Science.gov

Sample records for ongoing universal access

  1. The Universal Access System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Neil G.

    This final report discusses the outcomes of a project that created a Universal Access System (UAS), a system that gives students with disabilities access to the same computers as their classmates. The project developed a new approach in which the needs of the individual with disabilities are handled separately from the computers and other devices…

  2. Ongoing and future developments at the Universal Protein Resource

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary mission of Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is to support biological research by maintaining a stable, comprehensive, fully classified, richly and accurately annotated protein sequence knowledgebase, with extensive cross-references and querying interfaces freely accessible to the scientific community. UniProt is produced by the UniProt Consortium which consists of groups from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). UniProt is comprised of four major components, each optimized for different uses: the UniProt Archive, the UniProt Knowledgebase, the UniProt Reference Clusters and the UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequence Database. UniProt is updated and distributed every 4 weeks and can be accessed online for searches or download at http://www.uniprot.org. PMID:21051339

  3. Ongoing and future developments at the Universal Protein Resource.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The primary mission of Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is to support biological research by maintaining a stable, comprehensive, fully classified, richly and accurately annotated protein sequence knowledgebase, with extensive cross-references and querying interfaces freely accessible to the scientific community. UniProt is produced by the UniProt Consortium which consists of groups from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). UniProt is comprised of four major components, each optimized for different uses: the UniProt Archive, the UniProt Knowledgebase, the UniProt Reference Clusters and the UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequence Database. UniProt is updated and distributed every 4 weeks and can be accessed online for searches or download at http://www.uniprot.org. PMID:21051339

  4. Deaf Children with Complex Needs: Parental Experience of Access to Cochlear Implants and Ongoing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Wendy; Turner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of parents of deaf children with additional complex needs (ACN) in accessing cochlear implant (CI) services and achieving ongoing support. Of a total study group of fifty-one children with ACN, twelve had been fitted with a CI. The parental accounts provide a rich and varied picture of service access. For some…

  5. Extended Sessions in Ongoing Process Groups at University Counseling Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Brian

    Common in the 1960s, marathon groups are now rarely used. With the emerging effects of managed care, short-term brief focused therapies have become the therapeutic norm, and group counseling has become popular because of its low cost and therapeutic effectiveness. Most groups at university counseling centers run for one semester. A strategically…

  6. A Collaborative, Ongoing University Strategic Planning Framework: Process, Landmines, and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan E. Kogler; Thomas, Edward G.; Keller, Lawrence F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the strategic planning process at Cleveland State University, a large metropolitan state university in Ohio. A faculty-administrative team used a communicative planning approach to develop a collaborative, ongoing, bottom-up, transparent strategic planning process. This team then spearheaded the process through plan…

  7. Improving Web Accessibility in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Improving Web accessibility for disabled users visiting a university's Web site is explored following the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) guidelines and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act rules for Web page designers to ensure accessibility. The literature supports the view that accessibility is sorely lacking, not only in the USA, but also…

  8. Ongoing Spontaneous Activity Controls Access to Consciousness: A Neuronal Model for Inattentional Blindness

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Even in the absence of sensory inputs, cortical and thalamic neurons can show structured patterns of ongoing spontaneous activity, whose origins and functional significance are not well understood. We use computer simulations to explore the conditions under which spontaneous activity emerges from a simplified model of multiple interconnected thalamocortical columns linked by long-range, top-down excitatory axons, and to examine its interactions with stimulus-induced activation. Simulations help characterize two main states of activity. First, spontaneous gamma-band oscillations emerge at a precise threshold controlled by ascending neuromodulator systems. Second, within a spontaneously active network, we observe the sudden “ignition” of one out of many possible coherent states of high-level activity amidst cortical neurons with long-distance projections. During such an ignited state, spontaneous activity can block external sensory processing. We relate those properties to experimental observations on the neural bases of endogenous states of consciousness, and particularly the blocking of access to consciousness that occurs in the psychophysical phenomenon of “inattentional blindness,” in which normal subjects intensely engaged in mental activity fail to notice salient but irrelevant sensory stimuli. Although highly simplified, the generic properties of a minimal network may help clarify some of the basic cerebral phenomena underlying the autonomy of consciousness. PMID:15819609

  9. Universally Accessible Instruction: Oxymoron or Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    The movement to extend universal design from physical to instructional environments has escalated in the past two decades. Frameworks to guide the field of postsecondary education in its efforts to intentionally build accessibility features into college teaching and course materials include Universal Design in Education, Universal Design for…

  10. 47 CFR 54.807 - Interstate access universal service support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interstate access universal service support. 54... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.807 Interstate access universal service support. (a) Each Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) that...

  11. 47 CFR 54.807 - Interstate access universal service support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interstate access universal service support. 54... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.807 Interstate access universal service support. (a) Each Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) that...

  12. 47 CFR 54.807 - Interstate access universal service support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interstate access universal service support. 54.807 Section 54.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.807 Interstate access universal service support....

  13. 47 CFR 54.807 - Interstate access universal service support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interstate access universal service support. 54... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.807 Interstate access universal service support. (a) Each Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) that...

  14. 47 CFR 54.807 - Interstate access universal service support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interstate access universal service support. 54... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.807 Interstate access universal service support. (a) Each Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) that...

  15. Academic Momentum at University/College: Exploring the Roles of Prior Learning, Life Experience, and Ongoing Performance in Academic Achievement across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Wilson, Rachel; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Ginns, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the context of "academic momentum," a longitudinal study of university students (N = 904) showed high school achievement and ongoing university achievement predicted subsequent achievement through university. However, the impact of high school achievement diminished, while additive effects of ongoing university achievement continued.…

  16. Shopping center wheelchair accessibility: ongoing advocacy to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

    PubMed

    McClain, L

    2000-01-01

    Although the regulations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 were phased in by 1992, monitoring and enforcement continue to be problematic. This study of three large shopping centers in the Southwest included one mall that was opened in the mid-1990s, and two malls that were constructed prior to the law (but have undergone recent renovations). Use of the ADA Accessibility Guidelines Checklist for Buildings and Facilities (Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board [ATBCB], 1992) generated data which were analyzed descriptively to determine the frequency and percent compliance in: parking lots, entrances, ramps, elevators, telephones, restrooms, food courts, and 12 specific store-types. No mall was fully compliant in any area, other than telephone specifications. In other areas, compliance ranged from 0% (ramp slopes in the newer mall) to many areas of 100% compliance (for example, outdoor curb ramps and food court seating spaces and aisles). The implications are that shoppers who are wheelchair mobile cannot count on complete compliance and cannot predict which physical architectural barriers they will find in shopping centers. PMID:10840287

  17. Mobile App to Assess Universal Access Compliance.

    PubMed

    Fransolet, Colette

    2016-01-01

    In terms of local legislation, South Africa has a handful of regulations that indirectly require Universal Access, which is then in itself largely described as facilities for people with disabilities. The most predominant set of regulations is the South African National Building Regulations, with a specific code which is deemed to satisfy standard titled South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: Facilities for Persons with Disabilities. Revised in 2011, this building regulation offers some technical guidelines specific to built infrastructure, and largely for people with functional mobility limitations. The description of the term "functional mobility limitations" in the context of this paper refers to people who make use of mobility aids to assist with their functionality in an environment, for example people who use walking aids (sticks, canes or walkers) and people who use wheelchairs. Albeit lacking in specifics around the requirements for other areas of functional limitations, including people who are blind, people who are deaf, and people with cognitive limitations, the SANS 10400 Part S is, to date, the most effective regulatory requirement in the country to assist with making facilities more accessible. With only a few experts in South Africa working in the field, the ability to offer clients Universal Access Reviews in terms of basic compliance with the SANS 10400 Part S is limited by two major factors. Firstly, the costs associated with employing experts in the field to review infrastructure is mostly too exorbitant for clients to carry. Secondly, the amount of time taken to perform reviews onsite and then collate the information into a coherent report for the client is far too long. These aspects result in a gap between clients wanting to meet the requirements, and being able to have the work completed in a reasonable amount of time. To overcome the challenge of larger institutions and organizations wanting to have their facilities reviewed in

  18. Universal programming interface with concurrent access

    2004-10-07

    There exist a number of devices with a positioning nature of operation, such as mechanical linear stages, temperature controllers, or filterwheels with discrete state, and most of them have different programming interfaces. The Universal Positioner software suggests the way to handle all of them is with a single approach, whereby a particular hardware driver is created from the template and by translating the actual commands used by the hardware to and from the universal programmingmore » interface. The software contains the universal API module itself, the demo simulation of hardware, and the front-end programs to help developers write their own software drivers along with example drivers for actual hardware controllers. The software allows user application programs to call devices simultaneously without race conditions (multitasking and concurrent access). The template suggested in this package permits developers to integrate various devices easily into their applications using the same API. The drivers can be stacked; i.e., they can call each other via the same interface.« less

  19. Universal programming interface with concurrent access

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, Oleg

    2004-10-07

    There exist a number of devices with a positioning nature of operation, such as mechanical linear stages, temperature controllers, or filterwheels with discrete state, and most of them have different programming interfaces. The Universal Positioner software suggests the way to handle all of them is with a single approach, whereby a particular hardware driver is created from the template and by translating the actual commands used by the hardware to and from the universal programming interface. The software contains the universal API module itself, the demo simulation of hardware, and the front-end programs to help developers write their own software drivers along with example drivers for actual hardware controllers. The software allows user application programs to call devices simultaneously without race conditions (multitasking and concurrent access). The template suggested in this package permits developers to integrate various devices easily into their applications using the same API. The drivers can be stacked; i.e., they can call each other via the same interface.

  20. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  1. Broadband Access for Students at East Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of Internet access for students attending East Tennessee State University during the fall semester 2013. It has been unknown to what degree broadband access is available in the East Tennessee State University service area that includes counties in East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and…

  2. Assured Access/Mobile Computing Initiatives on Five University Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blurton, Craig; Chee, Yam San; Long, Phillip D.; Resmer, Mark; Runde, Craig

    Mobile computing and assured access are becoming popular terms to describe a growing number of university programs which take advantage of ubiquitous network access points and the portability of notebook computers to ensure all students have access to digital tools and resources. However, the implementation of such programs varies widely from…

  3. Educational Quality, Access, and Tuition Policy at State Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seneca, Joseph J.; Taussig, Michael K.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of the relationship between educational quality, access, and tuition rates at state universities suggests that these institutions face a trade-off between the goals of improving educational program quality and providing greater access, but that increases in student financial aid can improve access. (MSE)

  4. Universal access: making health systems work for women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Universal coverage by health services is one of the core obligations that any legitimate government should fulfil vis-à-vis its citizens. However, universal coverage may not in itself ensure universal access to health care. Among the many challenges to ensuring universal coverage as well as access to health care are structural inequalities by caste, race, ethnicity and gender. Based on a review of published literature and applying a gender-analysis framework, this paper highlights ways in which the policies aimed at promoting universal coverage may not benefit women to the same extent as men because of gender-based differentials and inequalities in societies. It also explores how ‘gender-blind’ organisation and delivery of health care services may deny universal access to women even when universal coverage has been nominally achieved. The paper then makes recommendations for addressing these. PMID:22992384

  5. Stanford University's Archimedes Project: Design for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The Archimedes Project's primary goal is to educate those who will develop the next generation of software and hardware on the obstacles and opportunities that technology presents for people with disabilities. Its research program designs prototypes, explores accessibility problems, and conducts research on relevant scientific issues. (Author/PEN)

  6. Web Accessibility Policies at Land-Grant Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbard, David A.; Peters, Cara; Caneva, Yoana

    2010-01-01

    The Web has become an integral part of postsecondary education within the United States. There are specific laws that legally mandate postsecondary institutions to have Web sites that are accessible for students with disabilities (e.g., the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)). Web accessibility policies are a way for universities to provide a…

  7. GO RIO: Achieving Universal Access to Mass Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ted, Jr.; Castaneda-Calleros, Russell

    2009-01-01

    GO RIO is a universal access, mass-transit program that has been offered to all students who are registered full-time at Rio Hondo College. Through an agreement with five local transit agencies, full-time students can obtain a pass that provides full access seven days a week throughout the entire semester.

  8. Patients struggle to access effective health care due to ongoing violence, distance, costs and health service performance in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Nic Carthaigh, Niamh; De Gryse, Benoit; Esmati, Abdul Sattar; Nizar, Barak; Van Overloop, Catherine; Fricke, Renzo; Bseiso, Jehan; Baker, Corinne; Decroo, Tom; Philips, Mit

    2015-01-01

    Background The Afghan population suffers from a long standing armed conflict. We investigated patients’ experiences of their access to and use of the health services. Methods Data were collected in four clinics from different provinces. Mixed methods were applied. The questions focused on access obstacles during the current health problem and health seeking behaviour during a previous illness episode of a household member. Results To access the health facilities 71.8% (545/759) of patients experienced obstacles. The combination of long distances, high costs and the conflict deprived people of life-saving healthcare. The closest public clinics were underused due to perceptions regarding their lack of availability or quality of staff, services or medicines. For one in five people, a lack of access to health care had resulted in death among family members or close friends within the last year. Conclusions Violence continues to affect daily life and access to healthcare in Afghanistan. Moreover, healthcare provision is not adequately geared to meet medical and emergency needs. Impartial healthcare tailored to the context will be vital to increase access to basic and life-saving healthcare. PMID:25492948

  9. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  10. University Supports for Open Access: A Canadian National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyson, Devon; Vezina, Kumiko; Morrison, Heather; Taylor, Donald; Black, Charlyn

    2009-01-01

    The advent of policies at research-funding organizations requiring grantees to make their funded research openly accessible alters the life cycle of scholarly research. This survey-based study explores the approaches that libraries and research administration offices at the major Canadian universities are employing to support the…

  11. University Access for Disadvantaged Children: A Comparison across Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrim, John; Vignoles, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider whether certain countries are particularly adept (or particularly poor) at getting children from disadvantaged homes to study for a bachelor's degree. A series of university access models are estimated for four English-speaking countries (England, Canada, Australia and the USA), which include controls for comparable…

  12. Access and Reproduction Policies of University Digital Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koulouris, Alexandros; Kapidakis, Sarantos

    2005-01-01

    The access and reproduction policies of the digital collections of 10 leading university digital libraries worldwide are classified according to factors such as the creation type of the material, acquisition method, copyright ownership etc. The relationship of these factors is analysed, showing how acquisition methods and copyright ownership…

  13. Implementing Accessible Workstations in a Large Diverse University Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christierson, Eric; Marota, Cindy; Radwan, Neveen; Wydeven, Julie

    This paper describes how San Jose State University installed adaptive and accessible computer workstations for students with disabilities. It begins by discussing factors crucial to the installation of such workstations, including the importance of understanding legal and budgetary constraints, applying standards which meet diverse disability…

  14. Electronic Resources: Access and Usage at Ashesi University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadzie, Perpetua S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Sets out to investigate the use of electronic resources by students and faculty of Ashesi University, Ghana, in order to determine the level of use, the type of information accessed and the effectiveness of the library's communication tools for information research. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire-based survey was utilized.…

  15. Refugee Students at College and University: Improving Access and Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Janet

    1999-03-01

    This article summarizes the findings and recommendations of a study into access to, and experience of, colleges of further education and universities by refugees in Sydney, Australia. The study sought to identify examples of institutional good practice which are potentially transferable to other major host countries for refugees in the developed world. It focuses upon the factors influencing the decision to enter college or university, sources and usefulness of information and advice, access courses and special entry schemes, the recognition of prior learning and overseas qualifications and institutional sensitivity and support. It concludes with a series of recommendations for providers of further and higher education to improve access and support for students from refugee backgrounds.

  16. [Effective access to health services: operationalizing universal health coverage].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germán; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; García-Saisó, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    The right to health and its operational form, as an organized social response to health: the right to health protection, are the mainstay for the global push towards universal health coverage. The path to achieve this goal is particular to each country and relates to the baseline and specific context in relation to what is feasible. In practical terms, universal coverage involves the correlation between demand and supply of services (promotion, prevention, and care), expressed by the ability for each individual to make use of services when these are required. In those terms universal coverage is then effective access. The objective of the paper is to explore the conceptualization of effective access to health services and propose a definition that allows its operationalization thereof. This definition considers key elements of supply and demand of services, including the availability of resources and adequate provision (quality), as well as barriers to use them. PMID:26235780

  17. Funding free and universal access to Journal of Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Mrak, Robert E; Griffin, W Sue T

    2004-10-14

    Journal of Neuroinflammation is an Open Access, online journal published by BioMed Central. Open Access publishing provides instant and universal availability of published work to any potential reader, worldwide, completely free of subscriptions, passwords, and charges. Further, authors retain copyright for their work, facilitating its dissemination. Open Access publishing is made possible by article-processing charges assessed "on the front end" to authors, their institutions, or their funding agencies. Beginning November 1, 2004, the Journal of Neuroinflammation will introduce article-processing charges of around US$525 for accepted articles. This charge will be waived for authors from institutions that are BioMed Central members, and in additional cases for reasons of genuine financial hardship. These article-processing charges pay for an electronic submission process that facilitates efficient and thorough peer review, for publication costs involved in providing the article freely and universally accessible in various formats online, and for the processes required for the article's inclusion in PubMed and its archiving in PubMed Central, e-Depot, Potsdam and INIST. There is no remuneration of any kind provided to the Editors-in-Chief, to any members of the Editorial Board, or to peer reviewers; all of whose work is entirely voluntary. Our article-processing charge is less than charges frequently levied by traditional journals: the Journal of Neuroinflammation does not levy any additional page or color charges on top of this fee, and there are no reprint costs as publication-quality pdf files are provided, free, for distribution in lieu of reprints. Our article-processing charge will enable full, immediate, and continued Open Access for all work published in Journal of Neuroinflammation. The benefits from such Open Access will accrue to readers, through unrestricted access; to authors, through the widest possible dissemination of their work; and to science and

  18. Remote access for NAS: Supercomputing in a university environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Olson, B.; Swisshelm, J.; Pryor, D.; Ziebarth, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment was designed to assist the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Project Office in the testing and evaluation of long haul communications for remote users. The objectives of this work were to: (1) use foreign workstations to remotely access the NAS system; (2) provide NAS with a link to a large university-based computing facility which can serve as a model for a regional node of the Long-Haul Communications Subsystem (LHCS); and (3) provide a tail circuit to the University of Colorado a Boulder thereby simulating the complete communications path from NAS through a regional node to an end-user.

  19. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    PubMed Central

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  20. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access.

    PubMed

    Pires, Denise Elvira Pires de; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda Dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  1. Universal Access to Post-Secondary Education: Some Policy and Administrative Observations from British Open University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Colin; Glatter, Ron

    The British Open University (OU) offers university degree programs to adults who are employed and study at home. It does so through a nationwide universal access (open admission) policy. A key feature of this program is that it imposes traditional university standards of excellence. Access is not limited by formal entry requirements, geography,…

  2. The Australian National University Music Education Programme: Developing a New Approach to Ongoing Engagement in Music Making for All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Music Education Programme at the Australian National University has developed a new, system-wide model in music education, focusing on peer and inter-generational social engagement through music making during and beyond the school years. One aim of the programme is to find alternative ways of fostering lifelong engagement in music making. A…

  3. Electromagnetic wave scattering from a forest or vegetation canopy - Ongoing research at the University of Texas at Arlington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Amar, Faouzi; Fung, Adrian K.

    1993-01-01

    The Wave Scattering Research Center at the University of Texas at Arlington has developed a scattering model for forest or vegetation, based on the theory of electromagnetic-wave scattering in random media. The model generalizes the assumptions imposed by earlier models, and compares well with measurements from several forest canopies. This paper gives a description of the model. It also indicates how the model elements are integrated to obtain the scattering characteristics of different forest canopies. The scattering characteristics may be displayed in the form of polarimetric signatures, represented by like- and cross-polarized scattering coefficients, for an elliptically-polarized wave, or in the form of signal-distribution curves. Results illustrating both types of scattering characteristics are given.

  4. Equity of access under Korean universal health insurance.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Moon

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the extent to which equity in the use of physician services has been achieved in the Republic of Korea. Descriptive and logistic regression analysis was performed examining the relationship between the dependent variable and the independent variables and the relative importance of factors. The results indicate that a universal health insurance system has not yielded a fully equitable distribution of services. Access differences arise from coverage limitation, as well as urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers. The policy options for expansion of coverage should be encouraged to ease the financial burden of out-of-pocket payments on patients and to limit the range of noninsured services. Urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers are caused by the government's "laissez-faire" policy for the private medical sector. To solve this geographic misdistribution, the attention of policy makers is required, with changing of the government's "laissez-faire" policy. PMID:22652252

  5. The University of Saskatchewan's Aboriginal Equity Access Program in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, Paul Elliot; Uswak, Gerald Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Persons of Aboriginal ancestry are underrepresented in the dental profession in North America. In Canada, the University of Saskatchewan College of Dentistry began a proactive program to recruit, retain, and graduate more Aboriginal students in 1996. This program, entitled the Aboriginal Equity Access Program, has seen the inclusion of twenty-two Aboriginal students in the predoctoral program. This article describes the program and reports on the success of the students enrolled via this route. The primary conclusion is that selection of Aboriginal dental students with lower entry scores--who would not have gained entry if the program did not exist--has not impaired their ability to successfully complete the dental undergraduate program and pass the National Dental Examining Board licensure examination. PMID:24489025

  6. New Economy Work (NEW) Scholarships: Universal Access to Training for Dislocated Workers. Policy Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Paul, Jr.

    The New Economy Work (NEW) Scholarship is a proposed scholarship designed to reform federal training programs and to make them universally accessible to dislocated or disadvantaged workers. NEW Scholarships would accomplish the following things: (1) make access to training for dislocated workers as universally available as access to college; (2)…

  7. Google Books: making the public domain universally accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Adam; Bloomberg, Dan S.

    2007-01-01

    Google Book Search is working with libraries and publishers around the world to digitally scan books. Some of those works are now in the public domain and, in keeping with Google's mission to make all the world's information useful and universally accessible, we wish to allow users to download them all. For users, it is important that the files are as small as possible and of printable quality. This means that a single codec for both text and images is impractical. We use PDF as a container for a mixture of JBIG2 and JPEG2000 images which are composed into a final set of pages. We discuss both the implementation of an open source JBIG2 encoder, which we use to compress text data, and the design of the infrastructure needed to meet the technical, legal and user requirements of serving many scanned works. We also cover the lessons learnt about dealing with different PDF readers and how to write files that work on most of the readers, most of the time.

  8. Web Accessibility Theory and Practice: An Introduction for University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbard, David A.; Peters, Cara

    2010-01-01

    Web accessibility is the practice of making Web sites accessible to all, particularly those with disabilities. As the Internet becomes a central part of post-secondary instruction, it is imperative that instructional Web sites be designed for accessibility to meet the needs of disabled students. The purpose of this article is to introduce Web…

  9. Acceptance and Adoption of Open Access Publication (OAP) in University Libraries in South East Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambe, Manasseh Tyungu; Raphael, Gabriel Okplogidi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the kinds of open access scholarly publication or information resources accepted and adopted by federal university libraries in South East Nigeria. The purpose was to determine the factors that affect open access scholarly publication or information resources acceptance and adoption in university libraries. The study adopted…

  10. Universal patient acceptance: ethics pipe dream or key to improved access in dentistry?

    PubMed

    Patthoff, D E; Corsino, B V

    2001-01-01

    The authors discuss ways that dentistry engages silently and sometimes unknowingly in practice patterns that adversely affect public access to dental care. The concept of acceptance is explained and contrasted with treatment and with access to care. The concept of Universal Patient Acceptance (UPA) is introduced, with a focus on how it underlies and precedes access, creating a pathway so that truer universal access to dental care can be realized. The authors argue that a commitment to Universal Patient Acceptance shows promise as an important starting point in the dental profession's concern to address society's unmet oral health needs. PMID:11887369

  11. Access to Higher Education in Egypt: Examining Trends by University Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Access to higher education in Egypt is expanding in both the public and private sectors. Using a nationally representative sample from the Survey of Young People in Egypt, this article is able to disaggregate patterns of access by both demographic group and university sector. Findings suggest that access in the public sector is governed strongly…

  12. Interactive Training for Information Access: The InfoMagic Multimedia Project at Chapman University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Dallas

    This paper proposes a new model for developing information access skills in an academic environment. In order to meet the increasing demand for "research competence" among students and faculty, it is necessary to move beyond traditional lecture formats and develop interactive multimedia instructional units which exploit ongoing advances in digital…

  13. 47 CFR 54.806 - Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access universal service support for areas served by price cap local exchange carriers. 54.806 Section 54...) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.806 Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served by price cap local...

  14. 47 CFR 54.806 - Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access universal service support for areas served by price cap local exchange carriers. 54.806 Section 54...) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.806 Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served by price cap local...

  15. 47 CFR 54.806 - Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access universal service support for areas served by price cap local exchange carriers. 54.806 Section 54...) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.806 Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served by price cap local...

  16. 47 CFR 54.806 - Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... access universal service support for areas served by price cap local exchange carriers. 54.806 Section 54...) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate Access Universal Service Support Mechanism § 54.806 Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served by price cap local...

  17. University and Community Partnership: Access and Economic Development in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audley, Barbara; Thompson, Ann McKay

    This report describes an educational partnership between South Dakota State University and Capital University Center, Inc. (CUC), (Pierre, South Dakota). CUC is a nonprofit organization founded in 1982 to provide access to higher education for residents of rural central South Dakota. CUC contracts with South Dakota State University for educational…

  18. Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: identification of nursing research priorities in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Bassalobre-Garcia, Alessandra; Reveiz, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estabilish a regional list for nursing research priorities in health systems and services in the Region of the Americas based on the concepts of Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. Method: five-stage consensus process: systematic review of literature; appraisal of resulting questions and topics; ranking of the items by graduate program coordinators; discussion and ranking amongst a forum of researchers and public health leaders; and consultation with the Ministries of Health of the Pan American Health Organization's member states. Results: the resulting list of nursing research priorities consists of 276 study questions/ topics, which are sorted into 14 subcategories distributed into six major categories: 1. Policies and education of nursing human resources; 2. Structure, organization and dynamics of health systems and services; 3. Science, technology, innovation, and information systems in public health; 4. Financing of health systems and services; 5. Health policies, governance, and social control; and 6. Social studies in the health field. Conclusion: the list of nursing research priorities is expected to serve as guidance and support for nursing research on health systems and services across Latin America. Not only researchers, but also Ministries of Health, leaders in public health, and research funding agencies are encouraged to use the results of this list to help inform research-funding decisions. PMID:26487014

  19. Descriptor data of Castanea accessions at the University of Missouri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chestnut, Castanea L., trees were propagated and planted in repositories at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center, New Franklin, Missouri in 1996, 2002, 2009 with additional accessions acquired annually. Trees have been pruned, fertilized, irrigated, and pests controlled following Unive...

  20. Universal Coverage without Universal Access: Institutional Barriers to Health Care among Women Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Socías, M. Eugenia; Shoveller, Jean; Bean, Chili; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Shannon, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to health care is a crucial determinant of health. Yet, even within settings that purport to provide universal health coverage (UHC), sex workers’ experiences reveal systematic, institutionally ingrained barriers to appropriate quality health care. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and correlates of institutional barriers to care among sex workers in a setting with UHC. Methods Data was drawn from an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort of women sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (An Evaluation of Sex Workers’ Health Access). Multivariable logistic regression analyses, using generalized estimating equations (GEE), were employed to longitudinally investigate correlates of institutional barriers to care over a 44-month follow-up period (January 2010-August 2013). Results In total, 723 sex workers were included, contributing to 2506 observations. Over the study period, 509 (70.4%) women reported one or more institutional barriers to care. The most commonly reported institutional barriers to care were long wait times (54.6%), limited hours of operation (36.5%), and perceived disrespect by health care providers (26.1%). In multivariable GEE analyses, recent partner- (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.46, % 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.10–1.94), workplace- (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.05–1.63), and community-level violence (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.04–1.92), as well as other markers of vulnerability, such as self-identification as a gender/sexual minority (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.03–1.69), a mental illness diagnosis (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.34–2.06), and lack of provincial health insurance card (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI 1.59–7.57) emerged as independent correlates of institutional barriers to health services. Discussion Despite Canada’s UHC, women sex workers in Vancouver face high prevalence of institutional barriers to care, with highest burden among most marginalized women. These findings underscore the need to explore new models of care

  1. Access to University Education in Nigeria: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agboola, B. M.; Ofoegbu, F. I.

