changed men. Over the years there has been an increase in awareness of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the impact of diagnosis. Treatment of PTSD presents a challenge on every level. This literature review provides some insight into the risks and benefits of three groups of drugs commonly prescribed for combat-induced PTSD: beta-blockers, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and benzodiazepines (BZDs). When prescribed in conjunction with other non-pharmacological treatments, these drugs help to minimize, and in some cases eliminate, the signs and symptoms of PTSD. Combination therapy would ideally result in better compliance and eventual completion of treatment programmes provided for PTSD sufferers. Healthcare professionals strive to provide patients with holistic care. Patients present with unique mental and physical intricacies, and nurses and health professionals must peel away the layers to uncover the nature of the PTSD. While there are many aspects to PTSD treatment, this literature review focuses on pharmacological treatment, specifically beta-blockers, SSRIs and BZDs.

  10. Pharmacologic treatment of hand-, knee- and hip-osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bobacz, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease of high prevalence and affects > 90 % of the population, depending on several risk factors. Symptomatic OA is less frequent, but requires an individually tailored therapeutic regimen consisting of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment modalities. Pharmacologic therapy, however, is mainly limited to analgetic and anti-inflammatory agents; structure modifying remedies do not exist. The therapeutic approach to hand-, knee- and hip-OA is basically similar and differs only at some minor points. Generally, topical agents or paracetamol are recommended as first-line agents. If unsuccessful oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selctive inhibitors should be introduced. Tramadol is an option in the case patients will not respond satisfactorily to NSAIDs. Glucosamine and chondroitine sulphate are no longer recommended in knee and hip OA, but chondroitine might be efficient in treating hand OA. Oral NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution due to potential side effects. Opioids are not recommended as their benefits are outweighed by an increased risk for serious adverse events.

  11. Pharmacologic approaches for the treatment of chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, David N

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem that for many sufferers persists chronically and may result from a wide range of causes. Specific treatments address particular underlying medical disorders. General therapeutic approaches, including pharmacologic and behavioral strategies, may have broad applicability to insomnia patients. Many different medications and substances have been used in an attempt to improve sleep. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of medications and other substances employed to promote improved sleep. Special emphasis is given to the use of the newer-generation benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics.

  12. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  13. New pharmacological treatments for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ebbert, Jon O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is quickly becoming the leading preventable cause of death in the USA. Over 60 obesity-related comorbidities exist which increase the complexity and cost of medical care in obese patients. Even a moderate weight loss of 5 % can reduce morbidity associated with these conditions. Lifestyle modification through caloric restriction and enhanced exercise and physical activity remain the first line treatment for obesity. The development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of obesity has been challenged by both lack of efficacy and serious adverse side effects leading to their removal from market. Two new agents were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to complement lifestyle modification in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight patients (BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and one obesity-related comorbidity). Lorcaserin is a novel serotonin 5-HT2C selective agonist which has been shown in three phase III studies to significantly reduce weight and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. Phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER) is a novel combination of two agents which have individually been shown to significantly reduce weight. The combination agent phentermine/topiramate ER has been shown to reduce weight in overweight and obese subjects in a number of studies. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of these new agents compared to past and other presently available medications for the treatment of obesity.

  14. Episodic migraines in children: limited evidence on preventive pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Rema; Taylor, Frederick R

    2013-10-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review of preventive pharmacological treatments for episodic childhood migraines searching several databases through May 20, 2012. Episodic migraine prevention was examined in 24 publications of randomized controlled trials that enrolled 1578 children in 16 nonrandomized studies. Single randomized controlled trials provided low-strength evidence that propranolol would result in complete cessation of migraine attacks in 713 per 1000 children treated (95% confidence interval, 452-974); trazodone and nimodipine decreased migraine days, while topiramate, divalproex, and clonidine were no more effective than placebo in preventing migraines. Migraine prevention with multidisciplinary drug management was not sustained at 6 months. Divalproex resulted in treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects, and topiramate increased the risk of paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, and weight loss. Long-term preventive benefits and improvement in disability and quality of life are unknown. No studies examined quality of life or provided evidence for individualized treatment decisions.

  15. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: cost effective pharmacologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, James P; Kirkbride, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) can range from morning sickness to moderate NVP to hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). If it is left unmanaged, health plans may pay for expensive unproven outpatient therapies that are not necessary for treatment of simple morning sickness or moderate NVP. Meanwhile, patients with serious hyperemesis gravidarum whose treatment is delayed may suffer needlessly, ending up with multiple hospitalizations or emergency room (ER) visits. Two expensive, heavily marketed outpatient therapies with scant supportive evidence in the treatment of NVP have recently emerged and some health plans are providing coverage without a thorough review of the medical evidence or cost implications. Health plans may have an opportunity to save a significant amount and to improve member satisfaction by utilizing evidence-based knowledge of pharmacologic interventions that are driven, in order, by known safety, proven efficacy, and cost effectiveness.

  16. Tourette Syndrome and comorbid ADHD: current pharmacological treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Calì, Paola V; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common co-morbid condition encountered in people with tics and Tourette Syndrome (TS). The co-occurrence of TS and ADHD is associated with a higher psychopathological, social and academic impairment and the management may represent a challenge for the clinicians. To review recent advances in management of patients with tic, Tourette Syndrome and comorbid Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. We searched peer reviewed and original medical publications (PUBMED 1990-2012) and included randomized, double-blind, controlled trials related to pharmacological treatment for tic and TS used in children and adolescents with comorbid ADHD. "Tourette Syndrome" or "Tic" and "ADHD", were cross referenced with the words "pharmacological treatment", "α-agonist", "psychostimulants", "selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor", "antipsychotics". Three classes of drugs are currently used in the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD: α-agonists (clonidine and guanfacine), stimulants (amphetamine enantiomers, methylphenidate enantiomers or slow release preparation), and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (atomoxetine). It has been recently suggested that in a few selected cases partial dopamine agonists (aripiprazole) could be useful. Level A of evidence supported the use of noradrenergic agents (clonidine). Reuptake inhibitors (atomoxetine) and stimulants (methylphenidate) could be, also used for the treatment of TS and comorbid ADHD. Taking into account the risk-benefit profile, clonidine could be used as the first line treatment. However only few studies meet rigorous quality criteria in terms of study design and methodology; most trials have low statistical power due to small sample size or short duration. Treatment should be "symptom targeted" and personalized for each patient. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Do ongoing lifestyle disruptions differ across cancer types after the conclusion of cancer treatment?

    PubMed

    Mah, Kenneth; Bezjak, Andrea; Loblaw, D Andrew; Gotowiec, Andrew; Devins, Gerald M

    2011-03-01

    Cancer interferes with participation in valued lifestyle activities (illness intrusiveness) throughout post-treatment survivorship. We investigated whether illness intrusiveness differs across life domains among survivors with diverse cancers. Intrusiveness should be highest in activities requiring physical/cognitive functioning (instrumental domain). Intrusiveness into relationship/sexual functioning (intimacy domain) should be higher in prostate, breast, and gastrointestinal cancers than in others. Cancer outpatients (N = 656; 51% men) completed the Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale (IIRS) during follow-up. We compared IIRS Instrumental, Intimacy, and Relationships and Personal Development [RPD] subscale and total scores across gastrointestinal, lung, lymphoma, head and neck, prostate (men), and breast cancers (women), comparing men and women separately. Instrumental subscale scores (M(men) = 3.05-3.80, M(women) = 3.02-3.63) were highest for all groups, except prostate cancer. Men with prostate cancer scored higher on Intimacy (M = 3.40) than Instrumental (M = 2.48) or RPD (M = 1.59), p's < .05; their Intimacy scores did not differ from men with gastrointestinal or lung cancer. Women collectively showed higher Instrumental (M = 3.39) than Intimacy (M = 2.49) or RPD scores (M = 2.27), p's < .001, but not the hypothesized group difference in Intimacy. Post-treatment survivors continue to experience some long-term interference with activities requiring physical and cognitive functioning. Sexual adjustment may be of special concern to men when treatments involve genitourinary functioning. Ongoing monitoring with the IIRS to detect lifestyle interference throughout survivorship may enhance quality of life. Screening and intervention should target particular life domains rather than global interference.

  18. Pharmacological approaches in the treatment of binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Jose C; McElroy, Susan L

    2004-04-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is a newly defined diagnostic category characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating not followed by the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors characteristic of bulimia nervosa. BED is usually associated with overweight or obesity and psychopathology. Pharmacotherapy may be a useful component of a multidimensional treatment approach. Although pharmacotherapy research in BED is still in its preliminary stages. some drugs have been shown to be promising agents. This paper reviews available pharmacological treatment studies of BED and related conditions. Currently, three main classes of drugs have been studied in double-blind, placebo controlled trials in BED: antidepressants, anti-obesity agents, and anticonvulsants. Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the best studied medications. Thus, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, sertraline and citalopram have been shown to modestly but significantly reduce binge eating frequency and body weight in BED over the short term. More recently, the anti-obesity agent sibutramine and the anticonvulsant topiramate have been shown to significantly reduce binge eating behavior and body weight in BED associated with obesity. Special issues concerning current pharmacological trials and future research directions in this area are also discussed.

  19. Pharmacological enhancement of naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen S; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Opioid dependence (OD) is a serious and growing clinical condition with increasing social costs that requires expanding treatment beyond opioid agonist substitution. The opioid antagonist naltrexone has displayed a remarkable association of theoretical effectiveness and poor clinical utility in treating OD due to noncompliant behavior and low acceptability among patients, only partly modified by psychosocial interventions. We reviewed pharmacological studies, including naltrexone depot formulations and combination treatments. Method We searched PubMed for clinical studies on the use of naltrexone implants and slow-release injections in OD, and investigations using adjunct medications to improve naltrexone maintenance therapy of OD. We discussed the results in view of their application to the clinical practice. Results Significant reduction in opioid use and improved retention in treatment have been found in several studies using depot naltrexone formulations, some of which are controlled clinical trials. Pilot investigations have gathered initial positive results on the use of naltrexone in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors, α-2 adrenergic, opioid, and γ-aminobutyric acid agonist medications. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that more research on effectiveness and safety is needed in support of depot naltrexone treatment for OD. Further research comparing slow-release with oral naltrexone and opioid agonist medications will help characterize the role of opioid antagonist-mediated treatment of OD. Preliminary investigations on naltrexone combination treatments suggest the opportunity to continue study of new mixed receptor activities for the treatment of OD and other drug addictions. PMID:21731898

  20. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1999-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit (Halpha1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Halpha1-205-induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis.

  1. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sin-Hyeog; Barchan, Dora; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR α-subunit (Hα1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Hα1-205–induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1723–1730 (1999). PMID:10606626

  2. Treatment strategies for HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis: ongoing and planned clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Francois-Xavier; Havlir, Diane V; Onyebujoh, Philip C; Thim, Sok; Goldfeld, Anne E; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois

    2007-08-15

    Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients with active tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death among individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in resource-limited areas. Four trials to take place in Southeast Asian, African, and South American countries will address the unresolved question of the optimal timing for initiation of HAART in patients with AIDS and TB: (1) Cambodian Early versus Late Introduction of Antiretrovirals (CAMELIA [ANRS 1295/NIH-CIPRA KH001]), (2) Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5221, (3) START, and (4) a trial sponsored by the World Health Organization/Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Two other clinical questions regarding patients with TB and HIV-1 coinfection are also undergoing evaluation: (1) the benefits of short-term HAART when CD4 cell counts are >350 cells/mm(3) (PART [NIH 1 R01 AI051219-01A2]) and (2) the efficacy of a once-daily HAART regimen in treatment-naive patients (BKVIR [ANRS 129]). Here, we present an overview of these ongoing or planned clinical studies, which are supported by international agencies.

  3. Pharmacological Treatments in Gambling Disorder: A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Lupi, Matteo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Brunetti, Marcella; Cinosi, Eduardo; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Gambling disorder (GD) is a psychiatric condition associated with both social and family costs; DSM-5 currently includes GD among addictive disorders. Despite the high burden of this condition, to date there are no treatment guidelines approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Purpose of this paper is to offer a qualitative overview about the different pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of GD. Our analysis, conducted on a final selection of 75 scientific papers, demonstrates that a variety of pharmaceutical classes have been utilised, with different results. Published data, although limited by brief duration of the studies and small number of enrolled subjects, shows mixed evidence for serotonergic antidepressants, opioid antagonists, and mood stabilizers. Other compounds, such as glutamatergic agents and psychostimulants, deserve further studies. PMID:24955359

  4. [New perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Bonne, C

    1993-01-01

    Open angle glaucoma is an optic neuropathy, the etiology of which is still unknown and which has not yet satisfactory therapy. Intraocular hypertension due to a decrease in trabecular out flow facility, is a risk factor. The side effects caused by ocular hypotensive treatments justify the search for better-tolerated drugs. A survey of the new approaches is reported: carbonic anhydrase inhibition, renin-angiotensin system inhibition, glucocorticoid antagonism, the use of prostaglandins etc. are evoked, as well as other more speculative ways: antioxidant treatments. Glaucoma which is characterized by ganglion cell degeneration probably related to a vascular defect, deserves to be studied from this point of view. Recent data on vascular and haemorheological abnormalities and the possible involvement of excitotoxic neurotransmitters in pathological process open a novel way for really innovative pharmacological research.

  5. Pharmacologic Treatment for Pediatric Gastroparesis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Smetana, Keaton S.; Bantu, Likeselam; Buckley, Merrion G.

    2016-01-01

    There have been a number of agents that have been tried for treatment of gastroparesis over the past 3 decades, with varying levels of success. Guidelines exist for the management of gastroparesis in adults; however, even though the cause of gastroparesis in children is similar to that in adults, no guidelines exist for treating pediatric gastroparesis as studies on the topic are limited. With what little information we have on pediatric gastroparesis, medications used in children's studies do not seem to demonstrate the same results as in adult patients with gastroparesis; thus, future studies of whether certain medications are effective for treating pediatric gastroparesis and at what dose still need to be conducted. Pharmacological treatment options for pediatric gastroparesis do not show a clear correlation of resolving or even maintaining gastroparesis-associated symptoms or disease state. This article reviews the available studies of drugs that have shown some efficacy, with an emphasis on pediatric studies. PMID:27199619

  6. Pharmacologic Treatment for Pediatric Gastroparesis: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Emma M; Smetana, Keaton S; Bantu, Likeselam; Buckley, Merrion G

    2016-01-01

    There have been a number of agents that have been tried for treatment of gastroparesis over the past 3 decades, with varying levels of success. Guidelines exist for the management of gastroparesis in adults; however, even though the cause of gastroparesis in children is similar to that in adults, no guidelines exist for treating pediatric gastroparesis as studies on the topic are limited. With what little information we have on pediatric gastroparesis, medications used in children's studies do not seem to demonstrate the same results as in adult patients with gastroparesis; thus, future studies of whether certain medications are effective for treating pediatric gastroparesis and at what dose still need to be conducted. Pharmacological treatment options for pediatric gastroparesis do not show a clear correlation of resolving or even maintaining gastroparesis-associated symptoms or disease state. This article reviews the available studies of drugs that have shown some efficacy, with an emphasis on pediatric studies.

  7. The presence of comorbidity in Tourette syndrome increases the need for pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2009-12-01

    Tourette syndrome is often accompanied by other syndromes, like attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder, and its treatment is symptomatic. Because there are no European guidelines for pharmacological treatment in Tourette syndrome, we wanted to contribute to a better insight into the common practice in Scandinavia. Furthermore, we wanted to elaborate the influence of the presence of comorbidities and of the severity of tics on pharmacological treatment. We have examined the frequency, art, and reason for pharmacological treatment in a Danish clinical cohort of 314 children with Tourette syndrome. In total, 60.5% of the children once had received pharmacological treatment. Mostly, the treatment was started because of tics or ADHD. If ADHD or obsessive-compulsive disorder were present, more children received pharmacological treatment and more different agents were tried. The children who received pharmacological treatment had more severe tics than those without medication.

  8. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  9. [Pharmacological treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Cornu, J N; Haab, F

    2013-04-01

    To depict the recent advances in the field of pharmacological treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder (iOAB). A literature search was conducted, using the PubMed/Medline database. Articles were included if published as full papers, after 2008 and before September 2012, and focused on recent pharmacologic treatment options for iOAB management. Publications having the highest level of evidence have been analyzed to summarize the available evidence, prioritizing the treatments available in France. Some meta-analyses have been published between 2008 and 2012, gathering information about 82 level 1 evidence studies about efficacy and safety of anticholinergics. According to the most recent meta-analysis, anticholinergics have proved their efficacy for iOAB management, reducing the number of micturitions per day by up to 1.59, the number of incontinence episodes per day by up to 0.7, the number of urgency episodes by up to 1.7, the number of urgency incontinence episodes by up to 2.25, and the number of nocturnal voids by up to 0.24. Safety profile was good, especially for solifenacin and fesoterodine, supported by strong scientific evidence. However, data were limited to short-term follow-up, with no anticholinergic drug superior to another. Few data were available about observance, risk factors for failure and results in specific populations. Anticholinergics can be used safely for management of lower urinary tract symptoms in men, but their role is still to be determined. Data about innovative drugs were still preliminary. Anticholinergics are a valuable option for management of iOAB, and have a growing role in management of lower urinary tract symptoms in men without bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacologic treatment of anaphylaxis: can the evidence base be strengthened?

    PubMed

    Simons, F Estelle R

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the evidence base for the pharmacologic treatment of anaphylaxis. In this review, we focus on four classes of medications (the alpha/beta-agonist epinephrine (adrenaline), H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and glucocorticoids) that are used in healthcare settings for the initial treatment of anaphylaxis. Epinephrine and many H1-antihistamines and glucocorticoids were introduced before the era of randomized controlled trials and before the era of evidence-based medicine. In anaphylaxis, no randomized controlled trials that are free from methodological problems and meet current standards have been performed with these medications, or with H2-antihistamines. The evidence base for epinephrine injection is stronger than the evidence base for use of other medications in anaphylaxis. Guidelines unanimously recommend prompt injection of epinephrine as the life-saving first-line medication in anaphylaxis; however, they differ in their recommendations for H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and glucocorticoids. Epinephrine is the only medication that is universally available for anaphylaxis treatment in healthcare settings worldwide. Paradoxically, it is underused in anaphylaxis treatment. For ethical reasons, there should never be a placebo-controlled trial of epinephrine in anaphylaxis. We discuss why the possibility of conducting randomized placebo-controlled trials with H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and particularly with glucocorticoids in anaphylaxis should be considered in order to improve the evidence base for treatment and guide clinical decision-making. We also describe the precautions that will be needed if randomized controlled trials are conducted in anaphylaxis.

  11. [Pharmacological treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome: a technical review].

    PubMed

    Remes-Troche, J M; Gómez-Escudero, O; Nogueira-de Rojas, J R; Carmona-Sánchez, R; Pérez-Manauta, J; López-Colombo, A; Sanjurjo-García, J L; Noble-Lugo, A; Chávez-Barrera, J A; González-Martínez, M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a comprehensive treatment in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients should be the improvement of symptoms and improve the quality of life. To review the drugs recommended in IBS, their mechanisms of action, side effects, risks and benefits, contraindications, availability in our country and the evidence supporting their use. A technical and narrative review which evaluated the articles published in national and world literature regarding the pharmacological treatment of IBS was performed. PubMed and IMBIOMED electronic databases were searched (until September 2009) using all descriptors regarding IBS and drug therapy. There is enough clinical evidence to recommend the use of antispasmodics (alone orin combination) and tricyclic antidepressants for pain treatment in IBS. Laxatives are useful in the management of chronic constipation, but there is little evidence in the management of IBS. Although, antiflatulents and antidiarrheals are widely used there is little information supporting its use. The use of a nonabsorbable antibiotic (rifaximin) is effective in a subgroup of IBS patients. Serotoninergics drugs have proven effective in relieving symptoms of IBS; however, these drugs require caution in their use. There are studies have shown that probiotics improve some symptoms of IBS. There are many effective treatment options in the symptomatic management of IBS. The choice of treatment should be based on the predominant symptoms of each patient.

  12. [An approach to the pharmacological treatment of autism].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V L

    1996-11-01

    In the past decade, notable advances have been made with regard to understanding the clinical, biological and epidermological aspects of the basic disorders of development (TPD), particularly autism. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the neurobiological basis is still limited. This has impeded the development of drugs which correct the defect and cure the illness. Although there is no perfect drug, in recent years clinico-pharmacological research has made it possible to use drugs which have been very helpful in correcting the symptoms associated with these disorders. These drugs have permitted a better therapeutic approach and improved family and social integration of these children (in the family and in society). We will proceed to analyze some of the drugs shown to be useful for treatment of children with TPD.

  13. Pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis in the oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, A; Luyten, FP; Flamaing, J; Gielen, E

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures increases with age. Consequently, the global prevalence of osteoporotic fractures will increase with the aging of the population. In old age, osteoporosis is associated with a substantial burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, osteoporosis in old age continues to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. This may, at least partly, be explained by the fact that evidence of the antifracture efficacy of osteoporosis treatments comes mainly from randomized controlled trials in postmenopausal women with a mean age of 70–75 years. However, in the last years, subgroup analyses of these landmark trials have been published investigating the efficacy and safety of osteoporosis treatment in the very elderly. Based on this evidence, this narrative review discusses the pharmacological management of osteoporosis in the oldest old (≥80 years). Because of the high prevalence of calcium and/or vitamin D deficiency in old age, these supplements are essential in the management of osteoporosis in the elderly people. Adding antiresorptive or anabolic treatments or combinations, thereof, reduces the risk of vertebral fractures even more, at least in the elderly with documented osteoporosis. The reduction of hip fracture risk by antiresorptive treatments is less convincing, which may be explained by insufficient statistical power in some subanalyses and/or a higher impact of nonskeletal risk factors in the occurrence of hip fractures. Compared with younger individuals, a larger absolute risk reduction is observed in the elderly because of the higher baseline fracture risk. Therefore, the elderly will benefit more of treatment. In addition, current osteoporosis therapies also appear to be safe in the elderly. Although more research is required to further clarify the effect of osteoporosis drugs in the elderly, especially with respect to hip fractures, there is currently sufficient evidence to initiate appropriate treatment in the

  14. Non-pharmacological treatment of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Henriksson, Chris

    2007-06-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment for patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia (FM) aims to enhance overall health. This chapter reviews studies of exercise, education, movement therapies and sensory stimulation. Based on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we suggest that aerobic exercise of low to moderate intensity, such as walking and pool exercise, can improve symptoms and distress in patients with CWP and FM, and it may improve physical capacity in sedentary patients. Aerobic exercise of moderate to high intensity has been shown to improve aerobic capacity and tender-point status. Educational programmes have been shown to enhance self-efficacy and health perception. There is no conclusive evidence about the type of educational programme that works best, but a small-group format and interactive discussions appear to be important components. Exercise combined with education appears to produce synergies. Studies of movement therapies (such as qigong) and sensory treatments (such as acupuncture and massage) are few in number. There is today no conclusive evidence about the effects of these treatments in CWP, although positive effects have been reported in a few studies.

  15. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain in individuals with HIV: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S; Bulls, Hailey W; Vucovich, Lee A; Edelman, E Jennifer; Starrels, Joanna L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pain occurs in as many as 85% of individuals with HIV and is associated with substantial functional impairment. Little guidance is available for HIV providers seeking to address their patients' chronic pain. We conducted a systematic review to identify clinical trials and observational studies that examined the impact of pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic interventions on pain and/or functional outcomes among HIV-infected individuals with chronic pain in high-development countries. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria and were mostly low or very low quality. Seven examined pharmacologic interventions (gabapentin, pregabalin, capsaicin, analgesics including opioids) and four examined non-pharmacologic interventions (cognitive behavioral therapy, self-hypnosis, smoked cannabis). The only controlled studies with positive results were of capsaicin and cannabis, and had short-term follow-up (≤12 weeks). Among the seven studies of pharmacologic interventions, five had substantial pharmaceutical industry sponsorship. These findings highlight several important gaps in the HIV/chronic pain literature that require further research.

  16. Patterns of pharmacologic treatment in US patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Broder, Michael S; Chang, Eunice; Ludlam, William H; Neary, Maureen P; Carmichael, John D

    2016-05-01

    To establish a baseline pattern of care across academic and community settings, it is important to examine the contemporary treatment of acromegaly. We characterized medical treatment patterns for acromegaly in the US to develop a basis for tracking concordance with guidelines. Acromegaly patients were identified in two commercial claims databases for this retrospective analysis. Study subjects had ≥2 medical claims with acromegaly (ICD-9-CM code 253.0) and ≥1 claim for pharmacotherapy (bromocriptine, cabergoline, octreotide SA, octreotide LAR, lanreotide, or pegvisomant) in the study timeframe (1 January 2002-31 December 2013). Patients were considered newly treated if they were continuously enrolled for ≥6 months before first observed treatment and had no claim for pharmacologic treatment during that time. Outcomes included various pharmacotherapies, including combination treatments, and differences between lines of therapy. A total of 3150 patients had ≥1 pharmacotherapy (mean age: 46.5 years; 50.1% were female); 1471 were newly treated. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) were the most common drug class used first line (57.2%); cabergoline (27.8%) was the most common treatment, followed by octreotide LAR (22.3%) and lanreotide (19.7%). SRLs were also the most commonly used second-line (42.8%) and third-line pharmacotherapies (43.9%), with combination therapy (23.2%) and octreotide LAR (19.8%) as the most commonly used treatments, respectively. This study, representing the largest claims-based analysis of acromegaly to date, used two databases across a 12 year period to examine complex treatment patterns in a difficult-to-study disease. Although wide variation in acromegaly treatment patterns exists in US clinical practice, in first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy, SRL was the most commonly used drug class. Drug combinations also varied considerably across lines of therapy. The switching between different monotherapies and varied use of drugs

  17. Treatment Approaches for Self-Injurious Behavior in Individuals with Autism: Behavioral and Pharmacological Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahatmya, Duhita; Zobel, Alicia; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral and pharmacological approaches to the treatment of self-injurious behavior in autism. Both behavioral and pharmacological approaches offer a multitude of treatment options which we hope to elucidate. In providing this review, the goal is to provide an awareness of the treatment options available and to prompt further…

  18. The preconception diet is associated with the chance of ongoing pregnancy in women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment.

    PubMed

    Twigt, J M; Bolhuis, M E C; Steegers, E A P; Hammiche, F; van Inzen, W G; Laven, J S E; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M

    2012-08-01

    Subfertility and poor nutrition are increasing problems in Western countries. Moreover, nutrition affects fertility in both women and men. In this study, we investigate the association between adherence to general dietary recommendations in couples undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment and the chance of ongoing pregnancy. Between October 2007 and October 2010, couples planning pregnancy visiting the outpatient clinic of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands were offered preconception counselling. Self-administered questionnaires on general characteristics and diet were completed and checked during the visit. Six questions, based on dietary recommendations of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre, covered the intake of six main food groups (fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, whole wheat products and fats). Using the questionnaire results, we calculated the Preconception Dietary Risk score (PDR), providing an estimate of nutritional habits. Dietary quality increases with an increasing PDR score. We define ongoing pregnancy as an intrauterine pregnancy with positive heart action confirmed by ultrasound. For this analysis we selected all couples (n=199) who underwent a first IVF/ICSI treatment within 6 months after preconception counselling. We applied adjusted logistic regression analysis on the outcomes of interest using SPSS. After adjustment for age of the woman, smoking of the woman, PDR of the partner, BMI of the couple and treatment indication we show an association between the PDR of the woman and the chance of ongoing pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment (odds ratio 1.65, confidence interval: 1.08-2.52; P=0.02]. Thus, a one-point increase in the PDR score associates with a 65% increased chance of ongoing pregnancy. Our results show that increasing adherence to Dutch dietary recommendations in women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment increases the chance of ongoing pregnancy. These data warrant further confirmation in

  19. Pharmacological Treatment of Cannabis-Related Disorders: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit psychoactive substance world-wide, yet no medication is approved for the treatment of intoxication, withdrawal, or cannabis use disorder (CUD). To comprehensively review the current state of knowledge. Search of the PubMed electronic data base and review of reference lists of relevant articles to identify controlled clinical trials of pharmacological treatment. The search identified 4 trials for specific intoxication symptoms (none for global intoxication), 7 trials for withdrawal, and 12 phase II trials for CUD. One or two trials each suggest that propranolol is effective for some intoxication symptoms, antipsychotics for cannabis-induced psychosis, and dronabinol (synthetic THC) and gabapentin for cannabis withdrawal. Of 10 medications and one medication combination studied in 12 trials for CUD, only two medications were effective (in single trials): gabapentin and Nacetylcysteine (in adolescents). Not effective were dronabinol and several antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antianxiety medications. Three trials of antidepressants for CUD with comorbid depression gave inconsistent results. A trial of atomoxetine for CUD with comorbid ADHD showed no efficacy. Five trials of second-generation antipsychotics for CUD with comorbid schizophrenia showed none better than any other. Further research is needed to confirm the efficacy of gabapentin for withdrawal and gabapentin and N-acetylcysteine for CUD and to develop new medications for all 3 cannabis-related disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder that reduces patients' quality of life. It is a chronic disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered defecation in the absence of identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities. IBS imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. Alteration in neurohumoral mechanisms and psychological factors, bacterial overgrowth, genetic factors, gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and immune system factors are currently believed to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. It is possible that there is an interaction of one or more of these etiologic factors leading to heterogeneous symptoms of IBS. IBS treatment is predicated upon the patient's most bothersome symptoms. Despite the wide range of medications and the high prevalence of the disease, to date no completely effective remedy is available. This article reviews the literature from January 2008 to July 2013 on the subject of IBS peripherally acting pharmacological treatment. Drugs are categorized according to their administration for IBS-C, IBS-D or abdominal pain predominant IBS.

  1. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  2. [Quality of care in diabetic patients receiving pharmacologic treatment].

    PubMed

    Lombraña, María A; Capetta, María E; Ugarte, Alejandro; Correa, Viviana; Giganti, Jorge; Saubidet, Cristian Lopez; Stryjewski, Martin E

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with an increasing prevalence. Appropriate treatment of the disease and prevention of chronic complications reduce morbidity and mortality in a cost-effective manner. These actions should be measured through the use of validated indicators for quality of care. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of care in diabetic patients under pharmacologic treatment in a private university hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in adult patients who bought insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents during a 3 month period; demographic and clinical data were obtained for 12 consecutive months following the buying period. The study included 305 adult patients; most were males (60%), with type 2 diabetes (95%), and using oral hipoglycemic agents (86%). Control of blood pressure was registered in 80%, foot exam in 5%, eye exam in 27%, HbA1C blood level in 85%, complete lipid profile in 82%, microalbuminuria in 27% and creatinine clearance in 22% of patients, respectively. Mean values were HbA1C 7.1(+/- 1.6)%, and < or = 7% in 66%, LDL 113 (+/- 33.6) mg/dl and <100 mg/dl in 30%, BP 136-79 mm Hg and < 130-80 mm Hg in 46% of patients, respectively. This study emphasizes the need for quality of care assessment through validated indicators and points out the aspects that should be improved within a health care system.

  3. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Potential Treatment for PMM2-CDG.

    PubMed

    Yuste-Checa, Patricia; Brasil, Sandra; Gámez, Alejandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2017-02-01

    The congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) due to phosphomannomutase 2 deficiency (PMM2-CDG), the most common N-glycosylation disorder, is a multisystem disease for which no effective treatment is available. The recent functional characterization of disease-causing mutations described in patients with PMM2-CDG led to the idea of a therapeutic strategy involving pharmacological chaperones (PC) to rescue PMM2 loss-of-function mutations. The present work describes the high-throughput screening, by differential scanning fluorimetry, of 10,000 low-molecular-weight compounds from a commercial library, to search for possible PCs for the enzyme PMM2. This exercise identified eight compounds that increased the thermal stability of PMM2. Of these, four compounds functioned as potential PCs that significantly increased the stability of several destabilizing and oligomerization mutants and also increased PMM activity in a disease model of cells overexpressing PMM2 mutations. Structural analysis revealed one of these compounds to provide an excellent starting point for chemical optimization since it passed tests based on a number of pharmacochemical quality filters. The present results provide the first proof-of-concept of a possible treatment for PMM2-CDG and describe a promising chemical structure as a starting point for the development of new therapeutic agents for this severe orphan disease.

  4. Prevention measures and exploratory pharmacological treatments of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Pinier, Maud; Fuhrmann, Gregor; Verdu, Elena F; Verdu, Elena; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2010-12-01

    Increasing prevalence, protean clinical manifestations, and lack of pharmacological therapy make celiac disease (CD) a complex and highly relevant illness in gastroenterology. This chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine is caused by the ingestion of gluten containing cereals in genetically susceptible individuals, leading to a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI manifestations. Awareness among physicians is growing due to accessible and highly accurate diagnostic and screening methods. Recent evidence suggests a possible rising incidence of CD. Environmental factors such as early life gluten exposure, intestinal infections, short duration of breast-feeding, and changes in intestinal microbiota have been proposed to have a role in CD pathogenesis. Thus, prevention approaches to diminish the rising prevalence of CD are currently being evaluated. Still, the cornerstone treatment of CD remains a strict gluten-free diet. This nutritional regime is demanding, and non-adherence is common because of social isolation, financial issues, or restriction of food diversity. Allowing patients to occasionally consume small amounts of gluten would greatly improve their quality of life. Owing to recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, different targets have been identified and have motivated the development of several experimental therapeutic strategies. The main goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms that can be exploited therapeutically to prevent or delay CD, disease associations and its complications. Current treatments for complications of CD, including refractory CD and malignancy, are beyond the scope of this review.

  5. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder that reduces patients’ quality of life. It is a chronic disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered defecation in the absence of identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities. IBS imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. Alteration in neurohumoral mechanisms and psychological factors, bacterial overgrowth, genetic factors, gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and immune system factors are currently believed to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. It is possible that there is an interaction of one or more of these etiologic factors leading to heterogeneous symptoms of IBS. IBS treatment is predicated upon the patient’s most bothersome symptoms. Despite the wide range of medications and the high prevalence of the disease, to date no completely effective remedy is available. This article reviews the literature from January 2008 to July 2013 on the subject of IBS peripherally acting pharmacological treatment. Drugs are categorized according to their administration for IBS-C, IBS-D or abdominal pain predominant IBS. PMID:25083060

  6. Pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence: target symptoms and target mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Markus; Egli, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a major public health problem and resembles, in many ways, other chronic relapsing medical conditions. At least 2 separate dimensions of its symptomatology offer targetable pathophysiological mechanisms. Systems that mediate positive reinforcement by alcohol are likely important targets in early stages of the disease, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. In contrast, long term neuroadaptive changes caused by chronic alcohol use primarily appear to affect systems mediating negative affective states, and gain importance following a prolonged history of dependence. Feasibility of pharmacological treatment in alcoholism has been demonstrated by a first wave of drugs which consists of 3 currently approved medications, the aldehyde dehydrogenase blocker disulfiram, the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) and the functional glutamate antagonist acamprosate (ACM). The treatment toolkit is likely to be expanded in the near future. This will improve overall efficacy and allow individualized treatment, ultimately taking in account the patient's genetic makeup. In a second wave, early human efficacy data are available for the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron, the GABA-B agonist baclofen and the anticonvulsant topiramate. The third wave is comprised of compounds predicted to be effective based on a battery of animal models. Using such models, a short list of additional targets has accumulated sufficient preclinical validation to merit clinical development. These include the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, receptors modulating glutamatergic transmission (mGluR2, 3 and 5), and receptors for stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and nociceptin. Once novel treatments are developed, the field faces a major challenge to assure their delivery to patients.

  7. Pharmacological Treatment of Presbyopia by Novel Binocularly Instilled Eye Drops: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Renna, Antonio; Vejarano, L Felipe; De la Cruz, Ernesto; Alió, Jorge L

    2016-06-01

    The feasibility, in terms of safety and potential efficacy, of a new drug combination for binocular use as a noninvasive pharmacological solution for treating presbyopia was examined. Fourteen emmetropic presbyopic subjects (28 eyes) were given one drop of the preparation under study in each eye. For each patient, the uncorrected distance visual acuity, uncorrected near visual acuity, near and far refraction, best corrected visual acuity, best corrected far-near visual acuity, photopic and scotopic pupil size, Schirmer's test, endothelial cell count, intraocular pressure, keratometry, pachymetry, and anterior chamber depth were all performed or assessed prior to the administration of the eye drops and then 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 h, 1 week, and 1 month post-administration prospectively in each eye and binocularly. The results showed that near uncorrected visual acuity improved by about 2-3 lines from baseline in each eye and binocularly. There was no degradation in uncorrected far vision in each eye and binocularly in any patient. Refractive measurements performed in this study showed there was a maximum myopic shift of just 0.5 D that progressively reduced and disappeared at 4 h. The new topical drug treatment analyzed herein significantly improved near vision without affecting far vision. This binocular pharmacologic treatment of presbyopia has the potential to ameliorate the reading vision of presbyopes and possesses the advantages of a nonmonovision therapy. A randomized, controlled, double-masked clinical trial with a twice-a-day treatment schedule is ongoing at our institution. This study was supported in part by the Spanish Ministry of Health, Instituto Carlos III, Red Temática de Investigación Oftalmológica (OFTALRED), and Fundación Oftalmológica Vejarano (Popayán, Colombia).

  8. Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Casella, Carmela; Buda, Antonio; Crespantini, Aurelio; Porcari, Bruno; Carioti, Luigi; Billeri, Luana; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-03-03

    The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated. We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient's performances. Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient's quality of life. Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity.

  9. Cost considerations in the pharmacological prevention and treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, A V; Smurawska, L T; Bartle, W; Oh, P

    1997-05-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of neurological disability and the third leading cause of death worldwide, consuming a large share of total healthcare expenditures. In this review, we discuss the cost effectiveness of stroke prevention for various risk factor-modification programmes and pharmacological interventions with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), ticlopidine and warfarin. Cost considerations and potential cost savings resulting from acute treatment are discussed for parenterally administered anticoagulants, such as heparin and nadroparin, and for intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator; r-tPA). Patients with multiple risk factors for stroke require more aggressive prevention strategies which are associated with a greater risk of complications. The rates of complications, particularly intracerebral haemorrhage, should be kept low to achieve cost benefits for warfarin and alteplase. Reduced hospital length of stay is the key factor in the implementation of cost-effective stroke therapies. The analysis of future clinical trials of new stroke therapies should also include economic parameters, such as length of hospital stay and intensity of resource usage, to help guide formulary and therapeutic decision.

  10. LITHIUM IN THE TREATMENT OF BIPOLAR DISORDER: PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMACOGENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Alda, Martin

    2016-01-01

    After decades of research, the mechanism of action of lithium in preventing recurrences of bipolar disorder remains only partially understood. Lithium research is complicated by absence of suitable animal models of bipolar disorder and by having to rely on in vitro studies of peripheral tissues. A number of distinct hypotheses emerged over the years, but none has been conclusively supported or rejected. The common theme emerging from pharmacological and genetic studies is that lithium affects multiple steps in cellular signalling, usually enhancing basal and inhibiting stimulated activities. Some of the key nodes of these regulatory networks include GSK3, CREB, and Na+-K+ ATPase. Genetic and pharmacogenetic studies are starting to generate promising findings, but remain limited by small sample sizes. As full responders to lithium seem to represent a unique clinical population, there is inherent value and need for studies of lithium responders. Such studies will be an opportunity to uncover specific effects of lithium in those individuals who clearly benefit from the treatment. PMID:25687772

  11. Lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder: pharmacology and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Alda, M

    2015-06-01

    After decades of research, the mechanism of action of lithium in preventing recurrences of bipolar disorder remains only partially understood. Lithium research is complicated by the absence of suitable animal models of bipolar disorder and by having to rely on in vitro studies of peripheral tissues. A number of distinct hypotheses emerged over the years, but none has been conclusively supported or rejected. The common theme emerging from pharmacological and genetic studies is that lithium affects multiple steps in cellular signaling, usually enhancing basal and inhibiting stimulated activities. Some of the key nodes of these regulatory networks include GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3), CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and Na(+)-K(+) ATPase. Genetic and pharmacogenetic studies are starting to generate promising findings, but remain limited by small sample sizes. As full responders to lithium seem to represent a unique clinical population, there is inherent value and need for studies of lithium responders. Such studies will be an opportunity to uncover specific effects of lithium in those individuals who clearly benefit from the treatment.

  12. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  13. A MODEL FOR THE PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF CROUZON SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Perlyn, Chad A.; Morriss-Kay, Gillian; Darvann, Tron; Tenenbaum, Marissa; Ornitz, David M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Crouzon syndrome is caused by mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) leading to constitutive activation of receptors in the absence of ligand binding. The syndrome is characterized by premature fusion of the cranial sutures that leads to abnormal cranium shape, restricted brain growth, and increased intracranial pressure. Surgical remodeling of the cranial vault is currently used to treat affected infants. The purpose of this study was to develop a pharmacological strategy using tyrosine kinase inhibition as a novel treatment for craniosynostotic syndromes caused by constitutive FGFR activation. METHODS Characterization of cranial suture fusion in Fgfr2C342Y/+ mutant mice, which carry the most common Crouzon mutation, was performed using microcomputed tomographic analysis from embryogenesis through maturation. Whole calvarial cultures from wild-type and Fgfr2C342Y/+ mice were established and cultured for 2 weeks in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide control or PD173074, an FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Paraffin sections were prepared to show suture morphology and calcium deposition. RESULTS In untreated Fgfr2C342Y/+ cultures, the coronal suture fused bilaterally with loss of overlap between the frontal bone and parietal bone. Calvaria treated with PD173074 (2 µmol/L) showed patency of the coronal suture and were without evidence of any synostosis. CONCLUSION We report the successful use of PD173074 to prevent in vitro suture fusion in a model for Crouzon syndrome. Further studies are underway to develop an in vivo treatment protocol as a novel therapeutic modality for FGFR associated craniosynostotic syndromes. PMID:16823318

  14. Pharmacology of cannabinoids in the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Tyler E; Friedman, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The use of cannabis products in the treatment of epilepsy has long been of interest to researchers and clinicians alike; however, until recently very little published data were available to support its use. This article summarizes the available scientific data of pharmacology from human and animal studies on the major cannabinoids which have been of interest in the treatment of epilepsy, including ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD), ∆9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (∆9-THCV), cannabidivarin (CBDV), and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (Δ9-THCA). It has long been known that ∆9-THC has partial agonist activity at the endocannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, though it also binds to other targets which may modulate neuronal excitability and neuroinflammation. The actions of Δ9-THCV and Δ9-THCA are less well understood. In contrast to ∆9-THC, CBD has low affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors and other targets have been investigated to explain its anticonvulsant properties including TRPV1, voltage gated potassium and sodium channels, and GPR55, among others. We describe the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of each of the above mentioned compounds. Cannabinoids as a whole are very lipophilic, resulting in decreased bioavailability, which presents challenges in optimal drug delivery. Finally, we discuss the limited drug-drug interaction data available on THC and CBD. As cannabinoids and cannabis-based products are studied for efficacy as anticonvulsants, more investigation is needed regarding the specific targets of action, optimal drug delivery, and potential drug-drug interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Cannabinoids and Epilepsy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Wim

    2012-03-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling using data mainly from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses regarding these randomized controlled trials. The review is restricted to the selection of first and second line pharmacological treatments for smoking, alcohol dependence, opioid dependence, cocaine dependence, cannabis dependence and pathological gambling. It is concluded that great progress has been made in the last three decades and that currently evidence-based pharmacological treatments are available for smoking cessation, alcohol and opioid dependence and pathological gambling. At the same time a series of existing and new pharmacological compounds are being tested in cocaine and cannabis dependence. The review concludes with a summary of additional strategies to increase the effect size of already available pharmacological interventions, including polypharmacy, combining pharmacotherapy with psychotherapy and psychosocial support, and improved patient-treatment matching.

  16. Pharmacological treatment options for autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leskovec, Thomas J; Rowles, Brieana M; Findling, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Autism and other pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) are frequently associated with dysfunctional behaviors and are characterized by deficits in socialization, communication, and behavioral rigidity. Despite the absence of a pharmacological cure for PDDs, many of the dysfunctional, coinciding behaviors may be treated pharmacologically. This article reviews what is known about the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological interventions for the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from autistic spectrum disorders.

  17. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  18. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  19. Pharmacologic approaches to treatment resistant depression: Evidences and personal experience.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; de Filippis, Rocco; Proietti, Luca

    2015-09-22

    To review evidence supporting pharmacological treatments for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and to discuss them according to personal clinical experience. Original studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing pharmacological treatment for TRD in adult patients published from 1990 to 2013 were identified by data base queries (PubMed, Google Scholar e Quertle Searches) using terms: "treatment resistant depression", "treatment refractory depression", "partial response depression", "non responder depression", "optimization strategy", "switching strategy", "combination strategy", "augmentation strategy", selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors antidepressants, mirtazapine, mianserine, bupropione, monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI), lithium, thyroid hormones, second generation antipsychotics (SGA), dopamine agonists, lamotrigine, psychostimulants, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, ketamine, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosil-L-metionine, methylfolat, pindolol, sex steroids, glucocorticoid agents. Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. Selected publications were grouped by treatment strategy: (1) switching from an ineffective antidepressant (AD) to a new AD from a similar or different class; (2) combining the current AD regimen with a second AD from a different class; and (3) augmenting the current AD regimen with a second agent not thought to be an antidepressant itself. Switching from a TCA to another TCA provides only a modest advantage (response rate 9%-27%), while switching from a SSRI to another SSRI is more advantageous (response rate up to 75%). Evidence supports the usefulness of switching from SSRI to venlafaxine (5 positive trials out 6), TCA (2 positive trials out 3), and MAOI (2 positive trials out 2) but not from SSRI to bupropione, duloxetine and

  20. Pharmacologic approaches to treatment resistant depression: Evidences and personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Antonio; de Filippis, Rocco; Proietti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review evidence supporting pharmacological treatments for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and to discuss them according to personal clinical experience. METHODS: Original studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing pharmacological treatment for TRD in adult patients published from 1990 to 2013 were identified by data base queries (PubMed, Google Scholar e Quertle Searches) using terms: “treatment resistant depression”, “treatment refractory depression”, “partial response depression”, “non responder depression”, “optimization strategy”, “switching strategy”, “combination strategy”, “augmentation strategy”, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors antidepressants, mirtazapine, mianserine, bupropione, monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI), lithium, thyroid hormones, second generation antipsychotics (SGA), dopamine agonists, lamotrigine, psychostimulants, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, ketamine, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosil-L-metionine, methylfolat, pindolol, sex steroids, glucocorticoid agents. Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. Selected publications were grouped by treatment strategy: (1) switching from an ineffective antidepressant (AD) to a new AD from a similar or different class; (2) combining the current AD regimen with a second AD from a different class; and (3) augmenting the current AD regimen with a second agent not thought to be an antidepressant itself. RESULTS: Switching from a TCA to another TCA provides only a modest advantage (response rate 9%-27%), while switching from a SSRI to another SSRI is more advantageous (response rate up to 75%). Evidence supports the usefulness of switching from SSRI to venlafaxine (5 positive trials out 6), TCA (2 positive trials out 3), and MAOI (2 positive trials out

  1. Pharmacological treatment of neurobehavioural sequelae of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F

    2008-01-01

    Neurobehavioural sequelae of traumatic brain injuries require an appropriate/effective pharmacological response in that they represent an important cause of disability. In this field, there is no evidence that reaches the level of a standard: there are guidelines on the use of methylphenidate, donepezil and bromocriptine for the treatment of cognitive disturbances, for the non-use of phenytoin and for the use of beta-blockers for controlling aggressiveness. Resolving a single symptom is not relevant in a rehabilitation project if it is not in the context of a more complex picture of neurobehavioural recovery, in which the positive and negative effects of every therapeutic choice are considered. For example, phenytoin could be used for the positive control of epileptic crises but is not advised since it impedes the recovery of cognitive functions in general. Analogous effects not yet identified may concern benzodiazepine, neuroleptics and other sedatives usually prescribed in cases of cranial trauma. Psychotropic drugs are considered to be able to influence the neuronal plasticity processes. Studies on animals have shown that the administration of D-amphetamine combined with sensorial-motor exercise produces the steady acceleration of motor recovery, which acts as a catalyst to the neurological recovery process. On the other hand, alpha1-NA receptor antagonist drugs produce negative effects; these include clonidine (antihypertension) and haloperidol (neuroleptic). Studies need to be carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of particular drugs. These studies need to focus not only on the disappearance of symptoms but also on the positive and negative effects on overall rehabilitation and on the neurobiological recovery of the patient.

  2. The effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in peripheral arterial disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment has been advocated as a first line therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) patients suffering from intermittent claudication. Previous studies document the ability of pharmacological treatment to increase walking distances. However, the effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in PAD patients has not been objectively evaluated as is common with other gait abnormalities. Methods Sixteen patients were prescribed an FDA approved drug (Pentoxifylline or Cilostazol) for the treatment of symptomatic PAD. Patients underwent baseline gait testing prior to medication use which consisted of acquisition of ground reaction forces and kinematics while walking in a pain free state. After three months of treatment, patients underwent repeat gait testing. Results Patients with symptomatic PAD had significant gait abnormalities at baseline during pain free walking as compared to healthy controls. However, pharmacological treatment did not produce any identifiable alterations on the biomechanics of gait of the PAD patients as revealed by the statistical comparisons performed between pre and post-treatment and between post-treatment and the healthy controls. Conclusions Pharmacological treatment did not result in statistically significant improvements in the gait biomechanics of patients with symptomatic PAD. Future studies will need to further explore different cohorts of patients that have shown to improve significantly their claudication distances and/or their muscle fiber morphology with the use of pharmacological treatment and determine if this is associated with an improvement in gait biomechanics. Using these methods we may distinguish the patients who benefit from pharmacotherapy and those who do not. PMID:20529284

  3. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2010-07-14

    Recent studies investigating the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain support the efficacy of certain antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids. Novel directions in drug applications include topical applications of patches with either lidocaine or capsaicin and intradermal injections of botulinum toxin. In cases of partial pain relief, drug combinations may be considered.

  4. Prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea: a clinical pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Rampal, P

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea represents a major health problem for travelers to developing countries. Although the syndrome is usually self-limited and recovery occurs in the majority of cases without any specific form of therapy, there is a need for safe and effective ways of preventing and treating it. Since the syndrome is most often caused by an infection acquired by ingesting fecally contaminated food or beverages, precautions regarding dietary habits remain the cornerstone of prophylaxis, but dietary self-restrictions do not always translate to reduced rates of diarrheal illness. Administration of probiotics (e.g. lactobacilli or Saccharomyces boulardii) and immunoprophylaxis with the newer oral cholera vaccines have been tried with promising results. Antimicrobials remain, however, the most successful form of prophylaxis, being effective in up to 90% of travelers. For those with impaired health who will take prophylaxis, systemic agents with proved efficacy should be recommended. For other otherwise healthy persons, poorly absorbed agents are preferable in order to avoid the serious, albeit rare, toxicity of systemic drugs. The key factor in the management of acute watery traveler's diarrhea, particularly in infants and young children, is the restoration of water and electrolyte balance. This does not reduce the duration of the illness but will limit dehydration and prevent acidosis. Many patients will require no additional therapy, whereas some will need pharmacologic treatment to shorten the duration of diarrhea or to relieve the accompanying symptoms, like abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. A typical 3- to 5-day illness can be reduced to approximately 1 day by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) combination. Some other systemic antimicrobials have been successfully used but, during the last few years, the 4-fluoroquinolone drugs have received considerable attention and have been shown to be highly effective in reducing the duration of traveler's diarrhea. These

  5. Pharmacological agents under research for the maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, S; Konstantakopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of bipolar disorder is a current challenge for clinicians and despite progress in psychopharmacology, options remain limited and results are often unsatisfactory. Current research focuses on finding new pharmaceutical agents for all phases of bipolar disorder, i.e. mania, bipolar depression and maintenance. Particularly, relapse prevention and longterm stabilization is a major therapeutic target. Combination treatment and polypharmacy are the most common choices concerning relapse prevention. Furthermore, during maintenance phase patients often experience residual mood symptoms, cognitive deficits and functional decline, which altogether illustrate the inadequate effectiveness of existing treatments and the need for new, targeted, effective and safe treatments for bipolar disorder. This review focuses on active agents for maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder investigated during the last 5 years. The compounds under investigation have been tried or tested either as monotherapy or as an add-on treatment in clinical trials that have progressed up to phase 3 or in preclinical models of bipolar disorder. While awaiting the completion of many ongoing studies, the results so far indicate that paliperidone and pregabalin may have a position in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Additionally, dextromethorphan, which acts primarily as a NMDA antagonist, may be an interesting compound for further study. However, results on memantine, another NMDA antagonist, were not encouraging. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids and cytidine were not superior to placebo, although they both have neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. Eslicarbazepine, which has antiepileptic action, provided some evidence of efficacy as monotherapy. Regarding preclinical studies in experimental models, the pharmacological agents under investigation seem to follow the neurobiological pathways related to mechanism of action of lithium, which is still the "golden standard

  6. The ongoing evolution of antibody-based treatments for Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Emelissa J; Racine, Trina; Kobinger, Gary P

    2017-03-01

    The 2014-2016 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa was the deadliest in history, prompting the evaluation of various drug candidates, including antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Prior to 2014, only convalescent blood products from EHF survivors had been administered to newly infected individuals as a form of treatment. However, during the recent outbreak, monoclonal antibody cocktails such as ZMapp, ZMAb and MB-003 were either tested in a human clinical safety and efficacy trial or provided to some based on compassionate grounds. This review aims to discuss the evolution of antibody-based treatments for EHF, their clinical trial efficacy and the development of new antibody-based therapies currently advancing in preclinical testing.

  7. [Behavioural and psychological signs in dementia. Clinical features. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Gabay, Pablo M; Herrera Mingorace, Julio; Kremer, Janus; Taragano, Fernando; Reich, Edgardo G; Ure, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    In first term, we define the current concepts in regard to psychosis (delirium and hallucinations) and abnormal behaviours (aggression, depression and mood changes such as mania, apathy, anxiety, agitation and desinhibition) in dementia. We also review the most used drugs in order to control these symptoms (typical and atypical antipsychotics, anti-epileptic drugs, benzodiazepines, SSRI, memantine and AcheI). As well, we take in consideration pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, relationship to aging and interactions of these medications. Finally, we briefly describe the management of non-pharmacological of the most common behavioural symptoms: disruptive conducts such as exaggerated responses to minimal stimuli, catastrophic reaction, violence, anger and hostility, wandering and sundowning. As well, we discuss how to manage sleep disturbances, sexual aggression, incontinence and dressing apraxia. Management of these conditions involves, in first term, a comprehensive understanding of the whole situation and identification of underlying possible causes will make possible to evaluate results. This approach will lead to a more rationale proposal of psychotherapeutic and behavioural techniques, and milieu modifications. Finaly, we consider safety patient's in the community as well as the risk of abuse originated in a non-healthy patient-caregiver relationship.

  8. An ongoing study of group treatment for men involved in problematic Internet-enabled sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Orzack, Maressa Hecht; Voluse, Andrew C; Wolf, David; Hennen, John

    2006-06-01

    Exponential advances have been made regarding computer/Internet technology in the past decade. This growth, in large part, can be attributed to greater access to, affordability of, and anonymity while on the computer. However, this progress has also produced negative psychological issues. Problematic Internet-enabled sexual behavior (IESB) has increasingly affected individuals' family relationships, work productivity, and academic success. This article is the first-known, empirically based outcome study regarding the effectiveness of group therapy treatment for men with problematic IESB. These closed-groups, which ran for 16 weeks, used a combination of Readiness to Change (RtC), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Motivational Interviewing (MI) interventions. Five groups were analyzed for this paper (yielding a total N of 35), with the average member's age being 44.5 years old. Three different scales (the Orzack Time Intensity Survey, the BASIS-32, and the BDI) were used to track participants' progress across time. The results demonstrated that this group treatment intervention significantly increased members' quality of life and decreased the severity of their depressive symptoms. However, the protocol failed to reduce participants' inappropriate computer use. Regarding comorbidity, the results showed the following: members in the "anxiety" category responded best to the current treatment, those in the "mood" cluster responded relatively positively, and those in the "A-D/HD" category failed to respond significantly. It is clear from this report that more attention must be focused on the treatment of problematic IESB, as opposed to exploratory studies.

  9. Portrait, treatment choices and management of breast cancer in nonagenarians: an ongoing challenge.

    PubMed

    Méry, Benoite; Assouline, Avi; Rivoirard, Romain; Bosacki, Claire; Auberdiac, Pierre; Falk, Alexander T; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Merrouche, Yacine; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    There are only scarce data on the management of nonagenarians with breast cancer, and more particularly on the place of radiation therapy (RT). We report a retrospective study on patients aged 90 years old or older, with breast cancer, receiving RT. Records from RT departments from five institutions were reviewed to identify patients 90 years old of age and older undergoing RT over past decade for breast cancer. Tumors' characteristics were examined, as well treatment specificities and treatment intent. 44 patients receiving RT courses were identified, mean age 92 years. Treatment was given with curative and palliative intent in 72.7% and 27.3% respectively. Factors associated with a curative treatment were performance status (PS), place of life, previous surgery, and tumor stage. Median total prescribed dose was 40 Gy (23-66). Hypo fractionation was used in 77%. Most toxicities were mild to moderate. RT could not be completed in 1 patient (2.3%). No long-term toxicity was reported. Among 31 patients analyzable for effectiveness, 24 patients (77.4%) had their diseased controlled until last follow-up, including 17 patients (54.8%) experiencing complete response. At last follow-up, 4 patients (12.9%) were deceased, cancer being cause of death for two of them. The study shows that breast/chest RT is feasible in nonagenarians. Although the definitive benefit of RT could not be addressed here, hypofractionated therapy allowed a good local control with acceptable side effects.

  10. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Pharmacological Treatments of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: Critique and Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry K.; Marchione, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Examines theoretical, methodologic, and research issues as well as strengths, limitations, and possible interactions pertaining to behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological treatments of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Compares attrition, outcome, and maintenance effects and presents composite indices of significant improvement, endstate…

  11. Evidence-Based, Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea, Revised Edition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce, summarize, and emphasize the importance of the 'Evidence-Based, Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea, Revised Edition'. The guideline broadly covers most aspects of the pharmacological treatment of patients in Korea diagnosed with moderate to severe major depression according to the DSM-IV TR. The guideline establishment process involved determining and answering a number of key questions, searching and selecting publications, evaluating recommendations, preparing guideline drafts, undergoing external expert reviews, and obtaining approval. A guideline adaptation process was conducted for the revised edition. The guideline strongly recommends pharmacological treatment considered appropriate to the current clinical situation in Korea, and should be considered helpful when selecting the appropriate pharmacological treatment of patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Therefore, the wide distribution of this guideline is recommended. PMID:24753693

  12. Dental ethics case 6. Stalled payment for ongoing orthodontic treatment--balancing responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L; Naidoo, S

    2010-10-01

    It is not always easy for an orthodontist to strike the right balance between a caring, supportive and patient-centered approach, and the need to make a living and to run a profitable business in order to achieve this. Striving to act ethically and professionally at all times will help find this elusive balance and ultimately it will be more rewarding and professionally satisfying. Especially when dealing with children whose lives may be dramatically affected by the interruption or cessation of treatment, orthodontists have a duty to reassure themselves about the financial stability of their contractual relationships with patients or parents. Having consistent financial policies and flexible payment options may assist in this regard. Even in the face of non-payment of fees, treatments that have begun must in some form continue if their cessation would compromise the best interests of patients.

  13. Partners' Ongoing Treatment for Chronic Disease and the Risk of Psychological Distress after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Naoki; Narita, Akira; Tsuchiya, Naho; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Ichiro; Hozawa, Atsushi; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported that not only patients with chronic diseases but also their partners are likely to face major psychosocial problems. This study examined the association between a partner's ongoing treatment for chronic disease and the risk of psychological distress after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE). In 2012, a questionnaire was distributed as part of a cross-sectional study of participants aged 20 years or older living in a municipality that had been severely inundated by the tsunami following the GEJE. We identified couples using the household numbers of the municipality and collected self-reported information on ongoing chronic disease treatment for stroke, cancer, myocardial infarction, and angina. Psychological distress was evaluated using the Kessler 6 scale (K6) and was defined as a score ≥ 5/24 points. Among 1,246 couples (2,492 participants) thus identified, 2,369 completed the K6. The number of participants whose partners were under treatment for chronic diseases was 209 (9%). Overall, participants with partners who were receiving treatment for chronic diseases (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.95-1.8, P = 0.09) did not show a significantly higher risk of psychological distress using logistic regression analysis. Women, but not men, whose partners were receiving treatment for chronic diseases, had a higher risk of psychological distress (women: OR = 1.6, P = 0.02; men: OR = 1.0, P = 0.92). After the GEJE, only in women the presence of partners under treatment for chronic diseases appears to be a risk factor for psychological distress.

  14. M2 macrophages or IL-33 treatment attenuate ongoing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Piñeros, A. R.; Campos, L. W.; Fonseca, D. M.; Bertolini, T. B.; Gembre, A. F.; Prado, R. Q.; Alves-Filho, J. C.; Ramos, S. G.; Russo, M.; Bonato, V. L. D.

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of mycobacterial infections on lung allergy are well documented. However, the inverse relationship between tuberculosis and type 2 immunity is still elusive. Although type 1 immunity is essential to protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis it might be also detrimental to the host due to the induction of extensive tissue damage. Here, we determined whether lung type 2 immunity induced by allergen sensitization and challenge could affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We used two different protocols in which sensitization and allergen challenge were performed before or after M. tuberculosis infection. We found an increased resistance to M. tuberculosis only when allergen exposure was given after, but not before infection. Infected mice exposed to allergen exhibited lower bacterial load and cellular infiltrates in the lungs. Enhanced resistance to infection after allergen challenge was associated with increased gene expression of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) and IL-33 levels. Accordingly, either adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages or systemic IL-33 treatment was effective in attenuating M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, the enhanced resistance induced by allergen exposure was dependent on IL-33 receptor ST2. Our work indicates that IL-33 might be an alternative therapeutic treatment for severe tuberculosis. PMID:28128217

  15. Randomised controlled trials of psychological & pharmacological treatments for body dysmorphic disorder: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan L; Wilding, Helen E; Castle, David J

    2016-11-30

    Treatment for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often involves a combination of psychological and pharmacological interventions. However, only a small number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been undertaken examining the efficacy of different therapeutic interventions. The aim of this study was to systematically review the RCTs involving psychological and pharmacological interventions for the treatment of BDD. The literature was searched to June 2015, and studies were included if they were written in English, empirical research papers published in peer-review journals, specifically assessed BDD patients, and involved a RCT assessing BDD symptoms pre- and post-intervention. Nine studies were identified: six involving psychological and three involving pharmacological interventions. Cognitive behaviour therapy, metacognitive therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were identified as treatments with potential benefit. The small number of RCTs and the heterogeneity of findings emphasises the need for more high quality RCTs assessing both psychological and pharmacological interventions for BDD.

  16. Ongoing investigations and new uses of radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, Ruby F. . E-mail: rmeredith@uabmc.edu

    2006-10-01

    Studies in radiation oncology are focusing on the optimal use of systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) in the treatment of patients with cancer. The two approved radioimmunotherapy agents, yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan and iodine-131 tositumomab, are being studied in a range of lymphoid malignancies, from low-grade to aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Studies of standard- and escalated-dose radioimmunotherapy with or without stem cell support are reviewed, as are radioimmunotherapy with other therapeutic modalities in these settings. The results of these trials have important implications for clinical practice, and it is hoped that they will further clarify the optimal timing and dosing of these agents.

  17. A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses of Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Treatments of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mucci, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disability characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness, which may cause impairment in a variety of cognitive, social, behavioral, and emotional domains. Extensive research has been conducted to determine the best course of treatment for…

  18. A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses of Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Treatments of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mucci, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disability characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness, which may cause impairment in a variety of cognitive, social, behavioral, and emotional domains. Extensive research has been conducted to determine the best course of treatment for…

  19. More ubiquitous effects from non-pharmacologic than from pharmacologic treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome: a meta-analysis examining six core symptoms.

    PubMed

    Perrot, S; Russell, I J

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize and compare the efficacy profile on six fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) core symptoms associated with pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. We screened PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for FM articles from 1990 to September 2012 to analyse randomized controlled trials comparing pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic treatments to placebo or sham. Papers including assessments of at least 2 of the 6 main FM symptom domains - pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue, affective symptoms (depression/anxiety), functional deficit and cognitive impairment - were selected for analysis. Studies exploring pharmacologic approaches (n = 21) were mainly dedicated to treating a small number of dimensions, mostly pain. They were of good quality but were not prospectively designed to simultaneously document efficacy for the management of multiple core FM symptom domains. Only amitriptyline demonstrated a significant effect on as many as three core FM symptoms, but it exhibited many adverse effects and was subject to early tachyphylaxis. Studies involving non-pharmacologic approaches (n = 64) were typically of poorer quality but were more often dedicated to multidimensional targets. Pool therapy demonstrated significant effects on five symptom domains, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on four domains, balneotherapy on three domains and exercise, cognitive behaviour therapy and massage on two domains each. Differences between pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches may be related to different modes of action, tolerability profiles and study designs. Very few drugs in well-designed clinical trials have demonstrated significant relief for multiple FM symptom domains, whereas non-pharmacologic treatments with weaker study designs have demonstrated multidimensional effects. Future therapeutic trials for FM should prospectively examine each of the core domains and should attempt to combine pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic

  20. Pharmacological Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shier, Anna C.; Reichenbacher, Thomas; Ghuman, Harinder S.; Ghuman, Jaswinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood that can result in significant functional impairment, and if not adequately treated can lead to impaired quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is considered the first-line treatment for ADHD in children and adolescents. We review both recent literature and seminal studies regarding the pharmacological treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents. There is ample evidence for the efficacy and safety of both stimulants and non-stimulants in the treatment of ADHD. We review important aspects of evaluation and assessment and discuss first-line pharmacological treatments and as well as when to consider using alternative pharmacological agents. Treatment approaches to manage frequently seen comorbid disorders with ADHD are also covered. PMID:23650474

  1. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis: current pharmacologic treatment and anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Deepa; Trost, Landon W; Lee, Travis; Baluch, Amir R; Kaye, Alan D

    2007-06-01

    A diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis carries with it a lifelong progressive disease; however twenty percent of patients enjoy periods of partial to total remission. After remission, the disease will frequently plague previously unaffected joints. Life expectancy is reduced by an average of three to seven years. Complications of RA include vasculitis and amyloidosis affecting any vessel, including the aorta. Additionally, complications of therapy such as chronic NSAID use leading to GI bleeding and infections associated with long term steroid use, can add to the difficulties of the disease. The recent discovery and use of anticytokines and DMARDs has lead to greatly reduced symptomology associated with RA and greater patient comfort. Side effects of drugs should be well understood including the risk of bleeding from NSAIDs. Management and surgical intervention of problems that arise from this disease vary dramatically. The anesthesiologist must be aware of airway pathologies, pain management techniques, and available pharmacology parameters.

  3. Dietary and pharmacological treatment of abdominal pain in IBS.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2017-05-01

    This review introduces the principles of visceral sensation and appraises the current approaches to management of visceral pain in functional GI diseases, principally IBS. These approaches include dietary measures including fibre supplementation, low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet, and pharmacological approaches such as antispasmodics, peppermint oil, antidepressants (tricyclic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron, ondansetron, ramosetron), non-absorbed antibiotic (rifaximin), secretagogues (lubiprostone, linaclotide), μ-opioid receptor (OR) and κ-OR agonist, δ-OR antagonist (eluxadoline), histamine H1 receptor antagonist (ebastine), neurokinin-2 receptor antagonist (ibodutant) and GABAergic agents (gabapentin and pregabalin). Efficacy and safety are discussed based on pivotal trials or published systematic reviews and meta-analysis, expressing ORs or relative risks and their 95% CIs. Potential new approaches may be based on recent insights on mucosal expression of genes, and microRNA and epigenetic markers in human biopsies and in animal models of visceral hypersensitivity.The objectives of this review are to appraise the physiology and anatomy of gut sensation and the efficacy in the relief of visceral pain (typically in IBS) of several classes of therapies. These include fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and different classes of medications (box 1). Box 1Classes of pharmacological agents for visceral painAntidepressants (tricyclic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors)Peppermint oil5-HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron, ondansetron, ramosetron)Non-absorbed antibiotic (rifaximin)Secretagogues (lubiprostone, linaclotide)μ-Opioid receptor (OR) and κ-OR agonist and δ-OR antagonist (eluxadoline)Histamine H1 receptor antagonist (ebastine)Neurokinin-2 receptor antagonist (ibodutant)GABAergic agents

  4. Wastewater treatment with submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor systems--design rules, operating experiences and ongoing developments.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, S; Koeser, H

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater treatment systems using bio-films that grow attached to a support media are an alternative to the widely used suspended growth activated sludge process. Different fixed growth biofilm reactors are commercially used for the treatment of municipal as well as industrial wastewater. In this paper a fairly new fixed growth biofilm system, the submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor (SFBBR), is discussed. SFBBRs are based on aerated submerged fixed open structured plastic media for the support of the biofilm. They are generally operated without sludge recirculation in order to avoid clogging of the support media and problems with the control of the biofilm. Reactor and process design considerations for these reactors are reviewed. Measures to ensure the development and maintenance of an active biofilm are examined. SFBBRs have been applied successfully to small wastewater treatment plants where complete nitrification but no high degree of denitrification is necessary. For the pre-treatment of industrial wastewater the use of SFBBRs is advantageous, especially in cases of wastewater with high organic loading or high content of compounds with low biodegradability. Performance data from exemplary commercial plants are given. Ongoing research and development efforts aim at achieving a high simultaneous total nitrogen (TN) removal of aerated SFBBRs and at improving the efficiency of TN removal in anoxic SFBBRs.

  5. [Pharmacological treatment of substance dependence from a neuroscientific perspective (I): opiates and cocaine].

    PubMed

    Haro, G; Cervera, G; Martínez-Raga, J; Pérez-Gálvez, B; Fernández-Garcés, M; Sanjuan, J

    2003-01-01

    In this review paper it is intended to analyze the most recent publications on pharmacological treatment of drug dependences from a neuroscientific perspective. It has been divided into two parts, the first one focuses on the treatment of illegal substance dependence, specifically opiates and cocaine; and the second part deals with the pharmacological treatments of three substances, two legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco, and a group of medications with abuse potential, benzodiazepines. In this first part the neuroscientific aspects (genetic, neurochemistry, circuits involved, neuroimaging and neuropsychological deficits) relevant to understanding the pharmacological treatment of the main drug addictions are summarized. The pharmacotherapies of opiate dependence, both for detoxification and for dehabituation, are then discussed. Finally, the main medications that have been proposed to treat cocaine dependence are also reviewed.

  6. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O.; Garbis, Spiros D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  7. Effects of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment on Smokeless Tobacco Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsukami, Dorothy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the effects of 2 mg of nicotine polacrilex versus placebo gum and a group behavioral treatment versus minimal contact on cessation of smokeless tobacco use. Participants (n=210) were randomly assigned 1 of the 4 treatment conditions. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed throughout the treatment. Discusses findings. (KW)

  8. Effects of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment on Smokeless Tobacco Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsukami, Dorothy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the effects of 2 mg of nicotine polacrilex versus placebo gum and a group behavioral treatment versus minimal contact on cessation of smokeless tobacco use. Participants (n=210) were randomly assigned 1 of the 4 treatment conditions. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed throughout the treatment. Discusses findings. (KW)

  9. Early pharmacological treatment of delirium may reduce physical restraint use: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Christopher J; Thomas, Wendy L; McAllen, Karen J

    2014-03-01

    Evidence surrounding pharmacological treatment of delirium is limited. The negative impact of physical restraints on patient outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU), however, is well published. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether initiating pharmacologic delirium treatment within 24 hours of a positive screen reduces the number of days in physical restraints and improves patient outcomes compared with delayed or no treatment. Patients from a mixed ICU with a documented positive delirium score using the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist were retrospectively grouped based on having received pharmacologic treatment within 24 hours of the first positive screen or not. Primary end points were number of days spent in physical restraints and time to extubation after delirium onset. Secondary end points included hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) and survival to discharge. Two hundred intubated patients were either pharmacologically treated (n = 98) or not treated (n = 102) within 24 hours of the first positive delirium score. Patients receiving treatment spent a shorter median time in restraints compared with patients who were not treated (3 vs 6 days; P < .001), and had a shorter median time to extubation (3 vs 6.5 days; P < .001). The treatment group also experienced a shorter ICU LOS (9.5 vs 16 days; P < .001) and hospital LOS (14.5 vs 22 days; P < .001) compared with the no-treatment group. Delirious patients who received pharmacological treatment within 24 hours of the first positive screen spent fewer days in physical restraints and less time receiving mechanical ventilation compared with those who did not. Although delirium management is multifactorial, early pharmacological therapy may benefit patients diagnosed with delirium.

  10. Non-Pharmacological Treatments for ADHD in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Gerbarg, Patricia L.; Brown, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in psychiatry or integrative psychiatry covers a wide range of biological, psychological and mind-body treatments that enhance standard medical practices and patient outcomes. While CAM approaches are popular amongst patients in their practice as well as in self-report because of their ease of use, health professionals have received limited education in these interventions and often are unaware of their patients’ use of CAM treatments. Method This overview highlights evidence-based CAM treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) including dietary interventions, phytomedicines, mind-body practices and neurofeedback. Results While conventional treatments are the mainstays for ADHD, there are a large number of available treatments that can be used to enhance treatment response. Conclusion With improved education and further scientific and clinical research, validated integrative treatments will provide more effective, lower risk and lower cost care for patients with ADHD. PMID:27489754

  11. Stuttering Treatment Research 1970-2005: II. Systematic Review Incorporating Trial Quality Assessment of Pharmacological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothe, Anne K.; Davidow, Jason H.; Bramlett, Robin E.; Franic, Duska M.; Ingham, Roger J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To complete a systematic review, incorporating trial quality assessment, of published research about pharmacological treatments for stuttering. Goals included the identification of treatment recommendations and research needs based on the available high-quality evidence. Method: Multiple readers reviewed 31 articles published between 1970…

  12. Stuttering Treatment Research 1970-2005: II. Systematic Review Incorporating Trial Quality Assessment of Pharmacological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothe, Anne K.; Davidow, Jason H.; Bramlett, Robin E.; Franic, Duska M.; Ingham, Roger J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To complete a systematic review, incorporating trial quality assessment, of published research about pharmacological treatments for stuttering. Goals included the identification of treatment recommendations and research needs based on the available high-quality evidence. Method: Multiple readers reviewed 31 articles published between 1970…

  13. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Pharmacological Treatments for Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadstock, Marita; Doughty, Carolyn; Eggleston, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The variable expression of autism over the lifespan is likely to lead to different symptoms and support requirements, and to distinct responses to pharmacotherapy treatment, in older patients compared to children. This systematic review considers the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment in managing autism spectrum disorder in adolescents and…

  14. Pharmacological Treatments for Osteoporosis in Very Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Wei Mei; Nandi, Novoneel; Masud, Tahir

    2011-01-01

    Only a few randomized controlled trials investigating antiosteoporotic agents with fracture endpoints have included participants over the age of 80 years. The pivotal trial with alendronic acid had an upper age range of 80 years, although a separate trial that showed a significant reduction in nonvertebral fractures included some participants up to age of 84 years. Risedronate and zoledronic acid are the only bisphosphonates to show a significant reduction in new vertebral, hip and nonvertebral fractures during a 3-year period in those over 80 years of age. In addition, zoledronic acid was associated with a reduction in the rate of new clinical fractures and improved survival in elderly subjects after hip fracture. More recently, denosumab was found to significantly reduce the risk of new radiographic vertebral, hip and nonvertebral fractures in women up to the age of 89 years with osteoporosis. Strontium ranelate and teriparatide have shown fracture reductions in populations that have included subjects over the age of 80 years. There has been evidence to show that a combination of calcium and vitamin D reduces nonvertebral fracture in older populations. The role of vitamin D alone is less clear, although there is the suggestion that it may be effective at higher doses. The burden of osteoporosis is unquestionably rising within our ageing population. More emphasis is therefore required on researching the benefits of these pharmacological agents in very elderly people. PMID:23251755

  15. Community Management of Endemic Scabies in Remote Aboriginal Communities of Northern Australia: Low Treatment Uptake and High Ongoing Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    La Vincente, Sophie; Kearns, Therese; Connors, Christine; Cameron, Scott; Carapetis, Jonathan; Andrews, Ross

    2009-01-01

    by poor treatment uptake by household contacts of infested children and high ongoing disease transmission. PMID:19478832

  16. The pharmacological treatment of opioid addiction--a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, Philipp; Gossop, Michael; Waal, Helge; Bramness, Jorgen

    2010-06-01

    This article reviews the main pharmacotherapies that are currently being used to treat opioid addiction. Treatments include detoxification using tapered methadone, buprenorphine, adrenergic agonists such as clonidine and lofexidine, and forms of rapid detoxification. In opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), methadone is most widely used. OMT with buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone combination, or other opioid agonists is also discussed. The use of the opioid antagonists naloxone (for the treatment of intoxication and overdose) and oral and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone (for relapse prevention) is also considered. Although recent advances in the neurobiology of addictions may lead to the development of new pharmacotherapies for the treatment of addictive disorders, a major challenge lies in delivering existing treatments more effectively. Pharmacotherapy of opioid addiction alone is usually insufficient, and a complete treatment should also include effective psychosocial support or other interventions. Combining pharmacotherapies with psychosocial support strategies that are tailored to meet the patients' needs represents the best way to treat opioid addiction effectively.

  17. Non-pharmacological treatment of depression: a systematic review and evidence map.

    PubMed

    Farah, Wigdan H; Alsawas, Mouaz; Mainou, Maria; Alahdab, Fares; Farah, Magdoleen H; Ahmed, Ahmed T; Mohamed, Essa A; Almasri, Jehad; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Mohammed, Khaled; Wang, Zhen; Asi, Noor; Sawchuk, Craig N; Williams, Mark D; Prokop, Larry J; Murad, M Hassan; LeBlanc, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The comparative effectiveness of non-pharmacological treatments of depression remains unclear. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the efficacy and adverse effects of non-pharmacological treatments of depression. We searched multiple electronic databases through February 2016 without language restrictions. Pairs of reviewers determined eligibility, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. We included 367 RCTs enrolling ∼20 000 patients treated with 11 treatments leading to 17 unique head-to-head comparisons. Cognitive behavioural therapy, naturopathic therapy, biological interventions and physical activity interventions reduced depression severity as measured using standardised scales. However, the relative efficacy among these non-pharmacological interventions was lacking. The effect of these interventions on clinical response and remission was unclear. Adverse events were lower than antidepressants. The quality of evidence was low to moderate due to inconsistency and unclear or high risk of bias, limiting our confidence in findings. Non-pharmacological therapies of depression reduce depression symptoms and should be considered along with antidepressant therapy for the treatment of mild-to-severe depression. A shared decision-making approach is needed to choose between non-pharmacological therapies based on values, preferences, clinical and social context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  19. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  20. Neuroprotective efficacy of pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment in tabun-poisoned rats.

    PubMed

    Krejcová, G; Kassa, J

    2003-03-14

    To study the influence of pharmacological pretreatment (PANPAL) and antidotal treatment (obidoxime plus atropine) on tabun-induced neurotoxicity, male albino rats were poisoned with a lethal dose of tabun (280 microg/kg i.m.; 100% of LD(50) value) and observed at 24 h and 7 days following tabun challenge. The neurotoxicity of tabun was evaluated using a functional observational battery (FOB) and an automatic measurement of motor activity. Pharmacological pretreatment as well as antidotal treatment were able to eliminate most of tabun-induced neurotoxic effects observed at 24 h following tabun poisoning. However, there was not significant difference between the efficacy of PANPAL and antidotal treatment to eliminate tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats. The combination of PANPAL pretreatment and antidotal treatment seems to be slightly more effective in the elimination of tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats at 24 h following tabun challenge in comparison with the administration of PANPAL pretreatment or antidotal treatment alone. At 7 days following tabun poisoning, very few neurotoxic signs in tabun-poisoned rats were observed regardless of administration of pharmacological pretreatment or antidotal treatment. Thus, our findings confirm that the combination of pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment is not only able to protect the experimental animals from the lethal effects of tabun but also to eliminate most of tabun-induced signs of neurotoxicity in tabun-poisoned rats.