    2010-01-01

    Demand for university education has increased due to the recent innovations of universal, free and compulsory education at the basic and senior secondary education level. Education has been expanding very rapidly at all levels in Nigeria. However, there are serious problems related to quality, equity, unavailable human and material resources and…

  2. The Barriers of Access to Selective Universities in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakhov, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the characteristics of students admitted to Russian universities with different levels of selectivity. First, we argue that students differ not only by the results of the Unified State Exam (USE), the university entrance exam, but by family and school characteristics, and by educational strategies. Next, it is shown that the…

  3. Regional University Access: A Case Study from the South West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eversole, Robyn

    A study examined university service delivery in an isolated, inland region of south Western Australia. Surveys, focus groups, and interviews with students and former students found that many pre-university youths leave the area because education is only offered through year 10. Therefore, college students in the area tend to be mature-aged. Key…

  4. Visualizing Access: Knowledge Development in University-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strier, Roni; Shechter, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    This article tackles the need to democratize processes of knowledge production in the context of university-community partnerships. These partnerships, which are a rich source of academic research, allow universities to create more reciprocal relationships with communities, especially those affected by social inequalities. Through their social…

  5. Access under Siege: Are the Gains of Open Education Keeping Pace with the Growing Barriers to University Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olcott, Don, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional and affordable access to a university education is under siege from all sides. National realpolitiks and global economic downturns have driven open education into the mainstream to stand against educational elitism, the growing digital divide, and to support the core values that give education its fundamental credence as a human right.…

  6. English Universities, Additional Fee Income and Access Agreements: Their Impact on Widening Participation and Fair Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaig, Colin; Adnett, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that the introduction of access agreements following the establishment of the Office for Fair Access (OFFA) has consolidated how English higher education institutions (HEIs) position themselves in the marketplace in relation to widening participation. However, the absence of a national bursary scheme has led to obfuscation rather…

  7. The Accessible School: Universal Design for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar, Laurel; Galluzzo, Judith

    This book provides practical reasons for the Americans with Disabilities Act requirements for accessibility of school sites, buildings, and educational rooms as well as clear illustrations to aid in the explanation of the guidelines. It addresses practical matters such as safety and cost-effectiveness while increasing sensitivity to different…

  8. Universities Have a Key Role in Global Access to Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panjabi, Rajesh; Rajkumar, Rahul; Kim, Jim Yong

    2008-01-01

    Around the world, the fight for affordable medical treatment is intensifying. Headline-grabbing battles are being waged in India, where the Chennai High Court recently decided a major constitutional case over access to lifesaving cancer medication. In Thailand, Abbott Laboratories, a multinational pharmaceutical giant, has withdrawn registration…

  9. Universal Tailored Access: Automating Setup of Public and Classroom Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Stephen G.; Young, Ted; Toth-Cohen, Susan

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a setup smart access card that enables users with visual impairments to customize magnifiers and screen readers on computers by loading the floppy disk into the computer and finding and pressing two successive keys. A trial with four elderly users found instruction took about 15 minutes. (Contains 3 references.) (CR)

  10. A University Center Leverages Resources and Provides Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baus, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    A parade of people composed of young mothers, young professionals, middle-aged men and women and elder South Carolinians are marching across the parking lot into the former McAlister Square Mall. They have access to higher education because higher education has come to them--not in the form of a traditional campus but as the concrete realization…

  11. Aspects of the Problems of Bibliographic Access to University Library Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguolu, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Problems of providing bibliographic access to university library-based information sources are discussed with focus upon bibliographies, card and union catalogs, and library classification schemes. (Author/MBR)

  12. The Costs of Providing Electronic Journal Access and Printed Copies of Journals to University Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Six models are developed to analyze the cost options the University of California faces in providing access to academic journals. The driving force in this analysis is a movement by publishers to deliver the content of their journals via the Internet. The models assume electronic access will always be provided. Researchers like this capability…

  13. Monitoring for Accessibility and University Websites: Meeting the Needs of People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solovieva, Tatiana I.; Bock, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with disabilities are guaranteed access to all postsecondary programs and services. The purpose of this study, conducted by the Center for Excellence in Disabilities, was to evaluate the current status of a major university's web accessibility. The results indicated that in 2011 only 51%…

  14. Does Gender Matter? University Library Access and Career Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniella

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine how the gender of distance learning students related to variables such as the perception of the availability of library resources, technology available at home and work, technology provided by a university for distance learning, and career preparedness. A total of 166 master's students in the…

  15. Flexible Work Arrangements: Accessibility in a University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharafizad, Fleur; Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Attraction and retention of highly qualified employees has become an area of concern for Australian universities. It has been suggested that flexible work arrangements can be utilised to achieve this goal once the factors affecting their uptake have been identified. This mixed-method study of 495 academic and general staff at an Australian…

  16. Universal Design for Learning: Curriculum, Technology, and Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlandson, Robert F.

    This paper examines how teachers, as educational designers, can utilize universal design for learning (UDL) concepts. UDL is a comprehensive approach to the design of educational systems that addresses elements necessary for the achievement of desired educational goals and objectives: elements such as equity among the participants, environmental…

  17. Opening Access to the University of California Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Barbara

    Developed at the beginning of the decade to serve as a union catalog for identifying the holdings in all University of California (UC) libraries, the MELVYL online catalog as of October 1989 contained 10 million holdings for over 5 million monographic titles of print and nonprint materials, and more than 1.2 million periodicals holdings which…

  18. "Adelante en Utah": Dilemmas of Leadership and College Access in a University-School-Community Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemán, Enrique, Jr.; Pérez-Torres, Judith C.; Oliva, Nereida

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses some of the issues that "Adelante," a 6-year university-school-community partnership, continues to encounter in addressing college access and parent and community leadership in a community of color. It provides the sociopolitical context as well as a description of the university and community partners that make…

  19. Universal Design for Instruction: A Matter of Equitable Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Simone; Stuart, Shannon; Riall, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Universal design for instruction is an inclusive teaching model that the authors advocate for responding to the diverse learning needs of students in today's postsecondary classrooms. The goal of universally designed courses is to allow all students to have available a menu of choices by which they can access curriculum content, engage in learning…

  20. Widening Access to University Education in Anglophone Africa: Problems and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oduaran, Akpovire; Oduaran, Choja

    2007-01-01

    Widening access to university-level education in Anglophone Africa has been moving away gradually from rhetorical optimism into the realm of political actualisation of collective intentions of community modernisation and growth. This is because university education is being deconstructed to embrace the welfare, self-actualisation and…

  1. Universal access: but when? Treating the right patient at the right time: access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, William; Arthur, Heather; Stokes, Helen; Morrin, Louise; Beaton, Louise

    2006-09-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society formed an Access to Care Working Group ('Working Group') in the spring of 2004. The mandate of the group was to use the best science and information to establish reasonable triage categories and safe wait times for access to common cardiovascular services and procedures. The present commentary presents the rationale for benchmarks for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services. The Working Group's search for evidence included: a full literature review of the efficacy of CR, and the factors affecting access and referral to CR; a review of existing guidelines for access to CR; and a national survey of 14 CR programs across Canada undertaken in May 2005 to solicit information on referral to, and wait times for, CR. The Working Group also reviewed the results of The Ontario Cardiac Rehabilitation Pilot Project (2002) undertaken by the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, which reported the average and median wait times for CR. Some international agencies have formulated their own guidelines relating to the optimal wait time for the onset of CR. However, due to the limited amount of supporting literature, these guidelines have generally been formed as consensus statements. The Canadian national survey showed that few programs had guidelines for individual programs. The Cardiac Care Network of Ontario pilot project reported that the average and median times from a cardiac event to the intake into CR were 99 and 70 days, respectively. The national survey of sampled CR programs also revealed quite remarkable differences across programs in terms of the length of time between first contact to first attendance and to commencement of exercise. Programs that required a stress test before program initiation had the longest wait for exercise initiation. Some patients need to be seen within a very short time frame to prevent a marked deterioration in their medical or psychological state. In some cases, early intervention and advocacy may reduce the risk

  2. Accessible Universe: Making Astronomy Accessible to All in the Regular Elementary Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, C. A.; Farley, N.; Avery, F.; Zamboni, E.; Clark, B.; Geiger, N.; de Angelis, M.; Woodgate, B.

    2002-05-01

    Astronomy is one of the most publicly accessible of the sciences, with a steady stream of new discoveries, and wide public interest. The study of exo-planetary systems is a natural extension of studies of the Solar System at the elementary and middle-school level. Such space-related topics are some of the most popular science curriculum areas at the elementary level and can serve as a springboard to other sciences, mathematics, and technology for typical student learners. Not all students are typical: 10 percent of American students are identified as having disabilities which impact their education sufficiently that they receive special education services; various estimates suggest that an additional 10 percent may have milder impairments. Most frequently these students are placed in comprehensive (mixed-ability) classrooms. Budgetary limitations for most school systems have meant that for the bulk of these children, usually those with comparatively mild learning impairments affecting their ability to access text materials and in some cases to make effective use of visual materials, individualized accommodations in the science curriculum have not been readily available. Our team, consisting of an astronomer, regular education teachers, and special educators has been piloting a suite of curriculum materials, modified activities, including use of assistive technology, age- appropriate astronomy web resources, and instructional strategies which can more effectively teach astronomy to children with disabilities in the regular education grade 3-5 classroom. This study was supported by a grant HST-EO-8474 from the STScI and funded by NASA.

  3. Paradigms and poverty in global energy policy: research needs for achieving universal energy access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Bazilian, Morgan; Toman, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This research letter discusses elements of a long-term interdisciplinary research effort needed to help ensure the maximum social, economic, and environmental benefits of achieving secure universal access to modern energy services. Exclusion of these services affects the lives and livelihoods of billions of people. The research community has an important, but not yet well-defined, role to play.

  4. Predicting Early Center Care Utilization in a Context of Universal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Janson, Harald; Naerde, Ane

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports predictors for center care utilization prior to 18 months of age in Norway, a country with a welfare system providing up to one-year paid parental leave and universal access to subsidized and publicly regulated center care. A community sample of 1103 families was interviewed about demographics, family, and child characteristics…

  5. "The Open Library at AU" (Athabasca University): Supporting Open Access and Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Colin; Fabbro, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    To address challenges that learners, course creators, librarians and academics involved with OER and MOOCs are facing when looking for scholarly materials, Athabasca University Library has initiated the development of "the Open Library at AU." This open library is a full library website that provides easy access to open and free…

  6. A Comparison of Keyword Subject Searching on Six British University OPACs Online Public Access Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aanonson, John

    1987-01-01

    Compares features of online public access catalogs (OPACs) at six British universities: (1) Cambridge; (2) Hull; (3) Newcastle; (4) Surrey; (5) Sussex; and (6) York. Results of keyword subject searches on two topics performed on each of the OPACs are reported and compared. Six references are listed. (MES)

  7. Unlocking the Gates: How and Why Leading Universities Are Opening up Access to Their Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a small revolution has taken place at some of the world's leading universities, as they have started to provide free access to undergraduate course materials--including syllabi, assignments, and lectures--to anyone with an Internet connection. Yale offers high-quality audio and video recordings of a careful selection of…

  8. Access vs. Ownership: A SUNY University Center Libraries Study of the Economics of Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Wahlde, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Examines issues surrounding ownership versus borrowing costs of scientific journals at the four State University of New York (SUNY) Centers. Compares access to journal articles through a consortial approach, traditional interlibrary loan (ILL), and commercial delivery services. Analyzes user satisfaction with ILL and willingness to pay for…

  9. Progress Report: Access and Persistence of Minority Students in the Arizona Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotera, Augustus S.; And Others

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this report presents statistical information on the progress of minority student access and persistence in the three Arizona Universities, Arizona's community colleges, and the Arizona Department of Education.…

  10. Refugee Children in South Africa: Access and Challenges to Achieving Universal Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meda, L.; Sookrajh, R.; Maharaj, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper questions whether the second Millennium Development Goal of achieving universal primary education targets by 2015 for all children to complete a full course of primary schooling, can be realised. A key contention of this paper is that this forecast is far-fetched when we take into cognizance refugee children's accessibility to…

  11. Open Access, Retention and Throughput at the Central University of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beer, K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The most debatable question in higher education today is: Why first "open access" to promote massafication and now "capping" to restrict learner intake? (cf. SA Media Information 2004). Concerning the managing of this difficult and extremely sensitive issue, the Central University of Technology, Free State (CUT) has come a long way. Its position…

  12. AUPress: A Comparison of an Open Access University Press with Traditional Presses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreal, Rory; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2011-01-01

    This study is a comparison of AUPress with three other traditional (non-open access) Canadian university presses. The analysis is based on the rankings that are correlated with book sales on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. Statistical methods include the sampling of the sales ranking of randomly selected books from each press. The results of one-way…

  13. Access and Finance Issues: The University of Alabama's Education Policy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the 1920s, the Education Policy Center (EPC) is the oldest center or institute at The University of Alabama. Our work centers on four interrelated areas: (a) access and finance of public higher education, (b) college completion, (c) Pell Grants, and (d) rural community colleges. As place-based institutions with service delivery…

  14. Multiple Perspectives on the Accessibility of E-Learning in Canadian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asuncion, Jennison V.; Fichten, Catherine S.; Ferraro, Vittoria; Chwojka, Caroline; Barile, Maria; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Wolforth, Joan

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study identified and compared the views of 77 campus disability service providers, 38 professors, and 45 e-learning professionals from Canadian colleges and universities regarding their experiences with e-learning and its accessibility to students with disabilities. Findings indicate that all groups saw benefit in having someone who…

  15. Mobility and Hierarchy in the Age of Near-Universal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    With the shift toward near-universal access, the movement of students within and between systems of higher education has assumed a new importance, especially for policies aimed at widening participation and social equity. Globalization has given rise to increasing levels of student mobility across national boundaries, with participation in…

  16. Opinions of Students at Turkish and German Universities on Turkey in the EU Accession Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celebi, Nurhayat

    2009-01-01

    Turkey's candidacy for accession to the European Union (EU) dates back to many years and is still a current and highly disputed issue. This study was conducted to determine the opinions of students at Turkish and German universities on Turkey in relation to the European Union. Two hundred twenty six German students participated in the study from…

  17. Evaluating the Usability and Accessibility of LMS "Blackboard" at King Saud University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alturki, Uthman T.; Aldraiweesh, Ahmed; Kinshuck

    2016-01-01

    King Saud University is in the process of adopting and implementing the interactive Blackboard Learning Management Systems (LMSs) with features that allow members of staff and teachers from different faculties to access, upload assignments, send quizzes, download content, and evaluate the academic progress of the members of faculty. However, many…

  18. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  19. Publishers' PR Tactic Angers University Presses and Open-Access Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on reactions to the Association of American Publishers' new public-relations campaign, which has upset many university presses and research librarians, as well as open-access advocates. The effort, known as the "Partnership for Research Integrity in Science & Medicine," or Prism, is the latest tactic in a continuing…

  20. Increasing Teacher Access to Ongoing Computer Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Elizabeth A.; Berger, Carl F.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Training Modules for Trainers (TMT) Project. Discusses the creation of competency-based materials, observing trainers at work and choosing a feasible model. Lists the titles and descriptions of TMT modules. Describes the purpose of the project as promoting the creative and productive use of computers as instructional tools. (CW)

  1. Improving Access to University Education: The Case of the National Open University of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nnaka, Chibuogwu V.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has proved to be a significant medium for the socio- economic, political, and technological development of any nation. It is absolutely necessary for equipping individuals with new knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Globally higher education, especially university education is faced with a lot of challenges and difficulties…

  2. Unemployment, Entrepreneurial Education and Mega Universities: Challenges to Expanding Access in Education in Nigeria University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Undie, John Atewhoble; Okafor, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In fundamental economics, individuals acquired education for two broad reasons, as an investment and as consumption. The investment function of education has continued to create tension for job search leading to cases of unemployment. Entrepreneurship education and establishment of mega universities have been identified as panaceas. This paper…

  3. PAHO'S Strategy for Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: implications for health services and hospitals in LAC.

    PubMed

    Holder, Reynaldo; Fabrega, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Moving towards Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage (UAH/UHC) is an imperative task on the health agenda for the Americas. The Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recently approved resolution CD53.R14, titled Strategy for Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. From the perspective of the Region of the Americas, UAH/UHC "imply that all people and communities have access, without any kind of discrimination, to comprehensive, appropriate and timely, quality health services determined at the national level according to needs, as well as access to safe, affordable, effective, quality medicines, while ensuring that the use of these services does not expose users to financial hardship, especially groups in conditions of vulnerability". PAHO's strategic approach to UAH/UHC sets out four specific lines of action toward effective universal health systems. The first strategic line proposes: a) implementation of integrated health services delivery networks (IHDSNs) based on primary health care as the key strategy for reorganizing, redefining and improving healthcare services in general and the role of hospitals in particular; and b) increasing the response capacity of the first level of care. An important debate initiated in 2011 among hospital and healthcare managers in the region tried to redefine the role of hospitals in the context of IHSDNs and the emerging UAH/UHC movement. The debates resulted in agreements around three main propositions: 1) IHSDNs cannot be envisioned without hospitals; 2) The status-quo and current hospital organizational culture makes IHSDNs inviable; and 3) Without IHSDNs, hospitals will not be sustainable. This process, that predates the approval of PAHO's UAH/UHC resolution, now becomes more relevant with the recognition that UAH/UHC cannot be attained without a profound change in healthcare service and particularly in hospitals. In this context, a set of challenges both for

  4. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/accessibility.html MedlinePlus Accessibility To use the sharing features on this page, ... Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs ...

  5. "I've Never Heard of It Before": Awareness of Open Access at a Small Liberal Arts University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocken, Gregory J.; Wical, Stephanie H.

    2013-01-01

    Small colleges and universities, often late adopters of institutional repositories and open access initiatives, face challenges that have not fully been explored in the professional literature. In an effort to gauge the level of awareness of open access and institutional repositories at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (UWEC), the authors of…

  6. Institutional Change for Improving Accessibility in the Design and Delivery of Distance Learning--The Role of Faculty Accessibility Specialists at the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Rachel; Pearson, Victoria K.; Warren, James P.; Forbes, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The Open University (OU) has an established infrastructure for supporting disabled students. Historically, the thrust of this has focused on providing accessible adjustments post-production. In 2012, the OU implemented securing greater accessibility (SeGA) to raise awareness and bring about an institutional change to curriculum design so that the…

  7. The Relationship of Promotion Focus, Need for Cognitive Closure, and Categorical Accessibility in American and Hong Kong Chinese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IP, Grace Wai-Man; Chen, Jing; Chiu, Chi-Yue

    2006-01-01

    Categorical accessibility is a cognitive factor that limits the extent of creative conceptual expansion. In the present study, we sought to establish the categorical accessibility norms in five conceptual domains among American and Hong Kong Chinese university students. In addition, we predicted that the tendency to access normatively inaccessible…

  8. The post-2015 delivery of universal and sustainable access to infrastructure services. Working Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Doczi, Julian, Dorr, Tobias; Mason, Nathaniel; Scott, Andrew

    2013-06-15

    In this new working paper, the authors focus specifically on what would be necessary to achieve High Level Panel-style goals and targets for water, energy and transport, if these were to be eventually adopted by world leaders. In all three cases, much of the advocacy - and the proposed High Level Panel goals - have emphasized the need to strive for universal and sustainable access to at least basic levels of services from these sectors. Many of the proposals for post-2015 goals and targets appear ambitious, but what would it take to achieve them? This paper assesses what is needed to achieve goals for universal and sustainable access to infrastructure, specifically water, energy and transport. Using illustrative goals and targets, the paper reviews the development challenges in each sector, and what will be necessary to overcome the barriers to universal and sustainable access to water, energy and transport infrastructure services, in the areas of governance, finance, capacity development and environmental protection. The paper ends with general conclusions about infrastructure in the post-2015 development agenda.

  9. Did Universal Access to ARVT in Mexico Impact Suboptimal Antiretroviral Prescriptions?

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Vega, Yanink; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Colchero, M. Arantxa; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Universal access to antiretroviral therapy (ARVT) started in Mexico in 2001; no evaluation of the features of ARVT prescriptions over time has been conducted. The aim of the study is to document trends in the quality of ARVT-prescription before and after universal access. Methods. We describe ARVT prescriptions before and after 2001 in three health facilities from the following subsystems: the Mexican Social Security (IMSS), the Ministry of Health (SSA), and National Institutes of Health (INS). Combinations of drugs and reasons for change were classified according to current Mexican guidelines and state-of-the-art therapy. Comparisons were made using χ2 tests. Results. Before 2001, 29% of patients starting ARVT received HAART; after 2001 it increased to 90%. The proportion of adequate prescriptions decreased within the two periods of study in all facilities (P value < 0.01). The INS and SSA were more likely to be prescribed adequately (P value < 0.01) compared to IMSS. The distribution of reasons for change was not significantly different during this time for all facilities (P value > 0.05). Conclusions. Universal ARVT access in Mexico was associated with changes in ARVT-prescription patterns over time. Health providers' performance improved, but not homogeneously. Training of personnel and guidelines updating is essential to improve prescription. PMID:24396592

  10. Pathways to achieve universal household access to modern energy by 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachauri, Shonali; van Ruijven, Bas J.; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Brew-Hammond, Abeeku; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa

    2013-06-01

    A lack of access to modern energy impacts health and welfare and impedes development for billions of people. Growing concern about these impacts has mobilized the international community to set new targets for universal modern energy access. However, analyses exploring pathways to achieve these targets and quantifying the potential costs and benefits are limited. Here, we use two modelling frameworks to analyse investments and consequences of achieving total rural electrification and universal access to clean-combusting cooking fuels and stoves by 2030. Our analysis indicates that these targets can be achieved with additional investment of US200565-86 billion per year until 2030 combined with dedicated policies. Only a combination of policies that lowers costs for modern cooking fuels and stoves, along with more rapid electrification, can enable the realization of these goals. Our results demonstrate the critical importance of accounting for varying demands and affordability across heterogeneous household groups in both analysis and policy setting. While the investments required are significant, improved access to modern cooking fuels alone can avert between 0.6 and 1.8 million premature deaths annually in 2030 and enhance wellbeing substantially.

  11. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  12. Efforts to secure universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment: a comparison of BRICS countries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Silveira, Marysabel P T; Bertoldi, Andréa D; Ziganshina, Liliya E; Khaziakhmetova, Veronica N; Khamidulina, Rashida M; Chokshi, Maulik R; McGee, Shelley; Suleman, Fatima

    2014-02-01

    This article illustrates how the BRICS countries have been building their focused leadership, making important high level commitment and national policy changes, and improving their health systems, in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemics in respective settings. Specific aspects are focused on efforts of creating public provisions to secure universal access to ARVs from the aspects of active responsive system and national program, health system strengthening, fostering local production of ARVs, supply chain management, and information system strengthening. Challenges in each BRICS country are analyzed respectively. The most important contributors to the success of response to HIV/AIDS include: creating legal basis for healthcare as a fundamental human right; political commitment to necessary funding for universal access and concrete actions to secure equal quality care; comprehensive system to secure demands that all people in need are capable of accessing prevention, treatment and care; active community involvement; decentralization of the management system considering the local settings; integration of treatment and prevention; taking horizontal approach to strengthen health systems; fully use of the TRIPS flexibility; and regular monitoring and evaluation to serve evidence based decision making. PMID:25155561

  13. Hidden Drug Resistant HIV to Emerge in the Era of Universal Treatment Access in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Alexander; Kerr, Stephen J.; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Law, Matthew G.; Cooper, David A.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Wilson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Universal access to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection is becoming more of a reality in most low and middle income countries in Asia. However, second-line therapies are relatively scarce. Methods and Findings We developed a mathematical model of an HIV epidemic in a Southeast Asian setting and used it to forecast the impact of treatment plans, without second-line options, on the potential degree of acquisition and transmission of drug resistant HIV strains. We show that after 10 years of universal treatment access, up to 20% of treatment-naïve individuals with HIV may have drug-resistant strains but it depends on the relative fitness of viral strains. Conclusions If viral load testing of people on ART is carried out on a yearly basis and virological failure leads to effective second-line therapy, then transmitted drug resistance could be reduced by 80%. Greater efforts are required for minimizing first-line failure, to detect virological failure earlier, and to procure access to second-line therapies. PMID:20544022

  14. Universal access to electricity in Burkina Faso: scaling-up renewable energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moner-Girona, M.; Bódis, K.; Huld, T.; Kougias, I.; Szabó, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the status quo of the power sector in Burkina Faso, its limitations, and develops a new methodology that through spatial analysis processes with the aim to provide a possible pathway for universal electricity access. Following the SE4All initiative approach, it recommends the more extensive use of distributed renewable energy systems to increase access to electricity on an accelerated timeline. Less than 5% of the rural population in Burkina Faso have currently access to electricity and supply is lacking at many social structures such as schools and hospitals. Energy access achievements in Burkina Faso are still very modest. According to the latest SE4All Global Tracking Framework (2015), the access to electricity annual growth rate in Burkina Faso from 2010 to 2012 is 0%. The rural electrification strategy for Burkina Faso is scattered in several electricity sector development policies: there is a need of defining a concrete action plan. Planning and coordination between grid extension and the off-grid electrification programme is essential to reach a long-term sustainable energy model and prevent high avoidable infrastructure investments. This paper goes into details on the methodology and findings of the developed Geographic Information Systems tool. The aim of the dynamic planning tool is to provide support to the national government and development partners to define an alternative electrification plan. Burkina Faso proves to be paradigm case for the methodology as its national policy for electrification is still dominated by grid extension and the government subsidising fossil fuel electricity production. However, the results of our analysis suggest that the current grid extension is becoming inefficient and unsustainable in order to reach the national energy access targets. The results also suggest that Burkina Faso’s rural electrification strategy should be driven local renewable resources to power distributed mini-grids. We find that

  15. Universal Design Criteria in Standards and Codes About Accessibility of Built Environments in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marcelo Pinto

    2016-01-01

    This paper includes some criticism in analysis of the development and implementation of the national standards for accessibility of the built environment in Brazil, i.e., the NBR9050. Currently, the 2015 version of it resembles an encyclopaedia including a variety of exotic contributions gathered historically from different sources; however, that characteristic makes it work like a puzzle that keeps alive prejudices about users' needs and disabilities. Besides, there are conflicts between recommended ideas and previous requirements from older versions. The definition of Universal Design has been published since 2004, but there is still no indication of how to make the principles work in practice. Therefore, it is very hard for city officials to assess quality of environments, and professionals have serious constraints to explore their skills further while addressing users' diversified needs. Certainly, the current NBR9050 requires further editorial work. Nevertheless, an important decision is necessary: it is important to organize information so that readers may identify in each topic whether Universal Design application can be achieved or whether the proposed technical solution may lead to construction of limited spatial adaptation and reach only some poor accommodation of users with uncommon needs. Presenting some examples in context of socially inclusive environments, the newer revised version of NBR9050 is necessary to explain about pitfalls of bad design of accessibility for discriminated disabled users. Readers should be able to establish conceptual links between the best ideas so that Universal Design could be easily understood. PMID:27534295

  16. A universal data access and protocol integration mechanism for smart home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Pengfei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-03-01

    With the lack of standardized or completely missing communication interfaces in home electronics, there is no perfect solution to address every aspect in smart homes based on existing protocols and technologies. In addition, the central control unit (CCU) of smart home system working point-to-point between the multiple application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces leads to its complicated architecture and unpleasant performance. A flexible data access and protocol integration mechanism is required. The current paper offers a universal, comprehensive data access and protocol integration mechanism for a smart home. The universal mechanism works as a middleware adapter with unified agreements of the communication interfaces and protocols, offers an abstraction of the application level from the hardware specific and decoupling the hardware interface modules from the application level. Further abstraction for the application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces are executed based on adaption layer to provide unified interfaces for more flexible user applications and hardware protocol integration. This new universal mechanism fundamentally changes the architecture of the smart home and in some way meets the practical requirement of smart homes more flexible and desirable.

  17. Access to antiretroviral treatment, issues of well-being and public health governance in Chad: what justifies the limited success of the universal access policy?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Universal access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Chad was officially declared in December 2006. This presidential initiative was and is still funded 100% by the country’s budget and external donors’ financial support. Many factors have triggered the spread of AIDS. Some of these factors include the existence of norms and beliefs that create or increase exposure, the low-level education that precludes access to health information, social unrest, and population migration to areas of high economic opportunities and gender-based discrimination. Social forces that influence the distribution of dimensions of well-being and shape risks for infection also determine the persistence of access barriers to ART. The universal access policy is quite revolutionary but should be informed by the systemic barriers to access so as to promote equity. It is not enough to distribute ARVs and provide health services when health systems are poorly organized and managed. Comprehensive access to ART raises many organizational, ethical and policy problems that need to be solved to achieve equity in access. This paper argues that the persistence of access barriers is due to weak health systems and a poor public health leadership. AIDS has challenged health systems in a manner that is essentially different from other health problems. PMID:23902732

  18. Universal Design and LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Bisexual, and Queer) Issues: Creating Equal Access and Opportunities for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Jennifer R.; Geiger, Tracy J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors extend the ideals set forth by the universal design (UD) framework seeking to include the unique needs of students in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community. Universal design is a philosophy that, when applied to higher education, constitutes acceptance of, equal access for, and equal opportunities for…

  19. 47 CFR 54.806 - Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation by the Administrator of interstate access universal service support for areas served by price cap local exchange carriers. 54.806 Section 54.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Interstate...

  20. Reviews and Practice of College Students Regarding Access to Scientific Knowledge: A Case Study in Two Spanish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jose Manuel Saez; Ruiz Ruiz, Jose Maria; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Cacheiro

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the concepts, attitudes, and practices of 327 pedagogy students from two major Spanish universities related to the process of finding academic information utilizing open access. A training program has been developed through an innovation project (PIMCD) to address the problem of the lack of university training designed to…

  1. The contribution of Portuguese nursing to universal health access and coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Mendes, Aida Maria de Oliveira Cruz; Leitão, Maria Neto da Cruz; Gomes, Sérgio David Lourenço; Amaral, António Fernando Salgueiro; Bento, Maria da Conceição Saraiva da Silva Costa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the contribution of Portuguese nursing to improving universal health access and coverage by means of the identification of nurses in the health system; evolution of health indicators; and access-promoting systems, in which nurses play a relevant role. Method: this was documentary research of publications fromnational and international organizations on planning and health outcomes. Statistical databases and legislation on health reforms were consulted. Results: nurses represent 30.18% of human resources in the national health service; the systems of access promotion performed by nurses have good levels of efficacy (95.5%) and user satisfaction (99% completely satisfied); in the local care the creation of Community Care Units (185) occurred, and 85.80% of home consultations were performed by nurses. Conclusion: political strategies, the National Health Service and strengthening of human resourcesin healthcareare the main determinants. Nursing is the most numerous professional group in the National Health Service, however numbers remaindeficient in primary health care. The improvement of academic qualification and self-regulation of this professional group has allowed for better answers inimproving health for the Portuguese. PMID:26959331

  2. Universal model for collective access patterns in the Internet traffic dynamics: A superstatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamazian, A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Markelov, O. A.; Bogachev, M. I.

    2016-07-01

    We suggest a universal phenomenological description for the collective access patterns in the Internet traffic dynamics both at local and wide area network levels that takes into account erratic fluctuations imposed by cooperative user behaviour. Our description is based on the superstatistical approach and leads to the q-exponential inter-session time and session size distributions that are also in perfect agreement with empirical observations. The validity of the proposed description is confirmed explicitly by the analysis of complete 10-day traffic traces from the WIDE backbone link and from the local campus area network downlink from the Internet Service Provider. Remarkably, the same functional forms have been observed in the historic access patterns from single WWW servers. The suggested approach effectively accounts for the complex interplay of both “calm” and “bursty” user access patterns within a single-model setting. It also provides average sojourn time estimates with reasonable accuracy, as indicated by the queuing system performance simulation, this way largely overcoming the failure of Poisson modelling of the Internet traffic dynamics.

  3. A multiprofessional perspective on the principal barriers to universal health coverage and universal access to health in extremely poor territories: the contributions of nursing1

    PubMed Central

    de França, Viviane Helena; Modena, Celina Maria; Confalonieri, Ulisses Eugenio Cavalcanti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the knowledge of managers and health professionals, social workers and education professionals regarding the principal barriers to universal health coverage and universal access to health on the part of the extremely poor population; and to point to the contributions made by nursing for the promotion of this right. Method: a qualitative study whose reference was, for ensuring the right to health, the reorientation of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) towards universal coverage and access in these territories. Interviews were held with 27 members of the multi-professional team of a municipality with high social vulnerability. The data were worked on using thematic content analysis. Results: the following were ascertained as the principal barriers to universal health coverage and access to health: failures in the expansion and strengthening of the services; absence of diagnosis of the priority demands; shortage of technology, equipment, and material and human resources; poor local infrastructure; and actions with low resolutive power and absence of interdepartmental policies. Within the multi-professional team, nursing acts in the SUS in unique health actions and social practices in these territories, presenting an in-depth perspective on this harsh reality, being able to contribute with indispensable support for confronting these disparities in universal health coverage and universal access to health. Conclusion: nursing's in-depth understanding regarding these barriers is essential for encouraging the processes reorienting the SUS, geared towards equality in the right to health. PMID:27143541

  4. Projeto Vida no Vale: universal access to water and sanitation in the North East of Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauark-Leite, L.; Vinçon-Leite, B.; Deroubaix, J. F.; Loireau, A.; Silveira, D.; Haddad, E.

    2007-08-01

    In the rural areas of the developing countries, the access to water supply and sanitation services is still largely inadequate. Poor governance of the water sector is frequently singled out as a cause and reforms are required. Studies analyzing the great diversity of restructuring efforts currently being undertaken in the water sector have not succeeded in determining the most appropriate institutional and economic framework for such reforms. Moreover they underline the lack of documentation on actual projects and call for concrete models and tools for improving water and sanitation services (WSS) and for adapting water utility practice to real conditions. In this context, the Vida no Vale (Life in the Valley) project is aimed at bringing universal access to WSS for all inhabitants of both urban and rural areas, in the north-eastern area of the Brazilian State of Minas Gerais. The project takes sustainable development as its guiding principle, and relies on the joint implementation of an innovative technical design, a governance model involving public participation and subsidiarity, and an economic structure combining financial viability and social equity. Designed at a consistent geographical and hydrological scale, it includes the creation of a regional subsidiary of the existing state water company as a keystone element. The institutional organisation also relies on the creation of a public board consisting of the 92 municipalities of the project region and of the State of Minas Gerais. This board will be in charge of the system's governance. The paper will present the first step of the project (2006), consisting of a feasibility study and the implementation of 9 pilot sub-projects. During the feasibility study, the supply, demand and capacity to pay for water services were defined, existing infrastructure appraised, the necessary amount of investment assessed and an innovative operational model and a sustainable management system, including civil society

  5. Gatekeeper Training and Access to Mental Health Care at Universities and Colleges

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Speer, Nicole; Brunwasser, Steven; Hahn, Elisabeth; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gatekeeper-training programs (GKTs) are an increasingly popular approach to addressing access to mental health care in adolescent and young adult populations. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a widely used GKT program, Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), in college student populations. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted on 32 colleges and universities between 2009 and 2011. Campus residence halls were assigned to the intervention (MHFA plus preexisting trainings) or control condition (pre-existing trainings only) using matched pair randomization. The trainings were delivered to resident advisors (RAs). Outcome measures include service utilization, knowledge and attitudes about services, self-efficacy, intervention behaviors, and mental health symptoms. Data come from two sources: (1) surveys completed by the students (RAs and residents) (N=2,543), 2-3 months pre- and post-intervention; and (2) utilization records from campus mental health centers, aggregated by residence. Results The training increases trainees’ self-perceived knowledge (regression-adjusted effect size (ES)=0.38, p<0.001), self-perceived ability to identify students in distress (ES=0.19, p=0.01), and confidence to help (ES=0.17, p=0.04). There are no apparent effects, however, on utilization of mental health care in the student communities in which the trainees live. Conclusions Although GKTs are widely used to increase access to mental health care, these programs may require modifications in order to achieve their objectives. PMID:25043834

  6. Coverage, universal access and equity in health: a characterization of scientific production in nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Parra, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to characterize the scientific contribution nursing has made regarding coverage, universal access and equity in health, and to understand this production in terms of subjects and objects of study. Material and methods: this was cross-sectional, documentary research; the units of analysis were 97 journals and 410 documents, retrieved from the Web of Science in the category, "nursing". Descriptors associated to coverage, access and equity in health, and the Mesh thesaurus, were applied. We used bibliometric laws and indicators, and analyzed the most important articles according to amount of citations and collaboration. Results: the document retrieval allowed for 25 years of observation of production, an institutional and an international collaboration of 31% and 7%, respectively. The mean number of coauthors per article was 3.5, with a transience rate of 93%. The visibility index was 67.7%, and 24.6% of production was concentrated in four core journals. A review from the nursing category with 286 citations, and a Brazilian author who was the most productive, are issues worth highlighting. Conclusions: the nursing collective should strengthen future research on the subject, defining lines and sub-lines of research, increasing internationalization and building it with the joint participation of the academy and nursing community. PMID:26959329

  7. Current state of open access to journal publications from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Škorić, Lea; Vrkić, Dina; Petrak, Jelka

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the share of open access (OA) papers in the total number of journal publications authored by the members of the University of Zagreb School of Medicine (UZSM) in 2014. Methods Bibliographic data on 543 UZSM papers published in 2014 were collected using PubMed advanced search strategies and manual data collection methods. The items that had “free full text” icons were considered as gold OA papers. Their OA availability was checked using the provided link to full-text. The rest of the UZSM papers were analyzed for potential green OA through self-archiving in institutional repository. Papers published by Croatian journals were particularly analyzed. Results Full texts of approximately 65% of all UZSM papers were freely available. Most of them were published in gold OA journals (55% of all UZSM papers or 85% of all UZSM OA papers). In the UZSM repository, there were additional 52 freely available authors’ manuscripts from subscription-based journals (10% of all UZSM papers or 15% of all UZSM OA papers). Conclusion The overall proportion of OA in our study is higher than in similar studies, but only half of gold OA papers are accessible via PubMed directly. The results of our study indicate that increased quality of metadata and linking of the bibliographic records to full texts could assure better visibility. Moreover, only a quarter of papers from subscription-based journals that allow self-archiving are deposited in the UZSM repository. We believe that UZSM should consider mandating all faculty members to deposit their publications in UZSM OA repository to increase visibility and improve access to its scientific output. PMID:26935617

  8. Use of the Moodle Platform to Promote an Ongoing Learning When Lecturing General Physics in the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gabriel A.; Sáenz, Jon; Leonardo, Aritz; Gurtubay, Idoia G.

    2016-03-01

    The Moodle platform has been used to put into practice an ongoing evaluation of the students' Physics learning process. The evaluation has been done on the frame of the course General Physics, which is lectured during the first year of the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). A test bank with more than 1000 multiple-choice questions, including conceptual and numerical problems, has been prepared. Throughout the course, the students have to answer a 10-question multiple-choice test for every one of the blocks the course is divided in and which were previously treated and worked in the theoretical lectures and problem-solving sessions. The tests are automatically corrected by Moodle, and under certain criteria, the corresponding mark is taken into account for the final mark of the course. According to the results obtained from a statistical study of the data on the student performances during the last four academic years, it has been observed that there exists an actual correlation between the marks obtained in the Moodle tests and the final mark of the course. In addition, it could be deduced that students who have passed the Moodle tests increase their possibilities of passing the course by an odds ratio close to 3.

  9. Use of the Moodle Platform to Promote an Ongoing Learning When Lecturing General Physics in the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gabriel A.; Sáenz, Jon; Leonardo, Aritz; Gurtubay, Idoia G.

    2016-08-01

    The Moodle platform has been used to put into practice an ongoing evaluation of the students' Physics learning process. The evaluation has been done on the frame of the course General Physics, which is lectured during the first year of the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). A test bank with more than 1000 multiple-choice questions, including conceptual and numerical problems, has been prepared. Throughout the course, the students have to answer a 10-question multiple-choice test for every one of the blocks the course is divided in and which were previously treated and worked in the theoretical lectures and problem-solving sessions. The tests are automatically corrected by Moodle, and under certain criteria, the corresponding mark is taken into account for the final mark of the course. According to the results obtained from a statistical study of the data on the student performances during the last four academic years, it has been observed that there exists an actual correlation between the marks obtained in the Moodle tests and the final mark of the course. In addition, it could be deduced that students who have passed the Moodle tests increase their possibilities of passing the course by an odds ratio close to 3.

  10. Access to Medicines by Seguro Popular Beneficiaries: Pending Tasks towards Universal Health Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Servan-Mori, Edson; Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Montañez-Hernandez, Julio; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Wirtz, Veronika J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the context of aiming to achieve universal health coverage in Mexico, this study compares access to prescribed medicines (ATPM) between Seguro Popular (SP) and non-SP affiliated outpatient health service users. Materials and Methods ATPM by 6,123 users of outpatient services was analyzed using the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012. Adjusted bi-probit models were performed incorporating instrumental variables. Results 17.3% of SP and 10.1% of the non-SP population lacked ATPM. Two-thirds of all outpatient SP and 18.5% of all outpatient non-SP received health services at Ministry of Health facilities, among whom, 64.6 and 53.6% of the SP and non-SP population respectively reported ATPM at these facilities. Lack of medicines in health units, chronic health problems (compared to acute conditions) and prescription ≥3 medicines were risk factors for non-ATPM. Adjusted models suggest that when using Ministry of Health services, the SP population has a higher probability of ATMP compared to the non-SP population. Conclusion Given the aspirations of achieving universal health coverage in Mexico, it is important to increase ATPM in Ministry of Health facilities thereby ensuring basic rights to health care are met. PMID:26407158

  11. Open University's Postgraduate Certificate in Education (UK): A Contribution to Teacher Quality, Diversity, Access and Retention through Distance Education and School-University National Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Ann Shelton

    This paper describes the Open University's Postgraduate Certificate in Education, a postgraduate preservice teacher training program in the United Kingdom. The program provides access to the teaching profession for those who cannot train by conventional routes. It is characterized by: distance education; school-based partnerships; an explicit…

  12. Strengths and Limitations of Ontario Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Plans: A Review of One University Accessibility Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opini, Bathseba M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the strengths and limitations of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act (ODA) accessibility plan prepared by one post-secondary education institution in Ontario, Canada, during the 2004/05 academic year. The paper focuses on ways the intersectionality between disability and gender is not voiced in the plan and its implications for…

  13. The Walking Egg Project: Universal access to infertility care – from dream to reality

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2013-01-01

    Childlessness and infertility care are neglected aspects of family planning in resource-poor countries, although the consequences of involuntary childlessness are much more dramatic and can create more wide ranging societal problems compared to Western societies, particularly for women. Because many families in developing countries completely depend on children for economic survival, childlessness has to be regarded as a social and public health issue and not only as an individual medical problem. In the Walking Egg Project we strive to raise awareness surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the world population. We hope to achieve this goal through innovation and research, advocacy and networking, training and capacity building and service delivery. The Walking Egg non-profit organization has chosen a holistic approach of reproductive health and therefore strengthening infertility care should go together with strengthening other aspects of family planning and mother care. Right from the start The Walking Project has approached the problem of infertility in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economical scientists and experts along with artists and philosophers to discuss and work together towards its goal. We recently developed a simplified tWE lab IVF culture system with excellent results. According to our first cost calculation, the price of a single IVF cycle using the methodologies and protocols we described, seems to be less than 200 Euros. We realize that universal access to infertility care can only be achieved when good quality but affordable infertility care is linked to effective family planning and safe motherhood programmes. Only a global project with respect to sociocultural, ethical, economical and political differences can

  14. Tiger Teams Technical Assistance: Reliable, Universal Open Architecture for Card Access to Dispense Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-03-01

    Report discusses the dilemma of incorporating consistent, convenient, universal card access (or ''pay-at-the-pump'') systems into alternative fueling stations across the country. The state of California continues to be in the forefront of implementing alternative fuels for transportation applications. Aggressive efforts to deploy alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in California have highlighted the need to provide adequate fueling stations and develop appropriate, user-friendly means to purchase fuel at the pump. Since these fuels are not typically provided by petroleum companies at conventional fueling stations, and acceptance of cash is often not an option, a payment method must be developed that is consistent with the way individual AFV operators are accustomed to purchasing automotive fuels--with a credit card. At the same time, large fleets like the California Department of General Services must be able to use a single fuel card that offers comprehensive fleet management services. The Gas Technology Institute's Infrastructure Working Group (IWG) and its stakeholders have identified the lack of a common card reader system as a hurdle to wider deployment of AFVs in California and the United States. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Clean Cities Program, the IWG has outlined a multi-phased strategy to systematically address the barriers to develop a more ''open'' architecture that's similar to the way gasoline and diesel are currently dispensed. Under the auspices of the IWG, survey results were gathered (circa 1999) from certain fuel providers, as a means to more carefully study card reader issues and their potential solutions. Pilot programs featuring card reader systems capable of accepting wider payment options have been attempted in several regions of the United States with mixed success. In early 2001, DOE joined the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the South Coast Air

  15. Achieving universal access and moving towards elimination of new HIV infections in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Mean Chhi; Fujita, Masami; Rathavy, Tung; Eang, Mao Tang; Sopheap, Seng; Sovannarith, Samreth; Chhorvann, Chhea; Vanthy, Ly; Sopheap, Oum; Welle, Emily; Ferradini, Laurent; Sedtha, Chin; Bunna, Sok; Verbruggen, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the mid-1990s, Cambodia faced one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in Asia. For its achievement in reversing this trend, and achieving universal access to HIV treatment, the country received a United Nations millennium development goal award in 2010. This article reviews Cambodia’s response to HIV over the past two decades and discusses its current efforts towards elimination of new HIV infections. Methods A literature review of published and unpublished documents, including programme data and presentations, was conducted. Results and discussion Cambodia classifies its response to one of the most serious HIV epidemics in Asia into three phases. In Phase I (1991–2000), when adult HIV prevalence peaked at 1.7% and incidence exceeded 20,000 cases, a nationwide HIV prevention programme targeted brothel-based sex work. Voluntary confidential counselling and testing and home-based care were introduced, and peer support groups of people living with HIV emerged. Phase II (2001–2011) observed a steady decline in adult prevalence to 0.8% and incidence to 1600 cases by 2011, and was characterized by: expanding antiretroviral treatment (coverage reaching more than 80%) and continuum of care; linking with tuberculosis and maternal and child health services; accelerated prevention among key populations, including entertainment establishment-based sex workers, men having sex with men, transgender persons, and people who inject drugs; engagement of health workers to deliver quality services; and strengthening health service delivery systems. The third phase (2012–2020) aims to attain zero new infections by 2020 through: sharpening responses to key populations at higher risk; maximizing access to community and facility-based testing and retention in prevention and care; and accelerating the transition from vertical approaches to linked/integrated approaches. Conclusions Cambodia has tailored its prevention strategy to its own epidemic, established

  16. Universal Access and the ADA: A Disability Access Design Specification for the New UCLA Library Online Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalfen, Daniel Hilton; Farb, Sharon E.

    1996-01-01

    In light of the compliance requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, this article explains adaptive computing technology and its use in the design of a new implementation of ORION, the online information system at the University of California Los Angeles. Addresses, both postal and electronic when possible, are provided for several…

  17. Public Funding and Budgetary Challenges to Providing Universal Access to Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omwami, Edith Mukudi; Keller, Edmond J.

    2010-01-01

    Budgetary capacity that would allow for the public funding of the provision of universal access to primary education is lacking in many sub-Saharan economies. National revenues significantly lag behind the overall economic productivity measure of GDP. Analysis of data derived from UNESCO and UNDP for 2004 shows that governments in the region spend…

  18. Awareness of Accessibility Barriers in Computer-Based Instructional Materials and Faculty Demographics at South Dakota Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and course delivery methods have enabled persons with disabilities to enroll in higher education at an increasing rate. Federal regulations state persons with disabilities must be granted equal access to the information contained in computer-based instructional materials, but faculty at the six public universities in South…

  19. Designing a Competence-Based Syllabus for Turkish Speaking Learners of English in Terms of Accessibility to Universal Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seker, Emrullah

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on designing an English grammar syllabus for Turkish speaking English learners, which is based on the assumption that learning English grammar will be simpler and easier for Turkish speaking learners if it is introduced in a way by which they can achieve accessibility to Universal Grammar. In this study, I analyze almost all…

  20. Evidence-Informed Leadership in the Japanese Context: Middle Managers at a University Self-Access Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, John; Brown, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the steering of a self-access learning center in a Japanese university by its "middle management" committee over the first years of its operation. Middle management practice was informed by an ethnographic archive of various facets of center use, particularly concerning language policy and curriculum integration, issues about…

  1. Laying the Groundwork: The Constant Gardening of Community-University-School Partnerships for Postsecondary Access and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Donald Earl; Weinbaum, Alexandra T.; Ramon, Gilberto; Vaughan, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative efforts between school districts and higher education institutions to address access, retention, and achievement issues for underrepresented students have grown in recent years. Yet many of these university or school district-led efforts possess limited understanding of the community context for systemic change, and engage community…

  2. The Use of Prompts, Increased Accessibility, Visibility, and Aesthetics of the Stairwell to Promote Stair Use in a University Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuw-Amerongen, M. E.; Kremers, S. P. J.; de Vries, N. K.; Kok, G.

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity in the form of consistently opting for stair use instead of elevator use can have important health benefits. The article discusses a study assessing whether increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of a stairwell had an impact on stair use among students and employees of Maastricht University, the Netherlands. The…

  3. A Tale of Two Logics: Social Reproduction and Mobilisation in University Access in Quebec, 1945-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante, Benoît; Doray, Pierre; Bastien, Nicolas; Chenard, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 Quebec students' protests against university tuition fees fostered a debate on access to higher education in Quebec, and specifically on the Quebec "educational lag". Using census data, we show that degree-holding is the same among Quebec French-speaking and Ontario English-speaking populations. Using event history analysis, we…

  4. Levelling or Playing the Field? The Politics of Access to University Education in Post-Apartheid South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Rajani

    1998-01-01

    Provides an account of access policies in relation to university education in South Africa by analyzing the practices surrounding the report "A Framework for Transformation." Argues that the repositioning of equity, economic development, and academic standards within the arena of the National Commission on Higher Education has shaped access…

  5. The University of Arizona Nanosat Program: Making Space accessible to scientific and commercial packages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, U.; Fevig, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    For the last couple of years we have been engaged in building nanosatellites within a student-mentor framework. The satellites are 10x10x10cm cubes, have a maximum mass of 1 kg, and power of a few watts. The standardized "cube-sat" form factor was suggested by Bob Twiggs of Stanford University so that a common launch platform could be utilized and more Universities could participate. We have now built four "cube-sats': a launchable Engineering model, Rincon 1 & 2, (funded by Rincon corporation), and Alcatel funded by Alcatel Espace. The costs for the four satellites are \\250,000. Launch costs using a Russian SS-18 are typically \\10,000 per kg. The payload for Rincon 1 & 2 is a sophisticated telecommunications board using only 10 mw of transmitting power. The Alcatel payload consists of three communications IC's whose radiation exposure and annealing properties will be studied over a period of years. Future nanosatellites will have considerable value in providing low cost access to space for experiments in nanotechnology, space electronics, micropropulsion, radiation experiments, astrobionics and climate change studies. For the latter area we are considering experiments to monitor the solar constant, the solar UV spectrum, the chromospheric activity through the Mg II index, the Earth's Albedo, etc. For this purpose we are developing a slightly larger satellite, 20x20x20cm and 10 kg. We have built a C-MOS camera with a 1 ms exposure time for attitude determination, and we are working with Honeywell Industries to develop micro-reaction wheels for attitude control. We are also working on micro-propulsion units with the Air Force and several aerospace companies. Preliminary calculations show that we can develop delta-V's of 5km/s which will allow us to visit 5% (about 100) of the NEA population or possibly some comets. We firmly believe a vigorous nanosatellite program will allow useful space experiments for costs of millions of Dollars instead of the present tens of

  6. Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-01-01

    High selectivities and exquisite control over reaction outcomes entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature’s known repertoire. We will use this review to outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progressions have been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been discovered and exploited for chemical synthesis, emphasizing reactions that do not have natural counterparts. The new functions have mechanistic parallels to the native reaction mechanisms that often manifest as catalytic promiscuity and the ability to convert from one function to the other with minimal mutation. We present examples of how non-natural activities have been improved by directed evolution, mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Examples of new enzyme functions include epoxide opening reactions with non-natural nucleophiles catalyzed by a laboratory-evolved halohydrin dehalogenase, cyclopropanation and other carbene transfer reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 variants, and non-natural modes of cyclization by a modified terpene synthase. Lastly, we describe discoveries of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for expanding the enzyme universe. PMID:25649694

  7. Open Access, Open Source and Digital Libraries: A Current Trend in University Libraries around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the open access and open source movement in the digital library world. Design/methodology/approach: A review of key developments in the open access and open source movement is provided. Findings: Open source software and open access to research findings are of great use to scholars in developing…

  8. Accelerators/decelerators of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a case study of Iranian health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background At the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), held in Cairo, the global community agreed to the goal of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and rights by 2015. This research explores the accelerators and decelerators of achieving universal access to the sexual and reproductive health targets and accordingly makes some suggestions. Method We have critically reviewed the latest national reports and extracted the background data on each SRH indicator. The key stakeholders, both national and international, were visited and interviewed at two sites. A total of 55 in-depth interviews were conducted with religious leaders, policy-makers, senior managers, senior academics, and health care managers. Six focus-group discussions were also held among health care providers. The study was qualitative in nature. Results Obstacles on the road to achieving universal access to SRH can be viewed from two perspectives. One gap exists between current achievements and the targets. The other gap arises due to age, marital status, and residency status. The most recently observed trends in the indicators of the universal access to SRH shows that the achievements in the “unmet need for family planning” have been poor. Unmet need for family planning could directly be translated to unwanted pregnancies and unwanted childbirths; the former calls for sexual education to underserved people, including adolescents; and the latter calls for access to safe abortion. Local religious leaders have not actively attended international goal-setting programs. Therefore, they usually do not presume a positive attitude towards these goals. Such negative attitudes seem to be the most important factors hindering the progress towards universal access to SRH. Lack of international donors to fund for SRH programs is also another barrier. In national levels both state and the society are interactively playing their roles. We have used a

  9. Ensuring Universal Access to Eye Health in Urban Slums in the Global South: The Case of Bhopal (India).

    PubMed

    Pregel, Andrea; Vaughan Gough, Tracy; Jolley, Emma; Buttan, Sandeep; Bhambal, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Sightsavers is an international organisation working with partners in over 30 countries to eliminate avoidable blindness and help people with disabilities participate more fully in society. In the context of its Urban Eye Health Programme in Bhopal (India), the organisation launched a pilot approach aimed at developing an Inclusive Eye Health (IEH) model and IEH Minimum Standards. Accessibility audits were conducted in a tertiary eye hospital and four primary vision centres located within urban slums, addressing the accessibility of physical infrastructures, communication and service provision. The collection and analysis of disaggregated data inform the inclusion strategy and provide a baseline to measure the impact of service provision. Trainings of eye health staff and sensitisation of decision makers on accessibility, Universal Design, disability and gender inclusion are organised on a regular basis. A referral network is being built to ensure participation of women, people with disabilities and other marginalised groups, explore barriers at demand level, and guarantee wider access to eye care in the community. Finally, advocacy interventions will be developed to raise awareness in the community and mainstream disability and gender inclusion within the public health sector. Founded on principles of Universal Design, accessibility and participation, and in line with international human rights treaties, Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Sightsavers' IEH model ultimately aims to develop a sustainable, scalable and universally accessible system-strengthening approach, capable of ensuring more inclusive services to people with disabilities, women and other marginalised groups, and designed to more effectively meet the health needs of the entire population. PMID:27534321

  10. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty. PMID:26960103

  11. University contributions to the HPV vaccine and implications for access to vaccines in developing countries: addressing materials and know-how in university technology transfer policy.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara E; Guillen, Ethan; Price, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with most of the disease burden concentrated in developing countries. Over 90 percent of cervical cancer deaths, almost all of which are caused by HPV, occur in low- and middle-income countries where access to goods and services for prevention and treatment pose major barriers to intervention. In resource-poor settings lacking the capacity for routine screening for cervical cancer, the HPV vaccines developed by Merck and GlaxoSmithKline are desperately needed to help prevent these unnecessary deaths. The initial development of currently available HPV vaccines took place at a number of universities and other publicly funded institutions, yet there is little low-cost access to the vaccine in developing countries where access would be most critical. This is the rule rather than the exception with most university-discovered medicines. Universities and other publicly-funded institutions can adopt a number of licensing methods to ensure that vaccines discovered on their campuses are available at low-cost in developing countries. Universities Allied for Essential Medicines has proposed that universities adopt Global Access Licensing policies to implement these changes by enabling generic or low-cost production of the end product in developing countries. Generic competition is a critical market force that has, for instance, driven down the price of HIV/AIDS treatments from more than $10,000 to less than $99 per patient per year today. While the central barrier to creation of small molecule generics is patent-protection, there are multiple additional barriers that need to be addressed in order to ensure the efficient production of cost-effective generic vaccines and other biologics. While certain biologics may require generic producers to perform additional clinical trials, vaccines are in a somewhat unique situation with respect to both safety and efficacy. With access to appropriate patents

  12. Open Access to Scientific Literature: An Assessment of Awareness Support and Usage among Academic Librarians at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Marsha Ann Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Open Access (OA) to scholarly communications is a critical component in providing equitable admission to scholarly information and a key vehicle toward the achievement of global access to research in the knowledge building process. A standard and universally accepted process for guaranteeing OA permits complimentary access to knowledge, research…

  13. The Athabasca University eduSource Project: Building an Accessible Learning Object Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland-Innes, Martha; McGreal, Rory; Anderson, Terry; Friesen, Norm; Ally, Mohamed; Tin, Tony; Graham, Rodger; Moisey, Susan; Petrinjak, Anita; Schafer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Athabasca University--Canada's Open University (AU) made the commitment to put all of its courses online as part of its Strategic University Plan. In pursuit of this goal, AU participated in the eduSource project, a pan-Canadian effort to build the infrastructure for an interoperable network of learning object repositories. AU acted as a leader in…

  14. Comparative Trends in Productivity and Access for Nova Southeastern University, the Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida, and the State University System of Florida. Research and Planning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, Blair T.

    This report examines trends in enrollment, degrees awarded, and other selected data from Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF) accountability reports published between 1996 and 2001. Were data were available, comparisons were made for Nova Southeastern University (NSU) and the State University System of Florida (SUS). Information…

  15. Public Funding and Budgetary Challenges To Providing Universal Access To Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omwami, Edith Mukudi; Keller, Edmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Budgetary capacity that would allow for the public funding of the provision of universal access to primary education is lacking in many sub-Saharan economies. National revenues significantly lag behind the overall economic productivity measure of GDP. Analysis of data derived from UNESCO and UNDP for 2004 shows that governments in the region spend far less in US dollars per unit cost on primary education than do developed countries. Increasing the unit cost of education in order to enable a government to guarantee universal primary education would take away resources from other tiers of the education system in many countries in the region. The alternative is to universalise access, despite existing budget allocation constraints, and thereby further compound the problems of poor infrastructure and limited human resource capacity that continue to compromise education quality in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. University Access and Theories of Social Justice: Contributions of the Capabilities Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson-Strydom, Merridy

    2015-01-01

    Issues of social justice in higher education together with a focus on access or widening participation have become of increasing importance globally. Given the complex theoretical terrain of social justice and the tensions inherent in applying social justice frameworks within higher education, and particularly in the area of access, this paper…

  17. Use of the "Moodle" Platform to Promote an Ongoing Learning When Lecturing General Physics in the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Gabriel A.; Sáenz, Jon; Leonardo, Aritz; Gurtubay, Idoia G.

    2016-01-01

    The "Moodle" platform has been used to put into practice an ongoing evaluation of the students' Physics learning process. The evaluation has been done on the frame of the course General Physics, which is lectured during the first year of the Physics, Mathematics and Electronic Engineering Programmes at the Faculty of Science and…

  18. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    PubMed

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory. PMID:12929791

  19. The Macroeconomic Consequences of Renouncing to Universal Access to Antiretroviral Treatment for HIV in Africa: A Micro-Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Ventelou, Bruno; Arrighi, Yves; Greener, Robert; Lamontagne, Erik; Carrieri, Patrizia; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Aim Previous economic literature on the cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs has been mainly focused on the microeconomic consequences of alternative use of resources devoted to the fight against the HIV pandemic. We rather aim at forecasting the consequences of alternative scenarios for the macroeconomic performance of countries. Methods We used a micro-simulation model based on individuals aged 15–49 selected from nationally representative surveys (DHS for Cameroon, Tanzania and Swaziland) to compare alternative scenarios : 1-freezing of ART programs to current levels of access, 2- universal access (scaling up to 100% coverage by 2015, with two variants defining ART eligibility according to previous or current WHO guidelines). We introduced an “artificial” ageing process by programming methods. Individuals could evolve through different health states: HIV negative, HIV positive (with different stages of the syndrome). Scenarios of ART procurement determine this dynamics. The macroeconomic impact is obtained using sample weights that take into account the resulting age-structure of the population in each scenario and modeling of the consequences on total growth of the economy. Results Increased levels of ART coverage result in decreasing HIV incidence and related mortality. Universal access to ART has a positive impact on workers' productivity; the evaluations performed for Swaziland and Cameroon show that universal access would imply net cost-savings at the scale of the society, when the full macroeconomic consequences are introduced in the calculations. In Tanzania, ART access programs imply a net cost for the economy, but 70% of costs are covered by GDP gains at the 2034 horizon, even in the extended coverage option promoted by WHO guidelines initiating ART at levels of 350 cc/mm3 CD4 cell counts. Conclusion Universal Access ART scaling-up strategies, which are more costly in the short term, remain the best economic choice in the

  20. Information Literacy Skills: Promoting University Access and Success in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shana, Zuhrieh; Ishtaiwa, Fawzi

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this research is to assess the level of information literacy (IL) skills required for the transition-to-university experience across the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This research further seeks to shed light on the IL levels of incoming first-year university students and describe their perceptions of their IL skills. The research…

  1. Contract Faculty in Canada: Using Access to Information Requests to Uncover Hidden Academics in Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, universities are undergoing a process of corporatization where business interests, values and practices are assuming a more prominent place in higher education. A key feature of this process has been the changing composition of academic labor. While it is generally accepted that universities are relying more heavily on contract faculty,…

  2. Housing and Transport: Access Issues for Disabled International Students in British Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soorenian, Armineh

    2013-01-01

    This article explores two disabled people's "Seven Needs" to independent living, those of "housing" and "transport" issues, in relation to disabled international students in British universities. Firstly, students' living arrangements, including issues related to the suitability of university accommodation…

  3. How Public Universities Can Promote Access and Success for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    The nation's public universities--a key vehicle of upward mobility--must do more to even the playing field for all students. As it currently stands, students from the least advantaged populations earn degrees at a lower rate and are burdened with a greater portion of debt than their peers. However, some standout public universities are reversing…

  4. Universal Design and Study Abroad: (Re-)Designing Programs for Effectiveness and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soneson, Heidi M.; Cordano, Roberta J.