  1. Pharmacological and other treatment modalities for esophageal pain.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Dag Arne Lihaug; Brock, Christina; Farmer, Adam D; Dickman, Ram; Ruffle, James K; Shaker, Anisa; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of esophageal pain remains a major challenge for the clinician. Although many patients have heartburn and may respond to proton pump inhibitors, there in an unmet need for other treatment modalities in patients where there are no obvious pathological findings. Although analgesics are the mainstay in esophageal pain treatment, many patients are nonresponders to these drugs. The current concise review focuses on other systems affecting pain processing, where better understanding may serve as a framework for therapy. These are the parasympathetic nervous system, exercise, and personality profiles. Finally, treatment with analgesics for functional chest pain remains a challenge, and an overview of treatment with antidepressive drugs is provided. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Orthopaedic surgeons’ strategies in pharmacological treatment of fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Antonio; Orgiano, Francesca; Pianu, Francesca; Planta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures are the most severe complications of osteoporosis and the poor mechanical properties of bone can make fixation and healing of these fracture extremely difficult. The role of orthopaedic surgeons does not end in skillful fixation of the fractures, but they have the unique opportunity to prevent complications which can negatively affect the patient’s quality of life. The best practice for preventing the risk of further fractures in patients presenting fragility fractures includes fall prevention, investigation of possible causes underlying osteoporosis, attention to exercise, calcium and vitamin D supplementation as well as prescription of drugs. Actually two classes of agents can be used for their effect on fracture prevention: antiresorptive and bone forming agents. Systemic therapy reduces the risk of vertebral (30–70%) and non-vertebral fractures (12–53%), depending on agents and patients’ compliance. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that pharmacological agents involved in osteoporosis can also influence the phases of fracture repair. Preclinical studies and evidences from case reports showed a positive effect of anabolic drugs on bone healing and implant osseointegration. The interventions in the process of fracture healing had evolved from a diamond to a pentagon concept, with interactions between the mechanical environment, the local therapies, the vascularity of the fracture site, the biology of the host and the systemic therapy which has the potential to represent the fifth interaction factor. The orthopaedic surgeon plays a central role in clinical setting to evaluate the efficacy of systemic anti-fracture drugs for improving fracture repair and preventing complications. PMID:25285136

  3. Pityriasis versicolor: an update on pharmacological treatment options.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Lyons, Danika C A

    2014-08-01

    Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a superficial fungal infection caused by Malassezia species; a yeast that naturally colonizes on the skins surface. High efficacy rates are generally obtained with both topical and systemic treatments. However, recurrence rates following successful treatment remain high and there are no dosage guidelines available for administration of systemic antifungal agents that carry risks of adverse events. This review focused on providing an overview of existing treatments for PV and an introduction to new treatments. A literature search was conducted using the search strategy, pityriasis versicolor OR tinea versicolor. Over the past decade, few new treatments have been introduced, but the efficacy and the dosing regimens of existing treatments have been systematically reviewed. The results of these reviews are discussed. Existing topical and systemic agents are both effective treatments against PV. Previous dosage recommendations for systemic agents have been modified based on recent evidence elucidated in systematic reviews. However, the absence of standardized collection and reporting practices in clinical trials precludes any conclusions to be drawn regarding the efficacy and safety of topical and systemic agents in comparison or in concert with each other.

  4. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Sun-Edelstein, Christina; Rapoport, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is a common and disabling disorder that remains underdiagnosed and poorly treated. Significant unmet therapeutic needs add to the burden of this disorder; even when CM is recognized, effective treatment options are limited and randomized controlled trials supporting the use of various preventive medications are sparse. In this review, we discuss the available options for CM treatment. Currently the only FDA-approved treatment for CM prevention is onabotulinumtoxinA. Two double-blind studies have demonstrated the efficacy of topiramate for CM prevention, but it is not FDA-approved for this indication. Treatments in development for migraine will also be reviewed. Advancements in the understanding of migraine pathogenesis have identified new targets for both acute and preventive treatment and have engendered the development of targeted and mechanism-based therapies. The need for more effective treatment for CM patients, which has long since been identified, is now being addressed. Several of the emerging treatments for migraine prevention are under investigation specifically for CM or high-frequency episodic migraine.

  5. Pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sixty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria, being the most of them focused in SSRI and Clomipramine. The trials on augmentation strategies and third line monotherapies are scarce, being the majority open-trials and case series. Similarly, studies on combined treatment (psychological and pharmacological) are few; furthermore this is a relevant future research line. It is also remarkable the lack of quasi-experimental and experimental comparison studies and the long-term follow-up measures.

  6. Methadone: applied pharmacology and use as adjunctive treatment in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R; Kraus, C; Fleming, M; Reddy, S

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the unique pharmacological properties of methadone and outlines its appropriate clinical application, with focus upon its use in the treatment of chronic pain. Although methadone is most widely known for its use in the treatment of opioid dependence, methadone also provides effective analgesia. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with other opioids or who suffer from neuropathic pain may benefit from a transition to methadone as their analgesic agent. Adverse effects, particularly respiratory depression and death, make a fundamental knowledge of methadone's pharmacological properties essential to the provider considering methadone as analgesic therapy for a patient with chronic pain. PMID:15537850

  7. [Is there a specific pharmacological treatment for anxiety disorders? Summary of a controversy].

    PubMed

    Todorov, Christo

    2004-01-01

    The acute pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders is barely specific with the exception of the obsessive-compulsive disorder: it responds preferentially to potent serotoninergic antidepressants only. For all other anxiety disorders all antidepressants regardless of their mechanism of action could be equally efficient thanks to their common class effect and are considered to be the pharmacological treatment of first choice. Benzodiazepines that also share a common class effect are recommended as possible and temporary adjuvants. Augmentation strategies for the cases of refractory anxiety disorders are also non-specific: lithium, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants.

  8. [Standard pharmacological treatment and new therapies for overactive bladder].

    PubMed

    Del Popolo, Giulio; Mencarini, Marco; Li Marzi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) in adult males varies from 10.2% to 17.4%, and in females from 7.7 to 31.3. 16.5% of the adult population presents symptoms consistent with OAB; of these, 37.2% are actually affected. The OAB has a significant effect on the quality of life. Initial treatment includes behavioral therapy, physiotherapy and antimuscarinic drugs. In patients where behavioral modifications fail, treatment is associated with antimuscarinics. The antimuscarinic agents used to treat OAB showed some efficacy, but adverse events too, such as dry mouth, constipation, headache and blurred vision. In selected cases unresponsive to antimuscarinic therapy, it is possible to use second-line treatments represented by sacral neuromodulation and botulinum toxin type A both for idiopathic detrusor overactivity, where it is still an experimental treatment, and for neurogenic cases with 2011 FDA approval. Surgical options represent the last choice for selected cases.

  9. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Hui; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered “treatment resistant.” We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  10. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine.

  11. Pharmacological treatment for Alzheimer's disease: current approaches and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2010-12-01

    More than a decade after the first approval of the use of acetylcholine esterase inhibitor on patients with Alzheimer's disease, we still not have a single treatment or combination therapy that can effectively stop or reverse the relentless progression of such neurodegenerative disease. Recently therapeutics targeting amyloid hypothesis have undergone scrutiny by many clinical trials. These include gamma secretase inhibitor for reducing beta amyloid formation, agents for preventing aggregation of amyloid oligomers, and immunotherapy for enhancing clearance of amyloid and plaque. Therapies targeting hyperphosphorylated tau is another promising mechanism to be tackled with. Other agents enforcing mitochondria functions, enhancing serotonin receptors, modulating advanced glycation end products, and neurotrophic factors, as well as other therapies are also emerging. We review current treatments and therapeutic strategies already undergone different stage of clinical trails in this report. We propose that therapeutics of various combination composed of symptomatic treatments and disease modifying therapies will become standard regimens of AD treatment with much better efficacy than current approaches.

  12. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine. PMID:26246787

  13. Drug counselors' attitudes toward non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain1

    PubMed Central

    Oberleitner, Lindsay M.; Beitel, Mark; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Kerns, Robert D.; Doucette, Christopher; Napoleone, Renee; Liong, Christopher; Barry, Declan T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine methadone counselors’ attitudes toward individual- and group-based non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain. Methods Thirty methadone drug counselors were interviewed about their attitudes toward pain interventions and completed a survey on the perceived efficacy of and willingness to refer patients to non-pharmacologic pain treatments. Results Counselors reported favorable attitudes toward interventions commonly found in interdisciplinary pain management, particularly, conventional psychological approaches. On average, counselors rated cognitive-behavioral therapy (individual or group) as the treatment with the highest perceived efficacy and the one to which they were most willing to refer patients with pain. In contrast, on average, counselors rated the use of herbal medicine, aromatherapy, and magnets among the lowest in perceived efficacy and in willingness to refer patients with pain. Generally, higher perceived efficacy was associated with higher referral willingness, and scores on both dimensions were comparable across individual and group interventions. Conclusions Findings indicate that methadone drug counselors perceive several non-pharmacologic evidence-based pain treatments as efficacious for methadone-maintained patients with chronic pain and counselors would be willing to refer their patients to these therapies if they were available. If some of these non-pharmacologic interventions were shown to be effective in methadone maintenance treatment, they have the potential to address, at least in part, the routine under-treatment of pain in this vulnerable patient population. PMID:26690289

  14. Pharmacology of appetite suppression: implication for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Halford, J C

    2001-12-01

    Given the current global epidemic of obesity there is a demand for new anti-obesity drugs to overcome the problem. Many pharmacological agents reduce food intake and significantly decrease body mass when administered to animals but affect feeding behaviour in a profoundly different way indicating the variety of biological mechanisms by which such agents act (appetite verses non-appetite). More limited clinical data demonstrates that some of the same drugs produce decreases in food intake and weight loss in humans. A few of these drugs do so by modifying the functioning of the appetite system as measured by subjective changes in feelings of hunger and fullness (indices of satiety). These drugs that modify the daily flux of appetite could be considered as 'appetite suppressants' with clinical potential as anti-obesity agents. Drugs that can be considered suitable candidates for appetite suppressants are agents that enhance peripherally satiety peptide systems (such as CCK, Bombesin/GRP, Enterostatin and GLP-1), alter the CNS levels of various hypothalamic neuropeptides (NPY, Galanin, Orexin, CART and Melanocortins) or monoamine neurotransmitters (such as serotonin, nor-adrenaline and possibly dopamine). Recently, the hormone leptin has become regarded as a key hormonal signal linking adipose tissue status with a number of key central nervous system circuits (NPY, CART, CRF, Melanocortins and possibly Orexins). This tonic system may also provide drug targets for the control of appetite. Any changes induced by a potential appetite suppressant should be considered in terms of the (i) psychological experience and behavioural expression of appetite, (ii) metabolism and peripheral physiology, and (iii) functioning of CNS neural pathways. In humans, such modulation of appetite will involve changes in total caloric consumption, subjective changes in feelings of hunger and fullness, preferences for specific food items, and general macronutrient preferences. These may be

  15. Pharmacological treatment of catarrh in Iranian traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choopani, Rasool; Sadr, Saeed; Kaveh, Shahpar; Kaveh, Narges; Dehghan, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Catarrh is a condition that is carefully explained in Iranian traditional medicine. Medieval Iranian physicians used some medicinal plants in the treatment of the catarrh. Some of these substances are used in treatment today, although still more of these materials can be used in modern medicine. In this study we searched known sources of Iranian traditional medicine and collected the ideas of former great scholars and physicians about medicinal plants that are used for treatment of catarrh. Then we searched PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science databases and found 10 medicinal herbs that have the ability to treat catarrh. Plants discussed in this study are consistent with new research and can be used in modern treatments. According to rising bacterial resistance to antibiotics and complications of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs, it seems that the various components of the medicinal herbs can be beneficial in producing new drugs. Also it is hoped that more investigations on medicinal plants will be conducted in the future treatment of catarrh and other diseases related to it. PMID:26151014

  16. Novel pharmacological approaches for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Valente Duarte de Sousa, Isabel Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease worldwide; yet, current treatment options, although effective, are associated with unwanted side effects, chronicity, relapses and recurrences. The adequate control of the four pathogenic mechanisms, involved in the appearance of acne lesions, is paramount to treatment success. The authors discuss and evaluate the pathogenic pathways related to the mechanisms of action of novel molecules, which are currently under investigation for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The manuscript is based on comprehensive searches made through PubMed, GoogleScholar and ClinicalTrial.gov, using different combination of key words, which include acne vulgaris, pathogenesis, treatment, sebogenesis and Propionibacterium acnes. In the near future, more effective treatments with fewer side effects are expected. The use of topical antiandrogens, acetylcholine inhibitors and PPAR modulators seem to be promising options for controlling sebum production. Retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agents and IL-1α inhibitors have the potential to become legitimate alternative options to retinoid therapy in the management of infundibular dyskeratosis. Indeed, the authors believe that there will likely be a decline in the use of antibiotics for controlling P. acnes colonization and targeting the inflammation cascade.

  17. Pharmacological treatments for paraphilic patients and sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Kafka, Martin P

    2007-11-01

    This review addresses testosterone-lowering and other psychotropic medications for the treatment of paraphilic patients or sexual offenders. Randomized controlled studies are still lacking, and only a few new studies were reported during the past year. On the other hand, there is substantial scientific knowledge about the wide range of psychiatric comorbidity associated with paraphilias and in sexual offenders. Empirically based treatment of these patients, especially of impulsivity, anxiety and mood disorders, may also ameliorate sexual impulsivity. Medication interventions, either substantially lowering serum testosterone or treating axis I comorbidities, show definite promise as a significant component of the management of sexual offenders. Pharmacotherapy should be combined with other therapeutic treatment modalities, most commonly cognitive-behaviour based psychotherapy and intensive community supervision.

  18. Long-term pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mahe, V; Balogh, A

    2000-03-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and has a poor prognosis, although it is often thought to be a minor complaint. This disorder has a chronic course of 5-15 years and longer. Long-term treatment with the commonly used benzodiazepines is controversial because of concerns over tolerance and dependence. We performed a thorough search of the literature for clinical trials of a duration of over 2 months conducted in patients with generalized anxiety disorder in order to identify any successful long-term treatment of this disorder. Only eight long-term reports of studies conducted in well-defined homogeneous groups of patients diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder were found with the methodology of these studies presenting a number of limiting factors. The results are inconclusive and no reference drug could be identified. In addition, an adequate evaluation of the long-term treatment of GAD has not yet been performed.

  19. Autoimmune diseases, their pharmacological treatment and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Marta; Czok, Michael E; Guzik, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular system involvement is a frequent complication of autoimmune diseases (AD) such as systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropaties or psoriatic arthritis. The most common forms of such involvement are pericarditis, myocarditis, accelerated atherosclerosis resulting in myocardial infarction or stroke, arrhythmias, conduction abnormalities or congestive heart failure. Some of these manifestations may be dramatic in their course and ultimately fatal. The treatment of AD may further affect the cardiovascular system and result in a lower quality of life, higher mortality and increased cost of healthcare. The aim of this review is to discuss possible cardiac complications of various AD and the related treatment of these diseases.

  20. Pharmacologic Therapies in Women's Health: Contraception and Menopause Treatment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Caitlin; Evans, Ginger; Sutton, Eliza L

    2016-07-01

    Female hormones play a significant role in the etiology and treatment of many women's health conditions. This article focuses on the common uses of hormonal therapy. When prescribing estrogen-containing regimens throughout the span of a woman's life, the risks are similar (ie, cardiovascular risk and venous thromboembolism), but the degree of risk varies significantly depending on a woman's particular set of risk factors and the details of the hormone regimen. In addition to estrogens and progestogens, this article also touches on the use of selective steroid receptor modulators in emergency contraception and in treatment of menopause symptoms.

  1. A Review of Spasticity Treatments: Pharmacological and Interventional Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eric; Ghosh, Nilasha; Yanni, Daniel; Lee, Sujin; Alexandru, Daniela; Mozaffar, Tahseen

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a velocity-dependent increase in muscle tone and uncontrolled, repetitive, involuntary contractions of skeletal muscles. Spasticity presents as upper motor neuron symptoms in patients with central nervous system pathology such as stroke, spinal cord injury, brain injury, or multiple sclerosis. As a result, a patient can have significant pain and limited mobility, which can lead to decreased quality of life and difficulty maintaining personal care. In this article we discuss mechanisms, indications, efficacy, and side effects of the most accepted current treatments. Currently available treatment options include oral medications and interventional procedures. Oral medications comprise centrally acting agents, such as baclofen, clonidine, and tizanidine, as well as anticonvulsants such as benzodiazepines and gabapentin and peripherally acting dantrolene. Interventional procedures include focal injections of botulinum toxin, phenol or alcohol, and an intrathecal baclofen pump. Surgical treatments include selective dorsal rhizotomy and neurectomy. We found that there are several treatments available with data to support their use, but many still need further research to prove their efficacy and develop optimal utilization. PMID:25750484

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pallanti, Stefano; Grassi, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is clearly a heterogeneous syndrome in which comorbidity is the rule rather than the exception and is often 'phase-specific'. Comorbid conditions have a negative impact on OCD outcome and may clearly impact the disease trajectory. Nevertheless, in the current literature there is an impressive neglect of comorbidities in clinical trials and treatment approaches for these conditions are still not evidence-based. In this paper we summarized the available data on the treatment of the main OCD comorbidities (mood and anxiety disorders, 'bipolar neurosis', tics and OCD-related disorders, addictions and impulsive disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, psychoses, and post-infective syndromes). To achieve the goals of 'precision medicine' there is a critical need for deconstructing current diagnostic groups with biomarkers to predict and improve response to treatment. Despite the continuous efforts of several researchers in subtyping homogeneous samples of OCD patients (for example the comorbidity-based subclassification), current available treatments are still syndrome-based rather than network dysfunctions-based. Identifying the homogenous subgroup, subtyping patients according to comorbidity patterns, symptom dimensions, clinical course, neurocognitive and neurophysiological dysfunctions, could represent an essential first step in the direction of a 'precision medicine' approach.

  3. Updates on Pharmacological Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Koirala, R; Søegaard, E G I; Thapa, S B

    2017-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder affects a significant proportion of those who have been exposed to exceptionally threatening or catastrophic events or situations such as earthquakes, rape and civil war. The condition can often become chronic and disabling. Medical intervention can therefore be of paramount importance. There are no national guidelines for trauma disorders in Nepal and there is a lack of adequate knowledge regarding drug treatment of PTSD among doctors and other service providers. Though psychotherapy is internationally regarded as the first line treatment for PTSD, it is often not feasible in Nepal due to lack of resources and skilled health workers in this field. The use of right psycho-pharmacotherapy is therefore important to reduce the burden of disease. A wide range of pharmacotherapy has been tested in the treatment of PTSD. This article is based on a selected sample of relevant articles from PubMed, PsycINFO, national guidelines from other countries and our own clinical experience. We have tried to give a concise and practical review regarding the use of drugs, their side effects and available evidence in the treatment of PTSD. The main findings point to use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors as the first line pharmacotherapy, and they can have effect on the full range of symptoms in PTSD. SNRIs show similar efficacy. Adjuvant drugs like Alpha-blockers and atypical antipsychotics have shown strong evidence in treating partially remitted cases and resolving ancillary symptoms.

  4. Psychophysiological Outcome of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments of Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry; Mavissakalian, Matig

    1985-01-01

    Examined relative and combined effectiveness of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy in 62 severe, chronic agoraphobics. Identified differential temporal response and treatment patterns across psychophysiological domains. Synchrony/desynchrony phenomena yielded significant findings with regard to process and clinical outcome status. Exploratory…

  5. Pharmacological Management of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; March, John

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presents with treatment-resistant symptoms of major depression. This is his first episode of depression, initially treated with 200 mg sertraline for 12 weeks with no significant benefit. The severe depression has shown a partial response to weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, which was titrated up to 60 mg…

  6. Pharmacological Management of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; March, John

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presents with treatment-resistant symptoms of major depression. This is his first episode of depression, initially treated with 200 mg sertraline for 12 weeks with no significant benefit. The severe depression has shown a partial response to weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, which was titrated up to 60 mg…

  7. A pharmacological treatment algorithm for localized neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Massimo; Baron, Ralf; Hans, Guy; Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Mayoral Rojals, Victor; Mick, Gerard; Serpell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is difficult to manage, often proving refractory to existing treatments. In more than half of cases, it is localized and affects a specific, clearly circumscribed area of the body (localized neuropathic pain, or LNP). A recently developed screening tool enables patients with probable neuropathic pain/LNP to be identified quickly and easily. In view of the conflicting current treatment recommendations, an advisory board of pain specialists met in June 2015 to develop a complementary treatment guidance algorithm, for use in the primary care setting and by non-pain specialists. The starting point of the algorithm is a diagnosis of LNP and there was consensus that first-line treatment should be a topical analgesic agent, because the benefit/risk ratios are far better than for systemic agents. Topical application offers site-specific delivery, a lower total systemic dose and avoidance of first-pass metabolism, reducing the risk of adverse events and drug/drug interactions. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster has most evidence supporting its use in LNP, producing effective analgesia and reducing the associated area of allodynia, but other topical agents include capsaicin, clonidine and botulinum toxin type A. Treatment should be commenced with the topical agent of choice, and the patient re-assessed after an appropriate period. Where the response is good the topical agent is continued, with a re-evaluation after 3-6 months. A systemic agent (e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, venlafaxine) is added if there is only a partial response, or substituted if there is no response, and the patient re-assessed after a month. If there is poor or no response to the systemic agent the patient should be switched to an alternative one and, if this also proves ineffective, referred to a pain specialist.

  8. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: an ongoing positive experience.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Muralidhar H; Carter, Beth A; Hawthorne, Keli M; King, Kristi; Abrams, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas in the use of FOLE in treatment of PNALD as presented at the 2013 Experimental Biology meeting. We describe the findings of a single center, prospective, observational study of infants <6 mo of age with PNALD who received parenteral FOLE as monotherapy. A total of 97 infants received FOLE under the compassionate-use protocol for the treatment of PNALD. Eighty-three (86%) survived with resolution of cholestasis and 14 (14%) died. The median conjugated bilirubin (CB) concentration at the initiation of FOLE therapy was 4.8 mg/dL (range 2.1-26). The median time to resolution of cholestasis was 40 d (range 3-158). Compared with infants with mild cholestasis (CB of 2.1-5 mg/dL at the initiation of FOLE), nonsurvivors were significantly more premature and took longer to resolve their cholestasis. Gestational age at birth correlated inversely with CB at the beginning of FOLE and peak CB. Infants with an initial CB >10 mg/dL had a higher mortality rate than infants with an initial CB <5 mg/dL (35% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). Our experience with the use of FOLE in PNALD continues to be encouraging. Prematurity continues to be a major determinant in mortality and severity of cholestasis. This calls for further controlled studies designed to optimize dose and timing of intervention in the use of FOLE in neonates.

  9. Pharmacological Treatment of the Pathogenetic Defects in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Jeppe; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Grodum, Ellen; Juhl, Henning; Hansen, Tony Bill; Christiansen, Christian; Yderstræde, Knud; Gjessing, Hans; Hansen, Henrik M.; Vestergaard, Vibe; Hangaard, Jørgen; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of treatment with insulin aspart compared with NPH insulin, together with metformin/placebo and rosiglitazone/placebo. The hypothesis was that combined correction of major pathogenetic defects in type 2 diabetes would result in optimal glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a 2-year investigator-driven randomized partly placebo-controlled multicenter trial in 371 patients with type 2 diabetes on at least oral antiglycemic treatment. Patients were assigned to one of eight treatment groups in a factorial design with insulin aspart at mealtimes versus NPH insulin once daily at bedtime, metformin twice daily versus placebo, and rosiglitazone twice daily versus placebo. The main outcome measurement was change in A1C. RESULTS A1C decreased more in patients treated with insulin aspart compared with NPH (−0.41 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001). Metformin decreased A1C compared with placebo (−0.60 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001), as did rosiglitazone (−0.55 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001). Triple therapy (rosiglitazone, metformin, and any insulin) resulted in a greater reduction in A1C than rosiglitazone plus insulin (−0.50 ± 0.14%, P < 0.001) and metformin plus insulin (−0.45 ± 0.14%, P < 0.001). Aspart was associated with a higher increase in body weight (1.6 ± 0.6 kg, P < 0.01) and higher incidence of mild daytime hypoglycemia (4.9 ± 7.5 vs. 1.7 ± 5.4 number/person/year, P < 0.001) compared with NPH. CONCLUSIONS Insulin treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia results in lower A1C than treatment of fasting hyperglycemia, at the expense of higher body weight and hypoglycemic episodes. However, insulin therapy has to be combined with treatment of both peripheral and liver insulin resistance to normalize blood glucose, and in this case, the insulin regimen is less important. PMID:20929990

  10. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of arterial hypertension in hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Chazot, C; Charra, B

    2007-10-01

    High blood pressure in dialysis patients is related to extracellular volume excess and the related increase of systemic vascular resistances. Scribner has early described the treatment of hypertension with ultrafiltration and low salt diet, without any drugs. The dry weight method relies on the progressive reduction of the postdialysis body weight until blood pressure is normalized. Additional measures are needed such as low salt diet, neutral sodium balance during dialysis treatment, stop of antihypertensive drugs, adequate length of the dialysis session, and patient education. It may exist a lag time between the normalization of the extracellular volume and blood pressure. It is related to the correction of the hemodynamic consequences of the extracellular volume overload. Moreover, the dry weight may potentially vary in patients undergoing catabolic intercurrent events. The complications of these changes (severe hypertension, pulmonary oedema) must be anticipated by the nephrologist and the staff to avoid additional morbidity to the patient.

  11. Pharmacologic modalities in the treatment of osteoradionecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    McCaul, James Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Managing osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the facial bones is a challenge in maxillofacial head and neck surgery. Changes in understanding of ORN of the jaws has led to new studies using novel therapeutic modalities to manage this disorder. These treatment regimens may allow medical management to replace major reconstructive surgery for some patients who have already undergone chemoradiotherapy or combined modality therapy for head and neck cancer.

  12. New pharmacological treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Burke, Stuart L; Rose, Warren E

    2014-03-01

    Despite available treatment options for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the morbidity and mortality attributed to the diverse infection manifestations of this pathogen remain high. More anti-MRSA agents are needed as options for treatment of these infections. Ideally, these new agents would be rapidly bactericidal for bloodstream clearance in septic patients, have few toxicities, be active against MRSA in biofilms, be easy to administer, and have oral bioavailability. This review focuses on MRSA agents in Phase III trials or antibiotics currently in the market, which are being studied for new indications. For each agent, the antimicrobial potency against MRSA, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations and approved and potential new indications are presented. The role of novel combination therapies is also introduced. The new lipoglycopeptides oritavancin, telavancin and dalbavancin have the potential to make a large impact on the treatment of MRSA due to unique pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties and proposed dosing regimens. Other new agents (omadacycline and tedizolid) as well as revisited older agents (fosfomycin and fusidic acid) appear promising but require further study for their potential role. Combination therapy may improve outcomes in patients with high MRSA infection burden or when patient or pathogen factors predict a worse outcome with monotherapy.

  13. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of atherosclerotic arterial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Capron, L

    1995-01-01

    Three consecutive periods in the natural history of atherosclerosis are amenable to medical treatment. Plaque development is the main target of prevention, which also aims at slowing the progression of already existing plaques. The control of several established risk factors (high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, tobacco smoking) has already yielded encouraging benefits, especially in the field of secondary prevention. More efficient prophylaxis is to be expected, either from the further improved control of these classic risk factors with earlier, stronger, and longer interventions or from the correction of newly established causal determinants of atherosclerosis. A plaque manifests itself clinically through progressive or abrupt obstruction of the arterial lumen, which can be avoided or retarded by interventions aimed at reducing thrombosis, at controlling plaque instability (the major cause of thrombosis), and at enhancing arterial remodeling (which allows compensatory enlargement of the arterial lumen). When ischemia has occurred, a third wave of palliative treatments aims at improving energy supply to the organ with compromised vascularization. Classic treatments reduce oxygen consumption or improve oxygen extraction by ischemic tissues. In addition, the design of drugs to enhance the development of collateral channels appears to be promising therapeutic approach.

  14. Topical treatment of glaucoma: established and emerging pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Dikopf, Mark S; Vajaranant, Thasarat S; Edward, Deepak P

    2017-06-01

    Glaucoma is a collection of optic neuropathies consisting of retinal ganglion cell death and corresponding visual field loss. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide and is forecasted to precipitously increase in prevalence in the coming decades. Current treatment options aim to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) via topical or oral therapy, laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork or ciliary body, and incisional surgery. Despite increasing use of trabecular laser therapy, topical therapy remains first-line in the treatment of most forms of glaucoma. Areas covered: Novel glaucoma therapies are a long-standing focus of investigational study. More than two decades have passed since the last United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a topical glaucoma drug. Here, the authors review established topical glaucoma drops as well as those currently in FDA phase 2 and 3 clinical trial, nearing clinical use. Expert opinion: Current investigational glaucoma drugs lower IOP, mainly through enhanced trabecular meshwork outflow. Although few emerging therapies show evidence of retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve neuroprotection in animal models, emerging drugs are focused on lowering IOP, similar to established medicines.

  15. The endocannabinoid system: a new pharmacological target for obesity treatment?

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Chao; Huang, Mao

    2009-06-01

    Being a great threaten for human health, obesity has become a pandemic chronic disease. There have been several therapeutic treatments for this social health issue, including diet and exercise therapy, medication and surgery, among which the diet is still the most common way. However, none of these therapeutic measures available is ideal, making it necessary to find an effective medical treatment. The endocannabinoid system, which is well known for its contributions in certain mental processes such as relaxation, amelioration of pain and anxiety, and sedation initiation, has been recently reported to play an essential role in regulating appetite and metabolism to maintain energy balance, leading to the belief that endocannabinoid system is closely related to obesity. This new discovery deepens our understanding of obesity, and provides us with a new direction for clinical obesity treatment. Rimonabant is an antagonist for CB1, and has entered the market in some countries. However, although effective as an anti-obesity drug, rimonabant also causes obviously adverse side-effects, thus is being doubted and denied for medical usage.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with co-morbid drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Cunill, R; Castells, X; Tobias, A; Capellà, D

    2015-01-01

    Drug dependence is frequent in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nevertheless, the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatments in this population are unclear. A systematic review with meta-analysis was performed. Randomised placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating the efficacy of pharmacological treatment in patients with co-occurring ADHD and substance use disorder (SUD) were included. ADHD symptom severity, drug abstinence and all-cause treatment discontinuation were the primary study endpoints. The effects of patient-, intervention- and study-related covariates over the primary outcomes were investigated by means of meta-regression. Thirteen studies were included, enrolling a total of 1,271 patients. A small to moderate reduction of ADHD symptoms was found. Meta-regression analysis identified the presence of a lead-in period as a covariate associated with reduced efficacy. Conversely, no beneficial effect was observed either on drug abstinence or treatment discontinuation. The efficacy on ADHD symptoms was smaller in studies with a lead-in period. A positive correlation between the efficacy for ADHD and that for SUD was found. The efficacy of pharmacological interventions for co-occurring ADHD and SUD has been little investigated. Mixed results were obtained: while pharmacological interventions improved ADHD symptoms, no beneficial effect on drug abstinence or on treatment discontinuation was noted. The strength of the recommendation of pharmacological treatment for co-occurring ADHD and SUD is therefore modest. The study was registered with the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO): CRD 4212003414. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Commissioning Pharmacological Treatments for Drug Users: A Brief Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Jenny; Oliver, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To provide a brief review of relevant existing evidence regarding pharmacological treatment for drug users, in order to enable commissioners and service providers to make informed decisions that are evidence based wherever possible. Methods: The review process involved an examination of key reference texts and literature derived from…

  18. Pharmacological approaches to the treatment of complicated grief: rationale and a brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Eric; Nadal-Vicens, Mireya; M. Simon, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a common and often under-acknowledged cause of profound impairment experienced after the loss of a loved one. Although both clinical and basic research suggests that pharmacological agents might be of use in the treatment of CG, research on pharmacological approaches to this condition is still scarce. Three open-label trials and one randomized trial on bereavement-related depression suggest that tricyclic antidepressants may be effective, although they may be more efficacious for depressive symptoms than for grief-specific symptoms. Four open-label trials (total number of participants, 50) of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have yielded results, providing very preliminary support that they might be effective in the treatment of CG, both as a standalone treatment and in conjunction with psychotherapeutic interventions. These more recent studies have shown an effect on both depression and grief-specific scales. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions for CG may be more effective in conjunction with SSRI administration. Given the small number of pharmacological studies to date, there is a need for randomized trials to test the potential efficacy of pharmacological agents in the treatment of CG. PMID:22754287

  19. Advances in the pharmacological treatment of Graves' orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Ruchała, Marek; Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    Graves' orbitopathy has a deteriorating effect on patients' appearance and vision, thus significantly decreases their quality of life. A multidisciplinary team of endocrinologists, ophthalmologists, head and neck surgeons, nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, and psychologists should constitute a standard health care team for those patients. It is vital that the therapy is based on an individual approach, with patients being well informed and involved in the decision-making process. Generally, traditional therapies include immunosuppression with steroids, orbital irradiation and surgical decompression. Novel treatment modalities include: biological agents, somatostatin analogs, antioxidants, methotrexate. Better insight into pathogenesis of Graves' orbitopathy is the only chance for targeted therapy development.

  20. Pharmacologic treatments for opioid dependence: detoxification and maintenance options

    PubMed Central

    Kleber, Herbert D.

    2007-01-01

    While opioid dependence has more treatment agents available than other abused drugs, none are curative. They can, however, markedly diminish withdrawal symptoms and craving, and block opioid effects due to lapses. The most effective withdrawal method is substituting and tapering methadone or buprenorphine, α-2 Adrenergic agents can ameliorate untreated symptoms or substitute for agonists if not available. Shortening withdrawal by precipitating it with narcotic antagonists has been studied, but the methods are plagued by safety issues or persisting symptoms. Neither the withdrawal agents nor the methods are associated with better long-term outcome, which appears mostly related to post-detoxification treatment. Excluding those with short-term habits, the best outcome occurs with long-term maintenance on methadone or buprenorphine accompanied by appropriate psychosocial interventions. Those with strong external motivation may do well on the antagonist naltrexone. Currently, optimum duration of maintenance on either is unclear. Better agents are needed to impact the brain changes related to addiction. PMID:18286804

  1. The Management and Outcomes of Pharmacological Treatments for Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Beebe Palumbo, Devon; Joos, Kathleen; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a phantom sensation experienced by people around the world, currently is endured without a known cure. Some find the condition tolerable, while others are tortured on a daily basis from the incessant phantom noises. For those who seek treatment, oftentimes, they have a comorbid condition (e.g., depression, anxiety, insomnia), which is treated pharmaceutically. These products aim to reduce the comorbities associated with tinnitus thereby minimizing the overall burden present. Because of the phantom nature of tinnitus, it is often compared to neurologic pain. Since pain can be managed with pharmaceutical options, it is reasonable to assume that similar agents might work to alleviate tinnitus. The effects of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and glutamate antagonists are reviewed in this paper. Table 1 summarizes the pharmaceutical products discussed. Due to the variety of comorbid factors and potential causes of tinnitus, there may not be one pharmaceutical treatment that will combat every type of tinnitus. Nevertheless, a product that finally addresses the true cause of tinnitus, and not just its comorbidities, will benefit millions of people worldwide.

  2. The Pharmacological Options in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Milano, W.; De Rosa, M.; Milano, L.; Riccio, A.; Sanseverino, B.; Capasso, A.

    2013-01-01

    The eating disorders (DCA) are complex systemic diseases with high social impact, which tend to become chronic with significant medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The literature data showed that there is good evidence to suggest the use of SSRIs, particularly at high doses of fluoxetine, in the treatment of BN reducing both the crisis of binge that the phenomena compensates and reducing the episodes of binge in patients with BED in the short term. Also, the topiramate (an AED) showed a good effectiveness in reducing the frequency and magnitude of episodes of binge with body weight reduction, both in the BN that is in the therapy of BED. To date, modest data support the use of low doses of second-generation antipsychotics in an attempt to reduce the creation of polarized weight and body shapes, the obsessive component, and anxiety in patients with AN. Data in the literature on long-term drug treatment of eating disorders are still very modest. It is essential to remember that the pharmacotherapy has, however, a remarkable efficacy in treating psychiatric disorders that occur in comorbidity with eating disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety, insomnia, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders and behavior. PMID:23956871

  3. The Management and Outcomes of Pharmacological Treatments for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Devon Beebe; Joos, Kathleen; Ridder, Dirk De; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a phantom sensation experienced by people around the world, currently is endured without a known cure. Some find the condition tolerable, while others are tortured on a daily basis from the incessant phantom noises. For those who seek treatment, oftentimes, they have a comorbid condition (e.g., depression, anxiety, insomnia), which is treated pharmaceutically. These products aim to reduce the comorbities associated with tinnitus thereby minimizing the overall burden present. Because of the phantom nature of tinnitus, it is often compared to neurologic pain. Since pain can be managed with pharmaceutical options, it is reasonable to assume that similar agents might work to alleviate tinnitus. The effects of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and glutamate antagonists are reviewed in this paper. Table 1 summarizes the pharmaceutical products discussed. Due to the variety of comorbid factors and potential causes of tinnitus, there may not be one pharmaceutical treatment that will combat every type of tinnitus. Nevertheless, a product that finally addresses the true cause of tinnitus, and not just its comorbidities, will benefit millions of people worldwide. PMID:26467416

  4. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches.

  5. Progress update: Pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B

    2007-01-01

    A number of drugs have been approved for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a larger number are being studied as possible therapies. The current mainstays of the pharmacotherapy of AD are the cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine) and memantine. They collectively have acceptable tolerability and proven but modest efficacy. The agents being studied include dietary supplements (eg, vitamin E), herbal preparations (eg, Ginkgo biloba), medications approved for other indications (eg, HMG-CoA reductase enzyme inhibitors) and research drugs. In this review we discuss in detail the approved agents and review a number of the unapproved therapies that are currently available to the practitioner. While our era offers much more in the way of therapeutics for AD, it is clear that more work still needs to be done. PMID:19300586

  6. A systematic review and mixed treatment comparison of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest; Marshall, David; Gabriel, Zahava L; Mitchell, Stephen A; Gylee, Elizabeth; Dakin, Helen A

    2011-12-01

    To review the literature on pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia. Relative efficacy was estimated in terms of outcome measures highlighted by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Network using a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials reporting treatments for fibromyalgia were identified by systematically reviewing electronic databases (Cochrane Library, Medline, EMBASE; accessed February 2008) and conducting manual bibliographic searches. Forty-five randomized controlled trials met the prespecified inclusion criteria for the systematic review. There were limited robust clinical data for some therapeutic classes (tricyclic antidepressants, analgesics, sedative hypnotics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors) and only 21 studies met the more stringent criteria for inclusion in the MTC. The majority of studies included in the MTC assessed the anticonvulsant pregabalin (n = 5) or the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) duloxetine (n = 3) and milnacipran (n = 3). Licensed doses of pregabalin and duloxetine were significantly (P < 0.05) more efficacious than placebo in terms of absolute reduction in pain, number of "responders" (≥30% reduction in pain), or change in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire score (pregabalin 450 mg/d only). There was no significant difference between licensed doses of pregabalin and duloxetine for these outcomes. However licensed doses of pregabalin produced significantly greater improvements in sleep compared with milnacipran (as measured by Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale). The current study confirms the therapeutic efficacy of pregabalin and the SNRIs, duloxetine and milnacipran, in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Given their different modes of action, combination therapy with pregabalin plus an SNRI should be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  8. The meaning of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenic patients1

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of medication therapy for schizophrenic patients and formulate a theoretical model about the study phenomenon. METHOD: a qualitative approach was employed, using Symbolic Interactionism as the theoretical and Grounded Theory as the methodological framework. The research was developed between 2008 and 2010 at three community mental health services in the interior of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Thirty-six patients and thirty-six family members were selected through theoretical sampling. The data were mainly collected through open interviews and observation and simultaneously analyzed through open, axial and selective coding. RESULTS: the meaning of the pharmacotherapy is centered on the phenomenon "Living with a help that bothers", which expresses the patients' ambivalence towards the medication and determines their decision making. The insight, access, limitations for self-administration of the drugs and interactions with family members and the health team influenced the patient's medication-related behavior. CONCLUSION: the theory presented in this study provides a comprehensive, contextualized, motivational and dynamic understanding of the relation the patient experiences and indicates potentials and barriers to follow the medication treatment. PMID:25296152

  9. Pharmacologic treatment of knee osteoarthritis in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy D; Fowler, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    There is a greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears due to noncontact sports injuries in women compared with men. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with accelerated development of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which is also more prevalent in women than in men. This article considers therapeutic modalities that are best suited for athletic women with knee OA. Clinical data on the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapies for knee OA, including acetaminophen, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and topical NSAIDs, are discussed, with attention paid to special considerations for women who participate in athletic activity. Adverse events associated with the use of acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs place potential limits on the dose and duration of therapy and may be of greater concern in female athletes than in other patient groups. Topical NSAIDs, which effect relief through the same mechanism of action as oral NSAIDs, produce dramatically lower systemic NSAID exposure compared with oral NSAIDs and are associated with a lower incidence of systemic adverse events. These findings, along with additional future studies, may have particular relevance to the choice of the most effective treatment options for athletic women with OA of the knee.