    2009-01-01

    Universal Design provides a framework to effectively increase the number of students studying abroad by creating and expanding supportive environments designed to meet a wide range of student needs. While the concept of Universal Design originated with the needs of students with disabilities, its value and application extend to a much wider…

  5. Equity and Access to University Education through Higher Loans in Bungoma District Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachiye, Herman J.; Nasongo, Joseph W.

    2009-01-01

    University student loans were introduced in Kenya with the aim of easing the burden of public expenditure in higher education. In the initial years the loans were to benefit all students enrolled at University irrespective of their socio-economic backgrounds. The beneficiaries were expected to repay the loan later upon getting into employment.…

  6. Event representations constrain the structure of language: Sign language as a window into universally accessible linguistic biases

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Brent; Geraci, Carlo; Chemla, Emmanuel; Schlenker, Philippe; Kelepir, Meltem; Pfau, Roland

    2015-01-01

    According to a theoretical tradition dating back to Aristotle, verbs can be classified into two broad categories. Telic verbs (e.g., “decide,” “sell,” “die”) encode a logical endpoint, whereas atelic verbs (e.g., “think,” “negotiate,” “run”) do not, and the denoted event could therefore logically continue indefinitely. Here we show that sign languages encode telicity in a seemingly universal way and moreover that even nonsigners lacking any prior experience with sign language understand these encodings. In experiments 1–5, nonsigning English speakers accurately distinguished between telic (e.g., “decide”) and atelic (e.g., “think”) signs from (the historically unrelated) Italian Sign Language, Sign Language of the Netherlands, and Turkish Sign Language. These results were not due to participants' inferring that the sign merely imitated the action in question. In experiment 6, we used pseudosigns to show that the presence of a salient visual boundary at the end of a gesture was sufficient to elicit telic interpretations, whereas repeated movement without salient boundaries elicited atelic interpretations. Experiments 7–10 confirmed that these visual cues were used by all of the sign languages studied here. Together, these results suggest that signers and nonsigners share universally accessible notions of telicity as well as universally accessible “mapping biases” between telicity and visual form. PMID:25918419

  7. Event representations constrain the structure of language: Sign language as a window into universally accessible linguistic biases.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Brent; Geraci, Carlo; Chemla, Emmanuel; Schlenker, Philippe; Kelepir, Meltem; Pfau, Roland

    2015-05-12

    According to a theoretical tradition dating back to Aristotle, verbs can be classified into two broad categories. Telic verbs (e.g., "decide," "sell," "die") encode a logical endpoint, whereas atelic verbs (e.g., "think," "negotiate," "run") do not, and the denoted event could therefore logically continue indefinitely. Here we show that sign languages encode telicity in a seemingly universal way and moreover that even nonsigners lacking any prior experience with sign language understand these encodings. In experiments 1-5, nonsigning English speakers accurately distinguished between telic (e.g., "decide") and atelic (e.g., "think") signs from (the historically unrelated) Italian Sign Language, Sign Language of the Netherlands, and Turkish Sign Language. These results were not due to participants' inferring that the sign merely imitated the action in question. In experiment 6, we used pseudosigns to show that the presence of a salient visual boundary at the end of a gesture was sufficient to elicit telic interpretations, whereas repeated movement without salient boundaries elicited atelic interpretations. Experiments 7-10 confirmed that these visual cues were used by all of the sign languages studied here. Together, these results suggest that signers and nonsigners share universally accessible notions of telicity as well as universally accessible "mapping biases" between telicity and visual form. PMID:25918419

  8. The role of the University of the West Indies Mona libraries in HIV/AIDS information access and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Harris, S

    2013-01-01

    The recommendations for controlling HIV/AIDS, whether prescriptive or descriptive, underscore the value of information: its translation into knowledge, and knowledge into behaviour. Thus, accessing, evaluating, disseminating and applying authoritative, credible and scholarly information on HIV/AIDS are critical elements in the control of this pandemic in the Web 2.0 era. The University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona libraries have embraced this information role. This article provides insights into three of the information initiatives implemented by the UWI Mona libraries in this important capacity. In this regard, it also provides ideas for other West Indian information units and enhances communication on access to information products and services, albeit incrementally, in an important area of health services for the West Indies. PMID:24756597

  9. [Informatics in the School of Medicine of the University of Chile. II. The school network and access to data bases].

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, E A

    1990-12-01

    Projects on informatics at the School of Medicine of the University of Chile are being brought about in accordance with both its institutional goals and present trends in technology. Prominent among the latter are the widespread distribution of autonomous processing power represented by low-cost computers and the ease of communication at local and worldwide levels. Our main project has been the design and start of a computer network that integrates the School's Departments and the geographically dispersed teaching hospitals. The principal services provided by the network are local and international electronic mail, access to data bases, and emulation of mainframe terminals (eg, to run remotely a mainframe's statistics software). Automated bibliographic search has been made available both through remote access to Medline data base and through local usage of compact disc (CD-ROM) versions. Since our network is open, it should become a forceful mean of assisting and integrating the biomedical community throughout the country. PMID:2152674

  10. Legal Factors Related to Access to Campuses of Public Colleges and Universities: An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Michael A.

    Legal methods and related case law that can be used by public higher education administrators to deal with intrusions by outsiders onto the campus are examined. The following legal factors related to control of campus access are addressed: risk management, police power, general trespass, school related trespass/loitering statutes, First and…

  11. Easing Access for Lifelong Learners: A Comparison of European Models for University Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Müller, Romina; Remdisch, Sabine; Köhler, Katharina; Marr, Liz; Repo, Saara; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Easing access to higher education (HE) for those engaging in lifelong learning has been a common policy objective across the European Union since the late 1990s. To reach this goal, the transition between vocational and academic routes must be simplified, but European countries are at different developmental stages. This article maps the…

  12. Going on to Uni? Access and Participation in University for Students from Backgrounds of Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Judith; Wilson, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a research project that investigated the aspirations of primary and secondary school students about access to, and participation in higher education. The research was undertaken at schools in low socio-economic status regional and rural areas of north-eastern New South Wales. The paper discusses the background to the…

  13. Making Student Services Welcoming and Accessible through Accommodations and Universal Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgstahler, Sheryl; Moore, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen focus groups with a total of 53 postsecondary students with disabilities and 14 focus groups with a total of 72 personnel from student service offices on campuses nationwide identified access problems encountered by students with disabilities in these offices and potential solutions to these problems. Students shared experiences in which…

  14. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  15. Internet Access and Usage in Improving Students' Self-Directed Learning in Indonesia Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahardjo, Djoko; Sumardjo; Lubis, Djuara P.; Harijati, Sri Ir.

    2016-01-01

    Internet is well known nowadays, however higher distance education students who live in remote rural areas still have not been able to take advantages of this medium optimally for their learning process. For accessing the internet the students have to be available with the minimum prerequisites: the existence of adequate devices and the sufficient…

  16. Rural Health Care Information Access and the Use of the Internet: Opportunity for University Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Biswa R.; Leatherman, John C.; Bressers, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has potential for improving health information delivery and strengthening connections between rural populations and local health service providers. An exploratory case study six rural health care markets in Kansas showed that about 70% of adults use the Internet, with substantial use for accessing health information. While there are…

  17. When Access Is Not Enough: Retaining Basic Writers at an Open-Admission University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Sunderhaus, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The author describes the challenges of a four-year, open-admission institution where equality of access has not equaled equality of success for basic writers. While there is a good deal of scholarship on student departure by compositions and experts in student retention and persistence, some models of student departure and success offered by these…

  18. Poverty, food security and universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a call for cross-movement advocacy against neoliberal globalisation.

    PubMed

    Sundari Ravindran, T K

    2014-05-01

    Universal access to sexual and reproductive health services is one of the goals of the International Conference on Population and Development of 1994. The Millennium Development Goals were intended above all to end poverty. Universal access to health and health services are among the goals being considered for the post-2015 agenda, replacing or augmenting the MDGs. Yet we are not only far from reaching any of these goals but also appear to have lost our way somewhere along the line. Poverty and lack of food security have, through their multiple linkages to health and access to health care, deterred progress towards universal access to health services, including for sexual and reproductive health needs. A more insidious influence is neoliberal globalisation. This paper describes neoliberal globalisation and the economic policies it has engendered, the ways in which it influences poverty and food security, and the often unequal impact it has had on women as compared to men. It explores the effects of neoliberal economic policies on health, health systems, and universal access to health care services, and the implications for access to sexual and reproductive health. To be an advocate for universal access to health and health care is to become an advocate against neoliberal globalisation. PMID:24908453

  19. Access or Inclusion? Conceptualisation and Operationalisation of Gender Equality in Zimbabwean State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauraya, Efiritha

    2014-01-01

    This article explores concerns about gender inequality in Zimbabwean state universities. The researcher's interest arose from the realisation of persistent gender inequalities despite initiatives to close gender gaps. Of particular concern is the conceptualization and operationalisation of gender equality in institutions. Focusing only on the…

  20. [University qualifying work (dissertations), their current registration, electronic access and related technical, administrative and legal questions].

    PubMed

    Spála, M; Bratková, E

    2004-01-01

    Many countries (USA, Australia, Canada, Latin America, Spain, France, SRN) have national or international systems (e.g. Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations--NDLTD), which openly (NDLTD) or commercially (University Microfilm International--UMI) present up to 50% of master dissertations and doctoral theses in a full text form. Such systems are in agreement with legal regulations of the given country and the author is the only holder of the work--of the dissertation. Authors are at the same time informed that dissertation represents a university document, which presents results of the given scientific community and it should be therefore distributed free of charge. Presentation is also the matter of honour of the author and his university. In the contemporary Czech Auctorial Law (No. 121/2000 Sb.) dissertation is considered as not fully defined "Educational work" and from the practical point the duration of necessary storage is not solved. For the contemporary worldwide conversion to electronically presented dissertations, the necessary technical and library standards has been prepared with the first positive experience. The supplement of the Auctorial and University Law appears to be necessary. It is inevitable to be prepared for that situation before the Czech Republic will join EU. PMID:15134043

  1. Public Investment and the Goal of Providing Universal Access to Primary Education by 2015 in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omwami, Edith Mukudi; Omwami, Raymond K.

    2010-01-01

    The authors use population census data to project school enrolment for Kenya. They also employ current education sector budget and national revenue base statistics to model the sector budget and to forecast the revenue base growth required to sustain universal primary education (UPE). The 2003 fiscal year unit cost of education is used as the base…

  2. Barriers to Physical Access for Students with Motor Disability at the University of Granada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Maria Tamara; Lopez, Maria Dolores

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: For a number of years we have been witnessing the progressive incorporation of disabled students into the university. There are publications (Alcantud, 1995) which recount experiences of social and educational integration of the disabled in primary and secondary education. However, it is more difficult to find documentation on…

  3. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  4. The Virtual University & Educational Opportunity. Issues of Equity and Access for the Next Generation. Policy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladieux, Lawrence E.; Swail, Watson Scott

    This report addresses issues concerned with educational programs provided through the Internet, the "virtual university" and their possible impacts on traditional higher education. It concludes that the new technologies may have the effect of deepening the divide between educational haves and have-nots and that public policy must intervene to…

  5. 24-Hour Access: Responding to Students' Need for Late Library Hours at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Bethany B.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Denver's Penrose Library saw a substantial increase in use as a result of several new and enhanced services over a six-year period. In turn, longer operating hours and increased staffing for a 24-hours-a-day, five-days-a-week (24 x 5) operating schedule was funded. This case study analyzes student need for longer library hours…

  6. Online Library Accessibility Support: A Case Study within the Open University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Wendy; Clough, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The Open University (OU) is the UK's largest distance education provider and has a large and growing disabled student population. Disabled user support presents particular challenges for an online library service in the distance learning environment. The OU introduced guidelines for working with non-OU--authored content (external content) in 2011…

  7. Universal Access to HIV prevention, treatment and care: assessing the inclusion of human rights in international and national strategic plans

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Tarantola, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Rhetorical acknowledgment of the value of human rights for the AIDS response continues, yet practical application of human rights principles to national efforts appears to be increasingly deficient. We assess the ways in which international and national strategic plans and other core documents take into account the commitments made by countries to uphold human rights in their efforts towards achieving Universal Access. Key documents from the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM) and the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) were reviewed along with 14 national HIV strategic plans chosen for their illustration of the diversity of HIV epidemic patterns, levels of income and geographical location. Whereas human rights concepts overwhelmingly appeared in both international and national strategic documents, their translation into actionable terms or monitoring frameworks was weak, unspecific or absent. Future work should analyse strategic plans, plans of operation, budgets and actual implementation so that full advantage can be taken, not only of the moral and legal value of human rights, but also their instrumental value for achieving Universal Access. PMID:18641464

  8. The Texas Experiment on the Border: Analysis of Student Access and Success of Borderland Top 10% Students at Borderland and Top Tier Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Cristobal

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzed trends in access and success of students admitted through the Top 10% admissions policy. The study employs an comparative analysis between public universities from the Borderland region and the two top-tier public universities in Texas. This Texas admissions policy provides students in the top 10% of their graduating high…

  9. Critical gaps in universal access to reproductive health: contraception and prevention of unsafe abortion.

    PubMed

    Culwell, Kelly R; Vekemans, Marcel; de Silva, Upeka; Hurwitz, Manuelle; Crane, Barbara B

    2010-07-01

    Unsafe abortion accounts for a significant proportion of maternal deaths, yet it is often forgotten in discussions around reducing maternal mortality. Prevention of unsafe abortion starts with prevention of unwanted pregnancies, most effectively through contraception. When unwanted pregnancies occur, provision of safe, legal abortion services can further prevent unsafe abortions. If complications arise from unsafe abortion, emergency treatment must be available. Recommendations made on this issue during the Precongress Workshop held prior to the 2009 FIGO World Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, were part of a report that was adopted by the FIGO General Assembly. These recommendations address prevention of unsafe abortion and its consequences and support access to safe abortion care to the full extent allowed by national laws, along with 6 strategies for implementation, including integration of family planning into other reproductive health services, adequate training for providers, task-sharing with mid-level providers, and using evidence to discuss this issue with key stakeholders. PMID:20451196

  10. Article processing charges for open access publication-the situation for research intensive universities in the USA and Canada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David; Björk, Bo-Christer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) publishing via article processing charges (APCs) is growing as an alternative to subscription publishing. The Pay It Forward (PIF) Project is exploring the feasibility of transitioning from paying subscriptions to funding APCs for faculty at research intensive universities. Estimating of the cost of APCs for the journals authors at research intensive universities tend to publish is essential for the PIF project and similar initiatives. This paper presents our research into this question. Methods. We identified APC prices for publications by authors at the 4 research intensive United States (US) and Canadian universities involved in the study. We also obtained APC payment records from several Western European universities and funding agencies. Both data sets were merged with Web of Science (WoS) metadata. We calculated the average APCs for articles and proceedings in 13 discipline categories published by researchers at research intensive universities. We also identified 41 journals published by traditionally subscription publishers which have recently converted to APC funded OA and recorded the APCs they charge. Results. We identified 7,629 payment records from the 4 European APC payment databases and 14,356 OA articles authored by PIF partner university faculty for which we had listed APC prices. APCs for full OA journals published by PIF authors averaged 1,775 USD; full OA journal APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 1,865 USD; hybrid APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 2,887 USD. The APC for converted journals published by major subscription publishers averaged 1,825 USD. APC funded OA is concentrated in the life and basic sciences. APCs funded articles in the social sciences and humanities are often multidisciplinary and published in journals such as PLOS ONE that largely publish in the life sciences. Conclusions. Full OA journal APCs average a little under 2,000 USD while hybrid articles average about 3,000 USD

  11. Article processing charges for open access publication—the situation for research intensive universities in the USA and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Bo-Christer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) publishing via article processing charges (APCs) is growing as an alternative to subscription publishing. The Pay It Forward (PIF) Project is exploring the feasibility of transitioning from paying subscriptions to funding APCs for faculty at research intensive universities. Estimating of the cost of APCs for the journals authors at research intensive universities tend to publish is essential for the PIF project and similar initiatives. This paper presents our research into this question. Methods. We identified APC prices for publications by authors at the 4 research intensive United States (US) and Canadian universities involved in the study. We also obtained APC payment records from several Western European universities and funding agencies. Both data sets were merged with Web of Science (WoS) metadata. We calculated the average APCs for articles and proceedings in 13 discipline categories published by researchers at research intensive universities. We also identified 41 journals published by traditionally subscription publishers which have recently converted to APC funded OA and recorded the APCs they charge. Results. We identified 7,629 payment records from the 4 European APC payment databases and 14,356 OA articles authored by PIF partner university faculty for which we had listed APC prices. APCs for full OA journals published by PIF authors averaged 1,775 USD; full OA journal APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 1,865 USD; hybrid APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 2,887 USD. The APC for converted journals published by major subscription publishers averaged 1,825 USD. APC funded OA is concentrated in the life and basic sciences. APCs funded articles in the social sciences and humanities are often multidisciplinary and published in journals such as PLOS ONE that largely publish in the life sciences. Conclusions. Full OA journal APCs average a little under 2,000 USD while hybrid articles average about 3,000 USD

  12. AccessAbility: Overcoming Information Barriers. Proceedings from the 1987 Spring Meeting of the Nebraska Library Association, College and University Section (Omaha, Nebraska, May 29, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kacena, Barbara J., Ed.

    Various aspects of the theme, "AccessAbility: Overcoming Information Barriers," are considered in the conference papers collected in this document. They include: (1) "The Library Image: A Barrier to Accessibility" (Janice S. Boyer); (2) "The Educationally Disadvantaged Student: How Can the Library Help?" (Michael Poma and Richard Jehlik); (3)…

  13. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  14. Mandatory universal drug plan, access to health care and health: Evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Qing; Sweetman, Arthur; Hurley, Jeremiah

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the impacts of a mandatory, universal prescription drug insurance program on health care utilization and health outcomes in a public health care system with free physician and hospital services. Using the Canadian National Population Health Survey from 1994 to 2003 and implementing a difference-in-differences estimation strategy, we find that the mandatory program substantially increased drug coverage among the general population. The program also increased medication use and general practitioner visits but had little effect on specialist visits and hospitalization. Findings from quantile regressions suggest that there was a large improvement in the health status of less healthy individuals. Further analysis by pre-policy drug insurance status and the presence of chronic conditions reveals a marked increase in the probability of taking medication and visiting a general practitioner among the previously uninsured and those with a chronic condition. PMID:26410422

  15. Increasing access to legal termination of pregnancy and postabortion contraception at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Macha, Swebby; Muyuni, Mutinta; Nkonde, Scholastica; Faúndes, Anibal

    2014-07-01

    The Zambian Association of Gynecology and Obstetrics is one of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) member societies participating in the FIGO Initiative for the Prevention of Unsafe Abortion and its Consequences from the East, Central, and Southern Africa region. The activities included in this country's plan of action were to provide access to safe abortion within the full extent of the law to women receiving care at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, and to increase the proportion of women leaving the hospital with a contraceptive method. Zambian law regarding abortion is liberal, but in general it was not applied until very recently. The proportion of legal terminations of pregnancy among patients receiving abortion care at the hospital increased from 3.2% in 2009 to 7.7% in 2011, while the percentage of women leaving the hospital with a contraceptive method increased from 25.3% to 69.4% over the same period. PMID:24786142

  16. Sex, Socioeconomic Status, Access to Cardiac Catheterization and Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndromes in the Context of Universal Healthcare Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fabreau, Gabriel E.; Leung, Alexander A.; Southern, Danielle A.; Knudtson, Merrill L.; McWilliams, J. Michael; Ayanian, John Z.; Ghali, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex and neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES) may independently affect the care and outcomes of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), partly through barriers in timely access to cardiac catheterization. We sought to determine whether sex modifies the association between nSES, and the receipt of cardiac catheterization and mortality following an ACS in a universal healthcare system. Methods and Results We studied 14,012 ACS patients admitted to cardiology services between April 18, 2004 and December 31, 2011 in Southern Alberta, Canada. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare the odds of cardiac catheterization within 2 and 30 days of admission and the odds of 30-day and 1-year mortality for men and women by quintile of neighborhood median household income. Significant relationships between nSES and the receipt of cardiac catheterization and mortality after ACS were detected for women but not men. When examined by nSES, each incremental decrease in neighborhood income quintile for women was associated with a 6% lower odds of receiving cardiac catheterization within 30 days (p=0.01) and a 14% higher odds of 30-day mortality (p=0.03). For men, each decrease in neighborhood income quintile was associated with a 2% lower odds of receiving catheterization within 30 days (p=0.10), and a 5% higher odds of 30-day mortality (p=0.36). Conclusions Associations between nSES and receipt of cardiac catheterization and 30-day mortality were noted for women but not men in a universal healthcare system. Care protocols designed to improve equity of access to care and outcomes are required, especially for low-income women. PMID:24895450

  17. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers. PMID:23627476

  18. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  19. Increasing Access for Economically Disadvantaged Students: The NSF/CSEM & S-STEM Programs at Louisiana State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zakiya S.; Iyengar, Sitharama S.; Pang, Su-Seng; Warner, Isiah M.; Luces, Candace A.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing college degree attainment for students from disadvantaged backgrounds is a prominent component of numerous state and federal legislation focused on higher education. In 1999, the National Science Foundation (NSF) instituted the "Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships" (CSEMS) program; this initiative was designed to provide greater access and support to academically talented students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Originally intended to provide financial support to lower income students, this NSF program also advocated that additional professional development and advising would be strategies to increase undergraduate persistence to graduation. This innovative program for economically disadvantaged students was extended in 2004 to include students from other disciplines including the physical and life sciences as well as the technology fields, and the new name of the program was Scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM). The implementation of these two programs in Louisiana State University (LSU) has shown significant and measurable success since 2000, making LSU a Model University in providing support to economically disadvantaged students within the STEM disciplines. The achievement of these programs is evidenced by the graduation rates of its participants. This report provides details on the educational model employed through the CSEMS/S-STEM projects at LSU and provides a path to success for increasing student retention rates in STEM disciplines. While the LSU's experience is presented as a case study, the potential relevance of this innovative mentoring program in conjunction with the financial support system is discussed in detail.

  20. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 1 in support of the objective to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030

    SciTech Connect

    Birol, Fatih

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force One which is dedicated to the objective of achieving universal access to modern energy services by 2030. The report shows that universal energy access can be realized by 2030 with strong, focused actions set within a coordinated framework.

  1. Challenges and Successes in the Application of Universal Access Principles in the Development of Bus Rapid Transport Sytems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The National Department of Transport started a programme to upgrade public transport systems throughout South Africa in 2008, which included the upgrading of transport systems for host cities of the 2010 World Cup. This was the first time there was a clear commitment to produce universally accessible public transport systems in South Africa. The requirement to achieve universal access was reinforced by National Treasuries stipulation, that universal access was a precondition for the approval of all funding for these projects. In the absence of any specific legislation in the transport sector to address universal access and the South African National Building Regulations and the associated deemed to satisfy code, South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: "Facilities for Persons with Disabilities", providing the only associated standards, there has been a need to revisit traffic engineering codes. This has created an opportunity to look at the functionality and safety of commuters, especially those who have functional limitations, at traffic intersections and midblock pedestrian crossings, especially as the commuters have to access predominately median located Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) trunk stations. Included in the specific areas of focus that impact on the issues of pedestrian safety, has been the application and functionality of tactile wayfinding and warning surfaces and other support systems for commuters with functional sight limitations and the integration of the systems with other infrastructure and the safety of all commuter. In addition to the issues of functionality, this paper will address the influence of misdirected foreign expertise that set the initial BRT Systems on a high floor vehicle modality, which has created operational challenges that have seriously compromised functional universal access. This presentation will highlight these challenges, opportunities and solutions, the procedural complexities, as well as the inherent resistance

  2. Report of the Retention Issues Subcommittee. The University System of Georgia's Task Force on Enhancing Access for African-American Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ. System, Atlanta. Board of Regents.

    The Retention Issues Subcommittee of the Task Force on Enhancing Access for African American Males of the University System of Georgia (USG) was charged with the identification of barriers to the successful retention of African American males within the USG and finding successful programs aimed at addressing these problems. A number of barriers…

  3. Widening Access through Openness in Higher Education in the Developing World: A Bourdieusian Field Analysis of Experiences from the National Open University of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olakulehin, Felix Kayode; Singh, Gurmit

    2013-01-01

    Bourdieu has argued that higher education is a field that reproduces social inequality, thus complicating how openness widens access to higher education in the developing world. Drawing on the experiences of the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), this paper critically analyses and evaluates the rationale, approach, difficulties,…

  4. The Health and Education Benefits of Universal Primary Education for the Next Generation: Evidence from Tanzania. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 62

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Westbrook, Jo; Hernandez-Fernandez, Jimena

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the importance of increasing women's education as a result of Universal Primary Education and its further impact on improving children's health and educational access in Tanzania. The study uses data from the 2007 Demographic Health Survey for empirical analysis and it is informed by the historical accounts of the…

  5. Social Capital of Non-Traditional Students at a German University. Do Traditional and Non-Traditional Students Access Different Social Resources?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brändle, Tobias; Häuberer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Social capital is of particular value for the acquisition of education. Not only does it prevent scholars from dropping out but it improves the educational achievement. The paper focuses on access to social resources by traditional and non-traditional students at a German university and asks if there are group differences considering this…

  6. MySchoolDayOnline: Applying Universal Design Principles to the Development of a Fully Accessible Online Scheduling Tool for Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the universal design features that were identified during the alpha development of a scheduler software program, known as MySchoolDayOnline, for use in schools, and provides preliminary research on the usability of these features. The study presented here investigated the accessibility and usability of MySchoolDayOnline for…

  7. Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

    This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

  8. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  9. Universities as Hubs for Next-Generation Networks: A Model for Universities to Spur 21st Century Internet Access and Innovation in Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennett, Benjamin; Morris, Sarah J.; Byrum, Greta

    2012-01-01

    Based on a request for information (RFI) submitted to The University Community Next Generation Innovation Project (Gig.U), the paper describes a model for universities to develop next generation broadband infrastructure in their communities. In the our view universities can play a critical role in spurring next generation networks into their…

  10. Projeto Vida no Vale: universal access to water and sanitation in the North East of Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauark-Leite, L.; Vinçon-Leite, B.; Deroubaix, J. F.; Loireau, A.; Silveira, D.; Haddad, E.

    2008-08-01

    In the rural areas of the developing countries, the access to water supply and sanitation services is still largely inadequate. Poor governance of the water sector is frequently singled out as a cause and reforms are required. Studies analyzing the great diversity of restructuring efforts currently being undertaken in the water sector have not succeeded in determining the most appropriate institutional and economic framework for such reforms. Moreover they underline the lack of documentation on actual projects and call for concrete models and tools for improving water and sanitation services (WSS) and for adapting water utility practice to real conditions. In this context, the Vida no Vale (Life in the Valley) project is aimed at bringing universal access to WSS for all inhabitants of both urban and rural areas, in the north-eastern area of the Brazilian State of Minas Gerais. The project takes sustainable development as its guiding principle, and relies on the joint implementation of an innovative technical design, a governance model involving public participation and subsidiarity, and an economic structure combining financial viability and social equity. Designed at a consistent geographical and hydrological scale, it includes the creation of a regional subsidiary of the existing state water company as a keystone element. The institutional organisation also relies on the creation of a public board consisting of the 92 municipalities of the project region and of the State of Minas Gerais. This board will be in charge of the system's governance. This paper presents the first step of the project (2006), consisting of a feasibility study and the implementation of 9 pilot sub-projects. During the feasibility study, the supply, demand and capacity to pay for water services were defined, existing infrastructure appraised, the necessary amount of investment assessed and an innovative operational model and a sustainable management system, including civil society

  11. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception.

    PubMed

    Wohlschläger, Afra M; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain's ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants' left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  12. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  13. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  14. Assessing Ongoing Electronic Resource Purchases: Linking Tools to Synchronize Staff Workflows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeffrey D.; Major, Colleen; O'Neal, Nada; Tofanelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing electronic resource purchases represent a substantial proportion of collections budgets. Recognizing the necessity of systematic ongoing assessment with full selector engagement, Columbia University Libraries appointed an Electronic Resources Assessment Working Group to promote the inclusion of such resources within our current culture of…

  15. Can the Virtual University Expand Access to Higher Education in Africa? The Dialectic of the Local and the Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adala, A. Atieno

    2010-01-01

    A recent phenomenon in higher education is the emergence of the virtual university. Some observers have attributed its emergence to globalization and technological innovation. This dissertation study is about one particular instance of the virtual university phenomenon, the African Virtual University (AVU). The AVU initiative was launched with…

  16. Fair Access and Fee Setting in English Universities: What Do Institutional Statements Suggest about University Strategies in a Stratified Quasi-Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowl, Marion; Hughes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how English universities operating in a "quasi-market" are managing the tension between two policy expectations: the first that they should encourage social mobility by widening the social base of their student population; the second that they should compete with other universities to attract students and thereby…

  17. The emergence of a global right to health norm – the unresolved case of universal access to quality emergency obstetric care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The global response to HIV suggests the potential of an emergent global right to health norm, embracing shared global responsibility for health, to assist policy communities in framing the obligations of the domestic state and the international community. Our research explores the extent to which this global right to health norm has influenced the global policy process around maternal health rights, with a focus on universal access to emergency obstetric care. Methods In examining the extent to which arguments stemming from a global right to health norm have been successful in advancing international policy on universal access to emergency obstetric care, we looked at the period from 1985 to 2013 period. We adopted a qualitative case study approach applying a process-tracing methodology using multiple data sources, including an extensive literature review and limited key informant interviews to analyse the international policy agenda setting process surrounding maternal health rights, focusing on emergency obstetric care. We applied John Kingdon's public policy agenda setting streams model to analyse our data. Results Kingdon’s model suggests that to succeed as a mobilising norm, the right to health could work if it can help bring the problem, policy and political streams together, as it did with access to AIDS treatment. Our analysis suggests that despite a normative grounding in the right to health, prioritisation of the specific maternal health entitlements remains fragmented. Conclusions Despite United Nations recognition of maternal mortality as a human rights issue, the relevant policy communities have not yet managed to shift the policy agenda to prioritise the global right to health norm of shared responsibility for realising access to emergency obstetric care. The experience of HIV advocates in pushing for global solutions based on right to health principles, including participation, solidarity and accountability; suggest potential avenues for

  18. Grand Canyon as a universally accessible virtual field trip for intro Geoscience classes using geo-referenced mobile game technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, N.; Pederson, J. L.; Shelton, B.

    2012-12-01

    question. The students must answer each question correctly in order to proceed to the next location and accrue points in the game and multiple attempts reduce the number of points earned when the correct answer is found. The questions are either multiple choice or involve touch-screen interaction to identify a specific geologic feature. Initial testing of the prototype game in Historical and Physical geology courses at Utah State University indicate that students enjoy the mobile "exploration" nature of the game as well as experiencing photographs of geologic features rather than traditional cartoons. Qualitative evaluation using anonymous surveys was conducted to help determine the usability of the game and the potential effectiveness of this technology-based approach. Students were asked about the degree of fun and difficulty of the game, content learned, and their overall response to features they liked/disliked about it. The results of these early assessments are positive, both in regard to the improvement of students' understanding of key geology concepts and their enjoyment of learning with the technology in a mobile orienteering manner. This is a positive first step in an innovative teaching tool with the power to overcome the pervasive problem of the boring first year STEM course and make world-class field trips accessible to all.

  19. Improving equitable access to imaging under universal-access medicine: the ontario wait time information program and its impact on hospital policy and process.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania Z; El-Maraghi, Robert H; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    In Canada, equal access to health care is the goal, but this is associated with wait times. Wait times should be fair rather than uniform, taking into account the urgency of the problem as well as the time an individual has already waited. In November 2004, the Ontario government began addressing this issue. One of the first steps was to institute benchmarks reflecting "acceptable" wait times for CT and MRI. A public Web site was developed indicating wait times at each Local Health Integration Network. Since starting the Wait Time Information Program, there has been a sustained reduction in wait times for Ontarians requiring CT and MRI. The average wait time for a CT scan went from 81 days in September 2005 to 47 days in September 2009. For MRI, the resulting wait time was reduced from 120 to 105 days. Increased patient scans have been achieved by purchasing new CT and MRI scanners, expanding hours of operation, and improving patient throughput using strategies learned from the Lean initiative, based on Toyota's manufacturing philosophy for car production. Institution-specific changes in booking procedures have been implemented. Concurrently, government guidelines have been developed to ensure accountability for monies received. The Ontario Wait Time Information Program is an innovative first step in improving fair and equitable access to publicly funded imaging services. There have been reductions in wait times for both CT and MRI. As various new processes are implemented, further review will be necessary for each step to determine their individual efficacy. PMID:20678727

  20. Ongoing pharmaceutical reforms in France: implications for key stakeholder groups.

    PubMed

    Sermet, Catherine; Andrieu, Veronique; Godman, Brian; Van Ganse, Eric; Haycox, Alan; Reynier, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The rapid rise in pharmaceutical costs in France has been driven by new technologies and the growing prevalence of chronic diseases as well as considerable prescribing freedom and choice of physician among patients. This has led to the introduction of a number of reforms and initiatives in an attempt to moderate expenditure whilst ensuring universal coverage and rewarding innovation. These reforms include accelerating access to and granting average European prices for new innovative drugs, delisting drugs where there are concerns over their value and instigating rebates for excessive prescribing. Alongside this, ongoing initiatives to improve the quality and efficiency of prescribing include programmes to enhance generic prescribing and dispensing as well as to reduce antibacterial and anxiolytic/hypnotic prescribing. However, there have been few publications documenting the impact of specific reforms on the overall costs and quality of care, which have been exacerbated by compartmentalization of budgets. Estimates suggest savings of over 27 million euro/year by decreasing antibacterial prescribing, 450 million euro/year by not reimbursing ineffective drugs, 670 million euro/year from pharmaceutical company rebates and approximately 1 billion euro/year from increased prescribing and dispensing of generics (year 2003-7 values). Additional savings of at least 1.5 billion euro/year are seen as being possible from increased use of generics such as generic proton pump inhibitors, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) and ACE inhibitors instead of current branded products such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]). Delisting drugs when there are concerns about their value provides an example to other countries with currently limited demand-side measures. Other possible examples include price : volume agreements and multifaceted campaigns to enhance generic prescribing and dispensing and reduce antibacterial prescribing

  1. University Access and After: Explaining the Social Composition of Degree Programmes and the Contrasting Expectations of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Helena; Elias, Marina

    2014-01-01

    University expansion in higher education has been hierarchically differentiated. There is some concentration of certain social profiles in some degrees of study, so social composition between degrees can vary considerably. This article describes in terms of social composition 10 degrees of four public universities in the metropolitan area of…

  2. Top 10% Admissions in the Borderlands: Access and Success of Borderland Top Students at Texas Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Texas Borderland students admitted through the Texas Top 10% admissions policy, which assumes that Top 10% students are college ready for any public university and provides Top 10% high school graduates automatic admission to any 4-year public university in Texas. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, results…

  3. Urban University Access and Affordability: The Implications of the Relationship between Gas Prices and Suburban Transit Ridership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginski, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    Many college campuses across the country have implemented U-Pass transit programs to mitigate transportation costs for students. However, urban university U-pass programs fall short for suburban students who cannot get to the urban metro area without connecting public transportation. As urban universities rely on suburbs as feeder communities,…

  4. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  5. Accessing the Microform Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Stan

    1985-01-01

    Characterizes types of indexing programs used by Research Publications, Inc. and describes provision of access to four major projects: "The Official Washington Post Index" (provides access to newspaper and microfilm edition); "The Eighteenth Century"; "The Declassified Documents Reference System" (ongoing fiche project abstracted and indexed…

  6. Croatian Meteor Network: ongoing work 2014 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Andreić, Ž.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing work mainly between 2014-2015 International Meteor Conferences (IMC) has been presented. Current sky coverage, software updates, orbit catalogues updates, shower search updates, international collaboration as well as new fields of research and educational efforts made by the Croatian Meteor Network are described.

  7. Overview of Ongoing NRMRL GI Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of ongoing NRMRL Green Infrastructure research and addresses the question: What do we need to know to present a cogent estimate of the value of Green Infrastructure? Discussions included are: stormwater well study, rain gardens and permeable su...

  8. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  9. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  10. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  11. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  12. Human rights and universal access for men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs: a qualitative analysis of the 2010 UNGASS narrative country progress reports.

    PubMed

    Persson, Asha; Ellard, Jeanne; Newman, Christy; Holt, Martin; de Wit, John

    2011-08-01

    All UN member states have endorsed a commitment to protect human rights in the global fight against HIV and to ensure universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support. To assess progress towards fulfilling this commitment, countries submit reports to UNAIDS biennially, known as UNGASS reports. Our quantitative analyses show that core indicators relating to most-at-risk populations, particularly men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who inject drugs (PWID) are limited or absent from many UNGASS reports, particularly those submitted by countries in developing regions. We conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of the narrative part of the 2010 UNGASS country progress reports, an important yet under-explored part of the reporting process, to consider how signatory countries in developing regions address the issue of MSM and PWID in a written form. Our analysis identified a repertoire of narrative approaches to MSM and PWID which revealed fault lines between countries' endorsement of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS and programmatic responses to MSM and PWID. Our findings raise questions about the relationship between "universal" human rights and "local" cultures, and about the UNGASS reporting process itself. Through critical engagement with these questions, our article aims to contribute to international dialogues on how to better recognise and respond to shortcomings in the global commitment to human rights and universal access for people vulnerable to HIV. PMID:21764488

  13. College and University Commitments to Student Access and Success: An Overview of Institutional Postsecondary Opportunity Programs. WISCAPE Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaade, Elizabeth Stransky

    2010-01-01

    The federal and state governments are placing greater emphasis on postsecondary attainment while concerns about rising college costs for students and families surge. Both groups are calling on institutions to do more to help improve student access and achievement rates. Further, recent research and policy have put pressure on institutions to admit…

  14. "What my Guidance Councillor Should Have Told Me": The Importance of Universal Access and Exposure to Executive-Level Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Catherine; Leck, Joanne; Rockwell, Brittany; Luthy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Often, knowledge and quality education is reserved for the elite, where there are systemic obstacles to gaining access to today's leaders. Gender and racial inequities in executive-level positions across North America have been a longstanding debate amongst scholars and policy makers. Research has consistently documented that women are…

  15. An Alternative Option to Dedicated Braille Notetakers for People with Visual Impairments: Universal Technology for Better Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sunggye

    2012-01-01

    Technology provides equal access to information and helps people with visual impairments to complete tasks more independently. Among various assistive technology options for people with visual impairments, braille notetakers have been considered the most significant because of their technological innovation. Braille notetakers allow users who are…

  16. Access to Higher Education: Exploring the Variation in Pell Grant Prevalence among U.S. Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Matthew P.; Piraino, Patrizio; Haveman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Access to higher education in the United States is increasingly on the public policy agenda as funding constraints affect the realization of college attendance for many middle and low-income students. We use the Pell Grant as a proxy for low-income participation, and the percent of undergraduate students receiving a Pell Grant (Pell Prevalence…

  17. Universal optical line terminal encoding and decoding architecture in two-code keying for noncoherent spectral amplitude coding optical code division multiple access systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Bih-Chyun; Lin, Cheing-Hong; Yang, De-Nian

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new code family, called extended shifted prime codes, and the universal encoding architecture for spectral amplitude coding optical code division multiple access systems using a two-code keying scheme. The proposed system can eliminate multiuser interference and suppress phase-induced intensity noise. In addition, we design the ESP codes to be an encoding/decoding architecture based on the array waveguide grating architecture and reduce the power loss and the complexity of the optical line terminal. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed system with ESP codes outperforms the existing one-dimensional shifted prime codes system.

  18. Influence of Municipality-Level Mean Income on Access to Aortic Valve Surgery: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study under Japan's Universal Health-Care Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seitetsu L.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kohro, Takahide; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Koide, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Background Universal health-care coverage has attracted the interest of policy makers as a way of achieving health equity. However, previous reports have shown that despite universal coverage, socioeconomic disparity persists in access to high-tech invasive care, such as cardiac treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic status and care of aortic stenosis in the context of Japan's health-care system, which is mainly publicly funded. Methods We chose aortic stenosis in older people as a target because such patients are likely to be affected by socioeconomic disparity. Using a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database, we identified 12,893 isolated aortic stenosis patients aged over 65 years who were hospitalized between July 2010 and March 2012. Municipality socioeconomic status was represented by the mean household income of the patients' residential municipality, categorized into quartiles. The likelihood of undergoing aortic valve surgery and in-hospital mortality was regressed against socioeconomic status level with adjustments for hospital volume, regional number of cardiac surgeons per 1 million population, and patients' clinical status. Results We found no significant differences between the highest and lowest quartile groups in surgical indication (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–1.03) or in-hospital mortality (1.00; 0.68–1.48). Hospital volume was significantly associated with lower postoperative mortality (odds ratio of the highest volume tertile to the lowest, 0.49; 0.34–0.71). Conclusions Under Japan's current universal health-care coverage, municipality socioeconomic status did not appear to have a systematic relationship with either treatment decision for surgical intervention or postoperative survival following aortic valve surgery among older patients. Our results imply that universal health-care coverage with high publicly funded coverage offers equal access to high

  19. A pathogenic mechanism of chronic ongoing myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Yamamura, T; Fukuta, S; Matsumori, A; Matsuzaki, M

    1996-08-01

    To clarify the pathogenetic mechanism of chronic ongoing myocarditis, we produced Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis in A/J mice and immunopathologically examined the microcirculation in the chronic phase of myocarditis. Forty-two 3-week-old A/J mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with Coxsackievirus B3 (Nancy strain) 2 x 10(4) PFU (plaque-forming units) and sacrificed 7, 14, 21, 50, 90, or 120 days later. To evaluate myocardial microcirculation, 18 of the hearts were perfused from the thoracic aorta with warm 2% gelatin/carbon solution. The remaining hearts were quickly frozen for immunologic analysis with an enzyme immunostaining assay using monoclonal antibodies against CD4, CD8, macrophages, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and major histocompatibility complex class I or II. The presence of viral RNA genome in the myocardium at 40, 50, or 60 days after inoculation was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction. The lesions in chronic ongoing myocarditis consisted of myocardial damage, myocardial calcification, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of mononuclear cells. These infiltrated lymphocytes were predominantly CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, microvascular abnormalities, including dilatation, tortuosity, constriction, and abrupt termination, were observed around the lesions. There was marked infiltration by mononuclear cells around the microvessels. ICAM-1 was strongly expressed in the endothelial cells of the vessels. Coxsackie B3 viral genome was not detected in the myocardium of mice with chronic ongoing myocarditis in each stage examined. These results suggest that an autoimmune mechanism is involved in the persistent inflammation seen in chronic ongoing myocarditis. PMID:8889664

  20. Engaged Outreach: Using Community Engagement to Facilitate Access to Higher Education for People from Low Socio-Economic Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scull, Sue; Cuthill, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Despite ongoing equity initiatives, there is still a clear discrepancy in regards to access to higher education for potential students from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. This paper reports on an action research initiative that has developed a model of engaged outreach as an alternative approach to traditional university outreach. Engaged…

  1. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  2. From the Fields to the University: Charting Educational Access and Success for Farmworker Students Using a Community Cultural Wealth Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejarano, Cynthia; Valverde, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the New Mexico State University College Assistance Migrant Program (NMSU CAMP) was created to increase the number of baccalaureate degrees held by students from farmworker backgrounds by mediating structural impediments that typically normalize post-secondary inequities for this population. Migrant and seasonal farmworker students are…

  3. Universal Design for Learning: Preparing Secondary Education Teachers in Training to Increase Academic Accessibility of High School English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) is well understood in the world of architecture and in the area of special education, its use to increase the academic performance of high school English learners (ELs) is not widely explored. To reduce this void, this article presents an overview of the UDL concept and its principles,…

  4. The Pedagogy of the Marginalized: Understanding How Historically Disadvantaged Students Negotiate Their Epistemic Access in a Diverse University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Michael; Atinde, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how successful undergraduate students from marginalized communities or historically disadvantaged backgrounds negotiate their performance within a university environment. It addresses one important question: How did they make their way up the academic ladder in the face of hardship determined by their unique historical…

  5. From Access to Excess: Changing Roles and Relationships for Distance Education, Continuing Education, and Academic Departments in American Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcroft, Judy Copeland

    2013-01-01

    In American universities, early distance education needed both continuing education and academic departments for establishing institutional cooperation, developing quality standards, adapting to change, and finding a funding model. Today, the Internet and the need for additional revenue are driving new distance education models.

  6. Expanding Access for Training of Science Teachers through ODL: A Case Study of University of Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okunuga, A. O.; Olaoluniyi, O.; Opara, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Rising up to the challenge of shortage of middle manpower in Nigeria, the University of Lagos established the Correspondence and Open Studies Unit (COSU), now Distance Learning Institute DLI). Accounting, Business Administration and Science-Education were the pilot courses at the B.Sc. level. The Special Entry Preparatory Programme (SEPP) was…

  7. The Accessibility of Universal Grammar in the Acquisition of Structure-Dependency in Persian Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Sima

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does Universal Grammar (UG) constrain second language (L2) acquisition? This is not only an empirical question, but one which is currently investigable. In this context, L2 acquisition is emerging as an important new domain of psycholinguistic research. Three logical possibilities have been articulated regarding the role of UG in L2…

  8. Universal Service in the Digital Age: The Commercialization and Geography of U.S. Internet Access. Research Brief No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    In 1997, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) supported a project on the geographic spread of the commercial Internet Service Provider (ISP) market. This Research Brief describes some of the principle findings of a report (by Professor Shane Greenstein of the Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University) on the…

  9. Ongoing SETI Observation Programs at the ATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array is designed for commensal observing with multiple users making spectral images at multiple freqeuncies and forming real time single-pixel beams in multiple directions at the same time. At the ATA, most SETI observations use beamforming and very high spectral resolution to perform targeted and wide area surveys of the sky, sometimes sharing the observing time with conventional astronomical observations with the imaging correlator. We shall briefly review several ongoing SETI programs as demonstrations of the capabilities of the ATA.

  10. A practical strategy for ongoing reinforcer assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, S A; McGee, G G; Farmer-Dougan, V; Risley, T R

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for practical methods of reinforcer assessment that systematically track ongoing changes in clients' preferences. In this study, the effects of a time-efficient reinforcer assessment package were evaluated in a multiple baseline across 3 preschoolers with autism, comparing individualized item selections by experienced teachers with children's presession preferences for items of various sensory qualities. Systematic assessment of children's reinforcers for correct responding virtually eliminated nontargeted maladaptive behaviors, as well as yielding expected improvements in accuracy. The powerful side-effects of potent reinforcers underline the importance of increased attention to reinforcer assessment in research and practice. PMID:2745238

  11. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  12. Universal Design for Learning: speech-language pathologists and their teams making the common core curriculum accessible.

    PubMed

    Staskowski, Maureen; Hardin, Susan; Klein, Mike; Wozniak, Carrie

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework was named in the supporting documents for the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as a means of helping all students, especially those with disabilities, to meet and exceed the rigorous expectations. This article will describe the principles of UDL, show how educational teams use the framework to design instruction to teach the CCSS with examples from science and English language arts, and finally explore how the implementation of UDL provides an opportunity for speech-language pathologists to play a critical role in school improvement and instructional design and support. PMID:22538708

  13. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  14. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity.

    PubMed

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the neurons show pathological tau. In transgenic mice, membrane potential oscillations are slower during slow-wave sleep and under anesthesia. Intracellular recordings revealed that these changes are due to longer Down states and state transitions of membrane potentials. Firing rates of transgenic neurons are reduced, and firing patterns within Up states are altered, with longer latencies and inter-spike intervals. By changing the activity patterns of a subpopulation of affected neurons, pathological tau reduces the activity of the neocortical network. PMID:25704951

  15. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe. PMID:27214552

  16. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  17. Patient Knowledge on Malaria Symptoms Is a Key to Promoting Universal Access of Patients to Effective Malaria Treatment in Palawan, the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto-Takahashi, Emilie Louise Akiko; Tongol-Rivera, Pilarita; Villacorte, Elena A.; Angluben, Ray U.; Jimba, Masamine; Kano, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Palawan, where health care facilities are still limited, is one of the most malaria endemic provinces in the Philippines. Since 1999, microscopists (community health workers) have been trained in malaria diagnosis and feasibility of early diagnosis and treatments have been enhanced throughout the province. To accelerate the universal access of malaria patients to diagnostic testing in Palawan, positive health seeking behavior should be encouraged when malaria infection is suspected. Methods In this cross-sectional study, structured interviews were carried out with residents (N = 218) of 20 remote malaria-endemic villages throughout Palawan with a history of suspected malaria from January to February in 2012. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to determine factors associated with appropriate treatment, which included: (1) socio-demographic characteristics; (2) proximity to a health facility; (3) health seeking behavior; (4) knowledge on malaria; (5) participation in community awareness-raising activities. Results Three factors independently associated with appropriate treatment were identified by SEM (CMIN = 10.5, df = 11, CFI = 1.000, RMSEA = .000): “living near microscopist” (p < 0.001), “not living near private pharmacy” (p < 0.01), and “having severe symptoms” (p < 0.01). “Severe symptoms” were positively correlated with more “knowledge on malaria symptoms” (p < 0.001). This knowledge was significantly increased by attending “community awareness-raising activities by microscopists” (p < 0.001). Conclusions In the resource-limited settings, microscopists played a significant role in providing appropriate treatment to all participants with severe malaria symptoms. However, it was considered that knowledge on malaria symptoms made participants more aware of their symptoms, and further progressed self-triage. Strengthening this recognition sensitivity and making residents aware of nearby microscopists may be the

  18. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  19. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  20. Low socioeconomic status is associated with adverse events in children and teens on insulin pumps under a universal access program: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Rayzel; Stukel, Therese A; Miller, Fiona A; Newman, Alice; Daneman, Denis; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Guttmann, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe adverse events in pediatric insulin pump users since universal funding in Ontario and to explore the role of socioeconomic status and 24-hour support. Research design and methods Population-based cohort study of youth (<19 years) with type 1 diabetes (n=3193) under a universal access program in Ontario, Canada, from 2006 to 2013. We linked 2012 survey data from 33 pediatric diabetes centers to health administrative databases. The relationship between patient and center-level characteristics and time to first diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) admission or death was tested using a Cox proportional hazards model and the rate of diabetes-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations with a Poisson model, both using generalized estimating equations. Results The rate of DKA was 5.28/100 person-years and mortality 0.033/100 person-years. Compared with the least deprived quintile, the risk of DKA or death for those in the most deprived quintile was significantly higher (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.38) as was the rate of diabetes-related acute care use (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.00). 24-hour support was not associated with these outcomes. Higher glycated hemoglobin, prior DKA, older age, and higher nursing patient load were associated with a higher risk of DKA or death. Conclusions The safety profile of pump therapy in the context of universal funding is similar to other jurisdictions and unrelated to 24-hour support. Several factors including higher deprivation were associated with an increased risk of adverse events and could be used to inform the design of interventions aimed at preventing poor outcomes in high-risk individuals. PMID:27547416

  1. Epilepsy Surgery: Current Status and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    KAWAI, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of surgical treatment of epilepsy and introduces the ongoing challenges. Seizure outcome of resective surgery for focal seizures associated with focal lesions is satisfactory. Particularly for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, surgical treatment should be considered from the earlier stage of the disease. Meanwhile, surgical outcome in nonlesional extratemporal lobe epilepsy is still to be improved using various approaches. Disconnective surgeries reduce surgical complications of extensive resections while achieving equivalent or better seizure outcomes. Multiple subpial transection is still being modified expecting a better outcome by transection to the vertical cortices along the sulci- and multi-directional transection from a single entry point. Hippocampal transection is expected to preserve memory function while interrupting the abnormal epileptic synchronization. Proper selection or combination of subdural and depth electrodes and a wide-band analysis of electroencephalography may improve the accurate localization of epileptogenic region. Patients for whom curative resective surgery is not indicated because of generalized or bilateral multiple nature of their epilepsies, neuromodulation therapies are options of treatment which palliate their seizures. PMID:25925752

  2. Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Drug Free Work Place Program (DFWP) has now matured to the point of being able to return employees to sensitive testing designated positions (TDP) after completion of treatment of their addiction. The known tendency of addicted individuals to suffer multiple relapses prior to their final recovery has resulted in several positive urine tests (relapses) occurring among those Federal employees who have already completed treatment and who have been returned to TDP's. The very real potential for further relapses occurring after additional employees return to TDP's will be a critical factor in the ultimate success of the DFWP and in the public's impression of the program's effectiveness. In response to this concern, NASA has begun development of its Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT) instrument. The aim of the NASA ORBIT is to provide Employee Assistance Program (EAP) professionals with an advanced clinical tool which will be helpful in supporting recovery from substance abuse and which will allow more accurate determinations of when clients may be successfully returned to sensitive positions.

  3. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  4. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. PMID:26546163

  5. Increased ongoing neural variability in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Gonen-Yaacovi, Gil; Arazi, Ayelet; Shahar, Nitzan; Karmon, Anat; Haar, Shlomi; Meiran, Nachshon; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-08-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been described as a disorder where frequent lapses of attention impair the ability of an individual to focus/attend in a sustained manner, thereby generating abnormally large intra-individual behavioral variability across trials. Indeed, increased reaction time (RT) variability is a fundamental behavioral characteristic of individuals with ADHD found across a large number of cognitive tasks. But what is the underlying neurophysiology that might generate such behavioral instability? Here, we examined trial-by-trial EEG response variability to visual and auditory stimuli while subjects' attention was diverted to an unrelated task at the fixation cross. Comparisons between adult ADHD and control participants revealed that neural response variability was significantly larger in the ADHD group as compared with the control group in both sensory modalities. Importantly, larger trial-by-trial variability in ADHD was apparent before and after stimulus presentation as well as in trials where the stimulus was omitted, suggesting that ongoing (rather than stimulus-evoked) neural activity is continuously more variable (noisier) in ADHD. While the patho-physiological mechanisms causing this increased neural variability remain unknown, they appear to act continuously rather than being tied to a specific sensory or cognitive process. PMID:27179150

  6. Coping with Selfish On-Going Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupferman, Orna; Tamir, Tami

    A rational and selfish environment may have an incentive to cheat the system it interacts with. Cheating the system amounts to reporting a stream of inputs that is different from the one corresponding to the real behavior of the environment. The system may cope with cheating by charging penalties to cheats it detects. In this paper, we formalize this setting by means of weighted automata and their resilience to selfish environments. Automata have proven to be a successful formalism for modeling the on-going interaction between a system and its environment. In particular, weighted finite automata (WFAs), which assign a cost to each input word, are useful in modeling an interaction that has a quantitative outcome. Consider a WFA A over the alphabet Σ. At each moment in time, the environment may cheat A by reporting a letter different from the one it actually generates. A penalty function η:Σ×Σ→IR ≥ 0 maps each possible false-report to a penalty, charged whenever the false-report is detected. A detection-probability function p:Σ×Σ→[0,1] gives the probability of detecting each false-report. We say that A is (η,p)-resilient to cheating if <η,p> ensures that the minimal expected cost of an input word is achieved with no cheating. Thus, a rational environment has no incentive to cheat A.

  7. Assessing Information Literacy among Undergraduates: A Discussion of the Literature and the University of California-Berkeley Assessment Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, Patricia Davitt

    2001-01-01

    Since 1994, the Teaching Library at the University of California-Berkeley has conducted an ongoing Survey of Information Literacy Competencies in selected academic departments to measure the "lower-order" information literacy skills of graduating seniors. The survey reveals that students think they know more about accessing information and…

  8. The Politics of Information: Building a Relational Database To Support Decision-Making at a Public University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Debra; Hoffman, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    Describes creation of a relational database at the University of Washington supporting ongoing academic planning at several levels and affecting the culture of decision making. Addresses getting started; sharing the database; questions, worries, and issues; improving access to high-demand courses; the advising function; management of instructional…

  9. Evolution of Antiretroviral Drug Costs in Brazil in the Context of Free and Universal Access to AIDS Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy S; Fonseca, Elize M; Bastos, Francisco I; Gruskin, Sofia; Salomon, Joshua A

    2007-01-01

    Background Little is known about the long-term drug costs associated with treating AIDS in developing countries. Brazil's AIDS treatment program has been cited widely as the developing world's largest and most successful AIDS treatment program. The program guarantees free access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for all people living with HIV/AIDS in need of treatment. Brazil produces non-patented generic antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), procures many patented ARVs with negotiated price reductions, and recently issued a compulsory license to import one patented ARV. In this study, we investigate the drivers of recent ARV cost trends in Brazil through analysis of drug-specific prices and expenditures between 2001 and 2005. Methods and Findings We compared Brazil's ARV prices to those in other low- and middle-income countries. We analyzed trends in drug expenditures for HAART in Brazil from 2001 to 2005 on the basis of cost data disaggregated by each ARV purchased by the Brazilian program. We decomposed the overall changes in expenditures to compare the relative impacts of changes in drug prices and drug purchase quantities. We also estimated the excess costs attributable to the difference between prices for generics in Brazil and the lowest global prices for these drugs. Finally, we estimated the savings attributable to Brazil's reduced prices for patented drugs. Negotiated drug prices in Brazil are lowest for patented ARVs for which generic competition is emerging. In recent years, the prices for efavirenz and lopinavir–ritonavir (lopinavir/r) have been lower in Brazil than in other middle-income countries. In contrast, the price of tenofovir is US$200 higher per patient per year than that reported in other middle-income countries. Despite precipitous price declines for four patented ARVs, total Brazilian drug expenditures doubled, to reach US$414 million in 2005. We find that the major driver of cost increases was increased purchase quantities of six

  10. On-Going Temperature Extremes in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordov, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Temperature trends (grows up to 0.5 °C per decade), more frequent occurrence of temperature extremes provoked serious natural disasters (2010 heat waves in Russia, 2013 flood in Russia's Far East) led to socio-economical impact (crop damages, infrastructure failures, respectively). To get reliable knowledge on location, frequency and magnitude of observed extremes we have studied daily max/min temperature trends based on ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis data (0,25°×0,25°). This dataset is most accurately reproduces observed temperature behavior in the region. Statistical analysis of daily temperature time series (1979-2012) indicates the asymmetric changes in distribution tails of such extreme indices as warm/cold days/nights. Namely, the warming during winter cold nights is stronger than during warm nights, especially over the north of Siberia. Increases in minimum temperatures are more significant than in maximum temperatures. Warming determined at the high latitudes of the region is achieved mostly due to winter temperature changes. South area of Siberia has slightly cooling during winter and summer. Results obtained provide regional decision-makers with detailed high spatial and temporal resolution climatic information required for adaptation and mitigation measures development. Calculations presented have been realized using information-computational web-GIS system "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/) which automatically generates the archive of calculated fields ready for multidisciplinary studies of regional climate change impacts. The authors acknowledge partial financial support for this research from the RFBR (13-05-12034, 14-05-00502), SB RAS 131 and VIII.80.2.1.) and grant of the President of RF (№ 181).

  11. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  12. Ongoing climatic extreme dynamics in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Shulgina, T. M.; Okladnikov, I. G.; Titov, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Recent investigations indicate not only large changes in averaged climatic characteristics (Kabanov and Lykosov, 2006, IPCC, 2007; Groisman and Gutman, 2012), but more frequent occurrence and stronger impacts of climatic extremes are reported as well (Bulygina et al., 2007; IPCC, 2012: Climate Extremes, 2012; Oldenborh et al., 2013). This paper provides the results of daily temperature and precipitation extreme dynamics in Siberia for the last three decades (1979 - 2012). Their seasonal dynamics is assessed using 10th and 90th percentile-based threshold indices that characterize frequency, intensity and duration of climatic extremes. To obtain the geographical pattern of these variations with high spatial resolution, the sub-daily temperature data from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis and daily precipitation amounts from APHRODITE JMA dataset were used. All extreme indices and linear trend coefficients have been calculated using web-GIS information-computational platform Climate (http://climate.scert.ru/) developed to support collaborative multidisciplinary investigations of regional climatic changes and their impacts (Gordov et al., 2012). Obtained results show that seasonal dynamics of daily temperature extremes is asymmetric for tails of cold and warm temperature extreme distributions. Namely, the intensity of warming during cold nights is higher than during warm nights, especially at high latitudes of Siberia. The similar dynamics is observed for cold and warm day-time temperatures. Slight summer cooling was observed in the central part of Siberia. It is associated with decrease in warm temperature extremes. In the southern Siberia in winter, we also observe some cooling mostly due to strengthening of the cold temperature extremes. Changes in daily precipitation extremes

  13. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  14. What Are the Appropriate Models for St. Petersburg College and the University Partnership Center To Expand Access to Bachelor's and Master's Degrees? Project Eagle Evaluation Question #5. Benchmarking St. Petersburg College: A Report to Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Joyce

    St. Petersburg College (SPC) (Florida), formerly a two-year community college, now offers four-year degrees. This paper discusses the findings of SPC's evaluation question focusing on what the appropriate models are for St. Petersburg College and the University Partnership Center (UPC) to increase access to bachelor's and master's programs.…

  15. Ongoing Evolution on the Geospace Electrodynamic Connections Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Buchanan, R. P.

    Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) Program, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) mission Geospace Electrodynamic Connections (GEC) is to be launched near the end of this decade. It consists of several identical spacecraft, in 83o inclination, eccentric (2000 km to 185 km) orbits. The spacecraft observations will be coordinated with global land-based facilities to delineate the complex spatial and temporal scaled processes in the ionosphere that are most important for energy and momentum transfer between the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. It will provide key in situ plasma and neutral particle measurements at the low altitudes where magnetosphere energy and momentum are dissipated. To best accomplish the science goals, the technical design of the mission must strive to minimally disturb the environment, to maximize the number of spacecraft and the amount of propulsion fuel (for deep dipping campaigns, down to ~ 130 km), and to efficiently manage a spacecraft constellation in a pearls-on-a-string configuration with variable spacecraft separations. These are the challenging goals, given the fixed mission cost cap, that are being sought in the ongoing formulation of the mission architecture. An initial spacecraft/systems concept for the mission was suggested by the GSFC Integrated Mission Design Center. NASA is now further defining the mission architecture by utilizing university and industry participation. In order to further understand the magnitude of the aerodynamic impacts of the deep dipping orbits, a NASA grant to the University of Maryland numerically assessed how different spacecraft geometries provide tradeoffs between the negative effects of atmospheric drag and the positive effects of lift. These analyses led to recommended spacecraft geometries. U. S. industry accommodation studies have just been completed providing a refined breakdown of the risks and cost-driving aspects of the mission. These will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Using BITNET to access the National Library of Medicine databases.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, R K; Gamboa, C A

    1992-01-01

    An ongoing developmental project is described that uses the National Library of Medicine (NLM) GRATEFUL MED software on the BITNET network to access the NLM databases. The objective of the project is to improve biomedical communication capabilities to support health professionals in countries where international telecommunication services are limited. After a successful demonstration of the concept, the system was assembled and tested by the University of Chile and NLM. The full impact of this project will be measured at a later time. This paper describes the concept and testing of the system in Latin American countries. PMID:1422503

  17. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  18. 10 CFR 1045.20 - Ongoing call for declassification proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing call for declassification proposals. 1045.20 Section 1045.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Identification of Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data Information § 1045.20 Ongoing...

  19. Access to HIV care in the context of universal test and treat: challenges within the ANRS 12249 TasP cluster-randomized trial in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Plazy, Mélanie; Farouki, Kamal El; Iwuji, Collins; Okesola, Nonhlanhla; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Larmarange, Joseph; Lert, France; Newell, Marie-Louise; Dabis, François; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to quantify and identify associated factors of linkage to HIV care following home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) in the ongoing ANRS 12249 treatment-as-prevention (TasP) cluster-randomized trial in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Individuals ≥16 years were offered HBHCT; those who were identified HIV positive were referred to cluster-based TasP clinics and offered antiretroviral treatment (ART) immediately (five clusters) or according to national guidelines (five clusters). HIV care was also available in the local Department of Health (DoH) clinics. Linkage to HIV care was defined as TasP or DoH clinic attendance within three months of referral among adults not in HIV care at referral. Associated factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for trial arm. Results Overall, 1323 HIV-positive adults (72.9% women) not in HIV care at referral were included, of whom 36.9% (n=488) linked to care <3 months of referral (similar by sex). In adjusted analyses (n=1222), individuals who had never been in HIV care before referral were significantly less likely to link to care than those who had previously been in care (<33% vs. >42%, p<0.001). Linkage to care was lower in students (adjusted odds-ratio [aOR]=0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24–0.92) than in employed adults, in adults who completed secondary school (aOR=0.68; CI 0.49–0.96) or at least some secondary school (aOR=0.59; CI 0.41–0.84) versus ≤ primary school, in those who lived at 1 to 2 km (aOR=0.58; CI 0.44–0.78) or 2–5 km from the nearest TasP clinic (aOR=0.57; CI 0.41–0.77) versus <1 km, and in those who were referred to clinic after ≥2 contacts (aOR=0.75; CI 0.58–0.97) versus those referred at the first contact. Linkage to care was higher in adults who reported knowing an HIV-positive family member (aOR=1.45; CI 1.12–1.86) versus not, and in those who said that they would take ART as soon as possible if they were

  20. Strategies for Improving Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hore, Terry; Barwood, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    The development of the varied strategies that have been introduced in order to improve access for disadvantaged groups at Monash University is discussed. The Junior University Programme, the Monash Orientation Scheme for Aborigines, the Mature Age Special Admission Scheme, Special Entry Scheme, and the Schools Link Programme are described. (MLW)

  1. Access to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunken, Anna; Delly, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Changes to education in Australia have seen new government legislations increasing educational pathways so students can more easily enter university, the aim being to increase participation. Now, many domestic students utilise various pathways to access university. Some have undertaken basic Further Education Diplomas, received subject credits,…

  2. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  3. Advanced Cosmic-Ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS): ACCESS Accommodation Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L. (Editor); Wefel, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 NASA Administrator selected the first high-energy particle physics experiment for the Space Station, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to place a magnetic spectrometer in Earth orbit and search for cosmic antimatter. A natural consequence of this decision was that NASA would begin to explore cost-effective ways through which the design and implementation of AMS might benefit other promising payload experiments. The first such experiment to come forward was Advanced Cosmic-Ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS) in 1996. It was proposed as a new mission concept in space physics to attach a cosmic-ray experiment of weight, volume, and geometry similar to the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS), and replace the latter as its successor when the AMS is returned to Earth. This was to be an extension of NASA's suborbital balloon program, with balloon payloads serving as the precursor flights and heritage for ACCESS. The balloon programs have always been a cost-effective NASA resource since the particle physics instrumentation for balloon and space applications are directly related. The next step was to expand the process, pooling together expertise from various NASA centers and universities while opening up definition of the ACCESS science goals to the international community through the standard practice of peer review. This process is still ongoing, and the accommodation study presented here will discuss the baseline definition of ACCESS as we understand it today.

  4. Ongoing Activities to Facilitate Access to Supplementary Materials for Cartographic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Paul S.

    A wealth of unpublished or unstructured educational materials for all aspects of cartographic instruction are widely dispersed and unnecessarily difficult to obtain. The Cartography Assistance Brochures Project of the Cartography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), the North American Cartographic Information Society,…

  5. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  6. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  7. Technology-Enabled and Universally Designed Assessment: Considering Access in Measuring the Achievement of Students with Disabilities--A Foundation for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Patricia; Winter, Phoebe; Cameto, Renee; Russell, Michael; Sato, Edynn; Clarke-Midura, Jody; Torres, Chloe; Haertel, Geneva; Dolan, Robert; Beddow, Peter; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents one outcome from the "Invitational Research Symposium on Technology-Enabled and Universally Designed Assessments," which examined technology-enabled assessments (TEA) and universal design (UD) as they relate to students with disabilities (SWD). It was developed to stimulate research into TEAs designed to make tests…

  8. The ethical and practical aspects of acceptance and universal patient acceptance.

    PubMed

    Corsino, Bruce V; Patthoff, Donald E

    2006-11-01

    "Acceptance" is an often presupposed, hidden core value and ethic focused on how dental and other health practitioners first accept people as possible patients. The three basic styles of patient acceptance are random, selective, and universal. Reduced public access to care results from the practice of random and selective acceptance. Only universal acceptance creates a potential pathway for improved access to care. The notion of Universal Patient Acceptance (UPA) is discussed here as one kind of applied ethical tool or clinical practice that allows for the ethic of acceptance to be more effectively pursued in daily practice. We suggest that health providers falsely surmise that they already understand and practice Universal Patient Acceptance. That myth and perspective are partly what keeps Acceptance hidden as an ethic and overlooked as a potential way to foster dialogue and indirectly promote better access to care. Without Universal Patient Acceptance, dental and health providers will continue to silently engage in practice patterns that adversely affect public access to care. The actual benefits of Universal Patient Acceptance are the subject of ongoing review and debate. Whatever those benefits might be will not likely be realized until Acceptance and Universal Patient Acceptance are included as part of dental and other health professional codes of ethics and training curricula. That is what we argue for here. PMID:17106034

  9. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  10. On Developing Academic Literacy in the Mother Tongue for Epistemological Access: The Role of isiZulu as the LoLT in a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mgqwashu, Emmanuel Mfanafuthi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the extent to which the development of academic literacy in isiZulu, an indigenous language spoken across all the nine provinces in South Africa, enhances opportunities for epistemological access. The focus is in relation to a pilot study of a Bachelor of Education Honours module that uses isiZulu as the…

  11. Fostering Distance Training Programme (DTP) Students' Access to Semester Examination Results via SMS at University of Rwanda-College of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nizeyimana, Gerard; Yonah, Zaipuna O.; Nduwingoma, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a situation analysis and implementation of Distance Training Programme (DTP) Semester Examination Results Access (SERA) through Short Message Service (SMS) available anytime and anywhere. "Texting" or SMS mobile phone messaging is rapidly increasing communication in business and community service. The prompting…

  12. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, September 28, 1992--September 27, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The goal of the MOLIS project was to develop, design, and pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities as well as federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since going on-line on April 29, 1991, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, precollege and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from participating federal agencies. Six federal agencies are currently participating in MOLIS, including: Agency for International Development; Department of Commerce; Department of Energy; Department of Housing and Urban Development; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and National Science Foundation.

  13. Costing Human Rights and Community Support Interventions as a Part of Universal Access to HIV Treatment and Care in a Southern African Setting

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Louisa; Akugizibwe, Paula; Clayton, Michaela; Amon, Joseph J; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Bennett, Rod; Stegling, Christine; Baggaley, Rachel; Kahn, James G; Holmes, Charles B; Garg, Navneet; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Mack, Christina DeFilippo; Williams, Phoebe; Smyth, Caoimhe; Vitoria, Marco; Crowley, Siobhan; Williams, Brian; McClure, Craig; Granich, Reuben; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has both individual health benefits and potential to decrease HIV incidence. Ensuring access to HIV services is a significant human rights issue and successful programmes require adequate human rights protections and community support. However, the cost of specific human rights and community support interventions for equitable, sustainable and non-discriminatory access to ART are not well described. Human rights and community support interventions were identified using the literature and through consultations with experts. Specific costs were then determined for these health sector interventions. Population and epidemic data were provided through the Statistics South Africa 2009 national mid-year estimates. Costs of scale up of HIV prevention and treatment were taken from recently published estimates. Interventions addressed access to services, minimising stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV, confidentiality, informed consent and counselling quality. Integrated HIV programme interventions included training for counsellors, ‘Know Your Rights’ information desks, outreach campaigns for most at risk populations, and adherence support. Complementary measures included post-service interviews, human rights abuse monitoring, transportation costs, legal assistance, and funding for human rights and community support organisations. Other essential non-health sector interventions were identified but not included in the costing framework. The annual costs for the human rights and community support interventions are United States (US) $63.8 million (US $1.22 per capita), representing 1.5% of total health sector HIV programme costs. Respect for human rights and community engagement can be understood both as an obligation of expanded ART programmes and as a critically important factor in their success. Basic rights-based and community support interventions constitute only a small percentage of overall

  14. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  15. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS: AN OVERVIEW OF ON-GOING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation covers an overview of research on emerging contaminants on-going at

    U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory in Las Vegas. Due to the

    improvements and sophistication of recent analytical instruments, increasing numbers of

    chemicals a...

  16. DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE INCREASES SEVERITY OF AN ONGOING INFLUENZA INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants including diesel exhaust (DE) alter host defense responses, resulting in decreased resistance to respiratory infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on the severity of an ongoing influenza in...

  17. Getting a Seat at the Table--An Ongoing Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing effort in the Massachusetts School Library Association (MSLA). Library media specialists who are members of the MSLA have utilized key components to successfully advocate for library media centers in the state of Massachusetts. These key components have resulted in their acquiring seats at important decision…

  18. A Response to Frederick Hess: An Ongoing Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacchetti, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the article "An Ongoing Conversation", by Frederick Hess. The author points out that the increasing polarization of the public's views on public education serves us poorly and we need to revive the skill and will to engage in more thoughtful dialogue.

  19. Information Access through CD-ROM and Its Impact upon Faculty Research Output: A Case of a University in Third World Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, S. Nazim; Young, Harold C.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of the use of CD-ROM technology at the University of Bahrain highlights database searching, interlibrary loan activity, and faculty publication. Statistics show that the acquisition of CD-ROM databases is a significant factor in an increase in faculty research publication output. (14 references) (LRW)

  20. Strategies That Teachers Implement to Help Students Access the General Education Curriculum: Investigating the Instructional Strategies of Universal Design for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Teachers today are being asked to teach to a broad range of learners (D. Rose, Sethuraman, & Meo, 2000a; Schumm, Vaughn, Haager, McDowell, & et al., 1995) and traditional instruction in not adequate to address students' instructional needs (Coyne, Kameenui, & Carnine, 2007). Universal Design for Learning (UDL) has been suggested…

  1. Using Satellite Classes to Optimise Access to and Participation in First-Year Business Management: A Case at an Open and Distance-Learning University in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanepoel, Elana; De Beer, Andreas; Muller, Helene

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of satellite classes as a component of blended learning, to enhance student performance of the Business Management I and Management I students at an open and distance-learning university. We discuss the evolution of distance education, the interactivities promoted by open and distance learning and the concept of blended…

  2. The Language(s) of Failure? Unequal Access to Journalism Education and Training at a Former Whites-Only Afrikaans University in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botma, Gabriel J.

    2012-01-01

    A former whites-only South African university's journalism department employs a dual-medium language policy in which Afrikaans and English alternate in classrooms, and students may use either. Admissions processes include a test of linguistic ability (general/cultural knowledge and writing skills). Citing Bourdieu, this article disputes the…

  3. Addressing critical gaps in achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH): the case for improving adolescent SRH, preventing unsafe abortion, and enhancing linkages between SRH and HIV interventions.

    PubMed

    Mbizvo, Michael Takura; Zaidi, Shahida

    2010-07-01

    The new target for achieving universal access to reproductive health was integrated within the revised Millennium Development Goal framework in October 2008, following reaffirmation of this ICPD goal at the 2005 World Summit. To achieve this goal, the Alliance for Women's Health identified 3 issues needing urgent attention: (1) adolescent sexual and reproductive health; (2) unsafe abortions and related mortality and morbidity; and (3) HIV prevention and care. These themes were discussed in Cape Town at the FIGO 2009 Precongress Workshop convened by the Alliance. The critical gaps identified by the Workshop included: the lack of information on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) issues for adolescents, such as safe sexual practices, contraception, risks related to early childbearing; unsafe abortion and its adverse consequences; and inadequate linkages between sexual and reproductive health and HIV interventions that result in missed opportunities for addressing both. Recommendations included the use of innovative information dissemination techniques, ensuring access to family planning and comprehensive abortion care to the full extent allowed by national laws, in accordance with FIGO and WHO guidelines, and promotion of universal HIV counseling and testing with opt-out strategies within SRH services and information on SRH in all HIV services. PMID:20451907

  4. National Articulation and Transfer Network (NATN): Building an Alternative Pathway for Underserved Student Populations To Access Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) & Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA.

    This is a report on the National Articulation and Transfer Network (NATN) program, which seeks to increase the achievement and aspirations of students from underserved population, namely African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. More than 150 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI), and…

  5. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  6. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  7. Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben; Martin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy-focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university…

  8. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception

    PubMed Central

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22–40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency. PMID:26106164

  9. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  10. Self-Access Centers: Maximizing Learners' Access to Center Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurry, Benjamin L.; Tanner, Mark W.; Anderson, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    Although some students have discovered how to use self-access centers effectively, the majority appear to be unaware of available resources. A website and database of materials were created to help students locate materials and use the Self-Access Study Center (SASC) at Brigham Young University's English Language Center (ELC) more effectively.…

  11. Bibliographic Access and Control System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Betsy; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents a brief summary of the functions of the Bibliographic Access & Control System (BACS) implemented at the Washington University School of Medicine Library, and outlines the design, development, and uses of the system. Bibliographic control of books and serials and user access to the system are also discussed. (Author/JL)

  12. ERIC Data Access System (EDAS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Pal V.

    The ERIC Data Access System (EDAS) is an information retrieval system developed at Eastern Illinois University to access the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) database and make it available to Eastern faculty and students in a convenient and timely fashion. This paper describes briefly why and how Eastern developed and implemented…

  13. Dynamics of multistable states during ongoing and evoked cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2015-05-27

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  14. Dynamics of Multistable States during Ongoing and Evoked Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  15. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  16. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: On-going results and new instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Since June 2011, the ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) has been collecting abyssal oceanographic data. The ACO is at Station ALOHA 100 km north of Oahu, the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has collected biological, physical, and chemical oceanographic data since 1988. At 4728 m water depth, it is the world's deepest operating cabled observatory. On-going results will be presented along with results from two new instrument packages to be deployed: a basic sensor package (CTDO2, fluorometer, acoustic modem, ADCP), and a video/light/hydrophone combination. Plans for future research will be discussed. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  17. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  18. The Need For Ongoing Surveys About Physician Practice Costs.

    PubMed

    Berk, Marc L

    2016-09-01

    Physicians continue to be the subject of many survey efforts asking them about a wide range of issues including training, retirement plans, satisfaction with practice, practice organization, and practice costs. The resources dedicated to the collection of different types of data have changed over time. Collection efforts have both expanded and contracted. Here I discuss this phenomenon for several types of physician surveys, with particular focus on the reduction in ongoing survey efforts about physician practice costs. The diminution of efforts to collect information about these costs represents an important challenge since the lack of timely, high-quality data could impair the correct calculation of reimbursement rates. PMID:27605646

  19. Accessing ITP: Accommodating the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, R. Wayne

    The Information Technology Project (ITP) at Clayton College & State University (CCSU) (Georgia) focuses on information technology as a central part of teaching and learning, primarily through Universal Personal Information Technology Access (UPITA). UPITA equips each student and faculty member with a powerful multimedia notebook computer with…

  20. An Ongoing Investigation of Science Literacy: Results of a 22-Year Study Probing Students' Knowledge and Attitude Towards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Antonellis, J.; CATS

    2013-04-01

    This talk presents findings related to our ongoing work investigating students' knowledge and attitudes towards science and technology. We present an overview of research studies and findings including a comparison of the science literacy measures of University of Arizona students compared to national studies, conceptions related to astrology, views of radiation, and students' pseudoscience and religious beliefs. We discuss implications for instructors and researchers interested in improving students' science literacy scores and diagnosing alternative beliefs.

  1. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  2. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  3. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  4. Widening Access to Higher Education: An Evaluative Case Study of a Foundation Year Alternative to Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Peter A.; Moores, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Universities are encouraged to widen access to a broad range of applicants, including mature students taking Access qualifications. Admissions tutors can find it difficult to compare and choose between Access and A-level applications, and Access applicants for popular courses may be disadvantaged relative to students with good A-levels. In this…

  5. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  6. Working Concept of Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Bastian J.; Rouphail, Nagui M.; Hughes, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    This research presents an analysis framework and associated performance measures for quantifying the accessibility of pedestrian crossings at modern roundabouts for pedestrians who are blind. The measures, developed under two ongoing national research projects, NCHRP Project 3-78A and a bioengineering research grant from the National Institutes of Health–National Eye Institute, attempt to isolate the components of the crossing task for a blind pedestrian into computable and replicable quantities that allow the comparison of accessibility across individuals or sites. The framework differentiates between crossing opportunities in the form of yields and crossable gaps and the utilization of these opportunities by the pedestrian. It further accounts for the amount of delay and risk involved in the crossing. The analysis framework and measures are demonstrated for two single-lane roundabouts in North Carolina evaluated under the aforementioned research projects. The application shows that the accessibility of a pedestrian crossing to a blind pedestrian is characterized by a combination of different measures and further depends on crossing geometry, traffic volume, driver behavior, and the travel skills and risk-taking behavior of the individual. With successful demonstration at roundabout crosswalks, the analysis framework is hypothesized to have broader application to unsignalized pedestrian crossings, including midblock locations. PMID:20664802

  7. Ongoing Development of NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Kato, Hiroko; Zaitchik, Ben

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) produces global fields of land surface states (e.g., soil moisture and temperature) and fluxes (e.g., latent heat flux and runoff) by driving offline land surface models with observation-based inputs, using the Land Information System (LIS) software. Since production began in 2001, GLDAS has supported more than 100 scientific investigations and applications. Some examples are GEWEX and NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) global water and energy budget analyses, interpretations of hydrologic data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, and forecast model initiation studies at NOAA and NASA. At the same time, the GLDAS team has continued improve results through the development of new modeling and data assimilation techniques. Here we describe several recent and ongoing innovations. These include global implementation of a runoff routing procedure, GRACE data assimilation, advanced snow cover assimilation, and irrigation modeling.

  8. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  9. Group crisis intervention for children during ongoing war conflict.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Abdel Aziz; Vostanis, Panos; Karim, Khalid

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term impact of a group crisis intervention for children aged 9-15 years from five refugee camps in the Gaza Strip during ongoing war conflict. Children were selected if they reported moderate to severe posttraumatic stress reactions, and were allocated to group intervention (N=47) encouraging expression of experiences and emotions through storytelling, drawing, free play and role-play; education about symptoms (N=22); or no intervention (N=42). Children completed the CPTSD-RI and the CDI pre- and post-intervention. No significant impact of the group intervention was established on children's posttraumatic or depressive symptoms. Possible explanations of the findings are discussed, including the continuing exposure to trauma and the non-active nature of the intervention. PMID:15981138

  10. Evaluation of ongoing oxycodone abuse among methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Sigmon, Stacey C; McGee, Mark R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. This study presents results from an internal quality assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis-testing methods. One hundred five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic's usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, whereas the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration, and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. Although future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication-dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  11. Evaluation of Ongoing Oxycodone Abuse among Methadone-Maintained Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; McGee, Mark R.; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. The current study presents results from an internal quality-assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone-maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis testing methods. One-hundred and five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic’s usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, while the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. While future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  12. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  13. How we conduct ongoing programmatic evaluation of our medical education curriculum.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly; Abendroth, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of undergraduate medical education programs is necessary to meet accreditation standards; however, implementation and maintenance of an adequate evaluation process is challenging. A curriculum evaluation committee (CEC) was established at the Penn State University College of Medicine in 2000 to complement the already established activities of the Office of the Vice Dean for Medical Education and the Committee on Undergraduate Medical Education. Herein, we describe the methodology used by the CEC at our academic medical center and outcomes attributable to the curriculum evaluation process that was enacted. Strengths of our process include ongoing, regular assessments that guarantee a course is reviewed at least every two years and a feedback loop whereby course directors are held accountable for implementing changes when necessary. Our evaluative process has proven effective, sustainable, and has identified additional areas for curricular improvements. PMID:22816980

  14. Thermal Filters for the ATHENA X-IFU: Ongoing Activities Toward the Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Marco; Argan, A.; Bozzo, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Gatti, F.; Jimenez Escobar, A.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nuzzo, F.; Paltani, S.; Parodi, G.; Piro, L.; Rauw, G.; Sciortino, L.; Sciortino, S.; Villa, F.

    2016-02-01

    ATHENA is the L2 mission selected by ESA to pursue the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe." One of the two focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit, an array of TES microcalorimeters operated at T < 100 mK. To allow the X-ray photons focused by the telescope to reach the detector, windows have to be opened on the cryostat thermal shields. X-ray transparent filters need to be mounted on these open windows to attenuate the IR radiation from warm surfaces, to attenuate RF electromagnetic interferences on TES sensors and SQUID electronics, and to protect the detector from contamination. This paper reviews the ongoing activities driving the design of the X-IFU thermal filters.

  15. Thermal Filters for the ATHENA X-IFU: Ongoing Activities Toward the Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Marco; Argan, A.; Bozzo, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Gatti, F.; Jimenez Escobar, A.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nuzzo, F.; Paltani, S.; Parodi, G.; Piro, L.; Rauw, G.; Sciortino, L.; Sciortino, S.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    ATHENA is the L2 mission selected by ESA to pursue the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe." One of the two focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit, an array of TES microcalorimeters operated at T < 100 mK. To allow the X-ray photons focused by the telescope to reach the detector, windows have to be opened on the cryostat thermal shields. X-ray transparent filters need to be mounted on these open windows to attenuate the IR radiation from warm surfaces, to attenuate RF electromagnetic interferences on TES sensors and SQUID electronics, and to protect the detector from contamination. This paper reviews the ongoing activities driving the design of the X-IFU thermal filters.

  16. Supporting Planful Teaching: Embedding Instructional Design in Ongoing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sally; Brent, Wayne

    As the University of Arizona implemented its curriculum reform initiative, faculty became much more planful about their teaching, but also much more demanding of credible advice about instruction. Faculty make sometimes paradoxical demands in these circumstances: demands for tools that make it easy to do new things, and demands that these tools be…

  17. Similarities and Differences of Marathon and Ongoing Strength Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Marilyn C.; Creveling, Patricia

    Marathon groups offer individuals an opportunity to engage in intensified, authentic personal encounter with each other in a small group setting, usually with 10-15 persons in a group. This is a report of tentative findings at the Student Life Center, University of Colorado. There were three matched groups, each with nine sophomores. The first…

  18. Translating Strategic Planning for Information Resources into Ongoing Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, James I.; Douglas, Judith V.

    1987-01-01

    With funding from the National Library of Medicine, the University of Maryland at Baltimore instituted a formal strategic planning process for an integrated academic information management system. A general model for organizational change is applied to the situation, with references to the literature on systems models and formal planning. (MLW)

  19. Continuously on-going hindcast simulations for impact applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Observations for e.g. temperature, precipitation, radiation, or wind are often used as meteorological forcing for different impact models, like e.g. crop models, urban models, economic models and energy system models. To assess a climate signal, the time period covered by the observation is often too short, they have gaps in between, and are inhomogeneous over time, due to changes in the measurements itself or in the near surrounding. Thus output from global and regional climate models can close the gap and provide homogeneous and physically consistent time series of meteorological parameters. CORDEX evaluation runs performed for the IPCC-AR5 provide a good base for the regional scale. However, with respect to climate services, continuously on-going hindcast simulations are required for regularly updated applications. In this study two projects are presented where hindcast-simulations optimized for a region of interest are performed continuously. The hindcast simulation performed by HZG covering Europe includes the EURO-CORDEX domain with a wider extend to the north to cover the ice edge. The simulation under consideration of the coastDat-experiences is available for the period of 1979 - 2015, prolonged ongoing and fulfills the customer's needs with respect of output variables, levels, intervals and statistical measures. CoastDat - customers are dealing e.g. with naval architecture, renewable energies, offshore wind farming, shipping emissions, coastal flood risk and others. The evaluation of the hindcast is done for Europe by using the EVAL-tool of the CCLM community and by comparison with HYRAS - data for Germany and neighbouring countries. The Climate Research group at the national Austrian weather service, ZAMG, is focusing on high mountain regions and, especially on the Alps. The hindcast-simulation is forced by ERA-interim and optimized for the Alpine Region. One of the main tasks is to capture strong precipitation events which often occur during summer when

  20. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  1. Updating the Qweak Database: Maintenance and Accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammill, Matthew; Spayde, Damon T.

    2011-10-01

    The Qweak experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is being conducted by a collaboration representing over 25 universities and research institutions, and is an attempt to measure with very low total uncertainty, 4%, the weak nuclear charge of a proton through parity-violating elastic electron-proton scattering. The weak charge can be used to calculate the running Weinberg mixing angle. The Standard Model makes a confident prediction for the mixing angle at low energies, so divergence could point to physics beyond the Standard Model, while agreement will constrain new and existing models. The expected asymmetries are on the order of a few hundred parts per billion, so an exceptional quantity of data (2200 beam-hours) must be gathered. Storing and organizing this data presents a considerable challenge, which the Qweak database aims to satisfy. Tools to improve accessibility for researchers, efforts to improve efficiency, statistical and data quality checks, and ongoing expansion of the database will be discussed. Research funded by a grant from the NSF.

  2. Universal Design Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  3. Asian Open Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of open universities in Asia is of interest to Australian educators, particularly since the Asian institutions differ in some respects from the British model which combined open entry to all and extensively employed the electronic media. The Asian Open Universities have provided access to higher education for many. (SSH)

  4. Miami University Information Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

    The 1975 information manual is designed to provide current data on policies, procedures, services, facilities, organization and governance of Miami University and, through the extensive index, quick access to this information. The manual is complementary to the university catalog and directory. Information relating to students is in the Student…

  5. New insights in the ongoing surge of the Austfonna icecap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, T.; Dunse, T.; Kääb, A.; Hagen, J. O.; Schuler, T.; Reijmer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Basin-3, a major drainage basin of the Austfonna icecap in NE-Svalbard switched to full surge mode in autumn 2012 after a multiannual, stepwise acceleration of its northern branch. A time series of velocity maps from repeat TerraSAR-X acquisitions revealed a maximum speed at the terminus of >18 m d-1 around the turn of the year 2012. The frontal ablation of Basin-3 was estimated to 4.2±1.6 Gt a-1 between April 2012 and May 2013, tripling the total dynamic mass loss from the largest icecap in the Eurasian arctic. Today, TerraSAR-X, Radarsat-2 and GPS data show that the surge is still ongoing. While the speed at the calving front dropped to 10 m d-1 until July 2014, areas further inland continued to accelerate after the climax, and 10 m d-1 were also measured ~20 km inland in summer 2014. This development will be further investigated by exploiting a time series of velocity maps based on Radarsat-2 Fine Beam data starting from July 2014, which will, other than the TerraSAR-X data, cover almost the entire fast flowing part of the basin. By combining both datasets we will extend the estimation of the frontal ablation and related sea-level rise contribution of the Basin-3 surge.