  10. Osteoporosis – a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =−2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically – in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients – and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  11. Physical Training as Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Neurocardiogenic Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Takahagi, Vanessa Cristina Miranda; Costa, Daniela Caetano; Crescêncio, Júlio César; Gallo, Lourenço

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterized as a sudden and temporary loss of consciousness and postural tone, with quick and spontaneous recovery, syncope is caused by an acute reduction of systemic arterial pressure and, therefore, of cerebral blood flow. Unsatisfactory results with the use of drugs allowed the nonpharmacological treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope was contemplated as the first therapeutic option. Objectives To compare, in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope, the impact of a moderate intensity aerobic physical training (AFT) and a control intervention on the positivity of head-up tilting test (HUT) and orthostatic tolerance time. Methods Were studied 21 patients with a history of recurrent neurocardiogenic syncope and HUT. The patients were randomized into: trained group (TG), n = 11, and control group (CG), n = 10. The TG was submitted to 12 weeks of AFT supervised, in cycle ergometer, and the CG to a control procedure that consisted in 15 minutes of stretching and 15 minutes of light walk. Results The TG had a positive effect to physical training, with a significant increase in peak oxygen consumption. The CG did not show any statistically significant change before and after the intervention. After the intervention period, 72.7% of the TG sample had negative results to the HUT, not having syncope in the revaluation. Conclusion The program of supervised aerobic physical training for 12 weeks was able to reduce the number of positive HUT, as it was able to increase tolerance time in orthostatic position during the HUT after the intervention period. PMID:24714795

  12. A comparison of psychological and pharmacological treatment in smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, K O

    1982-09-01

    A double-blind trial of a smoking-withdrawal chewing gum containing 2 mg nicotine was conducted with 100 consecutive patients in a smoking cessation clinic. All patients received the usual psychological treatment given at the clinic. In addition, the patients were randomly assigned to a nicotine gum (the experimental group) or a placebo chewing gum (control group). The abstinence rates for the experimental group at 1, 3, and 6 months after quitting were 90, 76, and 63%, respectively. The comparable abstinence rates for the control group were 60, 52, and 45%. The differences were significant at the 5% level at all three follow-up periods. When nicotine dependence, as measured by a standard questionnaire, was taken into consideration, it was found that 71% of the high-nicotine-dependent smokers in the experimental group were abstinent after 6 months, as compared to 39% in the placebo group. In contrast, low-nicotine-dependent patients achieved 75 and 65%, respectively, for the same time interval. The gum was well accepted by patients and gave no serious side effects.

  13. Fibromyalgia: Presentation and management with a focus on pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sumpton, Janice E; Moulin, Dwight E

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition with widespread muscle pain. Prevalence studies showed that 2% to 7% of the population have fibromyalgia, which affects approximately one million Canadians. Fibromyalgia is most common in women, but it also involves men and children. As with most chronic illnesses, the causes of fibromyalgia are unknown. However, recent research supports underlying abnormalities in the central nervous system, which supports fibromyalgia as a chronic disease state and valid clinical entity. Pain is the primary symptom, often accompanied by overwhelming fatigue, sleep dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology developed diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Lifestyle changes, including pacing of activities and aerobic exercise, are very important in managing fibromyalgia symptoms. Emotional and behavioural therapy can also be helpful. Controlled trials of antidepressants, gabapentinoids, tramadol, zopiclone and sodium oxybate have shown effectiveness in fibromyalgia patients. Pregabalin and duloxetine were recently approved in the United States. Effective management of fibromyalgia is complex and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Response and tolerance of different therapeutic interventions vary from patient to patient. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia offer hope for new and improved therapies in the management of this disabling condition. PMID:19225604

  14. Pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis for people over 70.

    PubMed

    Moro Alvarez, M Jesús; Díaz-Curiel, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    Osteoporosis has been defined as "a systemic disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, with consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture". The impact of osteoporosis is most pronounced in elderly populations who run the greatest risk of fractures. The probability of developing mainly hip, vertebral and other non-vertebral fractures (for example, a Colles fracture) not only depends on bone mineral density (BMD) but also on age. Older patients are more susceptible to fracture than younger patients with the same BMD T-score. As the older population increases, the incidence of osteoporotic fractures is expected to rise dramatically over the next few decades. Although hip fractures are considered to be the most severe and economically important osteoporotic fracture, vertebral fractures also lead to adverse health outcomes, including back pain, height loss and kyphosis. These changes may result in significant declines in physical performance, function and, ultimately, loss of independence. The challenge for physicians is to prevent bone loss, to diagnose and treat osteoporosis before fractures occur, and to treat patients who have already experienced a fracture to prevent recurrent fractures. The objective of this review is to analyze the capacity to reduce fractures as the key element to evaluate the effectiveness of available medications: calcium and Vitamin D, bone formation drugs, antiresortive drugs, and dual-effect drugs. In view of the paucity of information about treatment of osteoporosis in the elderly population, available studies were not designed with this objective, so that this article reviews data mostly deriving from post-hoc analysis or sub-analysis of the main phase III clinical trials of each of the tested medications.

  15. Lipoprotein(a) Management: Pharmacological and Apheretic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Ruth; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2017-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-like particle with an additional apolipoprotein, apolipoprotein (a), [apo(a)] attached to apolipoprotein B. Recent epidemiologic and Mendelian randomization studies have provided evidence that Lp(a) is causally related to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The risk association between Lp(a) concentrations and CVD is still controversial but seems to be continuous and without an obvious threshold Lp(a) level. Circulating concentrations of Lp(a) are genetically determined; desirable levels are < 50 mg/dl. A plasma concentration of 60 mg/dl is associated with an odds ratio for coronary heart disease of about 1.5 after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. Extended-release niacin is an option for decreasing elevated Lp(a) levels (by ~20-30%) but it is often poorly tolerated. Dietary measures, exercise and lipid-lowering drugs such as statins and ezetimibe are without significant effect. In patients with severe progressive CVD and very high Lp(a) levels, lipoprotein apheresis can decrease Lp(a) concentrations. The method is expensive and impractical for most patients and its feasibility depends mainly on the healthcare reimbursement system. Since no established treatment reduces Lp(a) without influencing other lipoproteins, there has been no trial that evaluated whether decreasing Lp(a) concentrations translates to clinical benefits. Recently, an antisense oligonucleotide against apo(a), IONIS-APO(a)Rx, has been shown to selectively decrease Lp(a) by almost 80%. A phase 2 study with this drug has been completed in late 2015 and results are expected to be published soon. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence.

  17. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence. PMID:23145768

  18. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ralevski, Elizabeth; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening A; Petrakis, Ismene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture) is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. PMID:24648794

  19. Current and emergent pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea: evidence-based treatment in practice

    PubMed Central

    Lucak, Susan; Chang, Lin; Halpert, Albena; Harris, Lucinda A.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is a common, chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder with symptoms that can be distressing for patients and often result in substantially impaired quality of life. This review focuses on providing clinicians with information on practical, evidence-based treatment for IBS-D. Current therapies commonly used for the treatment of IBS-D, including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, are briefly reviewed, followed by discussion of the emergent pharmacologic treatments (rifaximin and eluxadoline) and medical foods (IBgard® and EnteraGam®). Given the lack of a standard treatment algorithm for IBS-D and the emergence of new pharmacologic therapies, treatment needs to be tailored to the individual patient and take into account the severity of disease. In this context, the latter part of this manuscript examines how treatments for IBS-D can be used in clinical practice by presenting three patient case scenarios with varying degrees of IBS-D severity. For each case, the patient’s medical history and clinical presentation are related to the Rome Foundation multidimensional clinical profile (MDCP) and potential treatment options with current and emergent therapies are reviewed. The interplay of gastrointestinal symptoms and their psychosocial impact, as well as the importance of a patient-centered approach to therapy, are discussed. Consideration is given to the potential need for combination therapies and how emergent treatments could fit into the treatment pathway for mild, moderate, and severe cases of IBS-D in clinical practice. PMID:28203283

  20. A meta-analysis to determine the effect of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on fibromyalgia symptoms comprising OMERACT-10 response criteria.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Fassoulaki, Argyro; Tsoulas, Christos; Siafaka, Ioanna; Vadalouca, Athina

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, functional impairment, psychological distress, and cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this meta-analysis is to synthesize the available data on the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions across all domains included in the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT-10) fibromyalgia response definitions, and to examine response based on these definitions. We searched Cochrane, PubMed, Scopus, and the reference lists of articles for randomized controlled trials of any drug formulation or non-pharmacological intervention used for fibromyalgia treatment. We extracted efficacy data regarding pain, sleep, physical function, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and cognition. The available data were insufficient to draw definite conclusions regarding response. Indirect evidence indicates that it may be expected with the use of serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), and multidisciplinary treatment.

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorders in Adults: A Review of the Evidence on Pharmacologic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with bipolar disorder are exceptionally challenging to manage because of the dynamic, chronic, and fluctuating nature of their disease. Typically, the symptoms of bipolar disorder first appear in adolescence or early adulthood, and are repeated over the patient's lifetime, expressed as unpredictable recurrences of hypomanic/manic or depressive episodes. The lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder in adults is reported to be approximately 4%, and its management was estimated to cost the US healthcare system in 2009 $150 billion in combined direct and indirect costs. Objective To review the published literature and describe the personal and societal burdens associated with bipolar disorder, the impact of delays in accurate diagnosis, and the evidence for the clinical effectiveness of available pharmacologic therapies. Methods The studies in this comprehensive review were selected for inclusion based on clinical relevance, importance, and robustness of data related to diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder. The search terms that were initially used on MEDLINE/PubMed and Google Scholar were restricted to 1994 through 2014 and included “bipolar disorder,” “mania,” “bipolar depression,” “mood stabilizer,” “atypical antipsychotics,” and “antidepressants.” High-quality, recent reviews of major relevant topics were included to supplement the primary studies. Discussion Substantial challenges facing patients with bipolar disorder, in addition to their severe mood symptoms, include frequent incidence of psychiatric (eg, anxiety disorders, alcohol or drug dependence) and general medical comorbidities (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, migraine, and hepatitis C virus infection). It has been reported that more than 75% of patients take their medication less than 75% of the time, and the rate of suicide (0.4%) among patients with bipolar disorder is more than 20 times greater than in the general US population. Mood

  2. Development of responder criteria for multicomponent non-pharmacological treatment in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Vera M; Vriezekolk, Johanna E; van den Ende, Cornelia H

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to identify individual treatment success in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) who received non-pharmacological treatment. The present study described responder criteria for multicomponent non-pharmacological treatment in FM, and estimated and compared their sensitivity and specificity. Candidate responder sets were 1) identified in literature; and 2) formulated by expert group consensus. All candidate responder sets were tested in a cohort of 129 patients with FM receiving multicomponent non-pharmacological treatment. We used two gold standards (both therapist's and patient's perspective), assessed at six months after the start of treatment. Seven responder sets were defined (three identified in literature and four formulated by expert group consensus), and comprised combinations of domains of 1) pain; 2) fatigue; 3) patient global assessment (PGA); 4) illness perceptions; 5) limitations in activities of daily living (ADL); and 6) sleep. The sensitivity and specificity of literature-based responder sets (n=3) ranged between 17%-99% and 15%-95% respectively, whereas the expert-based responder sets (n=4) performed slightly better with regard to sensitivity (range 41%-81%) and specificity (range 50%-96%). Of the literature-based responder sets the OMERACT-OARSI responder set with patient's gold standard performed best (sensitivity 63%, specificity 75% and ROC area = 0.69). Overall, the expert-based responder set comprising the domains illness perceptions and limitations in ADL with patient's gold standard performed best (sensitivity 47%, specificity 96% and ROC area = 0.71). We defined sets of responder criteria for multicomponent non-pharmacological treatment in fibromyalgia. Further research should focus on the validation of those sets with acceptable performance.

  3. Low compliance to pharmacological treatment is linked to cognitive impairment in euthymic phase of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Ileana; Rizo-Méndez, Alfredo; Jarne-Esparcia, Adolfo

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment and low compliance to pharmacological treatment are frequent complications in bipolar disorder. Moreover, low compliance in patients with bipolar disorder is one of the main reasons for relapse. This in turn, is associated with an increase in neurocognitive symptoms. The current study aimed to determine whether attention, memory, and executive function are related to the level of compliance to pharmacological treatment in individuals with bipolar disorder in euthymic phase. We examined 34 patients with bipolar disorder (12 with low compliance to the treatment and 22 with high compliance to the treatment) according to the DSM-IV criteria, in the range of 18-55 years. All patients were assessed through a neuropsychological battery in one single session. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare neuropsychological test scores between low and high compliance patients. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were included as covariates in the study. Patients with low level of compliance performed significantly worse than high treatment compliance on verbal memory immediate free recall (F (1)=12.14, p=.002), verbal memory immediate cued recall (F (1)=10.45, p=.003), verbal memory delayed free recall (F (1)=5.52, p=.027), and verbal memory delayed cued recall (F (1)=6.11, p=.021). Covariates such as number of manic episodes, history of psychosis and years of education were found significant for executive functions and processing speed. We found that low compliance to pharmacological treatment is consistently linked to immediate and delayed verbal memory. In addition, executive function and processing speed were associated with clinical and demographic characteristics. Limitations of this study include the small sample size, a cross-sectional design that cannot address causality, and inability to account for pharmacologic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacological treatment of mechanical edema: a randomized controlled trial about the effects of mesoglycan.

    PubMed

    Viliani, T; Scarselli, M; Pieri, A; Gatti, M; Santini, M; Pasquetti, P

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical edema (MO) is frequently found in a lot of the lower extremities' orthopedic diseases. In absence of deep vein thrombosis, MO is caused by the change in the dynamics of calf muscle pump with venous hypertension and by the change in capillary permeability which offsets the extra-vascular fluid balance resulting in edema formation. The correct treatment includes specific training for musculo-skeletal and gait recovery, together with medical treatment focused on venous endothelium. Little information is available about pharmacological treatment of this condition. Some studies suggest the efficacy of mesoglycan in venous pathology. Aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the pharmacological treatment (mesoglycan 50 mg p.o., twice a day) in patients affected by MO. Forty-four patients with MO, aged 20-89 years, were randomized in two treatment groups: specific physiotherapy (Fkt) alone or physiotherapy plus mesoglycan 50 mg twice a day, per os. The patients were evaluated before treatment (t0), and after 1 month of treatment (t1), measuring ankle joint range of motion (degrees), calf circumference and malleolar circumference (cm), pain Borg CR10 Scale and adapted lymphedema Weiss Scale. Statistical analysis was performed by the Pearson's c2 test and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. At the final evaluation of the objective and subjective parameters, the mesoglycan effect combined to the Fkt provided statistical differences on nearly all the parameters in comparison with the patients randomised to Fkt alone. The present study suggest that mesoglycan treatment (50 mg p.o., twice a day) can improve the recovery of MO, and it is well tolerated by the patients. Specific physiotherapy remains the first treatment for the recovery of both muscular pump and correct walking, but the optimal treatment of MO seems to be a synergic approach, including both pharmacological and mobilization programs.

  5. Patient Preference for Psychological vs. Pharmacological Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Whitton, Sarah W.; Peckham, Andrew D.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Otto, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Models of evidence-based practice emphasize the consideration of treatment efficacy/effectiveness, clinical expertise, and patient preference in treatment selection and implementation. However, patient preference for psychiatric treatment has been understudied. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to provide an estimate of the proportion of patients preferring psychological treatment relative to medication for psychiatric disorders. Data Sources A literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library through August, 2011 for studies written in English that assessed patient preferences for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Study Selection Studies assessing the preferred type of treatment including at least one psychological treatment and one pharmacological treatment were included. Of the 641 articles initially identified, 34 met criteria for inclusion. Data Extraction Authors extracted relevant data including the proportion of participants reporting preference for psychological and pharmacological treatment. Results Across studies, the proportion preferring psychological treatment was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.80), which was significantly higher than equivalent preference (i.e., higher than 0.50, p < .001). Sensitivity analyses suggested that younger patients (p < .05) and women (p < .01) were significantly more like to choose psychological treatment. A preference for psychological treatment was consistently evident in both treatment-seeking and unselected samples (ps < .05), but was somewhat stronger for the unselected samples. Conclusions Aggregation of patient preferences across diverse settings yielded a significant three-fold preference for psychological treatment relative to medication. Given the similar efficacy of these treatments for depression and anxiety, improving access to evidence-based psychological treatment is needed to connect more patients to their preferred treatment. PMID:23842011

  6. Selected factors affecting adherence in the pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Chudiak, Anna; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Dudek, Krzysztof; Mazur, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Background Low adherence to hypertension (HT) management is one of the major contributors to poor blood pressure (BP) control. Approximately 40%–60% of patients with HT do not follow the prescribed treatment. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between selected variables and adherence to hypotensive pharmacological treatment. Besides socioclinical variables, the study focused on the role of illness acceptance. Participants and methods The study included 602 patients with HT. Adherence and acceptance of illness were assessed using the following validated instruments: the Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS) and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Results The high-adherence group comprised a significantly higher percentage of patients with high illness acceptance scale scores than that of patients with low-to-moderate scores (42.4 vs 31.8%; P=0.008<0.01). The odds ratio (OR) showed that high adherence to pharmacological treatment was >1.5 times as likely to occur in the high acceptance group as in the low-to-moderate acceptance group (OR =1.58, 95% CI 1.14–2.19). Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients showed statistically significant correlations between adherence and sex (men ρ=−0.101; P=0.012), age >45–66 years (ρ=0.098; P=0.015), higher education level (ρ=0.132; P=0.001), grade ESC of HT (ρ=−0.037; P=0.057), receiving one-tablet polytherapy (ρ=0.131; P=0.015), and illness acceptance (ρ=0.090; P=0.024). Conclusion Acceptance of illness is correlated with adherence to pharmacological treatment, and consideration should be given to more widespread assessment of illness acceptance in daily practice. Male sex, age >45–66 years, duration of illness grade ESC of HT, and receiving one-tablet polytherapy are significant determinants of adherence to pharmacological treatment in HT. PMID:28280309

  7. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care: executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Peuckmann‐Post, Vera; Minton, Ollie; Stone, Patrick; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In palliative care patients, fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted with rest, thereby impacting daily activity and quality of life. Further complicating issues are the multidimensionality, subjective nature and lack of a consensus definition of fatigue. The review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for fatigue in palliative care, with a focus on patients at an advanced stage of disease, including patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Methods We considered randomized controlled trials concerning adult palliative care with a focus on pharmacological treatment of fatigue compared with placebo, application of two drugs, usual care or a non‐pharmacological intervention. The primary outcome had to be non‐specific fatigue (or related terms such as asthenia). We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a selection of cancer journals up to 28 April 2014. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Results We screened 1645 publications of which 45 met the inclusion criteria. In total, we analysed data from 18 drugs and 4696 participants. There was a very high degree of statistical and clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Meta‐analysis of data was possible for modafinil, pemoline, and methylphenidate. Conclusions Due to the limited evidence, we cannot recommend a specific drug for the treatment of fatigue in palliative care patients. Some drugs, which may be beneficial for the treatment of fatigue associated with palliative care such as amantadine, methylphenidate, and modafinil, should be further researched. PMID:27066315

  8. Addressing the unmet needs of patients with persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: emerging pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Pierre; Lalonde, Justine K

    2014-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent an impairment of normal emotional responses, thought processes and behaviors, and include blunting or flattening of affect, alogia/aprosody, avolition/apathy, anhedonia, and asociality. Negative symptoms contribute to a reduced quality of life, increased functional disability, increased burden of illness, and poorer long-term outcomes, to a greater degree than positive symptoms. Primary negative symptoms are prominent and persistent in up to 26% of patients with schizophrenia, and they are estimated to occur in up to 58% of outpatients at any given time. Negative symptoms respond less well to medications than positive symptoms, and to date treatment options for negative symptoms have been limited, with no accepted standard treatment. Modest benefits have been reported with a variety of different agents, including second-generation antipsychotics and add-on therapy with antidepressants and other pharmacological classes. Recent clinical research focusing on negative symptoms target novel biological systems, such as glutamatergic neurotransmission. Different approaches include: enhancing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function with agents that bind directly to the glycine ligand site or with glycine reuptake inhibitors; influencing the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) with positive allosteric modulators; and stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In conclusion, the lack of clearly efficacious pharmacological treatments for the management of negative symptoms represents a significant unmet need, especially considering the importance of these symptoms on patient outcomes. Hence, further research to identify and characterize novel pharmacological treatments for negative symptoms is greatly needed. PMID:24855363

  9. Development of a self-treatment approach for patients with COPD and comorbidities: an ongoing learning process

    PubMed Central

    Lenferink, Anke; Buckman, Julie; Spicer, Deborah; Cafarella, Paul A.; Burt, Morton G.; Bassett, Katherine L.; van Ommeren, Clara; Anesbury, Sally; van der Valk, Paul D L P M; Frith, Peter A.; van der Palen, Job

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-initiated action plans are an important component of COPD self-management (SM) interventions. When integrated into SM interventions, these action plans have proven to be effective in reducing exacerbation severity, hospitalisations, and costs and in improving health status in patients with COPD without severe comorbidities. Because of overlap in symptoms, a self-treatment (ST) approach that focuses solely on traditional symptoms of COPD is inadequate for patients with COPD and comorbidities. The COPE-III SM intervention combines (I) patient-initiated action plans that are tailored to the individual’s co-morbid disease(s), and (II) ongoing nurse support. In this paper we provide information regarding the integration of information from two previous COPD SM studies (COPE I and II) in the development of the current COPE-III ST approach. Materials and methods COPE-III ST materials include daily symptom diaries and action plans that take patient’s common comorbidities [chronic heart failure (CHF), anxiety, depression, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and diabetes] into account. The comorbid diary and action plans components were developed in collaboration with multiple disease-experts. Results Previous SM studies have highlighted some essential topics that need to be considered when developing a SM or ST approach: ‘when to initiate ST’, ‘how to optimize materials and safety’, and ‘how to achieve behavioural change’. In the COPE-III study, ST is initiated after a significant change in symptoms. This is consistent with the COPE-II approach and was implemented because disease symptoms are often present even when patients are stable. We have tried to ensure patient safety by providing an easily accessible case-manager to patients throughout their involvement in the study. Furthermore, a psychologist has ensured the use of behavioural change techniques throughout the intervention. Conclusions We should continue to learn from our experiences

  10. Pharmacologic Treatment of Alcoholic Hepatitis: Examining Outcomes Based on Disease Severity Stratification.

    PubMed

    Owens, Ryan E; Snyder, Heather S; Twilla, Jennifer D; Satapathy, Sanjaya K

    2016-12-01

    Maddrey discriminant function (MDF) score is a measure of disease prognosis in alcoholic hepatitis (AH) used to identify patients at highest risk of mortality and determine the need for initiation of pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of pharmacologic therapy for hospitalized AH patients as stratified by MDF score. A retrospective review of patients with an AH diagnosis admitted to a Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare adult hospital between 06/2009 and 06/2014 was conducted. Patients ≥18 years of age with an ICD-9 code for AH were evaluated. Of the 493 patients screened, 234 met the inclusion criteria, comprised of 62 patients with an MDF ≥ 32 (treatment, n = 42 vs. no treatment, n = 20) and 172 patients with an MDF < 32 (treatment, n = 15 vs. no treatment, n = 157). For the patients with an MDF ≥ 32, there was no statistically significant difference between the treatment group vs. non-treatment group regarding 28-day mortality (31% vs. 11%, respectively; P = 0.18) and 6-month mortality (45% treatment vs. 38% non-treatment; P = 0.75). For the patients with an MDF <32, there was no statistically significant difference between the treatment group vs. non-treatment group regarding 28-day mortality (0% vs. 7%, respectively; P > 0.99) and 6-month mortality (11% treatment vs. 13% non-treatment; P > 0.99). There was no difference in incidence of acute kidney injury, hepatorenal syndrome, development of infection or hepatic encephalopathy between the treatment vs. non-treatment groups. Pharmacologic treatment showed no survival benefit, regardless of disease severity. Given the mortality risk seen in mild-moderate AH patients not receiving treatment and concern for a possible treatment ceiling effect in severe AH patients, more data are needed to adequately assess the utility of MDF in selecting appropriate candidates for AH treatment.

  11. Pharmacological treatment of neonatal pain: in search of a new equipoise.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; Tibboel, Dick; van den Anker, John

    2013-02-01

    Inadequate management of pain in early human life contributes to impaired neurodevelopmental outcome and alters pain thresholds, pain or stress-related behavior and physiological responses. However, there are also emerging animal experimental data on the impact of exposure to analgo-sedatives on the incidence and extent of neuro-apoptosis. Since this association has also been suggested in humans, the pharmacological treatment of neonatal pain is in search of a new equipoise since these 'conflicting' observations are the main drivers to further reconsider our current treatment regimens. This review focuses on new data concerning clinical pharmacology of morphine, followed by data on more recently introduced opioids like remifentanil and tramadol, locoregional anesthesia and minimally invasive techniques in neonates, and finally with data on intravenous paracetamol. Since the available data are still incomplete, priorities for both clinical management and future research will be proposed.

  12. Pharmacological treatment and demographic characteristics of pediatric patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bahmanyar, Shahram; Sundström, Anders; Kaijser, Magnus; von Knorring, Anne-Liis; Kieler, Helle

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pediatric population with ADHD and their pharmacological treatment. Using the Swedish National Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register we identified individuals below 19 years of age who were diagnosed or medically treated for ADHD for the first time 2006-2007. The unique patient identifiers were used to link information from the two registers to describe demographic characteristics, hospital care and drug treatments. Logistic regression model estimated the association between age, sex, frequency of hospitalization, diagnosis or treatment for other mental disorders and risk of gap in the treatment. Totally the study included 7931 patients of whom 74% were males. The mean age at first diagnosis was 12 years. Some 84% were medically treated for ADHD and approximately 90% received methylphenidate as the first substance. Combination therapy was rare and the most common combination was methylphenidate and atomoxetine. More than 55% of the patients, which could be followed up for two years after start of treatment, had at least one treatment gap of six months. Older age at diagnosis, lower number of hospitalizations and comorbidity with other mental disorders increased risks of gaps in medication. Approximately one fifth of the patients recorded in the National Patient Register as diagnosed with ADHD did not receive pharmacological treatment. Medication adherence seems to be low, when measured as gaps in treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Treating the insomniac patient - General measures and psychological and pharmacological treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general preliminary measures for treating insomnia include moderate physical exercise several hours before bedtime, and the relaxation of complex mental activity before bedtime. A case history concerning a woman with marital troubles is offered as evidence that insomnia may be caused by deeply rooted psychological and situational problems. Another case history illustrates how prior pharmacological treatment may complicate the process of clinically evaluating an insomniac.

  14. [The biological and pharmacological activity of essential oils in the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2013-09-22

    Despite the large progress in medicine and pharmacy in the last few decades, traditional treatment of bacterial or viral diseases is frequently ineffective and is connected with some side effects. Currently, there is observed an increasing interest in natural plant-derived substances as a potential and promising group of medicines in prevention and treatment of several infectious diseases. Terpenes and their derivatives are a large class of natural organic components of essential oils and are widespread in the plant kingdom. Numerous experimental studies have shown that essential oils exhibit a large spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities in vitro. Herbal essential oils have been proved to possess antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal and antiparasitic properties. They have also been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and immunostimulatory activities. Based on the wide spectrum of various biological activities, essential oils and terpenes commonly found in fruit, vegetables, herbs etc. have been suggested to constitute a novel group of preventive and therapeutic agents. Further experiments are necessary to confirm their pharmacological effectiveness, to determine potential toxic effects and the mechanism of their activity in in vivo models. This article describes the biological and pharmacological properties of herbal essential oils and some of their components, and summarizes the future prospects of potential application of essential oils in the prevention and treatment of infectious human diseases. In this review also possible mechanisms of their biological action are presented.

  15. Novel Pharmacologic Candidates for Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Louise J.; Tsai, James C.; Liu, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) affects approximately 45 million people worldwide and more than 2.5 million people aged 40 years or older in the United States. Pharmacologic treatment for glaucoma is directed towards lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) to slow disease progression and delay visual field loss. Current medical treatment options for the lowering of IOP include the following classes of topical medications: beta-adrenergic antagonists, alpha-adrenergic agonists, cholinergic agonists, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and prostaglandin analogs. Issues with existing drugs include failure to achieve target IOP with monotherapy, drug-related side effects, and low patient compliance with multiple daily administration of eye drops. In recent years, the scientific and medical community has seen encouraging development of novel classes of drugs for primary OAG, the majority of which lower IOP by targeting the trabecular meshwork outflow pathway to increase aqueous humor outflow. Among the most promising new pharmacologic candidates are rho kinase inhibitors including ripasudil (K-115), netarsudil (AR-13324), and AMA0076; adenosine receptor agonists including trabodenoson (INO-8875); and modified prostaglandin analogs including latanoprostene bunod (LBN, BOL-303259-X) and ONO-9054. This study aims to systematically review and summarize the most recent developments in clinical trials for new pharmacologic options for the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma. PMID:28356898

  16. Pharmacological interventions for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Papalia, Rocco; D'Adamio, Stefano; Diaz Balzani, Lorenzo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Several pharmacological interventions have been proposed for the management of Achilles tendinopathy, with no agreement on which is the overall best option available. This systematic review investigates the efficacy and safety of different local pharmacological treatments for Achilles tendinopathy. We included only randomized controlled studies (RCTs) focusing on clinical and functional outcomes of therapies consisting in injection of a substance or local application. Assessment of the methodological quality was performed using a modified version of the Coleman methodology score (CMS) to determine possible risks of bias. Thirteen RCTs were included with a total of 528 studied patients. Eleven studies reported the outcomes of injection therapies. Two studies examined the outcomes of patients who applied glyceryl trinitrate patch. The mean modified CMS was 70.6 out of 90. There was no significant evidence of remarkable benefits provided by any of the therapies studied. There is not univocal evidence to advise any particular pharmacological treatment as the best advisable non-operative option for Achilles tendinopathy as equivalent alternative to the most commonly used eccentric loading rehabilitation program. However, potential was shown by the combination of different substances administered with physical therapy. There is a need for more long-term investigations, studying large enough cohort with standardized scores and evaluations shared by all the investigations to confirm the healing potential, and provide a stronger statistical comparison of the available treatments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Long-Term Pharmacological Treatments of Anxiety Disorders: An Updated Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Alciati, Alessandra; Riva, Alice; Micieli, Wilma; Caldirola, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of long-term pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders (AnxDs) are still debated. We undertook an updated systematic review of long-term pharmacological studies on panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Relevant studies dating from January 1, 2012 to August 31, 2015 were identified using the PubMed database and a review of bibliographies. Of 372 records identified in the search, five studies on PD and 15 on GAD were included in the review. No studies on SAD were found. Our review confirms the usefulness of long-term pharmacological treatments for PD and GAD and suggests that they can provide further improvement over that obtained during short-term therapy. Paroxetine, escitalopram, and clonazepam can be effective for long-term treatment of PD. However, further studies are needed to draw conclusions about the long-term benzodiazepine use in PD, particularly for the possible cognitive side-effects over time. Pregabalin and quetiapine can be effective for long-term treatment of GAD, while preliminary suggestions emerged for agomelatine and vortioxetine. We did not find any evidence for determining the optimal length and/or dosage of medications to minimize the relapse risk. Few investigations have attempted to identify potential predictors of long-term treatment response. Personalized treatments for AnxDs can be implemented using predictive tools to explore those factors affecting treatment response/tolerability heterogeneity, including neurobiological functions/clinical profiles, comorbidity, biomarkers, and genetic features, and to tailor medications according to each patient's unique features.

  18. Factors Influencing Response to Pharmacologic Treatment of Migraine in a Pediatric Headache Clinic.

    PubMed

    Markus, Tal Eidlitz; Moad, Bder; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2016-07-01

    The responses of different patients to the same drug may vary as a consequence of biologic, psychosocial, and genetic differences. The aim of this study was to identify clinical factors associated with a response to pharmacologic treatment in pediatric patients with migraine. The medical files of patients with migraine attending the headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center in 2010-2015 were reviewed. The children and parents (or only the parents if the child was very young) completed the International Headache Society-based questionnaire. Patients were treated with at least one of the following medications: propranolol, amitriptyline, topiramate. Response to treatment was rated as no change in migraine pattern (grade 1) or a decrease in migraine attack frequency per month by at least 50% (grade 2) or at least 75% (grade 3). The highest-grade response to any pharmacologic treatment was defined as the best clinical response. The study group included 248 patients of mean age 12.71 ± 3.04 years. A grade 3 best clinical response was significantly associated with a positive maternal history of migraine, younger age at treatment onset, lower frequency of headache attacks per month, postpubertal children had a significantly lower rate of grade 3 response than prepubertal children (P < .05). Analysis of the association of overuse of medication and treatment response achieved a P value equal to .05. Several background and clinical factors are identified that may predispose children with migraine to respond better to pharmacologic treatment. Clinicians who see children with migraine in a pediatric headache clinic setting should consider these factors before initiating a treatment program. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. What is in the guidelines about the pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    López-Campos, José Luis; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    With the publication of the new guidelines (The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 and Guía Española de la COPD) on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the pharmacological treatment of this disease has changed substantially. In this article, the evidence supporting the use of pharmacological groups in COPD is summarized and the place of each of these drugs among the new therapeutic strategies is established. Although short-acting bronchodilators have been used as maintenance therapy for COPD for many years, few clinical trials are available on the efficacy and safety of these agents, whose role was defined at the very early stages of treatment. The introduction of long-acting bronchodilators, administered every 12 or 24 h, led to an increase in therapeutic effects and an improvement in both treatment adherence and dosage; therefore, both guidelines consider these drugs as the standard therapy for all types of patients and clinical phenotypes. The combination of long-acting bronchodilators from different families has been established as a new therapeutic approach for patients with persistent symptoms despite an appropriate bronchodilator treatment. Anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids has been discussed at length, and is considered in the current guidelines as the treatment of choice in patients with a high risk of exacerbations associated with an impaired lung function or previous exacerbations, or presenting with phenotypes that are susceptible to the effect of corticosteroids. Roflumilast is a novel drug with a clearly defined indication. Finally, further evidence about other therapies, such as antibiotics or mucolytics, is emerging that will help define their appropriate use in selected patients. At present, pharmacological management of COPD is being re-evaluated. As long as we are able to apply the new treatment approaches to the clinical reality of our patients we will achieve greater benefits in both the

  20. Detection of serum cytokines before and after pharmacological and surgical treatment in patients with cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Naik, M I; Tenguria, R K; Haq, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is one of the most important and widespread parasitic zoonoses. One of the problems that can be encountered after treating CE patients is the risk of post-surgical relapses or treatment failure, thus a long-term clinical and serological follow-up is required to evaluate the success or failure of therapy. In the present study immunological markers have been identified to indicate the effectiveness of pharmacological and surgical treatments. The relationship between serum cytokine levels and the outcome of chemotherapy and surgery was evaluated in 50 patients with CE. Serum interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) before and after pharmacological and surgical treatment. Serum cytokine levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were elevated in a significant proportion of patients during the active stage of disease. IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were measurable in 41 (82%), 37 (74%) and 25 (50%) patients before the treatment. Clinical and radiological assessment of patients 2 years after pharmacological treatment has shown that 48 of 50 patients responded to treatment. IL-4 and IL-10 levels were decreased significantly (P< 0.05) in these patients. Conversely, patients who did not respond showed high levels of IL-4 and IL-10 and undetectable levels of IFN-γ. Hence these results suggest that serum IL-4 and IL-10 detection may be useful in the follow-up of patients with CE.

  1. Artificial neural network assessment of substitutive pharmacological treatments in hospitalised intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Grassi, M C; Caricati, A M; Intraligi, M; Buscema, M; Nencini, P

    2002-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide better solutions than linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to problems of classification and estimation involving a large number of non-homogeneous (categorical and metric) variables. In this study, we compared the ability of traditional LDA and a feed-forward back-propagation (FF-BP) ANN with self-momentum to predict pharmacological treatments received by intravenous drug users (IDUs) hospitalised for coexisting medical illness. When medical staff considered detoxification appropriate they usually suggested methadone (MET) and (or) benzodiazepines (BDZ). Given four different treatment options (MET, BDZ, MET+BDZ, no treatment) as dependent variables and 38 independent variables, the FF-BP ANN provided the best prediction of the consultant's decision (overall accuracy: 62.7%). It achieved the highest level of predictive accuracy for the BDZ option (90.5%), the lowest for no treatment (29.6), often misclassifying no treatment as BDZ. The LDA yielded a lower mean accuracy (50.3%). When the untreated group was excluded, ANN improved its absolute recognition rate by only 1.2% and the BDZ group remained the best predicted. In contrast, LDA improved its absolute recognition rate from 50.3 to 58.9%, maximum 65.7% for the BDZ group. In conclusion, the FF-BP ANN was more accurate than the statistical model (discriminant analysis) in predicting the pharmacological treatment of IDUs.

  2. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Practical strategies for pharmacological and somatic treatment in adults.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Reghunandanan, Samar; Simpson, Helen B; Phillips, Katharine A; Richter, Margaret A; Matthews, Keith; Stein, Dan J; Sareen, Jitender; Brown, Angus; Sookman, Debbie

    2015-05-30

    This narrative review gathers together a range of international experts to critically appraise the existing trial-based evidence relating to the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for obsessive compulsive disorder in adults. We discuss the diagnostic evaluation and clinical characteristics followed by treatment options suitable for the clinician working from primary through to specialist psychiatric care. Robust data supports the effectiveness of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and clomipramine in the short-term and the longer-term treatment and for relapse prevention. Owing to better tolerability, SSRIs are acknowledged as the first-line pharmacological treatment of choice. For those patients for whom first line treatments have been ineffective, evidence supports the use of adjunctive antipsychotic medication, and some evidence supports the use of high-dose SSRIs. Novel compounds are also the subject of active investigation. Neurosurgical treatments, including ablative lesion neurosurgery and deep brain stimulation, are reserved for severely symptomatic individuals who have not experienced sustained response to both pharmacological and cognitive behavior therapies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children now: lifestyle changes and pharmacologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alisi, Anna; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of most common chronic liver diseases in children. A greater understanding about the risk factors and molecular pathogenesis of NAFLD suggests that lifestyle interventions aiming to decrease obesity/body mass index and metabolic derangement are the first line of treatments adopted in children affected by this disease. However, because these therapeutic options are often at the beginning misjudged by the patients and their parents, the use of pharmacologic agents may help to protect the liver and other organs from further irreversible tissue damage. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress) also might slow the progression of this increasingly prevalent pediatric disorder. On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of the dietary approaches, possibly coupled with regular exercise, on decreasing the metabolic and histologic damage in pediatric NAFLD. We also emphasize several advantages of the pharmacologic treatments adopted or adoptable in combination with lifestyle interventions in children with NAFLD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stuttering treatment research 1970-2005: II. Systematic review incorporating trial quality assessment of pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Anne K; Davidow, Jason H; Bramlett, Robin E; Franic, Duska M; Ingham, Roger J

    2006-11-01

    To complete a systematic review, incorporating trial quality assessment, of published research about pharmacological treatments for stuttering. Goals included the identification of treatment recommendations and research needs based on the available high-quality evidence. Multiple readers reviewed 31 articles published between 1970 and 2005, using a written data extraction instrument developed as a synthesis of existing standards and recommendations. Articles were then assessed using 5 methodological criteria and 4 outcomes criteria, also developed from previously published recommendations. None of the 31 articles met more than 3 of the 5 methodological criteria (M = 1.74). Four articles provided data to support a claim of short-term improvement in social, emotional, or cognitive variables. One article provided data to show that stuttering frequency was reduced to less than 5%, and 4 additional articles provided data to show that stuttering may have been reduced by at least half. Among the articles that met the trial quality inclusion criterion for the second stage of this review, none provided uncomplicated positive reports. None of the pharmacological agents tested for stuttering have been shown in methodologically sound reports to improve stuttering frequency to below 5%, to reduce stuttering by at least half, or to improve relevant social, emotional, or cognitive variables. These findings raise questions about the logic supporting the continued use of current pharmacological agents for stuttering.