  6. Ongoing behavior predicts perceptual report of interval duration

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Thiago S.; Monteiro, Tiago; Soares, Sofia; Atallah, Bassam V.; Paton, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to estimate the passage of time is essential for adaptive behavior in complex environments. Yet, it is not known how the brain encodes time over the durations necessary to explain animal behavior. Under temporally structured reinforcement schedules, animals tend to develop temporally structured behavior, and interval timing has been suggested to be accomplished by learning sequences of behavioral states. If this is true, trial to trial fluctuations in behavioral sequences should be predictive of fluctuations in time estimation. We trained rodents in an duration categorization task while continuously monitoring their behavior with a high speed camera. Animals developed highly reproducible behavioral sequences during the interval being timed. Moreover, those sequences were often predictive of perceptual report from early in the trial, providing support to the idea that animals may use learned behavioral patterns to estimate the duration of time intervals. To better resolve the issue, we propose that continuous and simultaneous behavioral and neural monitoring will enable identification of neural activity related to time perception that is not explained by ongoing behavior. PMID:24672473

  7. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  8. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  9. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. PMID:26432465

  10. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  11. Bullying behaviors in children and adolescents: "an ongoing story".

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis Kimon; Barlou, Efi; Andrie, Elisabeth; Dimitropoulou, Christine; Tzavela, Eleni C; Janikian, Mari; Tsolia, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Bullying in school-aged children is a universal problem, which continues to be a serious threat to physical and emotional health of children and adolescents. This article highlights the prevalence, the common characteristics of bullies and victims, as well as the short- and long-term impact of bullying involvement. Key areas highlighted include the efficacy of bullying prevention programs, which can help health care providers to assess and provide interventions to children and adolescents affected by bullying. PMID:24575396

  12. News UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

  13. Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Oneschuk, D; Bruera, E

    1998-01-01

    The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level. PMID:9616456

  14. Saint Louis University's Role as Midwife to Urban Rebirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Paul C.

    1982-01-01

    Saint Louis University has taken to heart its responsibility to the communities surrounding its metropolitan campuses in a series of cooperative neighborhood renewal projects. With both financial resources and ongoing commitment, the university has brought about substantial revitalization. (MSE)

  15. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - ...

  16. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  17. Enterprise SRS: Leveraging Ongoing Operations to Advance National Programs - 13108

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.E.; Murray, A.M.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-07-01

    The SRS is re-purposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, strategic view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with ongoing missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established the Center for Applied Nuclear Materials Processing and Engineering Research (CANMPER). The key objective of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear materials management advancements and large-scale deployment of the technology by leveraging SRS assets (e.g. facilities, staff, and property) for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. CANMPER will coordinate the demonstration of R and D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R and D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the R and D team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of CANMPER will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, CANMPER also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform R and D demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE's critical

  18. Morphological stasis in an ongoing gastropod radiation from Lake Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Hunt, Gene

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary processes leading to adaptive radiation regularly occur too fast to be accurately recorded in the fossil record but too slowly to be readily observed in living biota. The study of evolutionary radiations is thereby confronted with an epistemological gap between the timescales and approaches used by neontologists and paleontologists. Here we report on an ongoing radiation of extant Bellamya species (n = 4) from the African Rift Lake Malawi that provides an unusual opportunity to bridge this gap. The substantial molecular differentiation in this monophyletic Bellamya clade has arisen since Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Malawi Basin caused by climate change. Morphological time-series analysis of a high-resolution, radiocarbon-dated sequence of 22 faunas spanning the Holocene documents stasis up to the middle Holocene in all traits studied (shell height, number of whorls, and two variables obtained from geometric morphometrics). Between deposition of the last fossil fauna (∼5 ka) and the present day, a drastic increase in morphological disparity was observed (3.7–5.8 times) associated with an increase in species diversity. Comparison of the rates of morphological evolution obtained from the paleontological time-series with phylogenetic rates indicates that the divergence in two traits could be reconstructed with the slow rates documented in the fossils, that one trait required a rate reduction (stabilizing selection), and the other faster rates (divergent selection). The combined paleontological and comparative approach taken here allows recognition that morphological stasis can be the dominant evolutionary pattern within species lineages, even in very young and radiating clades. PMID:23924610

  19. Turtles to Terabytes: The Ongoing Revolution in Volcano Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano geodesy is in the midst of a revolution. GPS and InSAR, together with extensive ground-based sensor networks, have enabled major advances in understanding how and why volcanoes deform. Surveying techniques that produced a few bytes of information per benchmark per year have been replaced by continuously operating deformation networks and imaging radar satellites that generate terabytes of data at resolutions unattainable only a few decades ago. These developments have enabled more detailed assessments of volcano hazards, more accurate forecasts of volcanic activity, and better insights into how volcanoes behave over a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Forty years ago, repeated leveling surveys showed that the floor of the Yellowstone caldera had risen more than 70 cm in the past 5 decades. Today a network of GPS stations tracks surface movements continuously with millimeter-scale accuracy and the entire deformation field is imaged frequently by a growing number of SAR satellites, revealing a far more complex style of deformation than was recognized previously. At Mount St. Helens, the 1980-1986 eruption taught us that a seemingly quiescent volcano can suddenly become overtly restless, and that accurate eruption predictions are possible at least in some limited circumstances given sufficient observations. The lessons were revisited during the volcano's 2004-2008 eruption, during which a new generation of geodetic sensors and methods detected a range of co-eruptive changes that enabled new insights into the volcano's magma storage and transport system. These examples highlight volcano deformation styles and scales that were unknown just a few decades ago but now have been revealed by a growing number of data types and modeling methods. The rapid evolution that volcano geodesy is currently experiencing provides an ongoing challenge for geodesists, while also demonstrating that geodetic unrest is common, widespread, and illuminating. Vive la révolution!

  20. Robustness of Traveling Waves in Ongoing Activity of Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nauhaus, Ian; Busse, Laura; Ringach, Dario L.; Carandini, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed traveling waves of activity in sensory cortex, both following sensory stimulation and during ongoing activity. We contributed to this body of work by measuring the spike-triggered average of the local field potential (stLFP) at multiple concurrent locations (Nauhaus et al., 2009) in the visual cortex of anesthetized cats and macaques. We found the stLFP to be progressively delayed at increasing distances from the site of the triggering spikes, and interpreted this as a traveling wave of depolarization originating from that site. Our results were criticized, however, on two grounds. First, a study using the same recording techniques in the visual cortex of awake macaques reported an apparent lack of traveling waves, and proposed that traveling waves could arise artifactually from excessive filtering of the field potentials (Ray and Maunsell, 2011). Second, the interpretability of the stLFP was questioned (Kenneth Miller, personal communication), as the stLFP must reflect not only interactions between spike trains and field potentials, but also correlations within and across the spike trains. Here, we show that our data and interpretation are not imperiled by these criticisms. We reanalyzed our field potentials to remove any possible artifact due to filtering and to discount the effects of correlations within and across the triggering spike trains. In both cases, we found that the traveling waves were still present. In fact, closer inspection of Ray and Maunsell's (2011) data from awake cortex shows that they do agree with ours, as they contain clear evidence for traveling waves. PMID:22378881

  1. The Ongoing Impact of Modular Localization on Particle Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-08-01

    Modular localization is the concise conceptual formulation of causal localization in the setting of local quantum physics. Unlike QM it does not refer to individual operators but rather to ensembles of observables which share the same localization region, as a result it explains the probabilistic aspects of QFT in terms of the impure KMS nature arising from the local restriction of the pure vacuum. Whereas it played no important role in the perturbation theory of low spin particles, it becomes indispensible for interactions which involve higher spin s≥1 fields, where is leads to the replacement of the operator (BRST) gauge theory setting in Krein space by a new formulation in terms of stringlocal fields in Hilbert space. The main purpose of this paper is to present new results which lead to a rethinking of important issues of the Standard Model concerning massive gauge theories and the Higgs mechanism. We place these new findings into the broader context of ongoing conceptual changes within QFT which already led to new nonperturbative constructions of models of integrable QFTs. It is also pointed out that modular localization does not support ideas coming from string theory, as extra dimensions and Kaluza-Klein dimensional reductions outside quasiclassical approximations. Apart from hologarphic projections on null-surfaces, holograhic relations between QFT in different spacetime dimensions violate the causal completeness property, this includes in particular the Maldacena conjecture. Last not least, modular localization sheds light onto unsolved problems from QFT's distant past since it reveals that the Einstein-Jordan conundrum is really an early harbinger of the Unruh effect.

  2. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Hannes; Krebs, Ruth M; Wolfensteller, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one's own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations) can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-)R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO) learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-)R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the CO control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are "actively" integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-)R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode. PMID:23205016

  3. Antireflux surgery does not change ongoing renal functional deterioration.

    PubMed

    Arslansoyu Çamlar, Seçil; Çağlar, Sevinç; Soylu, Alper; Türkmen, Mehmet Atilla; Kavukçu, Salih

    2016-04-01

    Aim Treatment modalities of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) consist of antimicrobial prophylaxis and antireflux surgery. In this study, we aimed to determine if antireflux surgery changes the course of renal functional deterioration in children with VUR and urinary tract infections (UTI). Methods Medical files of patients with VUR diagnosed during evaluation for UTI were evaluated retrospectively for gender, age, follow-up period, and renal ultrasonography (US) and serial 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) scintigraphy findings. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein levels were determined at the initial and last visits, and before the operation in children who had antireflux surgery. The patients were divided into two groups as solely medically treated (Group 1) and both medically and surgically treated (Group 2). Group 2 was further divided as those with stable renal function (Group 2a) and with progressive renal injury (Group 2b). Results There were 140 patients (77 female; mean age 51.6 ± 51.9 months). Group 1 and Group 2 included 82 and 58 patients, respectively. In Group 2, the number of patients with the abnormal US, DMSA scintigraphy, and renal function was higher than in Group 1. Recurrent UTI rate was similar, but progressive scarring was more prominent in the antireflux surgery group. In Group 2, 31 patients had a stable renal function (Group 2a) while 27 had progressive deterioration of renal functions (Group 2b). These subgroups were not different with respect to the rate of high-grade VUR, the presence of a renal scar in DMSA, and UTI recurrence. However, the bilateral renal scar was more common in Group 2b. Conclusion Antireflux surgery does not change the course of ongoing renal injury and renal functional deterioration. PMID:26786885

  4. Morphological stasis in an ongoing gastropod radiation from Lake Malawi.

    PubMed

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Hunt, Gene

    2013-08-20

    Evolutionary processes leading to adaptive radiation regularly occur too fast to be accurately recorded in the fossil record but too slowly to be readily observed in living biota. The study of evolutionary radiations is thereby confronted with an epistemological gap between the timescales and approaches used by neontologists and paleontologists. Here we report on an ongoing radiation of extant Bellamya species (n = 4) from the African Rift Lake Malawi that provides an unusual opportunity to bridge this gap. The substantial molecular differentiation in this monophyletic Bellamya clade has arisen since Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Malawi Basin caused by climate change. Morphological time-series analysis of a high-resolution, radiocarbon-dated sequence of 22 faunas spanning the Holocene documents stasis up to the middle Holocene in all traits studied (shell height, number of whorls, and two variables obtained from geometric morphometrics). Between deposition of the last fossil fauna (~5 ka) and the present day, a drastic increase in morphological disparity was observed (3.7-5.8 times) associated with an increase in species diversity. Comparison of the rates of morphological evolution obtained from the paleontological time-series with phylogenetic rates indicates that the divergence in two traits could be reconstructed with the slow rates documented in the fossils, that one trait required a rate reduction (stabilizing selection), and the other faster rates (divergent selection). The combined paleontological and comparative approach taken here allows recognition that morphological stasis can be the dominant evolutionary pattern within species lineages, even in very young and radiating clades. PMID:23924610

  5. Ongoing monitoring of data clustering in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multicenter study designs have several advantages, but the possibility of non-random measurement error resulting from procedural differences between the centers is a special concern. While it is possible to address and correct for some measurement error through statistical analysis, proactive data monitoring is essential to ensure high-quality data collection. Methods In this article, we describe quality assurance efforts aimed at reducing the effect of measurement error in a recent follow-up of a large cluster-randomized controlled trial through periodic evaluation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for continuous measurements. An ICC of 0 indicates the variance in the data is not due to variation between the centers, and thus the data are not clustered by center. Results Through our review of early data downloads, we identified several outcomes (including sitting height, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure) with higher than expected ICC values. Further investigation revealed variations in the procedures used by pediatricians to measure these outcomes. We addressed these procedural inconsistencies through written clarification of the protocol and refresher training workshops with the pediatricians. Further data monitoring at subsequent downloads showed that these efforts had a beneficial effect on data quality (sitting height ICC decreased from 0.92 to 0.03, waist circumference from 0.10 to 0.07, and systolic blood pressure from 0.16 to 0.12). Conclusions We describe a simple but formal mechanism for identifying ongoing problems during data collection. The calculation of the ICC can easily be programmed and the mechanism has wide applicability, not just to cluster randomized controlled trials but to any study with multiple centers or with multiple observers. PMID:22413923

  6. Ongoing patient randomization: an innovation in medical care research.

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, V; Cohen, D; Kroenke, K; Neuhauser, D

    1986-01-01

    Hospitals often have rotational assignment of patients to one of several similar provider care teams. The research potential of these arrangements has gone unnoticed. By changing to random assignment of patients and physicians to provider care teams (firms) this kind of organization can be used for sequential, randomized clinical trials which are ethical and efficient. The paper describes such arrangements at three different hospitals: Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Brooke Army Medical Center, and University Hospitals of Cleveland. Associated methodologic issues are discussed. This is a new, more widely applicable method for medical care research. PMID:3546202

  7. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, N.; Manos Team

    2014-07-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are essential to understanding the origin of the Solar System through their compositional links to meteorites. As tracers of various regions within the Solar System they can provide insight to more distant, less accessible populations. Their relatively small sizes and complex dynamical histories make them excellent laboratories for studying ongoing Solar System processes such as space weathering, planetary encounters, and non-gravitational dynamics. Knowledge of their physical properties is essential to impact hazard assessment. Finally, the proximity of NEOs to Earth make them favorable targets for robotic and human exploration. However, in spite of their scientific importance, only the largest (km-scale) NEOs have been well studied and a representative sample of physical characteristics for sub-km NEOs does not exist. To address these issues we are conducting the Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS), a fully allocated multi-year survey of sub-km NEOs that will provide a large, uniform catalog of physical properties including light curves, spectra, and astrometry. From this comprehensive catalog, we will derive global properties of the NEO population, as well as identify individual targets that are of potential interest for exploration. We will accomplish these goals for approximately 500 mission-accessible NEOs across the visible and near-infrared ranges using telescope assets in both the northern and southern hemispheres. MANOS has been awarded large survey status by NOAO to employ Gemini-N, Gemini-S, SOAR, the Kitt Peak 4 m, and the CTIO 1.3 m. Access to additional facilities at Lowell Observatory (DCT 4.3 m, Perkins 72'', Hall 42'', LONEOS), the University of Hawaii, and the Catalina Sky Survey provide essential complements to this suite of telescopes. Targets for MANOS are selected based on three primary criteria: mission accessibility (i.e. Δ v < 7 km/s), size (H > 20), and observability. Our telescope assets allow

  8. Access to Sign Language Interpreters in the Criminal Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Katrina R.

    2001-01-01

    This study surveyed 46 professional sign language interpreters working in criminal justice settings and evaluated 22 cases to evaluate access issues for individuals with hearing impairments. Recommendations to increase the accessibility of interpreting services included providing ongoing awareness training to criminal justice personnel and…

  9. Competing health policies: insurance against universal public systems

    PubMed Central

    Laurell, Asa Ebba Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This article analyzes the content and outcome of ongoing health reforms in Latin America: Universal Health Coverage with Health Insurance, and the Universal and Public Health Systems. It aims to compare and contrast the conceptual framework and practice of each and verify their concrete results regarding the guarantee of the right to health and access to required services. It identifies a direct relationship between the development model and the type of reform. The neoclassical-neoliberal model has succeeded in converting health into a field of privatized profits, but has failed to guarantee the right to health and access to services, which has discredited the governments. The reform of the progressive governments has succeeded in expanding access to services and ensuring the right to health, but faces difficulties and tensions related to the permanence of a powerful, private, industrial-insurance medical complex and persistence of the ideologies about medicalized 'good medicine'. Based on these findings, some strategies to strengthen unique and supportive public health systems are proposed. PMID:26959328

  10. A Qualitative Research on the University Administrators' Capacity to Use Management Knowledge Tools (The Case of TRNC Universities)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagli, Gokmen; Silman, Fatos; Birol, Cem

    2009-01-01

    In order to reach goals and continue the ongoing learning process, like other organizations, universities also need the effective use of knowledge management. Knowledge management is an ongoing process and it has to be organized in a manner that is always open to new ideas. In universities where research and development studies play an important…

  11. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process

    PubMed Central

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  12. Titan Lake Probe: The Ongoing NASA Decadal Study Preliminary Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Brockwell, Tim; Elliot, John; Reh, Kim; Spencer, John; Outer Planets Satellites Decadal Subpanel, The

    2010-05-01

    This talk provides an update on the scientific requirements and preliminary design of a Titan Lake Probe for a future NASA Flagship mission. The starting point for this study is the joint NASA ESA TSSM mission. Using this as a starting point we have revisited the scientific requirements and expanded them to include the possibility of a lake floater and a submersible. The preliminary results of this ongoing study will be presented. The scientific objectives of a Titan Lake Probe mission are: 1) to understand the formation and evolution of Titan and its atmosphere through measurement of the composition of the target lake (e.g., Kraken Mare), with particular emphasis on the isotopic composition of dissolved minor species and on dissolved noble gases, 2) to study the lake-atmosphere interaction in order to determine the role of Titan's lakes in the methane cycle, 3) to investigate the target lake as a laboratory for both pre-biotic organic chemistry in both water (or ammonia-enriched water) solutions and non-water solvents, and 4) to determine if Titan has an interior ocean by measuring tidal changes in the level of the lake over the course of Titan's sixteen-day orbit. The driving requirements for the mission are: 1) the need to land on and explore the lake at depth while adequately communicating the data back to Earth via either direct to Earth or relay communications, 2) thermal design that allows sustained (>32 days) sampling of the 94K lake environment, and 3) a mass spectrometer inlet system that allows sampling of gas, liquid, and solids from the 94K environment. The primary payload is an analytical chemistry laboratory that includes an inlet system for sampling gas, liquid, and solids in and above the lake feeding two capable mass spectrometers that determine the organic and isotopic composition of the sampled materials. The instrumentation also includes a meteorological package that can measure the rate of gas exchange between the lake and the atmosphere, and

  13. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Ongoing Efforts in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.; Woodman, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in spaceflight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers, and from industry. It is our intent to develop a common core avionic system that has standard capabilities and interfaces, and contains the basic elements and functionality needed for any spacecraft. This common core will be scalable and tailored to specific missions. It will incorporate hardware and software from multiple vendors, and be upgradeable in order to infuse incremental capabilities and new technologies. It will maximize the use of reconfigurable open source software (e.g., Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Core Flight Software (CFS)). Our long-term focus is on improving functionality, reliability, and autonomy, while reducing size, weight, and power. Where possible, we will leverage terrestrial commercial capabilities to drive down development and sustaining costs. We will select promising technologies for evaluation, compare them in an objective manner, and mature them to be available for future programs. The remainder of this paper describes our approach, technical areas of emphasis, integrated test experience and results as of mid-2014, and future plans. As a part of the AES

  14. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  15. Equitable Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashway, Robert M.; Brentley, Mary; Carter, Joseph

    The purpose of this study was to examine certain objective admission criteria at open admission institutions, eliminating the problem of truncated variable distribution. Minorities who are admitted to selective colleges and universities with lower than average Scholastic Assessment Test or ACT Assessment test scores (1100 and 27, respectively) in…

  16. Keyless Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental truth of building security is that one misplaced key constitutes a crack in the armor that protects a space from unwelcome intruders. Imagine the headaches for administrators and security officials at a large university, where thousands of keys that are distributed to students and staff never find their way back to school officials.…

  17. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  18. Advanced Cosmic Ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Wefel, John P.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 the first high-energy particle physics experiment for the Space Station, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), was selected by NASA's Administrator as a joint collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The AMS program was chartered to place a magnetic spectrometer in Earth orbit and search for cosmic antimatter. A natural consequence of this decision was that NASA would begin to explore cost-effective ways through which the design and implementation of AMS might benefit other promising payload experiments which were evolving from the Office of Space Science. The first such experiment to come forward was ACCESS in 1996. It was proposed as a new mission concept in space physics to place a cosmic-ray experiment of weight, volume, and geometry similar to the AMS on the ISS, and replace the latter as its successor when the AMS is returned to Earth. This was to be an extension of NASA's sub-orbital balloon program, with balloon payloads serving as the precursor flights and heritage for ACCESS. The balloon programs have always been a cost-effective NASA resource since the particle physics instrumentation for balloon and space applications are directly related. The next step was to expand the process, pooling together expertise from various NASA centers and universities while opening up definition of the ACCESS science goals to the international community through the standard practice of peer-review. This process is still on-going and the Accommodation Study presented here will discuss the baseline definition of ACCESS as we understand it today. Further detail on the history, scope, and background of the study is provided in Appendix A.

  19. Positioning Your Library in an Open-Access Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Anjana H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the project that the author completed at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) library for providing online access to 80 open access E-journals and digital collections. Although FGCU uses SerialsSolutions products to establish online access, any one can provide access to these collections as they are free for all. Paper…

  20. The ongoing saga surrounding the velocity fluctuations in sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael P.

    2002-11-01

    Particles moving through a viscous fluid interact with each other, because each individual particle drags fluid along with it, which then pulls on other particles. In a low Reynolds number sediment, such hydrodynamic interactions are extremely strong, even when the particles are well separated. Despite more than a century of research, the character of the particle motions in a dilute suspension of heavy particles is highly controversial: In 1985, Caflisch and Luke presented an extremely simple argument indicating that the velocity fluctuations in such a sediment should diverge with the system size. Experiments have mainly contradicted this conclusion, leading to the hope that there is a (perhaps universal) ''screening mechanism'' controlling the size of the fluctuations. In this lecture I will review the history of this problem, and then present the results of our recent research which indicates that the velocity fluctuations are highly nonuniversal and system size dependent, depending subtley on both the shape of the container holding the sediment and any particle stratification that develops during an experiment. Experiments, numerical simulations and theory are presented that quantitatively support this point of view. This work is in collaboration with P. J. Mucha and the experimental group of D. A. Weitz: (S. Tee, S. Manley and L. Cippelletti).

  1. The ongoing educational anomaly of earth science placement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messina, P.; Speranza, P.; Metzger, E.P.; Stoffer, P.

    2003-01-01

    The geosciences have traditionally been viewed with less "aCademic prTstige" than other science curricula. Among the results of this perception are depressed K-16 enrollments, Earth Science assignments to lower-performing students, and relegation of these classes to sometimes under-qualified educators, all of which serve to confirm the widely-held misconceptions. An Earth Systems course developed at San Jos??e State University demonstrates the difficulty of a standard high school Earth science curriculum, while recognizing the deficiencies in pre-college Earth science education. Restructuring pre-college science curricula so that Earth Science is placed as a capstone course would greatly improve student understanding of the geosciences, while development of Earth systems courses that infuse real-world and hands-on learning at the college level is critical to bridging the information gap for those with no prior exposure to the Earth sciences. Well-crafted workshops for pre-service and inservice teachers of Earth Science can heIp to reverse the trends and unfortunate "sTatus" in geoscience education.

  2. [Traditions of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Brazdzionyte, Julija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the dimensions of the traditions of the idea of the university that are relevant in our today's world--the autonomy of the university, education of a free and creative personality, and belonging to the unified space of studies--and to review the experience of Kaunas University of Medicine in the development of the traditions of university studies. The research object was university studies, and the methods applied in this research were analysis of literature and analysis of documents. The article consists of the introduction, two parts, and generalization. The first part discusses the autonomy of the university, the importance of liberal studies, and the influence of the European higher education and provides a generalized survey of the historical tradition of university studies in Lithuania. The second part of the article reviews the predominant factors that condition the development of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine: organization of studies and implementation of liberal studies realized through general university education subjects into the modern content of university studies. The generalization of the results of the performed analysis allows for stating that the contents and the organization of curricula and the ongoing reforms at Kaunas University of Medicine expand the continuity of the traditions of the European university education, highlight the idea of the university, and realize university studies that reflect modern global tendencies. PMID:17090986

  3. Accessibility: Maximum Mobility and Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyser, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes how to design school and university labs to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, focusing on counter height for students in wheelchairs; appropriate knee space and sink height in sink areas; ADA-compliant fume hoods; accessible laboratory doors and entryways; and safety concerns (e.g., emergency eyewash stations…

  4. Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the application of assistive and universally designed technologies in real world environments, products and devices. More ... address and college name * The Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) ...

  5. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - Many Mechanisms for On-Going Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    number of software tools tailored to their respective user communities. Web services play an important part in improved access to data products including some basic analysis and visualization capabilities. A coherent view into all capabilities available from EOSDIS is evolving through the "Coherent Web" effort. Data are being made available in near real-time for scientific research as well as time-critical applications. On-going community inputs for infusion for maintaining vitality of EOSDIS come from technology developments by NASA-sponsored community data system programs - Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS), Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) and Applied Information System Technology (AIST), as well as participation in Earth Science Data System Working Groups, the Earth Science Information Partners Federation and other interagency/international activities. An important source of community needs is the annual American Customer Satisfaction Index survey of EOSDIS users. Some of the key areas in which improvements are required and incremental progress is being made are: ease of discovery and access; cross-organizational interoperability; data inter-use; ease of collaboration; ease of citation of datasets; preservation of provenance and context and making them conveniently available to users.

  6. The Offshore Model for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing effort of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to bring higher education services within the purview of the General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS). One result of the anticipated liberalization of trade in education, the author explains, is the headlong rush of Anglophone universities into the global market…

  7. Open Access to Mexican Academic Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adame, Silvia I.; Llorens, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the metadata harvester software development. This system provides access to reliable and quality educational resources, shared by Mexican Universities through their repositories, to anyone with Internet Access. We present the conceptual and contextual framework, followed by the technical basis, the results and…

  8. ACCESS: Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Foltz, R.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R. S.; Wright, E. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Riess, A. G.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Woodgate, B. E.; Bohlin, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Kurucz, R. L.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.

    2013-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (overview Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been performed. The flight detector controller boards have been installed into a ruggedized flight housing. They have been successfully vacuum tested for periods significantly longer than the flight length, and components have been heat-sunk and reinforced as necessary. Thermal stability tests have been performed, and results will be presented. Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL) executed initial characterization tests for the flight detector in 2007. These were repeated in 2012, to ensure and establish baseline performance. Current lab characterization tests at Johns Hopkins are ongoing, and results will be presented. NASA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  9. The Digital Divide among University Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricoy, Carmen; Feliz, Tiberio; Couto, Maria Joao

    2013-01-01

    Use of new technologies in university training is an ongoing reality today. However, the inequalities that exist among university students are the source of an important problem. Such inequalities need to be detected and analyzed and therefore a study of college freshmen can be very valuable. This qualitative study intends to analyze the digital…

  10. Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from University Purchases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Matthew; Eckelman, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory was conducted for Yale University's procurement of goods and services over a one-year period. The goal of the inventory was to identify the financial expenditures resulting in the greatest "indirect" GHG emissions. This project is part of an ongoing effort to quantify and reduce the university's…

  11. African Flagship Universities: Their Neglected Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teferra, Damtew

    2016-01-01

    This study documents and analyzes the contributions of flagship universities in Africa in teaching, learning, graduates, and research productivity since their inception. On the basis of empirical evidence (from an ongoing study) on eleven "flagship" universities in Africa--Addis Ababa, Botswana, Cairo, Chiekh Anta Diop, Dar es Salaam,…

  12. Posttraumatic stress disorder under ongoing threat: a review of neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings

    PubMed Central

    Fragkaki, Iro; Thomaes, Kathleen; Sijbrandij, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have investigated the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after single finished trauma, studies on PTSD under ongoing threat are scarce and it is still unclear whether these individuals present similar abnormalities. Objective The purpose of this review is to present the neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings on PTSD under ongoing threat. Ongoing threat considerably affects PTSD severity and treatment response and thus disentangling its neurobiological and neuroendocrine differences from PTSD after finished trauma could provide useful information for treatment. Method Eighteen studies that examined brain functioning and cortisol levels in relation to PTSD in individuals exposed to intimate partner violence, police officers, and fire fighters were included. Results Hippocampal volume was decreased in PTSD under ongoing threat, although not consistently associated with symptom severity. The neuroimaging studies revealed that PTSD under ongoing threat was not characterized by reduced volume of amygdala or parahippocampal gyrus. The neurocircuitry model of PTSD after finished trauma with hyperactivation of amygdala and hypoactivation of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was also confirmed in PTSD under ongoing threat. The neuroendocrine findings were inconsistent, revealing increased, decreased, or no association between cortisol levels and PTSD under ongoing threat. Conclusions Although PTSD under ongoing threat is characterized by abnormal neurocircuitry patterns similar to those previously found in PTSD after finished trauma, this is less so for other neurobiological and in particular neuroendocrine findings. Direct comparisons between samples with ongoing versus finished trauma are needed in future research to draw more solid conclusions before administering cortisol to patients with PTSD under ongoing threat who may already exhibit increased endogenous cortisol levels. Highlights of

  13. Robotic Access to Planetary Surfaces Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A set of robotic access to planetary surfaces capability developments and supporting infrastructure have been identified. Reference mission pulls derived from ongoing strategic planning. Capability pushes to enable broader mission considerations. Facility and flight test capability needs. Those developments have been described to the level of detail needed for high-level planning. Content and approach. Readiness and metrics. Rough schedule and cost. Connectivity to mission concepts.