  5. Molecular basis for prospective pharmacological treatment strategies in intellectual disability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verpelli, Chiara; Galimberti, Ivan; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Sala, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    A number of mutated genes that code for proteins concerned with brain synapse function and circuit formation have been identified in patients affected by intellectual disability (ID) syndromes over the past 15 years. These genes are involved in synapse formation and plasticity, the regulation of dendritic spine morphology, the regulation of the synaptic cytoskeleton, the synthesis and degradation of specific synapse proteins, and the control of correct balance between excitatory and inhibitory synapses. In most of the cases, even mild alterations in synapse morphology, function, and balance give rise to mild or severe IDs. These studies provided a rationale for the development of pharmacological agents that are able to counteract functional synaptic anomalies and potentially improve the symptoms of some of these conditions. This review summarizes recent findings on the functions of some of the genes responsible for ID syndromes and some of the new potential pharmacological treatments for these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Physical exercise as non-pharmacological treatment of chronic pain: Why and when.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Kirsten R; Golightly, Yvonne M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pain broadly encompasses both objectively defined conditions and idiopathic conditions that lack physical findings. Despite variance in origin or pathogenesis, these conditions are similarly characterized by chronic pain, poor physical function, mobility limitations, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, and they are treated alone or in combination by pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches, such as physical activity (aerobic conditioning, muscle strengthening, flexibility training, and movement therapies). Physical activity improves general health, disease risk, and progression of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. When applied to chronic pain conditions within appropriate parameters (frequency, duration, and intensity), physical activity significantly improves pain and related symptoms. For chronic pain, strict guidelines for physical activity are lacking, but frequent movement is preferable to sedentary behavior. This gives considerable freedom in prescribing physical activity treatments, which are most successful when tailored individually, progressed slowly, and account for physical limitations, psychosocial needs, and available resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Managing insomnia: an overview of insomnia and pharmacologic treatment strategies in use and on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas L; Goradia, Viral

    2013-01-01

    This review explores basic sleep physiology, the mechanism of action for each class of hypnotic agents, their clinical application based on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic factors, and potential pharmacologic sleep-inducing mechanisms of future hypnotics. The paper challenges the reader to understand the neuroscientific basis of insomnia and use this knowledge to guide prescription of hypnotic agents. Currently indicated hypnotic agents are discussed with regard to their mechanism of drug action and clinical application. A broader discussion is developed throughout this paper regarding other non-indicated agents that may improve sleep and describing newer pharmacological treatments that may become available in the future for use in sleep disorders and their comorbid conditions. PMID:24432044

  8. Clinical pharmacology of lysergic acid diethylamide: case reports and review of the treatment of intoxication.

    PubMed

    Blaho, K; Merigian, K; Winbery, S; Geraci, S A; Smartt, C

    1997-01-01

    Intoxication and overdose are common presenting complaints to the emergency department. Acute intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has become a relatively rare event, especially when compared with the incidence of ethanol and cocaine intoxication. We recently had an outbreak of presumed LSD intoxications occurring over one weekend. All patients had attended a performance by the musical group The Grateful Dead. At present, LSD intoxication or overdose can only be suspected based on clinical findings because there are no readily available rapid laboratory tests for detecting either the parent compound or the metabolites of the drug. The clinical findings and outcomes of five patients with suspected LSD intoxication are presented. The pharmacological effects of LSD and treatment modalities of intoxication are reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively based on clinical signs and symptoms. Only one patient required hospital admission for combative behavior that was initially refractory to pharmacological restraint.

  9. Recurrent Vascular Headache: Home-Based Behavioral Treatment versus Abortive Pharmacological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a home-based behavioral intervention (relaxation and thermal biofeedback training) with an abortive pharmacological intervention (with compliance training) for treating recurrent migraine and migraine/tension headaches. Both interventions yielded reductions in headache activity, psychosomatic symptoms, and daily life…

  10. Recurrent Vascular Headache: Home-Based Behavioral Treatment versus Abortive Pharmacological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a home-based behavioral intervention (relaxation and thermal biofeedback training) with an abortive pharmacological intervention (with compliance training) for treating recurrent migraine and migraine/tension headaches. Both interventions yielded reductions in headache activity, psychosomatic symptoms, and daily life…

  11. Pharmacologic treatment in pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith J; Rutten, Juliette M T M; Venmans, Leonie; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-02-01

    To systematically review literature assessing efficacy and safety of pharmacologic treatments in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). MEDLINE and Cochrane Database were searched for systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials investigating efficacy and safety of pharmacologic agents in children aged 4-18 years with AP-FGIDs. Quality of evidence was assessed using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. We included 6 studies with 275 children (aged 4.5-18 years) evaluating antispasmodic, antidepressant, antireflux, antihistaminic, and laxative agents. Overall quality of evidence was very low. Compared with placebo, some evidence was found for peppermint oil in improving symptoms (OR 3.3 (95% CI 0.9-12.0) and for cyproheptadine in reducing pain frequency (relative risk [RR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.17-5.04) and pain intensity (RR 3.03, 95% CI 1.29-7.11). Compared with placebo, amitriptyline showed 15% improvement in overall quality of life score (P = .007) and famotidine only provides benefit in global symptom improvement (OR 11.0; 95% CI 1.6-75.5; P = .02). Polyethylene glycol with tegaserod significantly decreased pain intensity compared with polyethylene glycol only (RR 3.60, 95% CI 1.54-8.40). No serious adverse effects were reported. No studies were found concerning antidiarrheal agents, antibiotics, pain medication, anti-emetics, or antimigraine agents. Because of the lack of high-quality, placebo-controlled trials of pharmacologic treatment for pediatric AP-FGIDs, there is no evidence to support routine use of any pharmacologic therapy. Peppermint oil, cyproheptadine, and famotidine might be potential interventions, but well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Axis I psychiatric disorders, paraphilic sexual offending and implications for pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Axis I non-sexual psychopathology, especially if associated with other manifestations of impulsivity, could be important to consider during the assessment and pharmacological treatment of paraphilic sexual offenders. The author performed a Medline literature search using combinations of the following terms "sexual offender," "paraphilia," "Axis I," and "comorbid." In addition, individual paraphilic disorders including "exhibitionism," "voyeurism," "frotteurism," "sexual sadism" and "pedophilia" were searched with the terms "Axis I" and "comorbid." From the literature retrieved, 18 relevant specific articles and additional references were reviewed that utilized either a comprehensive prospective methodology to ascertain Axis I psychopathology or a specific diagnosis not typically included in structured diagnostic instruments was ascertained with validated rating instruments. Unipolar and bipolar mood disorders, social anxiety disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other neurodevelopmental conditions (mental retardation, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, Asperger's disorder) are Axis I psychopathologies reported as co-associated with paraphilic sexual offending. The aforementioned Axis I psychiatric disorders typically manifest during childhood or adolescence, the same age of onset as paraphilic disorders. Alcohol abuse is prevalent among paraphilic offenders as well and its presence serves as an additional disinhibitor. Research supporting the concurrent pharmacological treatment of Axis I comorbidities is modest but offers support that such treatment could mitigate paraphilic behavior. This review was organized to emphasize positive findings. Studies reviewed varied in both sample types and settings as well as ascertainment and diagnostic methodologies. The literature reviewed is modest in size and additionally limited by small samples. A subset of males with Axis I diagnoses of mood disorders, social anxiety disorder, substance use disorders, and

  13. Pharmacologic treatments for the behavioral symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Carolyn A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    This review outlines pharmacologic treatments for the behavioral symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, adolescents, and adults. Symptom domains include repetitive and stereotyped behaviors, irritability and aggression, hyperactivity and inattention, and social impairment. Medications covered include serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), mirtazapine, antipsychotics, psychostimulants, atomoxetine, α-2 agonists, D-cycloserine, and memantine. Overall, SRIs are less efficacious and more poorly tolerated in children with ASDs than in adults. Antipsychotics are the most efficacious drugs for the treatment of irritability in ASDs, and may be useful in the treatment of other symptoms. Psychostimulants demonstrate some benefit for the treatment of hyperactivity and inattention in individuals with ASDs, but are less efficacious and associated with more adverse effects compared with individuals with ADHD. D-cycloserine and memantine appear helpful in the treatment of social impairment, although further research is needed. PMID:23226952

  14. Systematic review of the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Broadstock, Marita; Doughty, Carolyn; Eggleston, Matt

    2007-07-01

    The variable expression of autism over the lifespan is likely to lead to different symptoms and support requirements, and to distinct responses to pharmacotherapy treatment, in older patients compared to children. This systematic review considers the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment in managing autism spectrum disorder in adolescents and adults. Following a comprehensive search of literature published in English from 1980, methodological criteria were applied to identify studies designed to reliably assess treatment effectiveness. Only five double-blind, randomized controlled trials were eligible for appraisal. All had small sample sizes (mean = 30) and brief treatment duration of no more than 12 weeks. The paucity of trials and their methodological limitations means that there is only preliminary evidence about the short-term effectiveness of a few drug treatments for this age group. There was also a lack of reliable data reported on drug safety profiles. Methodological challenges and directions for future research are discussed.

  15. Pharmacologic Approaches to Treatment Resistant Depression: A Re-examination for the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Noah S.; Carpenter, Linda L.; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Price, Lawrence H.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is common and debilitating. Initial treatment is often insufficient to achieve full remission in a given depressive episode, resulting in more frequent episodes, worsened severity, and major disability. Areas covered in this review This review surveys literature on the diagnosis and pharmacological management of TRD in light of recent developments. Evidence regarding commonly used treatment options is critically examined and key recommendations are offered. The review ends by considering drugs acting on the melatonin, acetylcholine, and glutamate systems that hold promise as future options for TRD. What the reader will gain Recent trends and research findings have impacted how the evidence supporting different approaches to TRD should be evaluated. For example, many earlier TRD studies employed tricyclics (TCAs) as the primary antidepressant, but TCAs have now been superseded by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in routine clinical practice. This deficiency has been addressed by the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study, the largest effectiveness study of TRD ever conducted. However, design characteristics of the STAR*D study preclude simple comparisons with earlier studies. Take home message A shortcoming of most treatment recommendations for TRD is their reliance on older studies that do not reflect the current preeminence of SSRIs in clinical practice. This has distorted the prioritization of pharmacological strategies for TRD. Efforts to correct this distortion with effectiveness research, designed to better reflect current practice trends, require critical consideration of the strengths and limitations of this approach. PMID:20151847

  16. Multimodal compared to pharmacologic treatments for chronic tension-type headache in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Przekop, Peter; Przekop, Allison; Haviland, Mark G

    2016-10-01

    Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in children and adolescents is a serious medical condition, with considerable morbidity and few effective, evidence-based treatments. We performed a chart review of 83 adolescents (age range = 13-18 years; 67 girls and 16 boys) diagnosed with CTTH. Two treatment protocols were compared: multimodal (osteopathic manipulative treatments, mindfulness, and qi gong) and pharmacologic (amitriptyline or gabapentin). Four outcomes (headache frequency, pain intensity, general health, and health interference) were assessed at three time points (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months). A fifth outcome, number of bilateral tender points, was recorded at baseline and 6 months. All five were evaluated statistically with a linear mixed model. Although both multimodal and pharmacologic treatments were effective for CTTH (time effects for all measures were significant at p < .001), results from each analysis favored multimodal treatment (the five group by time interaction effects were significant at or below the p < .001 level). Headache frequency in the pharmacologic group, for example, reduced from a monthly average (95% Confidence Interval shown in parentheses) of 23.9 (21.8, 26.0) to 16.4 (14.3, 18.6) and in the multimodal group from 22.3 (20.1, 24.5) to 4.9 (2.6, 7.2) (a substantial group difference). Pain intensity (worst in the last 24 hours, 0-10 scale) was reduced in the pharmacologic group from 6.2 (5.6, 6.9) to 3.4 (2.7, 4.1) and from 6.1 (5.4, 6.8) to 2.0 (1.2, 2.7) in the multimodal group (a less substantial difference). Across the other three assessments, group differences were larger for general health and number of tender points and less so for pain restriction. Multimodal treatment for adolescent CTTH appears to be effective. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these promising results.

  17. Effectiveness of midodrine treatment in patients with recurrent vasovagal syncope not responding to non-pharmacological treatment (STAND-trial).

    PubMed

    Romme, Jacobus J C M; van Dijk, Nynke; Go-Schön, Ingeborg K; Reitsma, Johannes B; Wieling, Wouter

    2011-11-01

    Initial treatment of vasovagal syncope (VVS) consists of advising adequate fluid and salt intake, regular exercise, and physical counterpressure manoeuvres. Despite this treatment, up to 30% of patients continue to experience regular episodes of VVS. We investigated whether additional Midodrine treatment is effective in these patients. In our study, patients with at least three syncopal and/or severe pre-syncopal recurrences during non-pharmacological treatment were eligible to receive double-blind cross-over treatment starting either with Midodrine or placebo. Treatment periods lasted for 3 months with a wash-out period of 1 week in-between. At baseline and after each treatment period, we collected data about the recurrence of syncope and pre-syncope, side effects, and quality of life (QoL). Twenty-three patients (17% male, mean age 32) included in the cross-over trial received both Midodrine and placebo treatment. The proportion of patients who experienced syncopal and pre-syncopal recurrences did not differ significantly between Midodrine and placebo treatment (syncope: 48 vs. 65%, P= 0.22; pre-syncope: 74 vs. 78%, P> 0.99). The median number of syncopes and pre-syncopes per 3 months were also not significantly different during Midodrine and placebo treatment (0 vs. 1; P= 0.57; and 6 vs. 8; P= 0.90). The occurrence of side effects was similar during Midodrine and placebo treatment (48 vs. 57%; P= 0.75). Also, QoL did not differ significantly. Our findings indicate that additional Midodrine treatment is less effective in patients with VVS not responding to non-pharmacological treatment than reported as first-line treatment.

  18. Update of the Mexican College of Rheumatology guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Mario H; Díaz-Borjón, Alejandro; Vázquez del Mercado Espinosa, Mónica; Gámez-Nava, Jorge Iván; Barile Fabris, Leonor A; Pacheco Tena, César; Silveira Torre, Luis H; Pascual Ramos, Virginia; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; Aguilar Arreola, Jorge Enrique; González Díaz, Verónica; Alvarez Nemegyei, José; González-López, Laura del Carmen; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Castro Colín, Zully; Xibillé Friedman, Daniel Xavier; Alvarez Hernández, Everardo; Casasola Vargas, Julio; Cortés Hernández, Miguel; Flores-Alvarado, Diana E; Martínez Martínez, Laura A; Vega-Morales, David; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Medrano Ramírez, Gabriel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; García González, Adolfo; López López, Susana Marisela; Rosete Reyes, Alejandra; Espinosa Morales, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacologic management of rheumatoid arthritis has progressed substantially over the past years. It is therefore desirable that existing information be periodically updated. There are several published international guidelines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that hardly adapt to the Mexican health system because of its limited healthcare resources. Hence, it is imperative to unify the existing recommendations and to incorporate them to a set of clinical, updated recommendations; the Mexican College of Rheumatology developed these recommendations in order to offer an integral management approach of rheumatoid arthritis according to the resources of the Mexican health system. To review, update and improve the available evidence within clinical practice guidelines on the pharmacological management of rheumatoid arthritis and produce a set of recommendations adapted to the Mexican health system, according to evidence available through December 2012. The working group was composed of 30 trained and experienced rheumatologists with a high quality of clinical knowledge and judgment. Recommendations were based on the highest quality evidence from the previously established treatment guidelines, meta-analysis and controlled clinical trials for the adult population with rheumatoid arthritis. During the conformation of this document, each working group settled the existing evidence from the different topics according to their experience. Finally, all the evidence and decisions were unified into a single document, treatment algorithm and drug standardization tables. This update of the Mexican Guidelines for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis provides the highest quality information available at the time the working group undertook this review and contextualizes its use for the complex Mexican health system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-pharmacological treatment options for refractory epilepsy: an overview of human treatment modalities and their potential utility in dogs.

    PubMed

    Martlé, Valentine; Van Ham, Luc; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul; Bhatti, Sofie

    2014-03-01

    Refractory epilepsy is a common disorder both in humans and dogs and treatment protocols are difficult to optimise. In humans, different non-pharmacological treatment modalities currently available include surgery, the ketogenic diet and neurostimulation. Surgery leads to freedom from seizures in 50-75% of patients, but requires strict patient selection. The ketogenic diet is indicated in severe childhood epilepsies, but efficacy is limited and long-term compliance can be problematic. In the past decade, various types of neurostimulation have emerged as promising treatment modalities for humans with refractory epilepsy. Currently, none of these treatment options are used in routine daily clinical practice to treat dogs with the condition. Since many dogs with poorly controlled seizures do not survive, the search for alternative treatment options for canine refractory epilepsy should be prioritised. This review provides an overview of non-pharmacological treatment options for human refractory epilepsy. The current knowledge and limitations of these treatments in canine refractory epilepsy is also discussed.

  20. Novel vitreous modulators for pharmacologic vitreolysis in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Elaine de Paula Fiod; Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Farah, Michel E; Sebag, Jerry; Meyer, Carsten H

    2011-03-01

    Vitreous constitutes about 80% of the volume of the human eye. It is an extended extracellular matrix that is composed of collagen, hyaluronan, and other extracellular matrix molecules, but mostly water. In both health as well as disease, especially diabetic retinopathy (DR), special attention should be drawn to the posterior vitreous cortex and its relation to the retinal surface. The important role of vitreous in the pathogenesis of proliferative DR has already been demonstrated by several experimental and clinical studies. Thus, vitreo-retinal separation by pharmacologic vitreolysis and/or removal by surgical means are appropriate approaches to interrupt the pathogenic contribution of vitreous and prevent progression of diabetic retinopathy to more advanced stages. This review describes various aspects of the molecular morphology and structural anatomy of vitreous and the vitreo-retinal interface, as well as the role of vitreous in the pathophysiology of DR. Lastly, this treatise provides a critical analysis of novel vitreous modulators for pharmacologic vitreolysis in the treatment of DR. Microplasmin is currently the most promising approach to treat vitreoretinal traction by pharmacologic vitreolysis.

  1. Pharmacological Regulation of In Situ Tissue Stem Cells Differentiation for Soft Tissue Calcification Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Jie; Yin, Zi; Shen, Wei-Liang; Xie, Yu-Bin; Zhu, Ting; Lu, Ping; Cai, You-Zhi; Kong, Min-Jian; Heng, Boon Chin; Zhou, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wei-Shan; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Calcification of soft tissues, such as heart valves and tendons, is a common clinical problem with limited therapeutics. Tissue specific stem/progenitor cells proliferate to repopulate injured tissues. But some of them become divergent to the direction of ossification in the local pathological microenvironment, thereby representing a cellular target for pharmacological approach. We observed that HIF-2alpha (encoded by EPAS1 inclined form) signaling is markedly activated within stem/progenitor cells recruited at calcified sites of diseased human tendons and heart valves. Proinflammatory microenvironment, rather than hypoxia, is correlated with HIF-2alpha activation and promoted osteochondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs). Abnormal upregulation of HIF-2alpha served as a key switch to direct TSPCs differentiation into osteochondral-lineage rather than teno-lineage. Notably, Scleraxis (Scx), an essential tendon specific transcription factor, was suppressed on constitutive activation of HIF-2alpha and mediated the effect of HIF-2alpha on TSPCs fate decision. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HIF-2alpha with digoxin, which is a widely utilized drug, can efficiently inhibit calcification and enhance tenogenesis in vitro and in the Achilles's tendinopathy model. Taken together, these findings reveal the significant role of the tissue stem/progenitor cells fate decision and suggest that pharmacological regulation of HIF-2alpha function is a promising approach for soft tissue calcification treatment.

  2. Pharmacology of antithrombotic drugs: an assessment of oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatments.

    PubMed

    Mega, Jessica L; Simon, Tabassome

    2015-07-18

    Antithrombotic drugs, which include antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, prevent and treat many cardiovascular disorders and, as such, are some of the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. The first drugs designed to inhibit platelets or coagulation factors, such as the antiplatelet clopidogrel and the anticoagulant warfarin, significantly reduced the risk of thrombotic events at the cost of increased bleeding in patients. However, both clopidogrel and warfarin have some pharmacological limitations including interpatient variability in antithrombotic effects in part due to the metabolism, interactions (eg, drug, environment, and genetic), or targets of the drugs. Increased knowledge of the pharmacology of antithrombotic drugs and the mechanisms underlying thrombosis has led to the development of newer drugs with faster onset of action, fewer interactions, and less interpatient variability in their antithrombotic effects than previous antithrombotic drugs. Treatment options now include the next-generation antiplatelet drugs prasugrel and ticagrelor, and, in terms of anticoagulants, inhibitors that directly target factor IIa (dabigatran) or Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) are available. In this Series paper we review the pharmacological properties of these most commonly used oral antithrombotic drugs, and explore the development of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies.

  3. Nine traditional Chinese herbal formulas for the treatment of depression: an ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology review

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dan-dan; Tang, Tao; Lin, Xiang-ping; Yang, Zhao-yu; Yang, Shu; Xia, Zi-an; Wang, Yun; Zheng, Piao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Chun-hu

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major mental disorder, and is currently recognized as the second-leading cause of disability worldwide. However, the therapeutic effect of antidepressants remains unsatisfactory. For centuries, Chinese herbal formulas (CHFs) have been widely used in the treatment of depression, achieving better therapeutic effects than placebo and having fewer side effects than conventional antidepressants. Here, we review the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology studies of nine common CHFs: “banxia houpo” decoction, “chaihu shugansan”, “ganmaidazao” decoction, “kaixinsan”, “shuganjieyu” capsules, “sinisan”, “wuling” capsules, “xiaoyaosan”, and “yueju”. Eight clinical trials and seven meta-analyses have supported the theory that CHFs are effective treatments for depression, decreasing Hamilton Depression Scale scores and showing few adverse effects. Evidence from 75 preclinical studies has also elucidated the multitarget and multipathway mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of the nine CHFs. Decoctions, capsules, and pills all showed antidepressant effects, ranked in descending order of efficacy. According to traditional Chinese medicine theory, these CHFs have flexible compatibility and mainly act by soothing the liver and relieving depression. This review highlights the effective treatment choices and candidate compounds for patients, practitioners, and researchers in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. In summary, the current evidence supports the efficacy of CHFs in the treatment of depression, but additional large-scale randomized controlled clinical trials and sophisticated pharmacology studies should be performed. PMID:27703356

  4. Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatment for Apathy in Alzheimer Disease : A systematic review across modalities

    PubMed

    Theleritis, Christos; Siarkos, Kostas; Katirtzoglou, Everina; Politis, Antonios

    2017-01-01

    Apathy is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric symptoms encountered in Alzheimer disease (AD). Early diagnosis and timely treatment of apathy in AD seem to be of great importance, since apathy has been associated with poor disease outcome, reduced daily functioning, and caregiver distress. Within this context, we conducted an extensive electronic search from the databases included in the National Library of Medicine as well as PsychInfo and Google Scholar for studies that have investigated the effect of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments of apathy in AD. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, gingko biloba, methylphenidate, and a variety of nonpharmacological interventions were found to be successful in reducing apathy in patients with AD. Methodological heterogeneity of the studies and the small amount of studies where apathy was a primary outcome measure are limiting factors to evaluate for group effects. Treatment of apathy in AD is a complicated and an underexplored field. Standardized and systematic efforts primarily focused on the study of apathy in AD may establish a benefit from individualized treatment for specific disease groups that would stem from a combination of both pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  5. Combining Pharmacological and Psychological Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder: Current Status, Limitations, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; Reas, Deborah L; Mitchell, James E

    2016-06-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress about binge eating without the extreme compensatory behaviors for weight control that characterize other eating disorders. BED is prevalent, associated strongly with obesity, and is associated with heightened levels of psychological, psychiatric, and medical concerns. This article provides an overview of randomized controlled treatments for combined psychological and pharmacological treatment of BED to inform current clinical practice and future treatment research. In contrast to the prevalence and significance of BED, to date, limited research has been performed on combining psychological and pharmacological treatments for BED to enhance outcomes. Our review here found that combining certain medications with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or behavioral weight loss (BWL) interventions produces superior outcomes to pharmacotherapy only but does not substantially improve outcomes achieved with CBT/BWL only. One medication (orlistat) has improved weight losses with CBT/BWL albeit minimally, and only one medication (topiramate) has enhanced reductions achieved with CBT in both binge eating and weight. Implications for future research are discussed.

  6. Pharmacological agents used for treatment and prevention in noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Bercin, Sami

    2016-12-01

    Noise is a stress factor that causes auditory, psychological and physiological effects. The realization that sudden loud noises or chronic exposure to noise in social and working environments can cause hearing loss has led to increased interest in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The best means of preventing primary damage is protection against noise. Since this protection is not always possible for various reasons, the use of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat NIHL should also be considered. The purpose of this study is to discuss current pharmacological protection and treatment options in the light of the literature, since no such extensive reviews have been performed to date, including agents used for protection against and treatment of NIHL. We reviewed both animal and clinical studies, and these are discussed separately for ease of comprehension. For each agent, first animal studies, then clinical studies, if available, are discussed. We also performed a two-step search of the literature. In the first step, we searched the terms "noise induced hearing loss", "treatment" and "protection" in Pubmed. Based on the results obtained, we identified the agents used for the treatment of and protection against NIHL. In the second step, we searched the names of the agents identified in the first step, together with the term "noise induced hearing loss," and reviewed the results.

  7. Nine traditional Chinese herbal formulas for the treatment of depression: an ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan-Dan; Tang, Tao; Lin, Xiang-Ping; Yang, Zhao-Yu; Yang, Shu; Xia, Zi-An; Wang, Yun; Zheng, Piao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Chun-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major mental disorder, and is currently recognized as the second-leading cause of disability worldwide. However, the therapeutic effect of antidepressants remains unsatisfactory. For centuries, Chinese herbal formulas (CHFs) have been widely used in the treatment of depression, achieving better therapeutic effects than placebo and having fewer side effects than conventional antidepressants. Here, we review the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology studies of nine common CHFs: "banxia houpo" decoction, "chaihu shugansan", "ganmaidazao" decoction, "kaixinsan", "shuganjieyu" capsules, "sinisan", "wuling" capsules, "xiaoyaosan", and "yueju". Eight clinical trials and seven meta-analyses have supported the theory that CHFs are effective treatments for depression, decreasing Hamilton Depression Scale scores and showing few adverse effects. Evidence from 75 preclinical studies has also elucidated the multitarget and multipathway mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of the nine CHFs. Decoctions, capsules, and pills all showed antidepressant effects, ranked in descending order of efficacy. According to traditional Chinese medicine theory, these CHFs have flexible compatibility and mainly act by soothing the liver and relieving depression. This review highlights the effective treatment choices and candidate compounds for patients, practitioners, and researchers in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. In summary, the current evidence supports the efficacy of CHFs in the treatment of depression, but additional large-scale randomized controlled clinical trials and sophisticated pharmacology studies should be performed.

  8. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Beatriz; Franco-Trigo, Lucía; Moullin, Joanna C; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José P

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. Methods A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]). References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database’s indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability) was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Results A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky–Green–Levine; Brief Medication Questionnaire; Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale; Morisky Medication Adherence Scale; Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patients with Hypertension (TAQPH); and Martín–Bayarre–Grau. Questionnaire length ranged from four to 28 items. Internal consistency, assessed by Cronbach’s α, varied from 0

  9. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Beatriz; Franco-Trigo, Lucía; Moullin, Joanna C; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José P

    2015-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]). References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database's indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability) was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky-Green-Levine; Brief Medication Questionnaire; Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale; Morisky Medication Adherence Scale; Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patients with Hypertension (TAQPH); and Martín-Bayarre-Grau. Questionnaire length ranged from four to 28 items. Internal consistency, assessed by Cronbach's α, varied from 0.43 to 0.889. Additional statistical

  10. Efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatments for neuroborreliosis—protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroborreliosis is a tick-borne infectious disease of the nervous system caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Common clinical manifestations of neuroborreliosis are cranial nerve dysfunctions, polyradiculoneuritis, and meningitis. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical presentation, serologic testing, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. Many aspects of pharmacological treatment, such as choice of drug, dosage, and duration are subject of intense debate, leading to uncertainties in patients and healthcare providers alike. To approach the questions regarding pharmacological treatment of neuroborreliosis, we will perform a systematic review. Methods We will perform a comprehensive systematic literature search for potentially eligible studies that report outcomes after pharmacological interventions. To adequately consider the wealth of research that has been conducted so far, this review will evaluate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized studies on treatment of neuroborreliosis. We will assess potential risk of bias for each RCT meeting our selection criteria using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for RCTs. For non-randomized studies, we will use the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the recently piloted Cochrane risk of bias tool for non-randomized studies. Our primary outcome of interest will be neurological symptoms and the secondary outcomes will be disability, patient-reported outcomes (quality of life, and, if reported separately from other neurological symptoms, pain, fatigue, depression, cognition, and sleep), adverse events, and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Pooling of data and meta-analysis will only be deemed justified between studies with similar design (e.g., RCTs are only combined with other RCTs), characteristics (e.g., similar populations), and of acceptable heterogeneity (I2 < 80%). Pooled estimates will be calculated using RevMan software. Prespecified subgroup analyses will evaluate groups of antibiotics, length of antibiotic

  11. The Neurobiological Bases for Development of Pharmacological Treatments of Aggressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Allan; Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha; Zalcman, Steven S

    2007-01-01

    Violence and aggression are major causes of death and injury, thus constituting primary public health problems throughout much of the world costing billions of dollars to society. The present review relates our understanding of the neurobiology of aggression and rage to pharmacological treatment strategies that have been utilized and those which may be applied in the future. Knowledge of the neural mechanisms governing aggression and rage is derived from studies in cat and rodents. The primary brain structures involved in the expression of rage behavior include the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray. Limbic structures, which include amygdala, hippocampal formation, septal area, prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus serve important modulating functions. Excitatory neurotransmitters that potentiate rage behavior include excitatory amino acids, substance P, catecholamines, cholecystokinin, vasopressin, and serotonin that act through 5-HT2 receptors. Inhibitory neurotransmitters include GABA, enkephalins, and serotonin that act through 5-HT1 receptors. Recent studies have demonstrated that brain cytokines, including IL-1β and IL-2, powerfully modulate rage behavior. IL-1-β exerts its actions by acting through 5-HT2 receptors, while IL-2 acts through GABAA or NK1 receptors. Pharmacological treatment strategies utilized for control of violent behavior have met with varying degrees of success. The most common approach has been to apply serotonergic compounds. Others included the application of antipsychotic, GABAergic (anti-epileptic) and dopaminergic drugs. Present and futures studies on the neurobiology of aggression may provide the basis for new and novel treatment strategies for the control of aggression and violence as well as the continuation of existing pharmacological approaches. PMID:18615178

  12. Non-Pharmacological Approaches to the Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Respect to the Rising Treatment Costs.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Blanka; Maresova, Petra; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a serious degenerative disease which is mainly typical of the developed countries. The prevalence percentage in Africa is only 2.6 %, whereas in America it is 6.5 % and in Western Europe 7.2 %. Overall, this disease affects 44 million people worldwide. With respect to the demographic development, a number of people suffering from Alzheimer's disease is expected in future. The key issue is not only the discovery of an effective medication, but also the early diagnosis, prevention and care about people with AD, as well as the provision of an equivalent rise of places in health and social institutions. Since the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) imposes a severe economic and social burden, the main purpose of this study is to analyze and compare available non-pharmacological approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with AD with special focus on their cognitive competences. In addition, the analysis also concentrates on the costs of pharmacological care in individual countries all over world. This is done by using Drummond's methodological approaches to direct and indirect costs. The analysis of non-pharmacological approaches is conducted on the basis of literature review of both clinical and review studies relevant for the research issue in the acknowledged databases and a comparison and evaluation of their findings.

  13. [Ibogaine--the substance for treatment of toxicomania. Neurochemical and pharmacological action].

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Saulius; Kontrimaviciūte, Violeta; Sveikata, Audrius

    2004-01-01

    The review of scientific literature, concerning the indol alkaloid Ibogaine, which is extracted from the bush Tabernanthe Iboga, is presented in this article. Used as a stimulating factor for hundred of years in non-traditional medicine, this alkaloid could be important for modern pharmacology because of potential anti-addictive properties. The mechanism of action of this alkaloid is closely related to different neurotransmitting systems. Studies with animals allow concluding that Ibogaine or medicines based on this alkaloid can be used for treatment of drug dependencies.

  14. Current and Future Pharmacological Treatment Strategies in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Johannes; Pujol, Aurora; Aubourg, Patrick; Forss-Petter, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCD1 gene cause the clinical spectrum of the neurometabolic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (X-ALD/AMN). Currently, the most efficient therapeutic opportunity for patients with the cerebral form of X-ALD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and possibly gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Both treatments, however, are only accessible to a subset of X-ALD patients, mainly because of the lack of markers that can predict the onset of cerebral demyelination. Moreover, for female or male X-ALD patients with AMN, currently only unsatisfying therapeutic opportunities are available. Thus, this review focuses on current and urgently needed future pharmacological therapies. The treatment of adrenal and gonadal insufficiency is well established, whereas applications of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have failed to prevent progression of cerebral neuroinflammation. The use of Lorenzo's oil and the inefficacy of lovastatin to normalize very-long-chain fatty acids in clinical trials as well as currently experimental and therefore possible future therapeutic strategies are reviewed. The latter include pharmacological gene therapy mediated by targeted upregulation of ABCD2, the closest homolog of ABCD1, antioxidative drug treatment, small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrates and valproic acid, and other neuroprotective attempts. PMID:20626746

  15. Pharmacological treatment of refugees with trauma-related disorders: What do we know today?

    PubMed

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2016-12-12

    There is a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment for refugees with trauma-related disorders. The present paper provides an overview of available literature on the subject and discusses the transferability of results from studies on other groups of patients with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We conducted a systematic review of published treatment outcome studies on PTSD and depression among refugees. Fifteen studies were identified and reviewed. Most studies focused on the use of antidepressants. Included studies differed widely in method and quality. The majority were observational studies and case studies. Small sample sizes limited the statistical power. Few studies reported effect sizes, confidence intervals, and statistical significance of findings. No specific pharmacological treatment for PTSD among refugees can be recommended on the basis of the available literature. There is a need for well-designed clinical trials, especially with newer antidepressants and antipsychotics. Until such studies are available, clinical practice and design of trials can be guided by results from studies of other groups of PTSD patients, although differences in pharmacogenetics, compliance, and trauma reactions may affect the direct transferability of results from studies on nonrefugee populations.

  16. Longitudinal clinical course following pharmacological treatment of methamphetamine psychosis which persists after long-term abstinence.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kazufumi

    2006-08-01

    The present article investigated clinical symptoms and their longitudinal clinical course following pharmacological treatment in 32 female incarcerated patients suffering from methamphetamine (METH) psychosis who were referred to psychiatric consultation. The length of METH-abuse periods of the patients ranged from 2 to 31 years. A total of 31 patients suffered from psychosis at abstinence after 5-31 months from the self-injection of METH. Nine of these 31 patients experienced episodes of psychotic relapse. The following symptoms were observed: auditory hallucination (29 cases), delusion of persecution (29 cases), thought broadcasting (24 cases), visual hallucination (22 cases), depressive mood (29 cases), and suicidal idea (22 cases). Patients exhibited symptoms of psychosis and depression, which persisted for more than several months despite commencement of administration of antipsychotics and antidepressants. There were significant correlations among length of periods required for improvement in total Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores, and BPRS subscale scores representing positive symptoms and depression/anxiety dimensions. Three groups of patients, according to severity of positive and depressive/anxiety symptoms, showed apparent differences in prognoses during pharmacological treatment. Average degree of extrapyramidal symptoms significantly correlated with average daily dose of antipsychotics and length-of-treatment period required for improvement in BPRS subscale scores representing positive symptom dimension. These results suggest that both psychotic and affective symptoms are involved in therapeutic response and prognosis of METH psychosis.

  17. Pharmacological treatments in alcohol use disorders: state of art and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, R; Ioime, L; Solaroli, S; Janiri, L

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of this narrative review is to present and discuss the most relevant clinical data about the pharmacological therapy for alcohol use disorders. By using PubMed we conducted a review of the clinical literature on drugs related to alcohol use disorders. All data are presented following the three phases of treatment: a) from withdrawal to abstinence; b) abstinence and relapse prevention; c) reduction of alcohol consumption. Historical evidence shows that in addition to the drugs already approved for the treatment of alcoholism, there are some off-label medications as effective as the approved ones which deserve therefore further study. The treatment of the alcoholic patient always requires a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach, directed to the specific needs of each subject in order to achieve a correct care personalization. The study of the cognitive effects of each drug and pharmacogenetics will allow us to increasingly customize therapy for each individual patient.

  18. Pharmacological Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Iughetti, Lorenzo; China, Mariachiara; Berri, Rossella; Predieri, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing in children and adolescents worldwide raising the question on the approach to this condition because of the potential morbidity, mortality, and economic tolls. Dietetic and behavioral treatments alone have only limited success; consequently, discussion on strategies for treating childhood and adolescent obesity has been promoted. Considering that our knowledge on the physiological systems regulating food intake and body weight is considerably increased, many studies have underlined the scientific and clinical relevance of potential treatments based on management of peripheral or central neuropeptides signals by drugs. In this paper, we analyze the data on the currently approved obesity pharmacological treatment suggesting the new potential drugs. PMID:21197151

  19. Clinical pharmacology review of safinamide for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Margherita; Rosa, Mario M; Abreu, Daisy; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2015-12-01

    Safinamide (Xadago™) is an oral α-aminoamide derivative marketed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The drug has both dopaminergic properties, namely highly selective and reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase B, and nondopamimetic properties, namely selective sodium channel blockade and calcium channel modulation, with consequent inhibition of excessive glutamate release. In 2014, safinamide was approved in the European Economic Area, as "an add-on therapy to stable dose levodopa, alone or in combination with other PD therapies in mid- to late-stage-fluctuating PD patients." In addition, evidence has been provided for safinamide in the treatment of motor symptoms in early PD patients. This article summarizes the pharmacological properties, development program, clinical indications for PD treatment, stratified according to several disease's stages and the safety profile of safinamide. A meta-analysis of the most frequent adverse events among Phase III trials has been also performed.

  20. Novel pharmacologic treatment in acute binge eating disorder – role of lisdexamfetamine

    PubMed Central

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Casuto, Leah S; McElroy, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and an important public health problem. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive food consumption accompanied by a sense of loss of control over the binge eating behavior without the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors of bulimia nervosa. BED affects both sexes and all age groups and is associated with medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Until recently, self-help and psychotherapy were the primary treatment options for patients with BED. In early 2015, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a prodrug stimulant marketed for attention deficit hyperactive disorder, was the first pharmacologic agent to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of moderate or severe BED in adults. This article summarizes BED clinical presentation, and discusses the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of BED in adults. PMID:27143885

  1. Pharmacological therapies for infantile hemangiomas: A clinical study in 853 consecutive patients using a standard treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yuan, Wei-En; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2016-02-15

    Infantile hemangiomas are the most common infantile benign vascular tumor. While most infantile hemangiomas proliferate then involute, some may persist and require treatment for reasons including risk of disfigurement or functional impairment. Treatments currently include observation, pharmacological therapy, laser, cryosurgery, surgery and radiotherapy. Although pharmacological therapy is a well accepted treatment option, limited studies have evaluated the efficacy of different drug therapies. In this study, we compare different pharmacological modalities in the management of infantile hemangiomas. The study included 853 infants with proliferative infantile hemangiomas who were treated with topical timolol, oral propranolol, intralesional pingyangmycin, or intravenous vincristine from 2009 to 2012. Treatment stratification was based on clinical severity of the tumor. Response to the treatment was clinically evaluated and graded as: excellent, good, poor, or no response. Response to pharmacological therapies was excellent in almost all infantile hemangiomas. In addition, patients younger than 8 months responded highly to pharmacological treatment (89.1%), while patients older than 8 months were less responsive to treatment (36.3%). There were no instances of life-threatening complications. Overall, these findings support the efficacy of timolol, propranolol, pingyangmycin and vincristine in the treatment of infantile hemangiomas, especially in the youngest patient cohort (8 months or younger).

  2. Pharmacological and psychosomatic treatments for an elderly patient with severe nausea and vomiting in reaction to postoperative stress.

    PubMed

    Otera, Masako; Machida, Takatsugu; Machida, Tomomi; Abe, Mai; Ichie, Masayoshi; Fukudo, Shin

    2015-10-01

    Here we present a case of successful treatment employing a mixed approach including pharmacological and psychosomatic treatments for a 72-year-old woman who experienced severe nausea and vomiting in reaction to postoperative stress from gastric cancer surgery. This case demonstrates that appropriate provision of psychosomatic treatments, including a psychotherapeutic session and autogenic training, enhances the efficacy of pharmacotherapy.

  3. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Fred; Williams, David A; Collinge, William

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost–benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described. PMID:23166446

  4. Diagnosis of dementia and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacologic management of disease progression and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed Central

    van Reekum, R.; Simard, M.; Farcnik, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To highlight the importance of family physicians in the management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias. To provide an update on the diagnostic workup of people with suspected dementia and on the pharmacologic management of cognitive impairment and disease progression in AD. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and Psychological Abstracts were searched using the terms "cognitive enhancers" or a specific drug name and "dementia (exp)." Evidence is generally limited but promising. Methodologic flaws in existing research likely to affect clinicians are briefly reviewed. MAIN MESSAGE: Increasing evidence suggests that early intervention can delay the progression of AD and improve the symptoms and function of those affected. Available treatments have modest but important effects on the outcome of patients with AD; some patients respond dramatically. Most currently available treatments are relatively safe in carefully selected cases. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic workup of most cases of dementia can at least be initiated in family physicians' offices. Beginning the workup is important because, for treating AD, the earlier you start, the better. Donepezil, vitamin E, and, in the near future, propentofylline are the main pharmacologic choices for improving cognition and slowing disease progression. PMID:10216793

  5. Pharmacological treatment and BBB-targeted genetic therapy for MCT8-dependent hypomyelination in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zada, David; Tovin, Adi; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2016-11-01

    Hypomyelination is a key symptom of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), a psychomotor retardation associated with mutations in the thyroid-hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8). AHDS is characterized by severe intellectual deficiency, neuromuscular impairment and brain hypothyroidism. In order to understand the mechanism for TH-dependent hypomyelination, we developed an mct8 mutant (mct8(-/-)) zebrafish model. The quantification of genetic markers for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes revealed reduced differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes in mct8(-/-) larvae and adults. Live imaging of single glial cells showed that the number of oligodendrocytes and the length of their extensions are reduced, and the number of peripheral Schwann cells is increased, in mct8(-/-) larvae compared with wild type. Pharmacological analysis showed that TH analogs and clemastine partially rescued the hypomyelination in the CNS of mct8(-/-) larvae. Intriguingly, triiodothyronine (T3) treatment rescued hypomyelination in mct8(-/-) embryos before the maturation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but did not affect hypomyelination in older larvae. Thus, we expressed Mct8-tagRFP in the endothelial cells of the vascular system and showed that even relatively weak mosaic expression completely rescued hypomyelination in mct8(-/-) larvae. These results suggest potential pharmacological treatments and BBB-targeted gene therapy that can enhance myelination in AHDS and possibly in other TH-dependent brain disorders.

  6. Pharmacological treatment and BBB-targeted genetic therapy for MCT8-dependent hypomyelination in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypomyelination is a key symptom of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), a psychomotor retardation associated with mutations in the thyroid-hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8). AHDS is characterized by severe intellectual deficiency, neuromuscular impairment and brain hypothyroidism. In order to understand the mechanism for TH-dependent hypomyelination, we developed an mct8 mutant (mct8−/−) zebrafish model. The quantification of genetic markers for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes revealed reduced differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes in mct8−/− larvae and adults. Live imaging of single glial cells showed that the number of oligodendrocytes and the length of their extensions are reduced, and the number of peripheral Schwann cells is increased, in mct8−/− larvae compared with wild type. Pharmacological analysis showed that TH analogs and clemastine partially rescued the hypomyelination in the CNS of mct8−/− larvae. Intriguingly, triiodothyronine (T3) treatment rescued hypomyelination in mct8−/− embryos before the maturation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), but did not affect hypomyelination in older larvae. Thus, we expressed Mct8-tagRFP in the endothelial cells of the vascular system and showed that even relatively weak mosaic expression completely rescued hypomyelination in mct8−/− larvae. These results suggest potential pharmacological treatments and BBB-targeted gene therapy that can enhance myelination in AHDS and possibly in other TH-dependent brain disorders. PMID:27664134

  7. Rigour of development of clinical practice guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Arianna; Girlanda, Francesca; Barbui, Corrado

    2015-03-15

    There is an increasing concern about the quality of clinical practice guidelines. Because no information is available on the rigour of development of clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder, we carried out a systematic review of those focusing on its pharmacological treatment. We searched the National Guideline Clearinghouse, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINHAL for guidelines published from 2003 to 2014. The quality of each guideline was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II). Fourteen guidelines were appraised. The overall quality of included guidelines varied considerably, both within and across AGREE II domains. Overall, six guidelines were rated as "recommended", two "recommended with modifications", and six were not recommended according to AGREE II ratings. The mean score for rigour of development was 46.8% of the maximum possible score, with no guidelines scoring the maximum score in this domain. Guidelines with lower editorial independence scores also had lower rigour of development scores, whereas those with higher-quality domain scores scored high in both domains. As current appraisal focused on guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder, it will be important to critically assess the rigour of development of other guidelines for bipolar and other psychiatric disorders. Health care providers, policy makers, physicians and patients alike need to be aware of the variability in guideline quality and identify the high-quality guidelines that meet their needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacological profiles of peptide drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Adessi, Céline; Frossard, Marie-José; Boissard, Christophe; Fraga, Santiago; Bieler, Sylvain; Ruckle, Thomas; Vilbois, Francis; Robinson, Sandra M; Mutter, Manfred; Banks, William A; Soto, Claudio

    2003-04-18

    Amyloid plaques in brain, composed of aggregates of amyloid-beta peptide, play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and represent a good target for treatment. We have shown previously that a 5-amino acid beta-sheet breaker peptide (iA beta 5p), end-protected, has the ability to induce a dramatic reduction in amyloid deposition in two different transgenic Alzheimer's models (Permanne, B., Adessi, C., Saborio, G. P., Fraga, S., Frossard, M.-J., Dewachter, I., Van Dorpe, J., Banks, W. A., Van Leuven, F., and Soto, C. (2002) FASEB J. 16, 860-862). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical modifications of the peptide bonds at the metabolite cleavage sites on the pharmacological properties of iA beta 5p derivatives. Using a rational approach, peptide analogs were designed and tested for in vitro activity and enzymatic stability. One peptide analog containing a methyl group introduced at the nitrogen atom of one amide bond showed increased stability in vitro, a 10-fold higher in vivo half-life, and good brain uptake compared with iA beta 5p while maintaining a similar activity in vitro. Our results suggest that the pharmacological profile of beta-sheet breaker peptides can be improved to produce compounds with drug-like properties that might offer a new promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Mood Disorders & their Pharmacological Treatment during Pregnancy: Is the Future Child Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Catherine; Fitelson, Elizabeth M.; Werner, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Nearly half the U.S. population will meet criteria for a neuropsychiatric disorder at some point in their lives, and 1 in 17 has a seriously debilitating illness. Though not all affected adults had an identified disorder as a child, increasingly these psychopathologies are conceptualized as the late–stage culmination of aberrant developmental processes shaped by a complex interplay of genes and experience, including experiences in utero. Decades of studies with pregnant animals demonstrate that stress–elicited perturbations in maternal biology affect offspring neurodevelopment. Studies of stress in pregnant women largely mirror these findings. Pregnant women with anxiety and/or depression experience greater life stress, as well as illness–related alterations in their neurobiology, with a potential to impact fetal neurobehavioral development via associated changes in the intrauterine environment, and/or pharmacologic interventions. This article critically reviews findings on child development (including fetal neurobehavior) related to maternal depression, anxiety, and pharmacological treatments, primarily Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). The hypothesis under review is that, in addition to genetics and characteristics of the postnatal environment, the familial transmission of risk for neuropsychiatric disorders involves a ‘third path’ — prenatal exposure to psychiatric illness and its treatment. PMID:21289532

  10. Pharmacological agents for the prevention and treatment of toxic radiation exposure in spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Langell, John; Jennings, Richard; Clark, Jonathan; Ward, Jonathan B

    2008-07-01

    Astronauts are exposed to toxic ionizing radiation sources, including galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events (SPE). Exposure to these radiation sources can lead to cataracts, heritable genetic mutations, cancer, acute life-threatening physiological compromise, and death. Current countermeasures focus on spacecraft shielding and creation of heavily shielded safe havens. At issue is the extraordinarily high cost of launching these heavy structures into space and their inability to provide adequate shielding from heavy ions at a feasible shield thickness. Pharmacological enhancement of cellular radiation resistance, an alternative method to limiting radiation toxicity, has received less attention. We have conducted an extensive literature review and critical evaluation of the scientific data pertaining to this field of study. Publications for review were identified through a Medline search using relevant terms, including radiotherapeutics, galactic cosmic radiation, radiopharmacology, radioprotectants, radiation countermeasures, solar particles, solar flares, radiation toxicity, and radiotoxicity. We identified 15 agents with significant radiation dose reduction factors, ranging from 1.1 to 2.4, in experimental models. Of these, only amifostine is FDA approved for use in treating radiation toxicity. Current data do not support the use of radiopreventive agents in the treatment of low-level ionizing radiation exposures. However, pharmacological countermeasures should be instituted for life-threatening, high-level radiation exposures, as occur with SPE. Given the catastrophic effects of SPE, the risk of toxicity from radioprotective agents is warranted. The current data supports treatment with high-dose amifostine (at 910 mg m(-2)) 30 min prior to radiation exposure.

  11. The Administrative Problems Involved in Executing Clinical Recommendations for the Treatment of Severe Reading Disorders Within an Ongoing Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    Developing a program of treatment for dyslexic readers involves four major problems: (1) definition of the reading isability, (2) administrative and educational inertia, (3) organization of the treatment program, and (4) the need for evaluatio and research. There is great disagreement over definitions of reading disabilities, yet an effective…

  12. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear. In this study, the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM. CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245–0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma. A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  13. Prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms in Lyme neuroborreliosis after pharmacological treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dersch, R; Sommer, H; Rauer, S; Meerpohl, J J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists about residual symptoms after pharmacological treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Reports of disabling long-term sequels lead to concerns in patients and health care providers. We systematically reviewed the available evidence from studies reporting treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis to assess the prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms after treatment. A literature search was performed in three databases and three clinical trial registers to find eligible studies reporting on residual symptoms in patients after pharmacological treatment of LNB. Diagnosis must have been performed according to consensus-derived case definitions. No restrictions regarding study design or language were set. Symptom prevalence was pooled using a random-effects model. Forty-four eligible clinical trials and studies were found: 8 RCTs, 17 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 case series. The follow-up period in the eligible studies ranged from 7 days to 20 years. The weighted mean proportion of residual symptoms was 28 % (95 % CI 23-34 %, n = 34 studies) for the latest reported time point. Prevalence of residual symptoms was statistically significantly higher in studies using the "possible" case definition (p = 0.0048). Cranial neuropathy, pain, paresis, cognitive disturbances, headache, and fatigue were statistically significantly lower in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. LNB patients may experience residual symptoms after treatment with a prevalence of approximately 28 %. The prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms differ according to the applied case definition. Symptoms like fatigue are not reported in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. As the "possible" case definition is more unspecific, patients with other conditions may be included. Reports of debilitating fatigue and cognitive impairment after LNB, a "post-Lyme syndrome", could therefore be an artifact of unspecific case definitions in single

  14. Pharmacologic vitreolysis.

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, Marc-André; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    It is now well recognized that vitreous plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various retinal disorders. In many instances it can be addressed with pars plana vitrectomy, although this approach, like any surgery, has its limitations. The search for alternatives or adjunct to surgery has led to the development of pharmacologic vitreolysis. The use of intravitreal agents to alter the vitreous in order to reduce or eliminate its role in disease seems promising. The purpose of this article is to summarize the present knowledge on pharmacologic vitreolysis. A review of the different agents used and of ongoing trials will be presented. Also, current understanding of vitreous structure and its interaction with the retina will be discussed.

  15. Pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for adolescents with ADHD: an updated systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Margaret H; Kuriyan, Aparajita B; Evans, Steven W; Waxmonsky, James G; Smith, Bradley H

    2014-04-01

    Smith, Waschbusch, Willoughby, and Evans (2000) reviewed a small treatment literature on ADHD in adolescents and concluded that methylphenidate stimulant medication was a well-established treatment and behavior therapy (BT) demonstrated preliminary efficacy. This review extends and updates the findings of the prior one based on the previous 15years of research. Studies published since 1999 were identified and coded using standard criteria and effect sizes were calculated where appropriate. Highlights of the last 15years of research include an expansion of pharmacological treatment options and developmentally appropriate psychosocial treatment packages for adolescents with ADHD. Additionally, nonstimulant medications (e.g., atomoxetine) are now approved for the treatment of ADHD in adolescence. The review concludes that medication and BT produce a similar range of therapeutic effects on the symptoms of adolescents with ADHD. However, results suggest that BT may produce greater overall benefits on measures of impairment. There was no evidence that cognitive enhancement trainings, such as working memory training or neurofeedback improved the functioning of adolescents with ADHD. Whether to use medication, BT, or their combination to treat an adolescent with ADHD is complicated and we provide evidence-informed guidelines for treatment selection. The reviewed evidence does not support current American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry professional guidelines, which state that stimulant medication is the preferred treatment for adolescents with ADHD. Recommendations for assessment, practice guidelines, and future research are discussed.

  16. Is psychological treatment efficacious for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Review of non-pharmacological treatments in children and adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Troncoso, Eduardo; Guidi, Monica; Alda-Díez, José Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents, and has a great impact on the psychological development of affected patients. Even though its efficacy is proven, the use of medication for ADHD has several limitations, and non-pharmacological interventions are considered a necessary component of treatment. This work is a review of evidence-based non-pharmacological treatments with demonstrated efficacy for ADHD in children and adolescents, analyzed by age groups. Non-pharmacological treatments that have shown scientific evidence of efficacy are psychological and psychoeducational interventions. Psychological interventions include behavioral therapy, parent training (PT) and social skills training. Psychoeducational interventions include a set of practices to improve learning and are carried out in the school setting. Scientific evidence of efficacy in preschool children is limited to PT, while different psychological and psychoeducational interventions have been shown to be beneficial in school-age children. The available evidence for non-pharmacological treatment in adolescence is so far insufficient. Though more randomized controlled trials are necessary for non-pharmacological interventions to become established practices, there are clear indications of their efficacy. For more severe cases of ADHD, a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment is recommended.

  17. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Versijpt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Until an effective and especially disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) is available, the currently available pharmacological therapeutic arsenal aims at merely improving symptomatology. Health economic data make an important contribution to the planning of healthcare services and the estimation of the cost of drug reimbursement. As such, both for cholinesterase inhibitors and, to a lesser extent, for memantine it can be claimed that the direct cost of the drug itself is eclipsed by the cost savings associated with delaying institutionalization or delaying the time of progression into a more severe disease state. The present manuscript reviews several factors contributing to the costs of dementia, gives an overview of available studies claiming both the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of current dementia treatments, and highlights strengths and weaknesses of the aforementioned studies.

  18. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases.

  19. The treatment of sundowning. A selective review of pharmacological and nonpharmacological studies.

    PubMed

    McGaffigan, S; Bliwise, D L

    1997-01-01

    Sundowning refers to episodes of agitated behaviour that are more frequent or are more severe at night. Although the effects of different psychoactive medications on agitated behaviour in dementia patients have been documented in hundreds of reports over the last 30 years, less than 20 studies make explicit reference to time of day for which outcome measures were derived, and even fewer have also examined sleep as an outcome. Thus, despite varying claims of efficacy and effectiveness for various medications, there are few data to support informed management of disruptive nocturnal behaviour in these patients. In this brief article, we selectively review those few studies explicitly mentioning temporal dimensions of behavioural outcome, including some newer studies of unconventional types of treatment that may be useful for the treatment of sundowning. We conclude that future pharmacological studies should systematically assess behaviour throughout the 24-hour day to provide outcome data relevant to this phenomenon.

  20. [Effect of pharmacologic treatment of the nutritional status of neurologic patients].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Corrales, Guadalupe; Vázquez López, Cristina; Álvarez Payero, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Clinical manifestations accompanying neurological diseases are diverse and affect multiple organs. Nutritional status of patients with certain neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy and Multiple Sclerosis can be altered because of symptoms associated with disease course, including certain micronutrient deficiency (folic acid, zinc, vitamin B6 and B12, vitamin D, vitamin E and vitamin C), changes in energy expenditure, intake decreased, gastrointestinal disorders and dysfunction of the bone mass. Also, we have to take in account other factors as: advanced age, multiple co morbidities, polypharmacy, the use of herbal products, social habits, diet and pharmacological treatments effect. An assessment of the factors related to neurological treatment that cause alterations in metabolic and nutritional status was performed: side effects of anti-Parkinson drugs, antiepileptic drugs, and multiple sclerosis drugs; drug-nutrient interactions; and nutrient-drug interactions.

  1. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases. PMID:25767435

  3. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 104) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the “true” PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  4. Four-year follow-up study of pharmacological treatment in pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Oded; Dinur, Limor Klein; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the emergence of pharmacological treatments for pathological gambling with some success but many question marks. We aimed to explore pharmacological treatments that have been previously explored with some success, with the intent of comparing their efficacy and pave the way to larger placebo-controlled trials. In this study, we allocated 78 patients to 4 different types of psychotropic medications: naltrexone, topiramate, bupropion, and escitalopram. We treated patients for more than 2 years, with additional 2-year follow-ups without medication. The sample was evaluated using the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Visual Analog Scale to measure general well-being before enrollment as well as at 1 month, 6 months, 24 months, and 48 months after beginning medication treatment. During the first 2 years of treatment, 34 patients dropped out, with one more dropping out during the additional 2 years of follow-up. Significant improvement on all rating scales was seen in all groups after 2 years, except HAMD in the group that received topiramate. We found the naltrexone-treated group of patients to have a statistically significant lower dropout rate compared with other groups, statistically significant lower HAMD scores in comparison to the group treated with bupropion, statistically significant lower Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score compared to the groups treated with escitalopram and topiramate, and significantly higher Visual Analog Scale scores compared to the groups treated with bupropion and topiramate. Pathological gambling is essentially a biopsychological disorder that may be attenuated provided that patients adhere to medication. In our study, among 4 medications with different mechanisms of action, naltrexone was found to be the most effective. Placebo-controlled studies involving large numbers of subjects are required before

  5. Developmental evolution in a patient with multiple acyl-coenzymeA dehydrogenase deficiency under pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosa, M; Pascarella, A; Parenti, G; Buono, S; Romano, A; Della Casa, R; Andria, G; Marino, M; Riccio, M P; Bravaccio, C

    2012-03-01

    evaluate the psychomotor evolution of a child with Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency after treatment with L-carnitine, ubiquinone and riboflavin. an assessment of psychomotor development was performed before the start of farmacological treatment using the Assessment Scale of Mental Development Griffiths (GMDS-R, 0-2 years). The same assessment was performed after a month and after six months of treatment to evaluate the possible benefits of treatment. we noticed a quick and dramatic improvement in muscular tone and motor performances after pharmacological treatment. We also observed a substantial improvement in the personal/social and hearing/language areas, suggesting the presence of intellectual/cognitive improvement. The clinical improvement correlated with the biochemical response. In our patient early therapy resulted in a optimal response in psychomotor development, motor function and muscole hypotonia. Evaluation with GMDS-R, a simple, non-invasive and multidimensional tool, represents a useful instrument to monitor the clinical response to treatment. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvement in Psychopathology Among Opioid-Dependent Adolescents During Behavioral-Pharmacological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah K.; Marsch, Lisa A.; Badger, Gary J.; Solhkhah, Ramon; Hofstein, Yariv

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in behavioral and emotional problems among opioid-dependent adolescents during a four week combined behavioral and pharmacological treatment. Methods We examined scales of behavioral and emotional problems in youth using the Youth Self Report (YSR) measure at the time of substance abuse treatment intake and changes in scale scores during treatment Participants were 36 adolescents (ages 13–18 eligible) who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence. Participants received a 28-day outpatient, medication-assisted withdrawal with either buprenorphine, or clonidine, as part of a double-blind, double-dummy comparison of these medications. All participants received a common behavioral intervention, composed of three individual counseling sessions per week, and incentives contingent on opioid-negative urine samples (collected three times/week) attendance and completion of weekly assessments. Results: Although a markedly greater number of youth who received buprenorphine remained in treatment relative to those who received clonidine, youth who remained in treatment showed significant reductions during treatment on two YSR grouping scales (Internalizing Problems and Total Problems) and four of the empirically based syndrome scales (Somatic, Social, Attention and Thought). On YSR competence and adaptive scales, no significant changes were observed. There was no evidence that changes in any scales differed across medication condition. Conclusions Youth who were retained demonstrated substantive improvements in a number of clinically meaningful behavioral and emotional problems, irrespective of pharmacotherapy provided to them. PMID:22107875

  7. The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using Chinese medicinal plants: From pharmacology to potential molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shaowa; Wang, Qiushi; Li, Guoyu; Sun, Shuang; Guo, Yuyan; Kuang, Haixue

    2015-12-24

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common worldwide public health problem. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) achieved some results to some extent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Especially in China, TCM formulas are used in the clinic because of their advantages. Some of these TCM formulas have been used for thousands of years in ancient China, they pays much attention to strengthening healthy qi, cleaning heat, and wet, activating blood, etc. So TCM in anti-RA drug is considered as a simple and effective method. In addition, TCM are also traditionally used as extracts and many Chinese herbs which are considered to be effective for RA. With the advancement of technologies and research methods, researchers have devoted themselves to exploring new therapeutic materials from troves of TCM. The components of TCM are identified and purified, which include alkaloids, coumarins, flavonoids, saponins and so on. However, little or no review works are found in the research literature on the anti-RA drugs from TCM. The present review aims to provide systematically reorganized information on the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of TCM used traditionally against RA. The information recorded in this review will provide new directions for researchers in the future. Relevant scientific literatures were collected from Chinese traditional books and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Several important pharmacology data, clinical observations, animal experiments on effects of anti-RA drugs from TCM and their mechanisms were extracted from a library and electric search (Pubmed, PubChem Compound, Science Direct, Spring Link, Elsevier, Web of Science, CNKI, Wan Fang, Bai du, The Plant List, etc.). We collected information published between 2002 and 2015 on Chinese medicine in the treatment of RA. Information was also acquired from local classic herbal literature, conference papers, government reports, and PhD and MSc dissertations. This review mainly introduces the

  8. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-09-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases.

  9. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-09-06

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases.

  10. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases. PMID:27597117

  11. Acceptability and availability of pharmacological interventions for substance misuse by British NHS treatment services.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Harold; Melville, John; McLean, P C

    2002-01-01

    Despite their potential advantages, many of the pharmacological interventions available to treat substance misuse are controversial and their acceptability within the United Kingdom (and other countries) has only recently begun to be investigated. A questionnaire mailed to British National Health Service (NHS) alcohol and drug treatment services asked respondents to rate the acceptability and availability of 11 pharmacological interventions for substance misuse employed to relieve withdrawal, reduce the likelihood of relapse and opiate overdose and substitute pharmaceuticals for illicit drugs. A sample of NHS substance misuse services (n = 265) listed in one or more directories of services in England, Wales and Scotland. Substitute methadone for opiate addiction, substitute benzodiazepines for benzodiazepine-dependent patients, lofexidine for opiate detoxification, naltrexone for opiate relapse prevention and acamprosate for alcohol relapse prevention were widely acceptable and available interventions. Another subset of medications-buprenorphine for opiate detoxification, take-home naloxone for overdose prevention and substitute prescribing of levo-alpha-acetyl-methadol (LAAM), heroin and dexamphetamine-garnered less support, but the majority of participants rated even these therapies as acceptable. Ultra-rapid detoxification under sedation was the intervention rated as least acceptable to, and was one of the two least frequently available from, responding NHS services. Differences among specific medications notwithstanding, a wide range of harm-reduction and abstinence-orientated interventions were acceptable to and available from NHS services. Acceptance and availability are probably limited by a combination of practical, economic, safety, efficacy and theoretical considerations.

  12. Searching for new pharmacological targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Florencia Iulita, M; Pentz, Rowan; Aguilar, Lisi Flores; Orciani, Chiara; Barone, Concetta; Romano, Corrado; Drago, Filippo; Claudio Cuello, A

    2017-10-04

    Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease due to increase gene dosage resulting from chromosome 21 triplication. Although virtually all adults with Down syndrome will exhibit the major neuropathological hallmarks that define Alzheimer's disease, not all of them will develop the clinical symptoms associated with this disorder (i.e. dementia). Therefore, a good understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome will be crucial for the identification of novel pharmacological targets to develop disease-modifying therapies for the benefit of Down syndrome individuals and for Alzheimer's sufferers alike. The study of biomarkers will also be essential for the development of better screening tools to identify dementia at its incipient stages. This review discusses the best-validated pharmacological targets for the treatment of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome. We further examine the relevance of newly discovered biological markers for earlier dementia diagnosis in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  14. 2012 update of French guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Briot, Karine; Cortet, Bernard; Thomas, Thierry; Audran, Maurice; Blain, Hubert; Breuil, Véronique; Chapuis, Laure; Chapurlat, Roland; Fardellone, Patrice; Feron, Jean-Marc; Gauvain, Jean-Bernard; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Kolta, Sami; Lespessailles, Eric; Letombe, Brigitte; Marcelli, Christian; Orcel, Philippe; Seret, Patrick; Trémollières, Florence; Roux, Christian

    2012-05-01

    To update the evidence-based position statement published by the French National Authority for Health (HAS) in 2006 regarding the pharmacological treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, under the auspices of the French Society for Rheumatology and Groupe de Recherche et d'Information sur les Ostéoporoses (GRIO), and with the participation of several learned societies (Collège National des Gynécologues et Obstétriciens Français, Groupe d'Étude de la Ménopause et du Vieillissement hormonal, Société Française de Chirurgie Orthopédique, Société Française d'Endocrinologie, and Société Française de Gériatrie et de Gérontologie). A multidisciplinary panel representing the spectrum of clinical specialties involved in managing patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis developed updated recommendations based on a systematic literature review conducted according to the method advocated by the HAS. The updated recommendations underline the need for osteoporosis pharmacotherapy in women with a history of severe osteoporotic fracture. In these patients, any osteoporosis medication can be used; however, zoledronic acid is the preferred first-line medication after a hip fracture. In patients with non-severe fractures or no fractures, the appropriateness of osteoporosis pharmacotherapy depends on the bone mineral density and FRAX(®) values; any osteoporosis medication can be used, but raloxifene and ibandronate should be reserved for patients at low risk for peripheral fractures. Initially, osteoporosis pharmacotherapy should be prescribed for 5 years. The results of the evaluation done at the end of the 5-year period determine whether further treatment is in order. These updated recommendations are intended to provide clinicians with clarifications about the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacologic treatment of inner ear: from basic science to the patient.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P P; Staecker, H; Van de Water, T; Moonen, G; Malgrange, B

    2002-01-01

    Most of the deafness are of sensorineural origin and are characterized by a loss of hair cells and of spiral ganglion neurons. At the present time, hearing aids are the only treatment. However, in some diseases of the inner ear, pharmacological treatment have been proposed and used successfully. In this paper, we will review some basic science aspects of the biology of the neurosensory structures of the inner ear, in particular of the auditory neurons, that lead to the rationale of some treatments for the inner ear diseases. Developmental studies, neuronal cell culture experiments, and analyses of gene knockout animals reveal a number of growth factors which are important for the rescue and repair of injured auditory neurons in the inner ear. These factors rescue the injured auditory neurons in vivo. Furthermore, perfusion of antioxydant to the cochlea prevented the hearing loss induced by cisplatin. These in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that it is possible to manipulate the neurosensory structures of the inner ear and provide an effective treatment to prevent the degeneration of the neurons. The molecules or drugs can be administered locally to the inner ear through a direct perilymphatic perfusion or through the round window membrane. As an example, we will discuss the treatment of patients suffering from idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss which can be treated successfully by a perfusion through the round window membrane, improving their hearing threshold and their speech discrimination.

  16. The relationship between depression and generalized anxiety during intensive psychological and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Beard, Courtney; Lee, Josephine; Weiss, Rachel B; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2015-09-15

    In the present study we examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and generalized anxiety symptoms during intensive cognitive-behavioral and pharmacological treatment. Individuals (n = 157) with major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 83), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 29) and their combination (n = 45) who attended an intensive partial hospital treatment program, completed daily self-report measures of depression and generalized anxiety. Treatment included empirically-based cognitive-behavioral interventions in both individual and group format, as well as pharmacotherapy. Multilevel linear modeling indicated that for all diagnostic groups, changes in depressive symptoms led to changes in generalized anxiety symptoms to a greater extent than vice versa during treatment. Moreover, changes in depressive symptoms fully mediated changes in generalized anxiety symptoms, whereas changes in generalized anxiety symptoms only partially mediated the changes in depressive symptoms. Partial hospital setting. Our results suggest that depressive symptoms may play a prominent role in the process of change in both MDD and GAD. This has implications for the classification of GAD as well as for choosing early treatment targets for individuals with comorbid MDD and GAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of Pharmacological Treatment in Mood Disorders and Future Directions for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Frye, Mark A; Shelton, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    After a series of serendipitous discoveries of pharmacological treatments for mania and depression several decades ago, relatively little progress has been made for novel hypothesis-driven drug development in mood disorders. Multifactorial etiologies of, and lack of a full understanding of, the core neurobiology of these conditions clearly have contributed to these development challenges. There are, however, relatively novel targets that have raised opportunities for progress in the field, such as glutamate and cholinergic receptor modulators, circadian regulators, and enzyme inhibitors, for alternative treatment. This review will discuss these promising new treatments in mood disorders, the underlying mechanisms of action, and critical issues of their clinical application. For these new treatments to be successful in clinical practice, it is also important to design innovative clinical trials that identify the specific actions of new drugs, and, ideally, to develop biomarkers for monitoring individualized treatment response. It is predicted that future drug development will identify new agents targeting the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. PMID:21900884

  18. Behavioural and new pharmacological treatments for constipation: getting the balance right.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E

    2010-09-01

    Chronic constipation affects almost one in six adults and is even more frequent in the elderly. In the vast majority of patients, there is no obstructive mucosal or structural cause for constipation and, after excluding relatively rare systemic diseases (commonest of which is hypothyroidism), the differential diagnosis is quickly narrowed down to three processes: evacuation disorder of the spastic (pelvic floor dyssynergia, anismus) or flaccid (descending perineum syndrome) varieties, and normal or slow transit constipation. Treatment of chronic constipation based on identifying the underlying pathophysiology is generally successful with targeted therapy. The aims of this review are to discuss targeted therapy for chronic constipation: behavioural treatment for outlet dysfunction and pharmacological treatment for constipation not associated with outlet dysfunction. In particular, we shall review the evidence that behavioural treatment works for evacuation disorders, describe the new treatment options for constipation not associated with evacuation disorder, and demonstrate how 'targeting therapy' to the underlying diagnosis results in a balanced approach to patients with these common disorders.

  19. Review of Clinical Pharmacology of Aloe vera L. in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Mancari, Ferdinando; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2015-05-01

    Aloe vera L., is a plant used worldwide as folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments, including skin disorders. Its gel is present in cosmetics, medicinal products and food supplements. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease, involving mainly the skin, affects about the 2-3% of general population. Conventional pharmacological treatments for psoriasis can have limited effectiveness and can cause adverse reactions. For this reason often psoriatic patients look for alternative treatments based on natural products containing Aloe vera. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of aloe for the treatment of psoriasis. Clinical studies published in English were considered; a total of four clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Studies were also evaluated by using the Jadad scale and Consort Statement in Reporting Clinical trials of Herbal Medicine Intervention. Quality and methodological accuracy of considered studies varied considerably, and some crucial information to reproduce clinical results was missing. We conclude that administration of aloe as cutaneous treatment is generally well tolerated, as no serious side effects were reported. Results on the effectiveness of Aloe vera are contradictory; our analysis reveals the presence of methodological gaps preventing to reach final conclusions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A short treatment with an antibody to sclerostin can inhibit bone loss in an ongoing model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Eddleston, Alison; Marenzana, Massimo; Moore, Adrian R; Stephens, Paul; Muzylak, Mariusz; Marshall, Diane; Robinson, Martyn K

    2009-10-01

    Chronic inflammation leads to bone loss, and increased fracture rates have been reported in a number of human chronic inflammatory conditions. The study reported here investigates the skeletal effects of dosing a neutralizing antibody to the bone regulatory protein sclerostin in a mouse model of chronic colitis. When dosed prophylactically, an antibody to sclerostin (Scl-AbI) did not reduce the weight loss or histological changes associated with colitis but did prevent inflammation-induced bone loss. At the end of the experiment, Scl-AbI-treated animals had a significantly higher femoral BMD (+27%, p < 0.05) than control antibody (Cntrl-Ab)-treated animals. In a second experiment, treatment with Scl-AbI was delayed until colitis had developed, by which time the mechanical properties of femurs in colitic animals were significantly worse than those of healthy age-matched control mice (maximum load, -26%, p < 0.05; energy, -37%, p < 0.05; ultimate strength, -33%, p < 0.05; elastic modulus, -17%, p < 0.05). A short treatment with Scl-AbI halted bone loss and reversed the decline of both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanical properties of the femur such that, after 19 days of treatment, the bone mechanical properties in the Scl-AbI-treated animals were not significantly different from those of noncolitic age-matched controls. Serum markers of bone formation and resorption suggested that the antibody to sclerostin stimulated osteoblast activity and inhibited osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.

  1. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  2. Effectiveness of the psychological and pharmacological treatment of catastrophization in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    García-Campayo, Javier; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rodero, Baltasar; Magallón, Rosa; Alda, Marta; Andrés, Eva; Luciano, Juan V; del Hoyo, Yolanda López

    2009-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a prevalent and disabling disorder characterized by widespread pain and other symptoms such as insomnia, fatigue or depression. Catastrophization is considered a key clinical symptom in fibromyalgia; however, there are no studies on the pharmacological or psychological treatment of catastrophizing. The general aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behaviour therapy and recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia (pregabalin, with duloxetine added where there is a comorbid depression), compared with usual treatment at primary care level. Method/design Design: A multi-centre, randomized controlled trial involving three groups: the control group, consisting of usual treatment at primary care level, and two intervention groups, one consisting of cognitive-behaviour therapy, and the other consisting of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia. Setting: 29 primary care health centres in the city of Zaragoza, Spain. Sample: 180 patients, aged 18–65 years, able to understand and read Spanish, who fulfil criteria for primary fibromyalgia, with no previous psychological treatment, and no pharmacological treatment or their acceptance to discontinue it two weeks before the onset of the study. Intervention: Psychological treatment is based on the manualized protocol developed by Prof. Escobar et al, from the University of New Jersey, for the treatment of somatoform disorders, which has been adapted by our group for the treatment of fibromyalgia. It includes 10 weekly sessions of cognitive-behaviour therapy. Pharmacological therapy consists of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia: pregabalin (300–600 mg/day), with duloxetine (60–120 mg/day) added where there is a comorbid depression). Measurements: The following socio-demographic data will be collected: sex, age, marital status, education, occupation and social class. The diagnosis of psychiatric disorders will be made

  3. Effectiveness of the psychological and pharmacological treatment of catastrophization in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    García-Campayo, Javier; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rodero, Baltasar; Magallón, Rosa; Alda, Marta; Andrés, Eva; Luciano, Juan V; del Hoyo, Yolanda López

    2009-04-23

    Fibromyalgia is a prevalent and disabling disorder characterized by widespread pain and other symptoms such as insomnia, fatigue or depression. Catastrophization is considered a key clinical symptom in fibromyalgia; however, there are no studies on the pharmacological or psychological treatment of catastrophizing. The general aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behaviour therapy and recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia (pregabalin, with duloxetine added where there is a comorbid depression), compared with usual treatment at primary care level. A multi-centre, randomized controlled trial involving three groups: the control group, consisting of usual treatment at primary care level, and two intervention groups, one consisting of cognitive-behaviour therapy, and the other consisting of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia. 29 primary care health centres in the city of Zaragoza, Spain. 180 patients, aged 18-65 years, able to understand and read Spanish, who fulfil criteria for primary fibromyalgia, with no previous psychological treatment, and no pharmacological treatment or their acceptance to discontinue it two weeks before the onset of the study. Psychological treatment is based on the manualized protocol developed by Prof. Escobar et al, from the University of New Jersey, for the treatment of somatoform disorders, which has been adapted by our group for the treatment of fibromyalgia. It includes 10 weekly sessions of cognitive-behaviour therapy. Pharmacological therapy consists of the recommended pharmacological treatment for fibromyalgia: pregabalin (300-600 mg/day), with duloxetine (60-120 mg/day) added where there is a comorbid depression). The following socio-demographic data will be collected: sex, age, marital status, education, occupation and social class. The diagnosis of psychiatric disorders will be made with the Structured Polyvalent Psychiatric Interview. Other instruments to be

  4. Comparative Cost Analysis of Sequential, Adaptive, Behavioral, Pharmacological, and Combined Treatments for Childhood ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Page, Timothy F.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Pelham, William E.; Hart, Katie; Coxe, Stefany; Waxmonsky, James G.; Pelham, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We conducted a cost-analysis of the behavioral, pharmacological, and combined interventions employed in a sequential, multiple assignment randomized, and adaptive trial investigating the sequencing and enhancement of treatment for ADHD children (Pelham et al., under review; N=152, 76% male, 80% Caucasian). Methods The quantity of resources expended on each child’s treatment was determined from records that listed the type, date, location, persons present, and duration of all services provided. The inputs considered were the amount of physician time, clinician time, paraprofessional time, teacher time, parent time, medication, and gasoline. Quantities of these inputs were converted into costs in 2013 USD using national wage estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the prices of 30-day supplies of prescription drugs from the national Express Scripts service, and mean fuel prices from the Energy Information Administration. Results Beginning treatment with a low-intensity regimen of behavior modification (group parent training) was less costly for a school-year of treatment ($961) than beginning treatment with a low dose of stimulant medication ($1689), regardless of whether the initial treatment was intensified with a higher “dose” or if the other modality was added. Conclusions Outcome data from the parent study (Pelham et al., under review) found equivalent or superior outcomes for treatments beginning with low-intensity behavior modification compared to intervention beginning with medication. Combined with the present analyses, these findings document that initiating treatment with behavior modification rather than medication is the more cost-effective option for children with ADHD. PMID:26808137

  5. Pharmacological aversion treatment of alcohol dependence. I. Production and prediction of conditioned alcohol aversion.

    PubMed

    Howard, M O

    2001-08-01

    Eighty-two hospitalized alcoholics receiving pharmacological aversion therapy (PAT) over a 10-day treatment interval completed cognitive, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures evaluating conditioned aversion to alcohol. Pre-post assessments provided convergent support for the efficacy of PAT vis-à-vis production of conditioned aversion to alcohol. Positive alcohol-related outcome expectancies were significantly reduced, whereas confidence that drinking could be avoided in various high-risk situations for consumption was increased following PAT. Behavioral and cardiac rate assessments revealed significant changes following PAT that were specific to alcoholic beverages and potentially reflective of conditioned alcohol aversion. Patients with more extensive pretreatment experiences with alcohol-associated nausea and greater involvement in antisocial conduct appeared to be less susceptible to the PAT conditioning protocol.

  6. Pathophysiology and Potential Non-Pharmacologic Treatments of Obesity or Kidney Disease Associated Refractory Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Le Jemtel, Thierry H; Richardson, William; Samson, Rohan; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Oparil, Suzanne

    2017-02-01

    The review assesses the role of non-pharmacologic therapy for obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated refractory hypertension (rf HTN). Hypertensive patients with markedly heightened sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity are prone to develop refractory hypertension (rfHTN). Patients with obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated HTN have particularly heightened SNS activity and are at high risk of rfHTN. The role of bariatric surgery is increasingly recognized in treatment of obesity. Current evidence advocates for a greater role of bariatric surgery in the management of obesity-associated HTN. In contrast, renal denervation does not appear have a role in the management of obesity or CKD-associated HTN. The role of baroreflex activation as adjunctive anti-hypertensive therapy remains to be defined.

  7. Evidence-based guideline update: Pharmacologic treatment for episodic migraine prevention in adults

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, S.D.; Holland, S.; Freitag, F.; Dodick, D.W.; Argoff, C.; Ashman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for the preventive treatment of migraine headache. The clinical question addressed was: What pharmacologic therapies are proven effective for migraine prevention? Methods: The authors analyzed published studies from June 1999 to May 2009 using a structured review process to classify the evidence relative to the efficacy of various medications available in the United States for migraine prevention. Results and Recommendations: The author panel reviewed 284 abstracts, which ultimately yielded 29 Class I or Class II articles that are reviewed herein. Divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, topiramate, metoprolol, propranolol, and timolol are effective for migraine prevention and should be offered to patients with migraine to reduce migraine attack frequency and severity (Level A). Frovatriptan is effective for prevention of menstrual migraine (Level A). Lamotrigine is ineffective for migraine prevention (Level A). PMID:22529202

  8. Physical exercise as non-pharmacological treatment of chronic pain: Why and when

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Kirsten R.; Golightly, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain broadly encompasses both objectively defined conditions and idiopathic conditions that lack physical findings. Despite variance in origin or pathogenesis, these conditions are similarly characterized by chronic pain, poor physical function, mobility limitations, depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance and are treated alone or in combination by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches, such as physical activity (aerobic conditioning, muscle strengthening, flexibility training and movement therapies). Physical activity improves general health, disease risk and progression of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and obesity. When applied to chronic pain conditions within appropriate parameters (frequency, duration, intensity), physical activity significantly improves pain and related symptoms. For chronic pain, strict guidelines for physical activity are lacking, but frequent movement is preferable to sedentary behavior. This gives considerable freedom in prescribing physical activity treatments, which are most successful when tailored individually, progressed slowly and account for physical limitations, psychosocial needs and available resources. PMID:26267006

  9. Pharmacological treatments of cardiovascular diseases: Evidence from real-life studies.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; Bezin, Julien; Bosco-Levy, Pauline; Letinier, Louis; Blin, Patrick; Pariente, Antoine; Moore, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    The management of chronic cardiovascular diseases has evolved greatly in the last decades. Over the last thirty years, the management of acute coronary syndrome has improved, leading to an important lowering of the mortality in the acute phase of the event. Consequently, the optimal management of the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome has greatly evolved. Moreover, the increased number of pharmacological alternatives for patients affected by chronic heart failure and by non-valvular atrial fibrillation reserves a number of challenges for their correct management. Moreover, these diseases are without any reasonable doubt the largest contributor to global mortality in the present and will continue to be it in the future. The aim of this study was to provide the most updated information of the real-life drug use and their effectiveness. This review was performed to assess the potential knowledge gaps in the treatments of these diseases and to indicate potential perspective of pharmaco-epidemiological research in this area.

  10. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: A systematic review with network meta-analyses of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Brian; Núñez-Beltrán, Amparo; Page, Matthew J.; Ridao, Manuel; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; Catalá, Miguel A.; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders in childhood. A wide variety of treatments have been used for the management of ADHD. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of pharmacological, psychological and complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents. Methods and findings We performed a systematic review with network meta-analyses. Randomised controlled trials (≥ 3 weeks follow-up) were identified from published and unpublished sources through searches in PubMed and the Cochrane Library (up to April 7, 2016). Interventions of interest were pharmacological (stimulants, non-stimulants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other unlicensed drugs), psychological (behavioural, cognitive training and neurofeedback) and complementary and alternative medicine (dietary therapy, fatty acids, amino acids, minerals, herbal therapy, homeopathy, and physical activity). The primary outcomes were efficacy (treatment response) and acceptability (all-cause discontinuation). Secondary outcomes included discontinuation due to adverse events (tolerability), as well as serious adverse events and specific adverse events. Random-effects Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted to obtain estimates as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% credibility intervals. We analysed interventions by class and individually. 190 randomised trials (52 different interventions grouped in 32 therapeutic classes) that enrolled 26114 participants with ADHD were included in complex networks. At the class level, behavioural therapy (alone or in combination with stimulants), stimulants, and non-stimulant seemed significantly more efficacious than placebo. Behavioural therapy in combination with stimulants seemed superior to stimulants or non-stimulants. Stimulants seemed superior to behavioural therapy, cognitive training and non-stimulants. Behavioural therapy, stimulants

  11. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: A systematic review with network meta-analyses of randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Hutton, Brian; Núñez-Beltrán, Amparo; Page, Matthew J; Ridao, Manuel; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; Catalá, Miguel A; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders in childhood. A wide variety of treatments have been used for the management of ADHD. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of pharmacological, psychological and complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents. We performed a systematic review with network meta-analyses. Randomised controlled trials (≥ 3 weeks follow-up) were identified from published and unpublished sources through searches in PubMed and the Cochrane Library (up to April 7, 2016). Interventions of interest were pharmacological (stimulants, non-stimulants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other unlicensed drugs), psychological (behavioural, cognitive training and neurofeedback) and complementary and alternative medicine (dietary therapy, fatty acids, amino acids, minerals, herbal therapy, homeopathy, and physical activity). The primary outcomes were efficacy (treatment response) and acceptability (all-cause discontinuation). Secondary outcomes included discontinuation due to adverse events (tolerability), as well as serious adverse events and specific adverse events. Random-effects Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted to obtain estimates as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% credibility intervals. We analysed interventions by class and individually. 190 randomised trials (52 different interventions grouped in 32 therapeutic classes) that enrolled 26114 participants with ADHD were included in complex networks. At the class level, behavioural therapy (alone or in combination with stimulants), stimulants, and non-stimulant seemed significantly more efficacious than placebo. Behavioural therapy in combination with stimulants seemed superior to stimulants or non-stimulants. Stimulants seemed superior to behavioural therapy, cognitive training and non-stimulants. Behavioural therapy, stimulants and their combination showed the

  12. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment in a cessation trial among smokers in Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Ben Taleb, Ziyad; Ward, Kenneth D; Asfar, Taghrid; Bahelah, Raed; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    The development of evidence-based smoking cessation programs is in its infancy in developing countries, which continue to bear the main brunt of the tobacco epidemic. Adherence to treatment recommendations is an important determinant of the success of smoking cessation programs, but little is known about factors influencing adherence to either pharmacological or behavioral treatment in developing countries settings. Our study represents the first attempt to examine the predictors of adherence to cessation treatment in a low-income developing country. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment were identified by analyzing data from a multi-site, two-group, parallel-arm, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled smoking cessation trial in primary care clinics in Aleppo, Syria. Participants received 3 in-person behavioral counseling sessions plus 5 brief follow-up phone counseling sessions, and were randomized to either 6 weeks of nicotine or placebo patch. Of the 269 participants, 68% adhered to pharmacological treatment, while 70% adhered to behavioral counseling. In logistic regression modeling, lower adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment was associated with higher daily smoking at baseline, greater withdrawal symptoms, and perception of receiving placebo instead of active nicotine patch. Women showed lower adherence than men to behavioral treatment, while being assigned to placebo condition and baseline waterpipe use were associated with lower adherence to pharmacological treatment. Adherence to cessation treatment for cigarette smokers in low-income countries such as Syria may benefit from integrated cessation components that provide intensive treatment for subjects with higher nicotine dependence, and address concurrent waterpipe use at all stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacologic doses of nicotinamide in the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions: a review.

    PubMed

    Niren, Neil M

    2006-01-01

    Various skin disorders with an inflammatory component often have been treated with steroids and/or oral antibiotics. However, long-term use of these agents has drawbacks: steroids may induce numerous serious side effects such as hypertension, immunosuppression, and osteoporosis, and overuse of oral antibiotics may contribute to the development of bacterial resistance, as well as to a host of nuisance side effects such as diarrhea, yeast infections, and photosensitivity. As a result, alternative oral treatments, such as nicotinamide, have been investigated. During the past 50 years, many clinical reports have identified nicotinamide as a beneficial agent in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin disorders; what's more, its exceptional safety profile at pharmacologic doses makes it a potentially ideal long-term oral therapy for patients with inflammatory skin diseases. A recent large study evaluating nicotinamide for the treatment of acne or rosacea has confirmed the potential benefits of oral nicotinamide as an alternative approach to managing inflammatory lesions associated with acne vulgaris and acne rosacea. This article reviews the substantial number of reports published over the past 50 years that document the clinical utility and safety of oral and topical formulations of nicotinamide for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin conditions.

  14. Development and maintenance of guideline-based decision support for pharmacological treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Persson, M; Bohlin, J; Eklund, P

    2000-03-01

    The objective was to build a computer-based decision support system (DSS), which could apply the formal rules embedded in guidelines regarding pharmacological treatment of hypertension. The aim was also to test VISUAL BASIC as a development tool for DSS's in health care. From the Swedish guidelines for treatment of hypertension, the most widely accepted and scientifically best proved treatment strategies were chosen and implemented as rules. A DSS that is capable of applying the evidence-based rules extracted from guidelines regarding drug treatment of hypertension, to any patient's medical profile, was constructed. The output consists of a recommendation regarding preferred generic drug class and also a written report, reflecting decision steps provided by the rule-base and inference engine. We also provide methods for formalising an implementable language of guidelines. A mainstream programming language like VISUAL BASIC can be an alternative when building complicated decision support systems. A logic formal notation can facilitate communication between the expert and the programmer. The program is a stand-alone product independent of computerized medical records and thereby easy to install and maintain.

  15. Non-pharmacological biological treatment approaches to difficult-to-treat depression.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-09-16

    There has been substantial recent interest in novel brain stimulation treatments for difficult-to-treat depression. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a well established, effective treatment for severe depression. ECT's problematic side-effect profile and questions regarding optimal administration methods continue to be investigated. Magnetic seizure therapy, although very early in development, shows promise, with potentially similar efficacy to ECT but fewer side effects. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are clinically available in some countries. Limited research suggests VNS has potentially long-lasting antidepressant effects in a small group of patients. Considerable research supports the efficacy of rTMS. Both techniques require further study of optimal treatment parameters. Transcranial direct current stimulation may provide a low-cost antidepressant option if its efficacy is substantiated in larger samples. Deep brain stimulation is likely to remain reserved for patients with the most severe and difficult-to-treat depression, requiring further exploration of administration methods and its role in depression therapy. New and innovative forms of brain stimulation, including low-intensity ultrasound, low-field magnetic stimulation and epidural stimulation of the cortical surface, are in early stages of exploration and are yet to move into the clinical domain. Ongoing work is required to define which brain stimulation treatments are likely to be most useful, and in which patient groups. Clinical service development of brain stimulation treatments will likely be inconsistent and variable.

  16. Pharmacologic Stem Cell Based Intervention as a New Approach to Osteoporosis Treatment in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanming; Liu, Yongzhong; Akiyama, Kentaro; Sonoyama, Wataru; Patel, Voymesh; Gutkind, Silvio; Young, Marian; Gronthos, Stan; Le, Anh; Wang, Cun-Yu; Chen, WanJun; Shi, Songtao

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is the most prevalent skeletal disorder, characterized by a low bone mineral density (BMD) and bone structural deterioration, leading to bone fragility fractures. Accelerated bone resorption by osteoclasts has been established as a principal mechanism in osteoporosis. However, recent experimental evidences suggest that inappropriate apoptosis of osteoblasts/osteocytes accounts for, at least in part, the imbalance in bone remodeling as occurs in osteoporosis. The aim of this study is to examine whether aspirin, which has been reported as an effective drug improving bone mineral density in human epidemiology studies, regulates the balance between bone resorption and bone formation at stem cell levels. Methods and Findings We found that T cell-mediated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) impairment plays a crucial role in ovariectomized-induced osteoporosis. Ex vivo mechanistic studies revealed that T cell-mediated BMMSC impairment was mainly attributed to the apoptosis of BMMSCs via the Fas/Fas ligand pathway. To explore potential of using pharmacologic stem cell based intervention as an approach for osteoporosis treatment, we selected ovariectomy (OVX)-induced ostoeporosis mouse model to examine feasibility and mechanism of aspirin-mediated therapy for osteoporosis. We found that aspirin can inhibit T cell activation and Fas ligand induced BMMSC apoptosis in vitro. Further, we revealed that aspirin increases osteogenesis of BMMSCs by aiming at telomerase activity and inhibits osteoclast activity in OVX mice, leading to ameliorating bone density. Conclusion Our findings have revealed a novel osteoporosis mechanism in which activated T cells induce BMMSC apoptosis via Fas/Fas ligand pathway and suggested that pharmacologic stem cell based intervention by aspirin may be a new alternative in osteoporosis treatment including activated osteoblasts and inhibited osteoclasts. PMID:18612428

  17. Antianxiety medications for the treatment of complex agoraphobia: pharmacological interventions for a behavioral condition

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Giampaolo; Daccò, Silvia; Menotti, Roberta; Caldirola, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Background Although there are controversial issues (the “American view” and the “European view”) regarding the construct and definition of agoraphobia (AG), this syndrome is well recognized and it is a burden in the lives of millions of people worldwide. To better clarify the role of drug therapy in AG, the authors summarized and discussed recent evidence on pharmacological treatments, based on clinical trials available from 2000, with the aim of highlighting pharmacotherapies that may improve this complex syndrome. Methods A systematic review of the literature regarding the pharmacological treatment of AG was carried out using MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Cochrane databases, with keywords individuated by MeSH research. Only randomized, placebo-controlled studies or comparative clinical trials were included. Results After selection, 25 studies were included. All the selected studies included patients with AG associated with panic disorder. Effective compounds included selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, and benzodiazepines. Paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine showed the most consistent results, while fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, and imipramine showed limited efficacy. Preliminary results suggested the potential efficacy of inositol; D-cycloserine showed mixed results for its ability to improve the outcome of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy. More studies with the latter compounds are needed before drawing definitive conclusions. Conclusion No studies have been specifically oriented toward evaluating the effect of drugs on AG; in the available studies, the improvement of AG might have been the consequence of the reduction of panic attacks. Before developing a “true” psychopharmacology of AG it is crucial to clarify its definition. There may be several potential mechanisms involved, including fear

  18. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder. Part II: focus on pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with long-lasting psychological suffering, distressing psychosocial disability, markedly reduced health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality in a subgroup of individuals in the aftermath of serious traumatic events. Both etiopathogenesis and treatment modalities of PTSD are best conceptualized within a biopsychosotial model. Pharmacotherapy may lay claim to a major role in the multimodal treatment approaches. Here we outline two different pharmacotherapeutic trends that aim to modify the encoding, consolidation, and rehearsal of traumatic memory in order to reduce the risk of PTSD immediately after trauma exposure on the one hand, and that endeavor to treat the clinical state of PTSD on the other. The theoretical rationales of both pharmacological strategies are the complex neurobiological underpinnings that characterize traumatic memory organization and clinical PTSD. Meanwhile, promising data from randomized controlled trials have been obtained for both approaches. Empirical evidence may inform clinicians in their clinical efforts for this special group of patients. The efficacy of several classes of drugs that have been investigated within a context of research should be evaluated critically and still have to stand the test of effectiveness in daily clinical practice. From a patient perspective, empirical results may serve as a psychoeducative guideline to what pharmacotherapeutic approaches may realistically achieve, what their risks and benefits are, and what their limits are in contributing to reducing the often major chronic suffering caused by serious traumatic events. Ethical issues have to be considered, particularly in the context of pharmacological strategies projected to prevent PTSD in the aftermath of traumatic exposure.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder Part II: Focus on pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with long-lasting psychological suffering, distressing psychosocial disability, markedly reduced health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality in a subgroup of individuals in the aftermath of serious traumatic events. Both etiopathogenesis and treatment modalities of PTSD are best conceptualized within a biopsychosotial model. Pharmacotherapy may lay claim to a major role in the multimodal treatment approaches. Here we outline two different pharmacotherapeutic trends that aim to modify the encoding, consolidation, and rehearsal of traumatic memory in order to reduce the risk of PTSD immediately after trauma exposure on the one hand, and that endeavor to treat the clinical state of PTSD on the other. The theoretical rationales of both pharmacological strategies are the complex neurobiological underpinnings that characterize traumatic memory organization and clinical PTSD. Meanwhile, promising data from randomized controlled trials have been obtained for both approaches. Empirical evidence may inform clinicians in their clinical efforts for this special group of patients. The efficacy of several classes of drugs that have been investigated within a context of research should be evaluated critically and still have to stand the test of effectiveness in daily clinical practice. From a patient perspective, empirical results may serve as a psychoeducative guideline to what pharmacotherapeutic approaches may realistically achieve, what their risks and benefits are, and what their limits are in contributing to reducing the often major chronic suffering caused by serious traumatic events. Ethical issues have to be considered, particularly in the context of pharmacological strategies projected to prevent PTSD in the aftermath of traumatic exposure. PMID:25152660

  20. Opioid antagonists for pharmacological treatment of alcohol dependence - a critical review.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael; Rösner, Susanne

    2008-11-01

    Alcohol dependence is a widespread psychiatric disorder. While relapse prevention therapy in alcoholism was exclusively dominated by social and psychological treatments for many years, in the last decades the benefits of pharmacological agents for the rehabilitation treatment in alcoholism have become increasingly evident. Naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, blocks the pleasant and reinforcing effects of alcohol by preventing the stimulation of opioid receptors and the reduction of dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Clinical evidence about the effectiveness of the substance is not always consistent, but meta-analyses confirm naltrexone's effect on the risk of heavy drinking. Evidence about the abstinence-maintaining effects of the substance comes from a relatively small database and needs further investigation. The evaluation of differential effects of naltrexone depending on biological or psychological profiles, which could further enhance the effectiveness of treatments for alcohol dependence, remains a challenge. Nalmefene, another opioid antagonist, as well as naltrexone depot, a sustained release formulation of naltrexone, are further promising strategies for the treatment of alcohol dependence. The review at hand gives on overview of the current evidence on opioid antagonists for the treatment of alcohol dependence regarding the possible mechanism of action, the substances' safety profiles and their effectiveness. The corresponding evidence is critically reviewed taking into consideration the influence of the study design on the magnitude and consistency of effect sizes as well the impact of patient characteristics on the response to the treatment with opioid antagonists. Future studies on the role of different subtypes of alcoholics according to their genetic or psychological profile to explain or even predict the effects of opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence are needed.

  1. Pharmacological treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children with comorbid tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Steeves, Thomas

    2011-04-13

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent of the comorbid psychiatric disorders that complicate tic disorders. Medications commonly used to treat ADHD symptoms include the stimulants methylphenidate and amphetamine; nonstimulants, such as atomoxetine; tricyclic antidepressants; and alpha agonists. Due to the impact of ADHD symptoms on the child with tic disorder, treatment of ADHD is often of greater priority than the medical management of tics. However, for many decades clinicians have been reluctant to use stimulants to treat children with ADHD and tics for fear of worsening their tics.  To assess the effects of pharmacological treatments for ADHD on ADHD symptoms and tic severity in children with ADHD and comorbid tic disorders.  We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to July 2009), EMBASE (1980 to July 2009), CINAHL (1982 to July 2009), PsycINFO (1806 to July Week 4 2009) and BIOSIS Previews (1985 to July 2009). Dissertation Abstracts (searched via Dissertaation Express), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials were searched (30 July 2009). We included randomized, double-blind, controlled trials of any pharmacological treatment for ADHD used specifically in children with comorbid tic disorders. We included both parallel group and cross-over study designs. Two authors independently extracted data using standardized forms. We included a total of eight randomized controlled studies in the review but were unable to combine any of these in meta-analysis. Several of the trials assessed multiple agents. Medications assessed included methylphenidate, clonidine, desipramine, dextroamphetamine, guanfacine, atomoxetine, and deprenyl. All treatments, with the exception of deprenyl, were efficacious in treating symptoms of ADHD. Tic symptoms improved in children treated with guanfacine, desipramine, methylphenidate, clonidine, and the combination of methylphenidate and clonidine. Fear of worsening tics

  2. [Methotrexate pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Lagarce, L; Zenut, M; Lainé-Cessac, P

    2015-03-01

    Methotrexate is a folic acid analog, which is a thymidylate synthetase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor. It is used in oncology, dermatology and rheumatology and off labelling in the treatment of ectopic pregnancies. This paper is a review of methotrexate pharmacology with focus on data concerning ectopic pregnancies.

  3. Health literacy and the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, M Carlotta; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Altamura, A Carlo; Stein, Dan J; Baldwin, David S

    2014-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are treatable conditions, but many affected individuals neither seek professional help nor adhere to recommended pharmacological treatments. Increasing the health literacy of people with (or at risk of) anxiety disorders may encourage treatment-seeking and adherence to recommended interventions. Aims of this study were to review the literature relating to health literacy in the treatment of anxiety disorders, focusing on results on public opinion on psychotropic medications and its effectiveness in improving access to psychiatric health care and the actual use of medications. A computerized literature search of the published literature on mental health literacy was undertaken, focusing on the question of whether increased mental health literacy led to increased treatment-seeking and pharmacotherapy adherence in individuals with anxiety disorders. Twelve relevant articles were identified. All reported that improving mental health literacy leads to raised awareness, and in 10 out of 12 studies, increased help-seeking. However, there is currently no unequivocal evidence to show that increasing health literacy leads to increased use of medication in any psychiatric disorder, including anxiety disorders. Two studies show that knowledge of presumed biological mechanisms can predict use of psychotropic medication, including antidepressants, in psychiatric disorders, however, not specifically in anxiety disorders. There have been few investigations of health literacy focused on psychotropic medications. Given the prevalence, burden and sub-optimal recognition, and treatment of anxiety disorders, further work is needed to determine whether increased mental health literacy is associated with treatment-seeking and medication adherence in patients with these disorders. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Comparative, prospective, and randomized study between urotherapy and the pharmacological treatment of children with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Renata Martins; Gugliotta, Antonio; Ikari, Osamu; Perissinoto, Maria Carolina; Lúcio, Adélia Correia; Miyaoka, Ricardo; D'Ancona, Carlos Arturo Levi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To verify and compare the results of behavioral modification plus pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral modifications plus oxybutynin chloride in children with nonmonosymptomatic enuresis. Methods: A total of 47 children were randomized using opaque and sealed envelopes sequentially numbered. Group I was composed of 21 children who underwent antimuscarinic treatment (oxybutynin), and Group II was composed of 26 patients who underwent pelvic floor muscle training. Both groups were instructed as to behavioral modifications. Results: The voiding diary results were compared each month between Groups I and II. In the first month of treatment, children in Group I presented 12.2 dry nights, 13.4 in the second month, and 15.9 in the last month. In Group II, the results were: 14.9 dry nights in the first month, 20.8 dry nights in the second and 24.0 dry nights in the last month. There was a significant difference between the groups in second and third months. Conclusion: Pelvic floor exercises associated with behavioral changes were more effective than pharmacological treatment in children with urinary incontinence. PMID:23843062

  5. Pharmacologic treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction in patients with epilepsy and depression.

    PubMed

    Stimmel, Glen L; Gutierrez, Mary A

    2006-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a frequently encountered comorbid condition in patients with many medical and psychiatric conditions, such as epilepsy and depression. Most depressed patients experience some type of sexual dysfunction, decreased sexual desire being the most common. The association of sexual dysfunction with epilepsy is less clear. Changes in sex hormone levels are common in patients with epilepsy and may be attributable to the disease or to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Sexual dysfunction associated with depression or epilepsy is generally treated according to standard guidelines for the management of sexual disorders, since data from special populations are not available. The most common forms of female sexual dysfunction are lack of sexual desire and difficulty achieving orgasm. There are no approved pharmacotherapies for female hypoactive sexual desire disorder or female orgasmic disorder. Female sexual arousal disorder is treated with estrogen replacement therapy when indicated or vaginal lubricants. The most common male sexual dysfunction disorders are premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction. Phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor drugs are now the first-line treatment for erectile dysfunction, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and topical anesthetic creams are nonapproved but effective treatments for premature ejaculation. Testosterone and aromatase inhibitors have been used investigationally to treat sexual dysfunction in men taking AEDs. Patient education and follow-up appointments are essential to ensure optimal outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for sexual dysfunction.

  6. Pharmacological treatment of bipolar depression: qualitative systematic review of double-blind randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Lucas; Massuda, Raffael; Lovato, Lucas; Paim, Leonardo; Vares, Edgar Arrua; Sica da Rocha, Neusa; Ceresér, Keila Maria Mendes

    2012-06-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) is the best study design for treatment-related issues, yet these studies may present a number of biases and limitations. The objective of this study is to carry out a qualitative analysis of RCT methodology in the treatment of bipolar depression (BD). A systematic review covering the last 20 years was performed on PubMed selecting double-blind RCTs for BD. The identification items of the articles, their design, methodology, outcome and grant-related issues were all analyzed. Thirty articles were included, all of which had been published in journals with an impact factor >3. While almost half studies (46.7%) used less than 50 patients as a sample, 70% did not describe or did not perform sample size calculation. The Last Observation Carried Forward (LOCF) method was used in 2/3 of the articles and 53.4% of the studies had high sample losses (>20%). Almost half the items were sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry and 33.3% were sponsored by institutions or research foundations. Articles on the pharmacological treatment of BD have several limitations which hinder the extrapolation of the data to clinical practice. Methodological errors and biases are common and statistical simplifications compromise the consistency of the findings.

  7. Impact of Parkinson's disease and its pharmacologic treatment on quality of life and economic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scheife, R T; Schumock, G T; Burstein, A; Gottwald, M D; Luer, M S

    2000-05-15

    The impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) and its pharmacologic treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and economic outcomes is reviewed. PD is a chronic and progressive neurologic disorder characterized by specific motor deficits resulting from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The cardinal symptoms are tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. PD markedly reduces HRQL and places an economic burden on society of up to $25 billion per year. Patients' inability to move freely and to perform everyday tasks restricts their independence and leads to increased reliance on caregivers and assistive devices. Emotional and psychosocial well-being is also negatively affected. As the disease progresses, the response to levodopa typically decreases and various motor complications develop; these are difficult to treat and result in further declines in HRQL. The economic costs of PD include both direct health care costs (for drugs, physician services, and hospitalization) and indirect costs (for lost worker productivity). Economic analyses of PD and its treatments can help guide effective allocation of health care resources. Various antiparkinsonian agents and formulations, such as extended-release levodopa-carbidopa and pramipexole, have been found to be cost-effective relative to other agents. The newest antiparkinsonian drugs, cathechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, also have the potential to improve HRQL and economic outcomes, although more study is needed to confirm this. The total impact of PD and its treatment can be fully appreciated only when HRQL and economic outcomes, in addition to clinical outcomes, are examined.

  8. Pharmacological determinants of the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants: relation to agonist substitution treatment.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A

    2006-02-01

    Illicit use of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine, continues to pose a significant public health concern. On the basis of the relative success at treating opiate and tobacco users with agonist substitution treatments, this strategy has been pursued in the search for a pharmacotherapy for psychostimulant addiction. The reinforcing effects of drugs are central to their abuse liability; therefore, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants should inform the development of an effective treatment. Although the reinforcing effects of drugs are known to be multiply determined, the author's dissertation research focused on pharmacological factors. This review presents results from that research as well as findings reported in the extant literature, suggesting that the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs are determined both by their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. There is evidence to support the conclusion that affinity for dopamine transporters appears to be of critical importance, whereas serotonin transporters seem to serve a modulatory function. A more rapid rate of onset may enhance a drug's reinforcing effects, but a drug with a slow onset can still maintain self-administration. A drug's duration of action may only influence the rate but not the strength of responding that is maintained. Slow-onset, long-acting monoamine transporter ligands can be expected to have reinforcing effects and therefore abuse liability, which has implications for the use of these drugs as pharmacotherapies. Nonetheless, on the basis of promising preclinical and clinical findings, this appears to represent a viable treatment strategy.

  9. Randomized controlled trials of psychological and pharmacological treatments for nightmares: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Augedal, Aslak Wøien; Hansen, Kenneth Schøld; Kronhaug, Christian Robstad; Harvey, Allison G; Pallesen, Ståle

    2013-04-01

    A meta-analysis of treatments for nightmares is reported. The studies were identified by database searches and by an inspection of relevant reference lists. The inclusion criteria were: nightmares as a target problem, studies published in English, use of a randomized controlled trials and reporting of nightmare-relevant outcomes. A total of 19 studies, published between 1978 and 2012 were identified, which included 1285 participants. Effect sizes were calculated as Cohen's d. A statistically significant improvement for all studies combined (d = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.33-0.60, fixed effects model; d = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.32-0.66, random effects model) and for psychological treatments alone (d = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.36-0.60, random) and for prazosin alone (d = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.03-0.96, random) was found. Individual therapy format yielded a higher effect size than a self-help format (p = 0.03). Minimal interventions (relaxation, recording) yielded lower overall effect size than studies offering more extensive interventions (p = 0.02). It is concluded that there are both psychological and pharmacological interventions which have documented effects for the treatment of nightmares.

  10. A Systematic Review of Pharmacological Treatments of Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W.; Mehta, Swati; Aubut, Jo-Anne L.; Foulon, Brianne; Wolfe, Dalton L.; Hsieh, Jane T.C.; Townson, Andrea F.; Short, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of published research on the pharmacological treatment of pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). Data Sources Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published 1980 to June 2009 addressing the treatment of pain post SCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro assessment scale, while non-RCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black evaluation tool. A level of evidence was assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Study Selection The review included randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials which included prospective controlled trials, cohort, case series, case-control, pre-post and post studies. Case studies were included only when there were no other studies found. Data Extraction Data extracted included the PEDro or Downs and Black score, the type of study, a brief summary of intervention outcomes, type of pain, type of pain scale and the study findings.. Data Synthesis Articles selected for this particular review evaluated different interventions in the pharmacological management of pain post SCI. 28 studies met inclusion criteria: there were 21 randomized controlled trials of these 19 had Level 1 evidence. Treatments were divided into five categories: anticonvulsants, antidepressants, analgesics, cannabinoids and antispasticity medications. Conclusions Most studies did not specify participants’ types of pain; hence making it difficult to identify the type of pain being targeted by the treatment. Anticonvulsant and analgesic drugs had the highest levels of evidence and were the drugs most often studied. Gabapentin and pregabalin had strong evidence (five Level 1 RCTs) for effectiveness in treating post-SCI neuropathic pain, as did intravenous analgesics (lidocaine, ketamine and morphine) but the latter only had short term benefits. Tricyclic antidepressants only showed benefit for neuropathic

  11. A Systematic Review of Add-on Pharmacologic Therapy in the Treatment of Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tataru, Anita P; Barry, Arden R

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of add-on pharmacologic therapies in the treatment of resistant hypertension (RH), defined as blood pressure (BP) above target despite three antihypertensive agents. A systematic search was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google Scholar (inception to June 2016) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared any antihypertensive agent with control in patients with RH. Outcomes of interest included differences in BP, cardiovascular events, and serious adverse events. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias in RCTs was used to evaluate the quality of the included trials. Six RCTs were identified, including 749 participants. Four RCTs compared spironolactone with placebo and two used an active comparator. Four of the six studies did not report sufficient information regarding methods. A quantitative meta-analysis was not performed because of clinical heterogeneity among the RCTs. Compared with placebo, spironolactone reduced mean office BP by ~10 to 20 mmHg/~3 to 9 mmHg and home BP by ~10/4 mmHg. Compared with doxazosin or bisoprolol, spironolactone reduced clinic and home systolic BP, but not diastolic BP. Hyperkalemia occurred in ~3% of patients receiving spironolactone. Cardiovascular events were not consistently reported. All trials were limited by low enrollment, short follow-up, and inconsistent reporting of clinically meaningful outcomes and/or serious adverse events. Spironolactone has the best evidence as add-on pharmacologic therapy in patients with RH, but data are limited.

  12. Implant treatment in pharmacologically immunosuppressed liver transplant patients: A prospective-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Víctor; López-Pintor, Rosa María; Torres, Jesús; de Vicente, Juan Carlos; Sanz, Mariano; Hernández, Gonzalo

    2017-07-21

    The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of implant therapy in liver transplant patients (LTP). The secondary goal was to assess several implant- and patient-dependent variables, such as peri-implantitis (PI), peri-implant mucositis (PIM), bone loss (BL), and immediate postoperative complications. Two groups, including 16 pharmacologically immunosuppressed LTP and 16 matched controls, received 52 and 54 implants, respectively, between 1999 and 2008. After evaluating the postoperative healing, a mean follow-up of more than 8 years was carried out, and radiographic, clinical, and periodontal parameters were recorded to evaluate implant survival and implant- and patient-dependent outcomes. The early postsurgical complications were similar in both groups. Implant survival rate was 100% in the LTP group and 98.15% in the CG. PIM was diagnosed in 35.42% of the implants and 64.29% of the patients of LTP group (LTPG) and in 43.40% of the implants and 56.25% of the patients in the CG. PI was detected in 4.17% of the implants and 7.10% of the patients in the LTPG and in 9.43% of the implants and 18.80% of the patients in the CG. Pharmacologically immunosuppression in liver transplant patients was not a risk factor for implant failure, nor for the incidence of peri-implant diseases. Liver transplant is not a contraindication for dental implant treatment, although these patients should be carefully monitored during follow-up care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pharmacologic treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Jailwala, J; Imperiale, T F; Kroenke, K

    2000-07-18

    To evaluate the efficacy of pharmacologic agents for the irritable bowel syndrome. Electronic literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), PsycINFO (1967 to 1999), and the Cochrane controlled trials registry and a manual search of references from bibliographies of identified articles. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, or crossover trials of a pharmacologic intervention for adult patients that reported outcomes of improvement in global or irritable bowel-specific symptoms. Qualitative and quantitative data reported on study groups, interventions, treatment outcomes, and trial methodologic characteristics. 70 studies met the inclusion criteria. The most common medication classes were smooth-muscle relaxants (16 trials), bulking agents (13 trials), prokinetic agents (6 trials), psychotropic agents (7 trials), and loperamide (4 trials). The strongest evidence for efficacy was shown for smooth-muscle relaxants in patients with abdominal pain as the predominant symptom. Loperamide seems to reduce diarrhea but does not relieve abdominal pain. Although psychotropic agents were shown to produce global improvement, the evidence is based on a small number of studies of suboptimal quality. Psychotropic drugs, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-receptor antagonists, peppermint oil, and Chinese herbal medicine require further study. Smooth-muscle relaxants are beneficial when abdominal pain is the predominant symptom. In contrast, the efficacy of bulking agents has not been established. Loperamide is effective for diarrhea. Evidence for use of psychotropic agents is inconclusive; more high-quality trials of longer duration are needed. Evidence for the efficacy of 5-HT-receptor antagonists seems favorable, although more studies are needed.

  14. When love hurts. A systematic review on the effects of surgical and pharmacological treatments for endometriosis on female sexual functioning.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giussy; Facchin, Federica; Meschia, Michele; Berlanda, Nicola; Frattaruolo, Maria P; VercellinI, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Endometriosis is associated with an increased risk of dyspareunia, therefore this chronic gynecologic disease should be considered as a major cause of sexual dysfunctions. The aims of this study were to review the literature on the effects of surgical and pharmacological treatments for endometriosis on female sexual functioning, and to provide suggestions for future treatment strategies. We followed the PRISMA guidelines to conduct this systematic review, which involved an electronic database search of studies on the association between endometriosis and sexuality published between 2000 and 2016. As a result of the screening process, 22 studies were included in this systematic review. The 22 studies included were divided into two categories: (a) surgical intervention studies (n = 17), examining postoperative sexual outcomes of surgery for endometriosis; (b) pharmacological intervention studies (n = 5), evaluating the effects of pharmacological endometriosis treatments on sexual functioning. The studies considered showed that overall surgical and pharmacological interventions for endometriosis can lead to medium-/long-term improvement, but not necessarily to a definitive resolution of female sexual dysfunctions due to endometriosis. Sexual functioning is a multidimensional phenomenon and the ideal treatment for endometriosis-related sexual dysfunctions should be conducted by a multidisciplinary team that involves not only gynecologists, but also sexologists and psychologists/psychotherapists. Improving global sexual functioning, and not just reducing pain at intercourse, should be considered as a major clinical goal of endometriosis treatment. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Impact of etiology and duration of pain on pharmacological treatment effects in painful polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sindrup, S H; Holbech, J; Demant, D; Finnerup, N B; Bach, F W; Jensen, T S

    2017-09-01

    The pharmacological treatments for painful polyneuropathy have not changed much for more than a decade, and less than half of the patients obtain adequate pain relief with first line treatments. Therefore, patient-specific factors which could predict drug response are searched for. We analysed data from four published, randomized, controlled trials of drugs in painful polyneuropathy to see if diabetic etiology and duration of neuropathic pain had an impact on drug efficacy. The studies had a cross-over design, and had nearly similar outcome recordings as well as a thorough baseline registration of symptoms, signs and quantitative sensory testing. 244 patient records of drug effect distributed over treatments with three antidepressants (imipramine, venlafaxine, escitalopram) and two anticonvulsants (pregabalin, oxcarbazepine) were analysed. Diabetes as etiology of polyneuropathy had no impact on the effect of antidepressants (imipramine, venlafaxine, escitalopram), but there was a significant interaction with treatment effect on anticonvulsants with better effects in diabetics (0.86 NRS points, p = 0.021) with most pronounced interaction for oxcarbazepine (1.47 NRS points, p = 0.032). There was an interaction between duration of neuropathic pain and treatment with antidepressants with better effect with duration less than 3 years (0.62 NRS points, p = 0.036), whereas anticonvulsants tended to work best with duration of pain for more than 3 years. Despite the small sample size and limited number of drugs included this study suggests that diabetic etiology of polyneuropathy may impact on the efficacy of anticonvulsants, and duration of neuropathic pain may impact on the efficacy of antidepressants. This study found that duration of pain appears to have an impact on the effect of antidepressants in neuropathic pain and that diabetes as etiology for painful polyneuropathy appears to influence pain relief obtained with anticonvulsants. © 2017 European Pain

  16. Concurrent pemetrexed and radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of completed and ongoing studies.

    PubMed

    Choy, Hak; Gerber, David E; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Iyengar, Puneeth; Monberg, Matthew; Treat, Joseph; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Koustensis, Andrew; Barker, Scott; Obasaju, Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Current standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is combined concurrent therapy with a platinum-based regimen. Preclinical synergistic activity of pemetrexed with radiation therapy (RT) and favorable toxicity profile has led to clinical trials evaluating pemetrexed in chemoradiation regimens. This literature search of concurrent pemetrexed and RT treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC included MEDLINE database, meeting abstracts, and the clinical trial registry database. Nineteen unique studies were represented across all databases including 11 phase I studies and eight phase II studies. Of the six phase II trials with mature data available, median overall survival ranged from 18.7 to 34 months. Esophagitis and pneumonitis occurred in 0-16% and 0-23% of patients, respectively. Of the ongoing trials, there is one phase III and four phase II trials with pemetrexed in locally advanced NSCLC. Pemetrexed can be administered safely at full systemic doses with either cisplatin or carboplatin concomitantly with radical doses of thoracic radiation therapy. While results from the ongoing phase III PROCLAIM trial are needed to address definitively the efficacy of pemetrexed-cisplatin plus RT in stage III NSCLC, available results from phase II trials suggest that this regimen has promising activity with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  17. Pharmacological interventions for the treatment of anxiety disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Zafar A; Carson, Kristin V; Cheng, Jien N; Esterman, Adrian J; Smith, Brian J

    2011-11-09

    subclasses of anxiety medications were used including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and azapirones. Although two studies used SSRIs as the intervention (total of 21 participants), we were unable to meta-analyse the anxiety outcomes as one study had a standard deviation of zero for the control group. Included studies had relatively poor quality including small sample sizes and short follow-up periods. Due to the small number of included studies, we were unable to meta-analyse all the subclasses of medications. Due to the sub-optimal quality of the trials and statistically non-significant results, it is not possible to draw any conclusions for treatment. This review highlights the paucity of data in this area. As such, there is a need for scientifically rigorous research trials to evaluate the role of pharmacological interventions for anxiety disorders in patients with COPD, using a sample size large enough to demonstrate meaningful clinical significance.

  18. Pharmacological Treatment of ADHD in Addicted Patients: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; Levin, Frances R.

    2017-01-01

    Learning objectives After participating in this activity, learners should be better able to: Evaluate pharmacologic treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with substance use disorder (SUD)Assess the causes of the diminished efficacy of ADHD medication in patients with comorbid SUD Objective Substance use disorder (SUD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occur, and the presence of ADHD complicates the treatment of the addiction. Pharmacotherapy is a potent intervention in childhood and adult ADHD, but findings have been mixed in adolescent and adult ADHD patients with SUDs. This review focuses on several contributing factors and possible explanations, with implications both for future research and for clinical practice. Method This systematic review examined all randomized, placebo-controlled trials of pharmacotherapy for ADHD in adult and adolescent SUD patients. Results The number of studies is limited, and several studies are hampered by qualitative flaws. The results, in general, are inconclusive for most medications studied, but more recent trials using psychostimulants in robust dosing have demonstrated significantly positive results. Conclusion In reviewing these trials, possible explanations relating to the particular characteristics and problems of this complex patient group are discussed. Several factors, including ADHD symptom severity, psychiatric comorbidity, persistent drug use, choice of medication, and concomitant psychosocial intervention, influence study results. Taking these factors into account may improve the likelihood of detecting significant effects in future research, as the recent positive trials have indicated, and may help in the appropriate selection of pharmacotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:28272130

  19. The Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Ulipristal Acetate for the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Oliver; Zobrist, R. Howard

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign hormone-sensitive tumors of uterine smooth muscle cells leading to heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is an emerging medical treatment of fibroids with the potential to be used for long-term treatment. In this context, the present article summarizes UPA’s main clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Ulipristal acetate has good oral bioavailability and a half-life allowing one single oral administration per day for the management of fibroids. As a steroid, UPA is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 but does not act as an inducer or inhibitor of the CYP system or transporter proteins. With the exception of drugs modulating CYP3A4 activity, risks of drug–drug interactions with UPA are unlikely. In conclusion, besides its pharmacodynamic characteristics, UPA shows favorable PK properties that contribute to a good efficacy–safety ratio for the long-term management of uterine fibroids in clinical practice. PMID:25228633

  20. Pharmacological cognitive enhancement: treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and lifestyle use by healthy people.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, Barbara J; Morein-Zamir, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders typically manifest as problems with attentional biases, aberrant learning, dysfunctional reward systems, and an absence of top-down cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex. In view of the cost of common mental health disorders, in terms of distress to the individual and family in addition to the financial cost to society and governments, new developments for treatments that address cognitive dysfunction should be a priority so that all members of society can flourish. Cognitive enhancing drugs, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and methylphenidate, are used as treatments for the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, these drugs and others, including modafinil, are being increasingly used by healthy people for enhancement purposes. Importantly for ethical and safety reasons, the drivers for this increasing lifestyle use of so-called smart drugs by healthy people should be considered and discussions must occur about how to ensure present and future pharmacological cognitive enhancers are used for the benefit of society.

  1. Controversy over the pharmacological treatments of storage symptoms in spinal cord injury patients: a literature overview.

    PubMed

    del Popolo, G; Mencarini, M; Nelli, F; Lazzeri, M

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to locate research and communicate the evidence found from scientific studies pertaining to the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in the chronic stage of spinal cord injury (SCI). To address the controversy over the traditional (antimuscarinics) and the 'new' treatments for NDO and try to offer an insight on the rationale underlying the development of new drugs such as botulinum toxin (BTX), vanilloids, nociceptin/orphanin FQ. As a final point, to provide information on a new class of cation channels, the Degenerin/Epithelial Na(+)Channel (Deg/ENaC) Family that could be future targets for the management of NDO. International. Overview of English literature on drug management of NDO. Agents that block the 'efferent' function of micturition reflex, such as antimuscarinics, are currently first-line therapy for NDO. They reach the highest level of evidence (1a) and grade of recommendation (A). However, many patients and physicians believe that the 'efferent' pharmacological management of NDO is not completely satisfactory. Consequently, research is trying to address issues of efficacy, tolerability and convenience of new therapeutic strategies targeting the 'afferent' function. Antimuscarinic therapy increases the bladder capacity and delays the initial urge to void. However, in some patients they fail to achieve the patient's therapeutic goals. New interesting approaches have been investigated in the last few years. BTX seems to be very promising in treating neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB), but other compounds are now on the horizon.

  2. Network pharmacology-based study on the mechanism of action for herbal medicines in Alzheimer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Wang, Ling; Wu, Tian; Yang, Cong; Gao, Li; Cai, Haobin; Liu, Junhui; Fang, Shuhuan; Chen, Yunbo; Tan, Wen; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), as the most common type of dementia, has brought a heavy economic burden to healthcare system around the world. However, currently there is still lack of effective treatment for AD patients. Herbal medicines, featured as multiple herbs, ingredients and targets, have accumulated a great deal of valuable experience in treating AD although the exact molecular mechanisms are still unclear. In this investigation, we proposed a network pharmacology-based method, which combined large-scale text-mining, drug-likeness filtering, target prediction and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action for the most widely studied medicinal herbs in AD treatment. The text mining of PubMed resulted in 10 herbs exhibiting significant correlations with AD. Subsequently, after drug-likeness filtering, 1016 compounds were remaining for 10 herbs, followed by structure clustering to sum up chemical scaffolds of herb ingredients. Based on target prediction results performed by our in-house protocol named AlzhCPI, compound-target (C-T) and target-pathway (T-P) networks were constructed to decipher the mechanism of action for anti-AD herbs. Overall, this approach provided a novel strategy to explore the mechanisms of herbal medicine from a holistic perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Betahistine in the treatment of vertigo. History and clinical implications of recent pharmacological researches.

    PubMed

    Mira, E

    2001-06-01

    A short profile of betahistine and its activity in treatment of Menière's disease and other forms of peripheral vertigo is presented. The clinical efficacy of betahistine is documented by a series of more than twenty controlled clinical studies, performed in the years 1966-2000. Basic researches initially proved that bethaistine acts trough a vasodilating action on inner ear and cerebral blood flow (Suga and Snow, 1969; Martinez, 1972). In the following years this activity was confirmed using the modern laser doppler flowmetry technique (Laurikainen et al, 1998). Further recent studies proved that betahistine acts on the central vestibular histaminergic system as a weak H1 agonist and a strong H3 antagonist (Arrang et al., 1985), improving the process of vestibular compensation (Tighilet et al., 1995) as well as on peripheral labyrinthine receptors, reducing the spontaneous firing rate but not the activity induced by thermal or mechanical stimulation (Botta et al., 1998). More than forty years after its discovery, this series of studies carried out in the second half of the 90s leads to the conclusion that betahistine is a drug which maintains its scientific interest and its pharmacological potential in the treatment of vertigo.

  4. Validation of the AQT Color-Form Additive Model for Screening and Monitoring Pharmacological Treatment of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Niels Peter; Wiig, Elisabeth Hemmersam

    2013-01-01

    Objective:This retrospective study used A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) processing-speed and efficiency measures for evaluating sensitivity and monitoring effects during pharmacological treatment of adults with ADHD. Method: Color (C), form (F), and color-form (CF) combination naming were administered to 69 adults during outpatient…

  5. Validation of the AQT Color-Form Additive Model for Screening and Monitoring Pharmacological Treatment of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Niels Peter; Wiig, Elisabeth Hemmersam

    2013-01-01

    Objective:This retrospective study used A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) processing-speed and efficiency measures for evaluating sensitivity and monitoring effects during pharmacological treatment of adults with ADHD. Method: Color (C), form (F), and color-form (CF) combination naming were administered to 69 adults during outpatient…

  6. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  7. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  8. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Laurinda; Alegria, Carlos; Oliveira, Joana; Machado, Ana; Oliveira, Pedro; Almeida, Armando

    2011-01-01

    In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1) a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol]), (2) the association of gabapentin (GBP) and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP) (GBP+ROP protocol), and (3) a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol). Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols) from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22) due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug therapies, while after MDV surgery several patients showed important side effects. Data reinforce that, (1) TN patients should be carefully evaluated before choosing therapy for pain control, (2) different pharmacological approaches are available to initiate pain control at low costs, and (3) criteria for surgical interventions should be clearly defined due to important side effects, with the initial higher costs being strongly reduced with time. PMID:21941455

  9. The role of dental therapists in pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of anxious and phobic patients.

    PubMed

    MacLeavey, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Dental Therapists are in a prime position to be involved with the management of anxious and phobic patients. They earn less than dentists and are therefore a more cost-effective way of providing specialised care for anxious patients. Dental Therapists can spend more time educating and acclimatising these patients, do most if not all of the patient's treatment, only referring back to the dentist for RCT, crown/bridgework/dentures and permanent extractions. Ultimately this means that the patient receives high quality continuity of care. Treating anxious and phobic patients is time-consuming but ultimately very rewarding. If handled correctly and sensitively the anxious and phobic patient will not always be anxious or phobic, in the same way that children won't always be children. Dental Therapists can now extend their duties to include Relative Analgesia. This should enhance their employability and role within the dental team especially in the management of anxious and phobic patients. Employing a therapist with a toolbox of techniques at their disposal can be seen as part of a long-term practice plan to ensure that anxious and phobic patients become rehabilitated, happy, compliant and loyal to the practice! In fact .... the sort of patients every dentist really wants to see.

  10. Pharmacological Treatment of Sleep Disturbance in Developmental Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollway, Jill A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in children with developmental disabilities. Effective pharmacologic interventions are needed to ameliorate sleep problems that persist when behavior therapy alone is insufficient. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of the quantity and quality of pharmacologic research targeting sleep in…

  11. Pharmacological Treatment of Sleep Disturbance in Developmental Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollway, Jill A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in children with developmental disabilities. Effective pharmacologic interventions are needed to ameliorate sleep problems that persist when behavior therapy alone is insufficient. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of the quantity and quality of pharmacologic research targeting sleep in…

  12. Mortality among individuals accessing pharmacological treatment for opioid dependence in California, 2006 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Li, Libo; Min, Jeong; Huang, David; Urada, Darren; Liu, Lei; Hser, Yih-Ing; Nosyk, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Aims To estimate mortality rates among treated opioid-dependent individuals by cause and in relation to the general population, and to estimate the instantaneous effects of opioid detoxification and maintenance treatment (MMT) on the hazard of all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Design Population-based treatment cohort study. Setting Linked mortality data on all individuals first enrolled in publicly-funded pharmacological treatment for opioid dependence in California, USA from 2006 to 2010. Participants 32,322 individuals, among whom there were 1,031 deaths (3.2%) over a median follow-up of 2.6 years (interquartile range: 1.4 - 3.7). Measurements The primary outcome was mortality, indicated by time to death, crude mortality rates (CMR), and standardized mortality ratios (SMR). Findings Individuals being treated for opioid dependence had a more than four-fold increase of mortality risk compared with the general population (SMR 4.5 95% CI: 4.2, 4.8). Mortality risk was higher (1) when individuals were out-of-treatment (SMR 6.1, 95% CI: 5.7, 6.5) than in-treatment (SMR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.6, 2.1) and (2) during detoxification (SMR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 3.8) than during MMT (SMR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5, 2.1), especially in the two weeks post-treatment entry (SMR 5.5, 95% CI 2.7, 9.8 versus SMR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7, 4.9). Detoxification and MMT both independently reduced the instantaneous hazard of all-cause and drug-related mortality. MMT preceded by detoxification was associated with lower all-cause and other-cause-specific mortality than MMT alone. Conclusions In people with opiate dependence, detoxification and methadone maintenance treatment both independently reduce the instantaneous hazard of all-cause and drug-related mortality. PMID:25644938

  13. [Pharmacological treatment in alcohol-, drug- and benzodiazepine-dependent patients - the significance of trazodone].

    PubMed

    Funk, Sándor

    2013-06-01

    Currently detoxification of drug and alcohol dependent patients is pharmacologically unresolved, and long-term treatment following the acute phase is also not very successful including a high number of relapses. We would need medications that on the short term cease: the severe vegetative symptoms, the pain, the extremely distressing psychosyndrome characterised by restlessness, anxiety or acute depressive symptoms, and the craving. The optimal would be if there was one medication capable of simultaneously alleviating or diminishing all the above symptoms without causing dependency and preventing relapse in the long-term. Dependency is almost all cases accompanied by primary and/or secondary mood disorder or sleep disorder which should also be treated. It should be considered, however, that following withdrawal of the agent benzodiazepine dependency often develops. The serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI) trazodone is effective in the treatment of depression accompanied by sleeping disorder and it has also shown efficacy in alcohol and benzodiazepine-dependency. Its administration may improve the efficacy of detoxification and treatment of following conditions, may decrease medication load and the risk of the development of benzodiazepine dependency. In our clinical practice we frequently use this agent to treat our patients simultaneously suffering from depression and addiction problems, gaining experience comparing it to other pharmacotherapies (benzodiazepines or other antidepressants). The medication is not approved for alcohol and drug dependence, however, treatment t of comorbid conditions is not against to the official recommendations. Our aim was, in addition to reviewing the literature, to share our experience which, although cannot be considered an evidence based study, we deemed worthy of publishing. We cannot, at this point, put forward a protocol addressing all related scientific problems and problems of off-label treatment, and we could

  14. New pharmacological strategies for treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focus on disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Salvatore; Caraci, Filippo; Leggio, Gian Marco; Fedotova, Julia; Drago, Filippo

    2012-04-01

    Current approved drug treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD) include cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. These drugs provide symptomatic relief but poorly affect the progression of the disease. Drug discovery has been directed, in the last 10 years, to develop 'disease modifying drugs' hopefully able to counteract the progression of AD. Because in a chronic, slow progressing pathological process, such as AD, an early start of treatment enhances the chance of success, it is crucial to have biomarkers for early detection of AD-related brain dysfunction, usable before clinical onset. Reliable early biomarkers need therefore to be prospectively tested for predictive accuracy, with specific cut off values validated in clinical practice. Disease modifying drugs developed so far include drugs to reduce β amyloid (Aβ) production, drugs to prevent Aβ aggregation, drugs to promote Aβ clearance, drugs targeting tau phosphorylation and assembly and other approaches. Unfortunately none of these drugs has demonstrated efficacy in phase 3 studies. The failure of clinical trials with disease modifying drugs raises a number of questions, spanning from methodological flaws to fundamental understanding of AD pathophysiology and biology. Recently, new diagnostic criteria applicable to presymptomatic stages of AD have been published. These new criteria may impact on drug development, such that future trials on disease modifying drugs will include populations susceptible to AD, before clinical onset. Specific problems with completed trials and hopes with ongoing trials are discussed in this review.

  15. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Thomas R E

    2011-05-01

    These guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology address the scope and targets of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenia. A consensus meeting, involving experts in schizophrenia and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from the participants and interested parties, and cover the pharmacological management and treatment of schizophrenia across the various stages of the illness, including first-episode, relapse prevention, and illness that has proved refractory to standard treatment. The practice recommendations presented are based on the available evidence to date, and seek to clarify which interventions are of proven benefit. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to inform clinical decision making for practitioners, and perhaps also serve as a source of information for patients and carers. They are accompanied by a more detailed qualitative review of the available evidence. The strength of supporting evidence for each recommendation is rated.

  16. Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischaemia--pharmacologic approach and alternative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Erbe, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Raynaud's attacks and to minimize the related morbidity rather than to cure the underlying condition. Treatment strategies depend on whether Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is primary or secondary. All patients should be instructed about general measures to maintain body warmth and to avoid triggers of RP attacks. Pharmacologic intervention can be useful for patients with severe and frequent RP episodes that impair the patient's quality of life. Calcium channel blockers are currently the most prescribed and studied medications for this purpose. There has been limited evidence for the efficacy of alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, angiotensin receptor blockers, topical nitrates or fluoxetine to treat RP. The intravenously administered prostacyclin analogue iloprost can reduce the frequency and severity of RP attacks and is considered a second-line therapy in patients with markedly impaired quality of life, critical digital ischaemia and skin ulcers who are at risk for substantial tissue loss and amputation. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil) can also improve RP symptoms and ulcer healing whereas endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan) are mainly considered treatment options in secondary prevention for patients with digital skin ulcers related to systemic sclerosis. However, their use in clinical practice has been limited by their high cost. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin is recommended for all patients who suffer from secondary RP due to ischaemia caused by structural vessel damage. Anticoagulant therapy can be considered during the acute phase of digital ischaemia in patients with suspected vascular occlusive disease attributed to the occurrence of new thromboses. In patients with critical digital ischaemia, consideration should be given to hospitalisation, optimisation of medical treatment in accordance with the underlying disease and evaluation for a

  17. First Latin American position paper on the pharmacological treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Mario H

    2006-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease that involves synovial joints, resulting in severe dysfunction or burden for individual patients, families and society. Latin American Rheumatology Associations have acknowledged its relevance and recognized multiple limitations for its diagnosis and treatment in Latin America and the Caribbean. This document underscores issues regarding the impact and relevance of this disease in these countries. To develop a consensus document that may unify and guide the pharmacological management of RA in Latin America and the Caribbean. An Executive Committee appointed by the Epidemiology, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Radiology Committees of Pan-American League of Association for Rheumatology (PANLAR), held a meeting at Lisbon in May 2003. The goal was to establish a task force for the development of a Latin American consensus on the management of RA. Efforts focused on the problems encountered in the region regarding the availability of appropriate treatment for RA and the development of treatment guidelines for clinical practice. A secondary objective was the diffusion of the consensus conclusions and recommendations in participating countries. Six major issues were identified for discussion by six working groups. All Latin American Rheumatology Associations registered in PANLAR were invited to participate in the consensus. PANLAR members were well-represented in each group. Coordinators identified essential literature to be reviewed, analysed, and electronically discussed before the consensus meeting. The consensus' results and recommendations of this effort to delineate RA management in Latin America are contained in this article, which has been reviewed by participant societies and authors during 2004/2005 and endorsed by PANLAR.

  18. New approaches to the pharmacological treatment of obesity: can they break through the efficacy barrier?

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Clifton, P G

    2010-11-01

    In this review we assess the range of centrally active anorectics that are either in human clinical trials, or are likely to be so in the near future. We describe their weight loss efficacy, mode of action at both pharmacological and behavioural levels, where understood, together with the range of side effects that might be expected in clinical use. We have however evaluated these compounds against the considerably more rigorous criteria that are now being used by the Federal Drugs Agency and European Medicines Agency to decide approvals and market withdrawals. Several trends are evident. Recent advances in the understanding of energy balance control have resulted in the exploitation of a number of new targets, some of which have yielded promising data in clinical trials for weight loss. A second major trend is derived from the hypothesis that improved weight loss efficacy over current therapy is most likely to emerge from treatments targeting multiple mechanisms of energy balance control. This reasoning has led to the development of a number of new treatments for obesity where multiple mechanisms are targeted, either by a single molecule, such as tesofensine, or through drug combinations such as qnexa, contrave, empatic, and pramlintide+metreleptin. Many of these approaches also utilise advances in formulation technology to widen safety margins. Finally, the practicality of peptide therapies for obesity has become better validated in recent studies and this may allow more rapid exploitation of novel targets, rather than awaiting the development of orally available small molecules. We conclude that novel, more efficacious and better tolerated treatments for obesity may become available in the near future.

  19. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment)

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Results Steady state was reached within 1–2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Conclusion Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3–9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26834462

  20. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Steady state was reached within 1-2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3-9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia.

  1. Regulated recycling of mutant CFTR is partially restored by pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, John P.; Zeng, Jianxin; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Watkins, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Efficient trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to and from the cell surface is essential for maintaining channel density at the plasma membrane (PM) and ensuring proper physiological activity. The most common mutation, F508del, exhibits reduced surface expression and impaired function despite treatment with currently available pharmacological small molecules, called correctors. To gain more detailed insight into whether CFTR enters compartments that allow corrector stabilization in the cell periphery, we investigated the peripheral trafficking itineraries and kinetics of wild type (WT) and F508del in living cells using high-speed fluorescence microscopy together with fluorogen activating protein detection. We directly visualized internalization and accumulation of CFTR WT from the PM to a perinuclear compartment that colocalized with the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) markers Rab11 and EHD1, reaching steady-state distribution by 25 minutes. Stimulation by protein kinase A (PKA) depleted this intracellular pool and redistributed CFTR channels to the cell surface, elicited by reduced endocytosis and active translocation to the PM. Corrector or temperature rescue of F508del also resulted in targeting to the ERC and exhibited subsequent PKA-stimulated trafficking to the PM. Corrector treatment (24 hours) led to persistent residence of F508del in the ERC, while thermally destabilized F508del was targeted to lysosomal compartments by 3 hours. Acute addition of individual correctors, C4 or C18, acted on peripheral trafficking steps to partially block lysosomal targeting of thermally destabilized F508del. Taken together, corrector treatment redirects F508del trafficking from a degradative pathway to a regulated recycling route, and proteins that mediate this process become potential targets for improving the efficacy of current and future correctors. PMID:23572510

  2. Pharmacologic treatment approaches for children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Craig L

    2003-04-01

    should target anxiety, mood, and reexperiencing symptoms. Adrenergic agents, such as clonidine, used either alone or in combination with an SSRI may be useful when symptoms of hyperarousal and impulsivity are problematic. Supplementing with a mood stabilizer may be necessary in severe affective dyscontrol. Similarly, introduction of an atypical neuroleptic agent may be necessary in cases of severe self-injurious behavior, dissociation, psychosis, or aggression. Comorbid conditions such as ADHD should be targeted with pharmacotherapy known to be effective, such as psychostimulants or newer agents such as atomoxetine. Pharmacologic treatment of PTSD in childhood is one approach to alleviating the acute and chronic symptoms of the disorder. Despite the lack of well-designed, randomized, controlled trials that support efficacy, medication can be used in a rational and safe manner. Reduction in even one disabling symptom, such as insomnia or hyperarousal, may have a positive ripple effect on a child's overall functioning. Pharmacotherapy is typically used as one component of a more comprehensive multiple modality treatment package, including psychoeducation of the parent and child, focused exposure-based psychotherapy with adjunctive family therapy when indicated, and long-term booster interventions that use an admixture of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and pharmacologic interventions.

  3. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches.

  4. Monochloramine induces acute and protracted colitis in the rat: response to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Isabel; González, Raquel; Nieto, Ana; Zarzuelo, Antonio; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2005-05-06

    Monochloramine is a powerful oxidative molecule that is produced in inflammatory sites. We investigated the effect of intrarectally administered monochloramine (3.2 mg) in the rat. A single enema induced after 24 h an intense inflammatory reaction characterized by mucosal necrosis, submucosal edema, hemorrhage and colonic thickening, as well as induction of nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor and an increase in the interferon gamma/interleukin 4 ratio. The inflammatory response peaked 3-5 days after monochloramine administration and then followed a extended recovery phase. At 1 week there was substantial but incomplete mucosal repair, submucosal edema, neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and increased myeloperoxydase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Oxidative stress, as determined by malonyldialdehyde levels, was prominent only in the acute phase (3-5 days). Monochloramine colitis was amenable to pharmacological treatment with sulphasalazine or prednisolone, suggesting that it may be used as an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, monochloramine induces acute and protracted colonic inflammation in the rat. Locally produced monochloramine might contribute to the perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Potential Pharmacologic Treatments for Cystinuria and for Calcium Stones Associated with Hyperuricosuria

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, David S.

    2012-03-14

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to 'salt out' (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of L-cystine methyl ester and L-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, L-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  6. Pharmacologic rationale for treatments of peritoneal surface malignancy from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sugarbaker, Paul H; Van der Speeten, Kurt; Stuart, O Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The peritoneal surfaces of the abdomen and pelvis are important sites for the dissemination of gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancy. Transcoelomic dissemination of cancer cells gives rise to carcinomatosis, which, without special treatment, is a fatal manifestation of these diseases. To treat peritoneal carcinomatosis, cytoreductive surgery removes gross disease plus perioperative intraperitoneal and perioperative intravenous chemotherapy eradicates microscopic residual disease and chemical compatibilities. Chemotherapy agents are administered either by the intraperitoneal or intravenous route, based on their pharmacologic properties. A peritoneal-plasma barrier, which retards the clearance of high molecular weight chemotherapy from the peritoneal cavity, results in a large exposure of small cancer nodules on abdominal and pelvic surfaces. Tissue penetration of the intraperitoneal chemotherapy is facilitated by moderate hyperthermia (41-42°C). Targeting of intravenous chemotherapy to the peritoneal surface is facilitated by the intraperitoneal heat. A constant dose of chemotherapy agent and volume of carrier solution, based on body surface area, allows prediction of systemic drug exposure and systemic toxicity. Timing of the hyperthermic chemotherapy as a scheduled part of the surgical procedure to uniformly expose all peritoneal surfaces is crucial to success. PMID:21160813

  7. Frovatriptan: a review of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and clinical potential in the treatment of menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Balbisi, Ebrahim A

    2006-09-01

    Frovatriptan is an orally active 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist which binds with high affinity to 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors. Earlier clinical trials demonstrated that frovatriptan 2.5 mg is significantly more effective than placebo in the acute management of migraine and its associated symptoms. More recently, frovatriptan was shown to be effective in the management of menstrual migraine. The incidence of menstrual migraine in subjects receiving frovatriptan 2.5 mg twice daily during the six day perimenstrual period was 41% compared with 67% with placebo. Frovatriptan treatment is generally well tolerated. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dizziness, paresthesia, dry mouth, and fatigue. Pharmacologic studies demonstrated that frovatriptan is cerebroselective. Its selectivity for cerebral vessels lessens the potential for undesirable peripheral effects. Frovatriptan has a terminal deposition half-life of approximately 26 hours, which appears to be independent of age, gender, and renal function. This imparts that frovatriptan may be particularly well suited to patients with prolonged migraines and those who suffer migraine recurrence. Frovatriptan does not alter cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes, as such it is unlikely to affect the metabolism of other drugs. No dosage adjustments are necessary based on age, renal, or mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Apart from its efficacy in the acute management of migraine, frovatriptan is an effective agent when used as either acute therapy or as intermittent prophylaxis therapy of menstrual migraines, particularly in women who do not respond to conventional therapies.

  8. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  9. Tics and other stereotyped movements as side effects of pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Mir, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Tics and other stereotyped abnormal movements can be seen as adverse effects of some pharmacologic drugs. Among these drugs, antipsychotics may provoke tardive syndromes after a chronic exposure, primarily in the case of typical antipsychotics. These syndromes include tardive tics, tardive dyskinesia, or tardive akathisia, which present with tics or stereotyped movements as a clinical phenomenon. Psychostimulants (mainly methylphenidate) have traditionally been associated with the appearance of tics due to the increased dopamine activity caused by stimulants. Nevertheless, in recent years, several studies have concluded not only that methylphenidate does not exacerbate or reactivate tics but also that tics can improve with its use in patients with associated attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and tic disorder. Antiepileptic drugs, although infrequently, can also induce tics, with carbamazepine and lamotrigine described as tic inducers. Other antiepileptics, including levetiracetam and topiramate, have been proposed as a potential treatment for tic disorders due to a positive effect on tics, especially in those with associated epileptic disorder. Clinical and therapeutic approaches to tics and stereotyped movements after exposure to antipsychotics, stimulants, and antiepileptic drugs will be reviewed in this chapter.

  10. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  11. Interaction between behavioral and pharmacological treatment strategies to decrease cocaine choice in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic approaches constitute two prominent strategies for treating cocaine dependence. This study investigated interactions between behavioral and pharmacological strategies in a preclinical model of cocaine vs food choice. Six rhesus monkeys, implanted with a chronic indwelling double-lumen venous catheter, initially responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, FR 10 schedule) during continuous 7-day treatment periods with saline or the agonist medication phenmetrazine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h). Subsequently, the FR response requirement for cocaine or food was varied (food, FR 100; cocaine, FR 1-100; cocaine, FR 10; food, FR 10-300), and effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine vs food choice were redetermined. Decreases in the cocaine FR or increases in the food FR resulted in leftward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve, whereas increases in the cocaine FR or decreases in the food FR resulted in rightward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. The efficacy of phenmetrazine to decrease cocaine choice varied systematically as a function of the prevailing response requirements, such that phenmetrazine efficacy was greatest when cocaine choice was maintained by relatively low unit cocaine doses. These results suggest that efficacy of pharmacotherapies to modulate cocaine use can be influenced by behavioral contingencies of cocaine availability. Agonist medications may be most effective under contingencies that engender choice of relatively low cocaine doses.

  12. Heart Failure in African Americans: Unique Etiology and Pharmacologic Treatment Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Clyde W.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: After reading the article, “Heart Failure in African Americans: Unique Etiology and Pharmacologic Treatment Responses,” the learner should be able to complete the following quiz and evaluation questions. Accredidation: NMA is accredited by the Accredidation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. NMA designates this continuing medical education activity for one credit hour in category one of the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. The Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA) has been approved by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) as having educational content acceptable for five prescribed credit hours. This article has been approved for one credit hour. Term of approval is from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2003. Credit may be claimed for one year from date of individual use. Expiration: The quiz must be completed, postmarked and mailed by Feb. 25, 2003, for eligibility to receive continuing medical education credit for this CME activity. PMID:12656444

  13. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Samuel A; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D; Lytton, William W

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails.

  14. Frovatriptan: A Review of Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Potential in the Treatment of Menstrual Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Balbisi, Ebrahim A

    2006-01-01

    Frovatriptan is an orally active 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist which binds with high affinity to 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors. Earlier clinical trials demonstrated that frovatriptan 2.5 mg is significantly more effective than placebo in the acute management of migraine and its associated symptoms. More recently, frovatriptan was shown to be effective in the management of menstrual migraine. The incidence of menstrual migraine in subjects receiving frovatriptan 2.5 mg twice daily during the six day perimenstrual period was 41% compared with 67% with placebo. Frovatriptan treatment is generally well tolerated. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dizziness, paresthesia, dry mouth, and fatigue. Pharmacologic studies demonstrated that frovatriptan is cerebroselective. Its selectivity for cerebral vessels lessens the potential for undesirable peripheral effects. Frovatriptan has a terminal deposition half-life of approximately 26 hours, which appears to be independent of age, gender, and renal function. This imparts that frovatriptan may be particularly well suited to patients with prolonged migraines and those who suffer migraine recurrence. Frovatriptan does not alter cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes, as such it is unlikely to affect the metabolism of other drugs. No dosage adjustments are necessary based on age, renal, or mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Apart from its efficacy in the acute management of migraine, frovatriptan is an effective agent when used as either acute therapy or as intermittent prophylaxis therapy of menstrual migraines, particularly in women who do not respond to conventional therapies. PMID:18360605

  15. Current Pharmacological Treatment for Male LUTS due to BPH: Dutasteride or Finasteride?

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Luisella; Sountoulides, Petros; Castellan, Pietro; Presicce, Fabrizio; Lombardo, Riccardo; Romero, Marilena; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Schips, Luigi; Cindolo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a potentially progressive disease which is commonly associated with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and might result in complications, such as acute urinary retention and BPH-related surgery. In the current medical therapy scenario for LUTS attributed to BPH, only one class of drugs, 5-α reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), has been found to be effective in reducing the risk of disease progression. The two 5ARIs that are currently available include finasteride and dutasteride. These two drugs have different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Greater suppression of dehydrotestosterone is achieved by dutasteride (>90% dutasteride vs 70% finasteride) which theoretically should correlate with greater efficacy in alleviating urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, this hypothesis has not yet been clinically demonstrated. The pertinent literature is scarce and heterogeneous and produces low scientific levels of evidence. The present review article aims to evaluate the comparative head-to-head studies in order to evaluate if the hypothetical clinical differences between dutasteride and finasteride do exist. Pharmacological treatment with either drug results in similar symptom improvements; however dutasteride seems to have a better profile in reducing the risk of prostate surgery and acute urinary retention (AUR). More studies are necessary to better evaluate both the clinical and pharmacoeconomic profile of the two 5ARIs.

  16. The pharmacologic treatment of short bowel syndrome: new tricks and novel agents.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Matthew L; McClave, Stephen A; Palmer, Lena B; Nguyen, Douglas L; Urben, Lindsay M; Martindale, Robert G; Hurt, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a manifestation of massive resection of the intestines resulting in severe fluid, electrolyte, and vitamin/mineral deficiencies. Diet and parenteral nutrition play a large role in the management of SBS; however, pharmacologic options are becoming more readily available. These pharmacologic agents focus on reducing secretions and stimulating intestinal adaptation. The choice of medication is highly dependent on the patient's symptoms, remaining anatomy, and risk versus benefit profile for each agent. This article focuses on common and novel pharmacologic medications used in SBS, including expert advice on their indications and use.

  17. Pharmacological efficacy of FGF21 analogue, liraglutide and insulin glargine in treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xianlong; Qi, Jianying; Yu, Dan; Wu, Yunzhou; Zhu, Shenglong; Li, Shujie; Wu, Qiang; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2017-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a promising regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism with multiple beneficial effects including hypoglycemic and lipid-lowering. Previous studies have reported that FGF21 is expected to become a new drug for treatment of diabetes. Liraglutide and insulin glargine are the two representative anti-diabetic biological drugs. In the current study, we aim to compare the long-term pharmacological efficacy of mFGF21 (an FGF21 analogue), liraglutide and insulin glargine in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Db/db mice were initially treated with three kinds of proteins (25nmol/kg/day) by subcutaneous injection once a day for 4weeks, then subsequently be treated with once every two days for next 4weeks. After 8weeks of treatments, the blood glucose levels, body weights, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, fasting insulin levels, serum lipid profiles, hepatic biochemical parameters, oral glucose tolerance tests and hepatic mRNA expression levels of several proteins (GK, G6P, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4) associated with glucose metabolism of the experimental mice were detected. Results demonstrated that three proteins could significantly decrease the fed blood glucose levels of db/db mice. After treatment for 1week, the fed blood glucose levels of db/db mice in liraglutide group were significantly lower than those in mFGF21 and insulin glargine groups. However, after 2weeks of administration, the long-lasting hypoglycemic effect of mFGF21 was superior to liraglutide and insulin glargine up to the end of the experiments. Compared with liraglutide and insulin glargine, mFGF21 significantly reduced the glycosylated hemoglobin levels and improved the ability on glycemic control, insulin resistance, serum lipid and liver function states in db/db mice after 8weeks treatments. In addition, mFGF21 regulated glucose metabolism through increasing the mRNA expression levels of GK and GLUT-1, and decreasing the mRNA expression level of G6P. But liraglutide and insulin

  18. [Differences in pharmacologic treatment after acute myocardial infarction. The role of treatment effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Bobbio, M; Imazio, M; Tidu, M; Presbitero, P; Trinchero, R; Brusca, A

    1997-06-01

    Despite growing interest concerning the prescription of different drugs in different clinical settings, no explanatory variables have been determined. The aim of this study was to verify if there are any differences in drug prescription at the time of hospital release following myocardial infarction and if any of these differences can be explained by scientific evidence concerning treatment efficacy. All drugs prescribed to 430 patients discharged from three different cardiology departments after acute myocardial infarction were analyzed. Based on current scientific evidence, it has been, ascertained that aspirin, beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitors can be prescribed unless contraindicate whereas anticoagulants, nitrates and calcium antagonists should be prescribed only in specific clinical conditions. The odd ratio of prescription of each drug among the three cardiology departments was calculated and adjusted for any clinical and test result variables that can specifically affect drug prescription. Different clinical characteristics of the patients discharged from the three cardiology departments are the following: mean age ranges from 60 to 66 years (p < 0.001), the incidence of non-Q myocardial infarction ranges from 23 to 45% (p < 0.001), post infarction angina ranges from 6 to 15% (p = 0.016), left ventricular failure ranges from 6 to 13% (p = 0.003) and arrhythmia ranges from 5 to 18% (p = 0.007). The adjusted odd ratio for clinical and test results variables showed that prescriptions were similar for ACE-inhibitors (odd ratio 1.3; 95% confidence interval from 0.6 to 3.2), aspirin (OR 2.2; 95% confidence interval from 0.8 to 5.5), beta-blockers (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval from 0.9 to 5.5) and oral anticoagulants (1.6; 95% confidence interval from 0.6 to 4.5). Instead, there is a statistically significant difference in the prescription of nitrates (OR 4.4; 95% confidence interval from 1.6 to 12.3) and of calcium antagonists (OR 5.4%, 95% confidence interval

  19. Non-pharmacological treatment and prevention of bone loss after spinal cord injury: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Hansen, B; Lee, B S B

    2009-07-01

    Review the literature on non-pharmacological prevention and treatment of osteoporosis after spinal cord injury (SCI). PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched. All identified papers were read by title, abstract and full-length article when relevant. Hand search of the articles' sources identified additional papers. For included studies, the level of evidence was determined. No studies conclusively showed an effective intervention. However, there are few randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and those that exist assess interventions and outcome measures that could be improved. Five studies on weight-bearing early post-injury are conflicting, but standing or walking may help retain bone mineral. In the chronic phase, there was no effect of weight bearing (12 studies). One study found that an early commencement of sports after SCI improved bone mineral, and the longer the period of athletic career, the higher the (leg) bone mineral. Early after SCI, there may be some effects of electrical stimulation (ES) (five studies). Chronic-phase ES studies vary (14 studies, including mixed periods after injury), but improvement is seen with longer period of training, or higher frequency or stimulus intensity. Improvements correspond to trabecular bone in the distal femur or proximal tibia. Impact vibration and pulsed electromagnetic fields may have some positive effects, whereas pulsed ultrasound does not. Six studies on the influence of spasticity show inconsistent results. Bone mineral should be measured around the knee; the length and intensity of the treatment should be sufficiently long and high, respectively, and should commence early after SCI. If bone mineral is to remain, the stimulation has to be possibly continued for long term. In addition, RCTs are necessary.

  20. Optimizing the Pharmacologic Treatment of Insomnia: Current Status and Future Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Minkel, Jared; Krystal, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications are available for treating patients with insomnia. These medications include agents approved as insomnia therapies by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), agents approved by the FDA for another condition that are used “off-label” to treat insomnia, and agents available “over-the-counter” that are taken by individuals with insomnia. These agents differ in their properties, their safety and efficacy when used for different insomnia patient subtypes, and the available data on their efficacy and safety in these subtypes. As a result, optimizing the medication treatment of insomnia for a given patient requires that the clinician select an agent for use which has characteristics that make it most likely to effectively and safely address the type of sleep difficulty experienced by that individual. This article is intended to assist clinicians and researchers in carrying out this optimization. It begins by reviewing the basic characteristics of the medications used to treat insomnia. This is followed by a review of the fundamental ways that individuals with insomnia may differ and affect the choice of medication therapy. This review includes discussions that illustrate how to best choose a medication based on the characteristics of the available medications, the key differences among insomnia patients, and the available research literature. Lastly, we discuss future directions for the optimizing pharmacologic management of insomnia. It is hoped that the treatment tailoring methods discussed herein serve as a means of improving the clinical management of insomnia and, thus, improve the lives of the many patients who suffer from this common and impairing condition. PMID:24015116

  1. [Non pharmacological treatment for Alzheimer's disease: comparison between musical and non-musical interventions].

    PubMed

    Narme, Pauline; Tonini, Audrey; Khatir, Fatiha; Schiaratura, Loris; Clément, Sylvain; Samson, Séverine

    2012-06-01

    On account of the limited effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a growing interest on nonpharmacological treatments, including musical intervention. Despite the large number of studies showing the multiple benefits of music on behavioral, emotional and cognitive disorders of patients with AD, only a few of them used a rigorous method. Finally, the specificity of musical as compared to non-musical and pleasant interventions has rarely been addressed. To investigate this issue, two randomized controlled trials were conducted contrasting the effects of musical to painting (Study 1) or cooking (Study 2) interventions on emotional state of 33 patients with AD. The patients' emotional state was assessed by analyzing professional caregivers' judgments of the patient's mood, then facial expressions and valence of the discourse from short-filmed interviews. In the first study (n=22), each intervention lasted 3 weeks (two sessions per week) and the patients' emotional state was assessed before, during and after intervention periods. After the interventions, the results showed that facial expression, discourse content and mood assessment improved (more positive than negative expressions) as compared to pre-intervention assessment. However, musical intervention was more effective and had longer effects as compared with painting. In the second study (n=11), we further examined long lasting effects of music as compared to cooking by adding evaluation of the patients' emotional state 2 and 4 weeks after the last intervention. Again, music was more effective to improve the emotional state. Music had positive effects that remained significant up to 4 weeks after the intervention, while cooking only produced short-term effect on mood. In both studies, benefits were significant in more than 80% of patients. Taken together, these findings show that music intervention has specific effects on patients' emotional well being, offering promising