  14. LERU roadmap towards Open Access.

    PubMed

    Ayris, Paul; Björnshauge, Lars; Collier, Mel; Ferwerda, Eelco; Jacobs, Neil; Sinikara, Kaisa; Swan, Alma; de Bries, Saskia; van Wesenbeeck, Astrid

    2015-09-01

    Money which is not directly spent on research and education, even though it is largely taxpayers´ money. As Harvard University already denounced in 2012, many large journal publishers have rendered the situation "fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive", with some journals costing as much as $40,000 per year (and publishers drawing profits of 35% or more). If one of the wealthiest universities in the world can no longer afford it, who can? It is easy to picture the struggle of European universities with tighter budgets. In addition to subscription costs, academic research funding is also largely affected by "Article Processing Charges" (APC), which come at an additional cost of €2000/article, on average, when making individual articles Gold Open Access. Some publishers are in this way even being paid twice for the same content ("double dipping"). In the era of Open Science, Open Access to publications is one of the cornerstones of the new research paradigm and business models must support this transition. It should be one of the principal objectives of Commissioner Carlos Moedas and the Dutch EU Presidency (January-June 2016) to ensure that this transition happens. Further developing the EU´s leadership in research and innovation largely depends on it. With this statement "Moving Forwards on Open Access", LERU calls upon all universities, research institutes, research funders and researchers to sign this statement and give a clear signal towards the European Commission and the Dutch EU Presidency. PMID:27036747

  15. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  16. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  17. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  18. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  19. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  20. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  1. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  2. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  3. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  4. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  5. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  6. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  7. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  8. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  9. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  10. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  11. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  12. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  13. 10 CFR 51.12 - Application of subpart to ongoing environmental work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of subpart to ongoing environmental work. 51.12 Section 51.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... extent practicable to NRC's ongoing environmental work. (b) No environmental report or any supplement...

  14. 11 CFR 116.2 - Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees. 116.2 Section 116.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL DEBTS OWED BY CANDIDATES AND POLITICAL COMMITTEES § 116.2 Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and...

  15. Access, Consider, Teach: ACT in Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Pokey; Reeves, Stacy

    2007-01-01

    University teachers who are teacher educators cannot connect to "The Millennial Generation" of today's preservice learners by using chalk and dull outdated textbooks. When university professionals access the technology available, consider the curriculum, and teach with technology (ACT) undergraduate teacher candidates acquire the vision of…

  16. Ongoing evaluation of ease-of-use and usefulness of wireless tablet computers within an ambulatory care unit.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin C; Wong, Frances L; Martin, Lee Ann; Edmiston, Dave

    2009-01-01

    This ongoing research is to assess user acceptance of wireless convertible tablet portable computers in their support of patient care within the clinic environment and to determine their impact on workload reduction for the information staff. A previous publication described our initial experience with a limited wireless environment. There, we tested the premise that wireless convertible tablet computers were equivalent to desktop computers in their support of user tasks. Feedback from users demonstrated that convertible tablet computers were not able to replace desktop computers. Poor network access was a weakness as well as the "cognitive overhead" encountered due to technical problems. This paper describes our further experience with a centre-wide wireless implementation while using a new wireless device. The new tablets, which have some unique functions that existing desktop computers do not provide, have been well received by the clinicians. PMID:19380977

  17. Accessing Rydberg-dressed interactions using many-body Ramsey dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rick; Killian, Thomas; Hazzard, Kaden

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that Ramsey spectroscopy can be used to observe Rydberg-dressed interactions in a many-body system. Our scheme operates comfortably within experimentally measured lifetimes, and accesses a regime where quantum superpositions are crucial. We build a spin-1/2 from one level that is Rydberg-dressed and another that is not. These levels may be hyperfine or long-lived electronic states. An Ising spin model governs the Ramsey dynamics, for which we derive an exact solution. Due to the structure of Rydberg interactions, the dynamics differs significantly from that in other spin systems. As one example, spin echo can increase the rate at which coherence decays. The results are relevant for the current ongoing experiments, including those at Rice University.

  18. Geocomputation over Hybrid Computer Architecture and Systems: Prior Works and On-going Initiatives at UARK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    As NSF indicated - "Theory and experimentation have for centuries been regarded as two fundamental pillars of science. It is now widely recognized that computational and data-enabled science forms a critical third pillar." Geocomputation is the third pillar of GIScience and geosciences. With the exponential growth of geodata, the challenge of scalable and high performance computing for big data analytics become urgent because many research activities are constrained by the inability of software or tool that even could not complete the computation process. Heterogeneous geodata integration and analytics obviously magnify the complexity and operational time frame. Many large-scale geospatial problems may be not processable at all if the computer system does not have sufficient memory or computational power. Emerging computer architectures, such as Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), and advanced computing technologies provide promising solutions to employ massive parallelism and hardware resources to achieve scalability and high performance for data intensive computing over large spatiotemporal and social media data. Exploring novel algorithms and deploying the solutions in massively parallel computing environment to achieve the capability for scalable data processing and analytics over large-scale, complex, and heterogeneous geodata with consistent quality and high-performance has been the central theme of our research team in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arkansas (UARK). New multi-core architectures combined with application accelerators hold the promise to achieve scalability and high performance by exploiting task and data levels of parallelism that are not supported by the conventional computing systems. Such a parallel or distributed computing environment is particularly suitable for large-scale geocomputation over big data as proved by our prior works, while the potential of such advanced

  19. Ongoing Savings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevington, E. Milton

    2002-01-01

    Education institutions rely heavily on good HVAC systems. Maintaining these systems can be expensive and are a significant factor in operating costs. Energy conservation is a real resource that is often overlooked. This article addresses what causes energy waste, how schools can find sources of energy waste, and how schools can improve…

  20. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  1. Celebrations and Tough Questions Follow Harvard's Move to Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    In light of a decision by members of Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences to make access to their scholarly papers free, advocates of open access celebrated, but some publishers expressed concern. Members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to provide the university with copies of their published articles and…

  2. Flordia State University

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Frawley, A.; Myers, E.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne fabricated the niobium resonators and some auxiliary devices for the superconducting-linac energy booster built at Florida State University. Personnel from FSU came to ANL to assemble and test the resonators. The main resonator fabrication work for FSU was completed during 1986, but we continue to interact with personnel concerning ongoing refinements in the technology. Topics in which we were most recently involved are (1) a change in the method of cooling the FSU resonators and (2) the transfer of information about fast tuner upgrades. During the past year there was very little interaction.

  3. ONGOING INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT THAT DRUGSTORE BEETLES HAVE ON CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES FOUND WITHIN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.

    2009-06-08

    During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-60) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex. The Savannah River National Laboratory is continuing to conduct the investigation with entomological expertise being provided by Clemson University. The outcome from the investigation conducted over the previous year was that no discernible damage had been caused by the drugstore beetles. One of the two packages has been essentially untouched over the past year and has only been opened to visually inspect for additional damage. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation of that package.

  4. A Digitally Addressable Random-Access Image Selector and Random-Access Audio System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitzer, Donald L.; And Others

    The requirements of PLATO IV, a computer based education system at the University of Illinois, have led to the development of an improved, digitally addressable, random access image selector and a digitally addressable, random access audio device. Both devices utilize pneumatically controlled mechanical binary adders to position the mecahnical…

  5. Re-Thinking Disability in Public: The Making of the "UTS AccessAbility" Website Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Moves are afoot at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) to acknowledge disability within the overall experience of student life. Scheduled to launch in time for UTS Orientation 2010, "UTS AccessAbility" is a student-generated web presence addressing the significant additional layer that experiences of disability add to study experiences.…

  6. Availability and Accessibility in an Open Access Institutional Repository: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jongwook; Burnett, Gary; Vandegrift, Micah; Baeg, Jung Hoon; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the extent to which an institutional repository makes papers available and accessible on the open Web by using 170 journal articles housed in DigiNole Commons, the institutional repository at Florida State University. Method: To analyse the repository's impact on availability and accessibility, we conducted…

  7. The Institutional Crisis of the German Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, David P.; Lenhardt, Gero

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing crisis of the German university illustrates the potential difficulties with implementing the emerging global model (EGM) of the new research university in a nation where there is a long tradition of higher education, and where the university and the nation-state have developed together through a historical symbiotic relationship. To…

  8. Self-Access and Culture: Retreating from Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeremy F.

    1995-01-01

    Reflecting on the experience of creating a university self-access center in Cambodia, this paper challenges the idea that individual autonomy is a necessary goal in self-access. It proposes ideas for self-access design that offer the prospect of a more friendly environment to learners whose culture and upbringing may predispose them against…

  9. Accessibility of Instructional Web Sites in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kay; Yoder, Diane; Riley, Elizabeth; So, Yvonne; Yusufali, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Access to education has always challenged students with disabilities. The increase of online instructional materials presents new opportunities--and possible barriers--for accessibility in higher education. Despite rising numbers of students with disabilities in higher education, colleges and universities have not ensured accessibility of online…

  10. Establishing Accessibility for E-Journals: A Suggested Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonin, Bryna

    2002-01-01

    Examines 11 electronic research journals for accessibility to users with visual or mobility impairments and suggests that librarians need to consider accessibility issues. Discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act (1998); usability and universal design; accessibility errors; following links; browser compatibility;…

  11. Ongoing exposure versus intense periodic exposure to military conflict and terror attacks in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lahad, Mooli; Leykin, Dmitry

    2010-12-01

    The manifestation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in two clinical samples in Israel (N = 212) was examined. Individuals suffering ongoing exposure to shelling were compared with subjects exposed to intense periodic exposure. Elevated arousal and avoidance symptoms, but not intrusion were reported in the ongoing exposure group. When compared by age, young participants in the ongoing exposure group had significantly lower PTSD scores, whereas no differences were found between participants among the intense periodic exposure age groups. No gender differences in symptoms were found among participants from intense periodic exposure, whereas in the other ongoing group the difference was in avoidance. Results are discussed in light of past research on exposure to terrorism. PMID:21171129

  12. Prospective memory in young and older adults: the effects of task importance and ongoing task load.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Hunt, R Reed

    2014-01-01

    Remembering to perform an action in the future, called prospective memory, often shows age-related differences in favor of young adults when tested in the laboratory. Recently Smith, Horn, and Bayen (2012; Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 19, 495) embedded a PM task in an ongoing color-matching task and manipulated the difficulty of the ongoing task by varying the number of colors on each trial of the task. Smith et al. found that age-related differences in PM performance (lower PM performance for older adults relative to young adults) persisted even when older adults could perform the ongoing task as well or better than the young adults. The current study investigates a possible explanation for the pattern of results reported by Smith et al. by including a manipulation of task emphasis: for half of the participants the prospective memory task was emphasize, while for the other half the ongoing color-matching task was emphasized. Older adults performed a 4-color version of the ongoing color-matching task, while young adults completed either the 4-color or a more difficult 6-color version of the ongoing task. Older adults failed to perform as well as the young adults on the prospective memory task regardless of task emphasis, even when older adults were performing as well or better than the young adults on the ongoing color-matching task. The current results indicate that the lack of an effect of ongoing task load on prospective memory task performance is not due to a perception that one or the other task is more important than the other. PMID:24628461

  13. American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000 Awards: Work in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents photographs and basic information on architectural design, costs, square footage, and principle designers of the award winning and ongoing school construction projects that competed in the American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000. (GR)

  14. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  15. Going to University: Pacific Island Migrant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthill, Michael; Scull, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive and on-going efforts, people from a low socio-economic background continue to be significantly under-represented in Australian higher education. In response to this situation, a two year action research project explored the broad issue of higher education access for young people from low socio-economic backgrounds in South East…

  16. Asynchronous Access to Conventional Course Delivery: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Natalie

    2006-01-01

    This study describes a technological pilot project providing 160 graduate students with asynchronous access to the ongoing proceedings of a lecture-based course. Exactly half of the students spoke the language of instruction, English, as a second language (ESL). While the asynchronous video-on-demand service proved popular overall, ESL students…

  17. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    IP-number access. Current subscriptions can be upgraded to IP-number access at little additional cost. We are pleased to be able to offer to institutions and libraries this convenient mode of access to subscriber only resources at JCE Online. JCE Online Usage Statistics We are continually amazed by the activity at JCE Online. So far, the year 2000 has shown a marked increase. Given the phenomenal overall growth of the Internet, perhaps our surprise is not warranted. However, during the months of January and February 2000, over 38,000 visitors requested over 275,000 pages. This is a monthly increase of over 33% from the October-December 1999 levels. It is good to know that people are visiting, but we would very much like to know what you would most like to see at JCE Online. Please send your suggestions to JCEOnline@chem.wisc.edu. For those who are interested, JCE Online year-to-date statistics are available. Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists: Mission Statement Feature Editor: Barbara Burke Chemistry Department, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, Pomona, CA 91768 phone: 909/869-3664 fax: 909/869-4616 email: baburke@csupomona.edu The primary goal of this JCE Internet column is to provide information about chemists who have made important contributions to chemistry. For each chemist, there is a short biographical "snapshot" that provides basic information about the person's chemical work, gender, ethnicity, and cultural background. Each snapshot includes links to related websites and to a biobibliographic database. The database provides references for the individual and can be searched through key words listed at the end of each snapshot. All students, not just science majors, need to understand science as it really is: an exciting, challenging, human, and creative way of learning about our natural world. Investigating the life experiences of chemists can provide a means for students to gain a more realistic view of chemistry. In addition students

  18. Associations of adult separation anxiety disorder with conflict-related trauma, ongoing adversity, and the psychosocial disruptions of mass conflict among West Papuan refugees.

    PubMed

    Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Rees, Susan; Kareth, Moses; Silove, Derrick

    2016-03-01

    Refugees commonly experience traumatic events that threaten the self and close others, suggesting the possibility that they may experience overlapping symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD). We examine this possibility among West Papua refugees (n = 230) displaced to Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. We also examine associations between the combined PTSD-SAD construct and indices of past trauma exposure, ongoing adversity, and the psychosocial disruptions caused by mass conflict and displacement. We applied culturally adapted interview modules to assess symptoms of PTSD, SAD, traumatic events (TEs), ongoing adversity, and 5 psychosocial dimensions. Latent class analysis identified a PTSD class (23%), a posttraumatic (PT) SAD class (22%), and a low-symptom class (55%). Compared with the low-symptom class, both the PTSD and PT-SAD classes endorsed higher levels of exposure to all domains of TEs (conflict-related trauma, witnessing murder, childhood related adversities, traumatic losses, and health stress) and ongoing adversity (access to health care, displacement/separation, safety in the community, and access to basic needs), but the 2 comorbid groups did not differ on these indices. The PT-SAD class alone scored higher than the low-symptom reference class in relation to disruptions to the psychosocial domains (safety/security, bonds/network, access to justice, roles/identities, existential meaning) and higher than the PTSD class on safety/security, justice and roles/identities. Our findings suggest that the PT-SAD pattern may represent a response to the most severe forms of psychosocial disruptions of mass conflict among refugees. A focus on separation anxiety may enhance psychotherapies designed to treat PTSD in refugees. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26752442

  19. University of Delaware Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Michael T

    2012-09-30

    The main goal of this project funded through this DOE grant is to help in the establishment of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) which is designed to be a long-term, on-going project. The broad mission of UDEI is to develop collaborative programs encouraging research activities in the new and emerging energy technologies and to partner with industry and government in meeting the challenges posed by the nation's pressing energy needs.

  20. Tools for Online Access and Manipulation of Spatial Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, W.; Daly, C.; Doggett, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Oregon State University's Spatial Climate Analysis Service (SCAS) is dedicated to the spatial analysis and mapping of climate. Using the well-known PRISM climate mapping system, SCAS has created digital climate data sets for the US, Canada, parts of Asia and Europe, and elsewhere. Major projects include official USDA precipitation maps for the US, and a new US climate atlas. SCAS also maintains and regularly updates an ongoing monthly time series of digital precipitation, temperature, and dew point maps for the conterminous US, spanning 1895-present. Many PRISM data sets are made accessible to the public online via Web tools that allow users to views map images, download grids, and explore the data. The Minnesota Mapserver has been implemented to allow users to view and query map layers, and create monthly climate time series over the past century for individual grid cells. Time series data are presented as downloadable graphs and tables. Mapserver is also being used by SCAS in a separate Web application, which is geared towards agriculture. In this application, spatial climate and soils data are used to produce suitability maps for various crop species. In the future, we envision greater use of MapServer capabilities for spatial data quality control activities. SCAS is cooperating with the several institutions in developing the WestMap initiative. WestMap aims to provide an easily accessible, comprehensive package of 1 km monthly (or better) resolution climate data series, with associated accuracy estimates, online analysis tools, and educational resources to the highly diverse user communities of climate data stakeholders in the United States.

  1. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  2. Universal Basic Education Policy: Impact on Enrolment and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Issah

    2016-01-01

    The universal basic education policy enshrined in the constitution of Ghana is aimed at making education accessible and affordable for all Ghanaian citizens. This paper sought to assess whether the universal basic education policy really have an impact on access at the basic level. The study was carried out on the premise that the universal basic…

  3. Universal Services in the European Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Johannes M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses universal service policies in the European Union. Topics include information access; the demise of the public service model; the effects of competition on universal service; financing; national implementation of member states; programs for schools and libraries; and pertinent Web sites on European universal service policy. (LRW)

  4. Lessons Learned: Reflections of a University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, William G.

    2010-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" gives unprecedented access to the university president's office, providing a unique set of reflections on the challenges involved in leading both research universities and liberal arts colleges. In this landmark book, William Bowen, former president of Princeton University and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and coauthor of…

  5. On Building a Web-Based University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinescu, Dana; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes some of the principles for building a freely available web-based university with open content. The "tutor-web" is an international project for web-assisted education, including such free and open access. This project was initiated by the University of Iceland in partnership with many universities around the world, among them…

  6. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul; Moskovitz, Nicholas; DeMeo, Francesca; Endicott, Thomas; Busch, Michael; Roe, Henry; Trilling, David; Thomas, Cristina; Willman, Mark; Grundy, Will; Christensen, Eric; Person, Michael; Binzel, Richard; Polishook, David

    2013-01-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are essential to understanding the origin of the Solar System. Their relatively small sizes and complex dynamical histories make them excellent laboratories for studying ongoing Solar System processes. The proximity of NEOs to Earth makes them favorable targets for space missions. In addition, knowledge of their physical properties is crucial for impact hazard assessment. However, in spite of their importance to science, exploration, and planetary defense, a representative sample of physical characteristics for sub-km NEOs does not exist. Here we present the Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey (MANOS), a multi-year survey of subkm NEOs that will provide a large, uniform catalog of physical properties (light curves + colors + spectra + astrometry), representing a 100-fold increase over the current level of NEO knowledge within this size range. This survey will ultimately characterize more than 300 mission-accessible NEOs across the visible and near-infrared ranges using telescopes in both the northern and southern hemispheres. MANOS has been awarded 24 nights per semester for the next three years on NOAO facilities including Gemini North and South, the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m, and the SOAR 4m. Additional telescopic assets available to our team include facilities at Lowell Observatory, the University of Hawaii 2.2m, NASA's IRTF, and the Magellan 6.5m telescopes. Our focus on sub-km sizes and mission accessibility (dv < 7 km/s) is a novel approach to physical characterization studies and is possible through a regular cadence of observations designed to access newly discovered NEOs within days or weeks of first detection before they fade beyond observational limits. The resulting comprehensive catalog will inform global properties of the NEO population, advance scientific understanding of NEOs, produce essential data for robotic and spacecraft exploration, and develop a critical knowledge base to address the risk of NEO impacts. We intend

  7. Fiber-wireless (FiWi) access networks for a green video-dominated future internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin

    2010-12-01

    We report on our ongoing research activities on integrated EPON and WLAN-based wireless mesh networks with a focus on reducing the CO2 footprint and improving the bandwidth-efficient video transport of fiber-wireless (FiWi) access networks. Various power saving techniques and mechanisms for efficient video transport in FiWi access networks are discussed.

  8. Novel Therapies for Hemodialysis Vascular Access Dysfunction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Dember, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction is a major source of morbidity for patients with ESRD. Development of effective approaches to prevent and treat vascular access failure requires an understanding of the underlying mechanisms, suitable models for preclinical testing, systems for targeted delivery of interventions to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity, and rigorous clinical trials that use appropriate outcome measures. This article reviews the substantial progress and ongoing challenges in developing novel treatments for arteriovenous vascular access failure and focuses on localized rather than systemic interventions. PMID:24235283

  9. Access to Scientific Publications: The Scientist's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Myrzahmetov, Askar; Bernstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientific publishing is undergoing significant changes due to the growth of online publications, increases in the number of open access journals, and policies of funders and universities requiring authors to ensure that their publications become publicly accessible. Most studies of the impact of these changes have focused on the growth of articles available through open access or the number of open-access journals. Here, we investigated access to publications at a number of institutes and universities around the world, focusing on publications in HIV vaccine research – an area of biomedical research with special importance to the developing world. Methods and Findings We selected research papers in HIV vaccine research field, creating: 1) a first set of 50 most recently published papers with keywords “HIV vaccine” and 2) a second set of 200 articles randomly selected from those cited in the first set. Access to the majority (80%) of the recently published articles required subscription, while cited literature was much more accessible (67% freely available online). Subscriptions at a number of institutions around the world were assessed for providing access to subscription-only articles from the two sets. The access levels varied widely, ranging among institutions from 20% to 90%. Through the WHO-supported HINARI program, institutes in low-income countries had access comparable to that of institutes in the North. Finally, we examined the response rates for reprint requests sent to corresponding authors, a method commonly used before internet access became widespread. Contacting corresponding authors with requests for electronic copies of articles by email resulted in a 55-60% success rate, although in some cases it took up to 1.5 months to get a response. Conclusions While research articles are increasingly available on the internet in open access format, institutional subscriptions continue to play an important role. However, subscriptions do not

  10. Ongoing EEG Phase as a Trial-by-Trial Predictor of Perceptual and Attentional Variability

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, R.; Busch, N. A.; Drewes, J.; Dubois, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Even in well-controlled laboratory environments, apparently identical repetitions of an experimental trial can give rise to highly variable perceptual outcomes and behavioral responses. This variability is generally discarded as a reflection of intrinsic noise in neuronal systems. However, part of this variability may be accounted for by trial-by-trial fluctuations of the phase of ongoing oscillations at the moment of stimulus presentation. For example, the phase of an electro-encephalogram (EEG) oscillation reflecting the rapid waxing and waning of sustained attention can predict the perception of a subsequent visual stimulus at threshold. Similar ongoing periodicities account for a portion of the trial-by-trial variability of visual reaction times. We review the available experimental evidence linking ongoing EEG phase to perceptual and attentional variability, and the corresponding methodology. We propose future tests of this relation, and discuss the theoretical implications for understanding the neuronal dynamics of sensory perception. PMID:21716580

  11. Ongoing victim suffering increases prejudice: the case of secondary anti-semitism.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Banse, Rainer

    2009-12-01

    Some people have postulated that the perception of Jews' ongoing suffering from past atrocities can result in an increase in anti-Semitism. This postulated secondary anti-Semitism is compatible with a number of psychological theories, but until now there has been no empirical evidence in support of this notion. The present study provides the first evidence that ongoing suffering evokes an increase in prejudice against the victims. However, this effect became apparent only if respondents felt obliged to respond truthfully because of a bogus pipeline (BPL); without this constraint, the perception of ongoing victim suffering led to a socially desirable reduction in self-reported prejudice. The validity of the BPL manipulation was confirmed by the finding that it moderated the relation between explicit and implicit anti-Semitism, as measured with an affect misattribution procedure. PMID:19845891

  12. Accessibility in Teaching Assistant Training: A Critical Review of Programming from Ontario's Teaching and Learning Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kloet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly understood that university education must be accessible to persons with disabilities. The responsibility to make the university accessible is arguably shared by all of us and yet, the extent to which it has become fully accessible is certainly suspect. By undertaking qualitative, discursive analysis of websites, online texts and…

  13. Towards Universal Design Hotels in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Based on the research project 'Accessible Hotel Rooms' that studies the balance between the experience of supply and demand regarding accessibility features in Danish hotel rooms, this paper demonstrates factors having an influence on Universal Design hotels in Denmark. The research project was financed by the Danish Transport and Construction Agency. Different notions in the hotel sector of the current supply and demand for Universal Design hotel rooms are identified, as well as future demand. Despite supplying accessible rooms, some hotels do not advertise their accessibility features on their website. There exists an attitude in the hotel sector that functions as a barrier for Universal Design: if there are enough guests, for example business travellers, then why market the hotel on Universal Design? The paper points out the coherence between the understanding of the users and the view of demand. Another important factor is Corporate Social Responsibility, which can be regarded as a strategy or platform towards Universal Design hotels. PMID:27534313

  14. Access to cochlear implants: Time to reflect.

    PubMed

    Raine, Christopher; Atkinson, Helen; Strachan, David R; Martin, Jane M

    2016-04-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) intervention is expensive and accessed mainly by developed countries. The introduction of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and funding via a public health service give children better access to CIs. However for adults large disparities exist between utilization and estimated prevalence. In the UK CI selection criteria are restrictive compared with many other countries. Improved audiological awareness and screening programmes for adults would improve access to hearing technologies that would improve health and quality of life. Hearing loss itself has significant medical and financial burdens on society and by investing in early intervention and using best technology this would mitigate some of the rising associated medical costs. PMID:27099110

  15. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    PubMed

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued. PMID:18955546

  16. Making Astronomy Accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2011-05-01

    A new semester begins, and your students enter the classroom for the first time. You notice a student sitting in a wheelchair or walking with assistance from a cane. Maybe you see a student with a guide dog or carrying a Braille computer. Another student gestures "hello” but then continues hand motions, and you realize the person is actually signing. You wonder why another student is using an electronic device to speak. Think this can't happen in your class? According to the U.S. Census, one out of every five Americans has a disability. And some disabilities, such as autism, dyslexia and arthritis, are considered "invisible” disabilities. This means you have a high probability that one of your students will have a disability. As an astronomy instructor, you have the opportunity to reach a wide variety of learners by using creative teaching strategies. I will share some suggestions on how to make astronomy and your part of the universe more accessible for everyone.

  17. Enterprise SRS: Leveraging Ongoing Operations to Advance Nuclear Fuel Cycle Programs - 12579

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.E.; Griffin, J.C.; Murray, A.M.; Wilmarth, W.R.

    2012-07-01

    The international leadership in nuclear technology development and deployment long held by the United States has eroded due to the lack of clear national strategies for advanced reactor fuel cycle concepts and for nuclear materials management, as well as to the recent policy decision that halts work on the nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain. Although no national consensus on strategy has yet been reached, a number of recent high-profile reviews and workshops have clearly highlighted a national need for robust research, development and deployment (RD and D) programs in key areas of nuclear technology, especially nuclear separations science and engineering. Collectively, these reviews and workshops provide a picture of the nuclear separations mission needs for three major program offices: Department of Energy Office of-Environmental Management), DOE Office of Nuclear Energy), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). While the individual program needs differ significantly in detail and timing, they share common needs in two critical areas of RD and D: - The need for access to and use of multi-purpose engineering-scale demonstration test facilities that can support testing with radioactive material, and - The need for collaborative research enterprises that encompass government research organizations (i.e., national laboratories), commercial industry and the academic community. Such collaborative enterprises effectively integrate theory and modeling with the actual experimental work at all scales, as well as strengthen the technical foundation for research in critical areas. The arguments for engineering-scale collaborative research facilities are compelling. Processing history has shown that test programs and demonstrations conducted with actual nuclear materials are essential to program success. It is widely recognized, however, that such facilities are expensive to build and maintain; creating an imposing, if not prohibitive, financial burden

  18. Academic Patents and Access to Medicines in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There is a widespread and growing concern that patents hinder access to life-saving drugs in developing countries. Recent student movements and legislative initiatives emphasize the potential role that research universities in developed countries could have in ameliorating this “access gap.” These efforts are based on the assumption that universities own patents on a substantial number of drugs and that patents on these drugs are currently filed in developing countries. I provide empirical evidence regarding these issues and explore the feasibility and desirability of proposals to change university patenting and licensing practices to promote access to medicines in the developing world. PMID:19008514

  19. Using Digital Materials in Online Courses: A Cautionary Tale of Georgia State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talab, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    On April 15, 2008, a lawsuit was filed against Georgia State University by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage, supported by the American University Presses (AAP). The complaint asserted ""pervasive, flagrant, and ongoing" unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials...through its electronic course reserves service,…

  20. Colleges and universities: survival in the information age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Warren D.

    2000-07-01

    Coping with information technology (IT) planning is one of the more important, expensive, time-consuming and potentially disastrous exercises an academic institution can undertake. Those institutions that are successful in establishing administrative and academic frameworks within which rapid technological change and adaptation can occur will survive and those who stubbornly adhere to archaic styles of management and decision-making will not. IT strategies, priorities and plans must be driven by and integrated with on-going academic planning. Cross-department/unit collaboration must be encouraged and facilitated by university resources and processes. Long-range planning and identification of reasonable and attainable goals requires a leadership and governance structure in which all major stakeholders participate in setting information technology strategies, priorities, plans, standards and performance measures. A successful technology funding strategy must ensure budgeting for adequate network facilities, including assets and the people and processes to support them. Accompanying these administrative procedures should be an open dialogue on the issues brought about by apparent conflicts between University wide standardization of basic policy, procedures and technologies and the pedagogical and research initiatives which address unique collegiate or departmental needs. Network capabilities should be integrated, timely, accurate, secure and easily accessible to all who need it.

  1. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. 35.1220 Section 35.1220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance §...

  2. Assessing ongoing sources of dissolved-phase polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dang, Viet D.; Walters, David M.; Lee, Cindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies assess the potential of ongoing sources of “fresh” polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to aquatic systems when direct discharge to the environment has been eliminated. In the present study, the authors used single-layered, low-density polyethylene samplers (PEs) to measure total PCB concentrations, congener profiles, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) in a contaminated stream and to provide multiple lines of evidence for assessing ongoing inputs of PCB. Concentrations were well above background levels that have been monitored for years. Concentrations significantly increased with distance, the farthest downstream PE concentrations being almost five times greater than those at 79 m downstream of a historical point source. The PCBs in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the contamination source were dominated by low KOW congeners, similar to those in the mixture of Aroclors 1016 and 1254 (4:1 v/v) historically released from the former capacitor manufacturer. The only two chiral congeners detected in the PEs downstream were PCBs 91 and 95. The EF values were nonracemic for PCB 91, while the values were either racemic or near racemic for PCB 95. Increased PCB concentrations with distance and a congener composition of predominantly low-weight congeners in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the plant site suggested an ongoing PCB source from the plant site. Chiral signatures suggested aerobic biotransformation of dissolved PCBs but did not shed any light on possible ongoing PCB inputs.

  3. Quality Matters™: An Educational Input in an Ongoing Design-Based Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Deborah; Shattuck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Quality Matters (QM) has been transforming established best practices and online education-based research into an applicable, scalable course level improvement process for the last decade. In this article, the authors describe QM as an ongoing design-based research project and an educational input for improving online education.

  4. Initial and Ongoing Teacher Preparation and Support: Current Problems and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    The effective initial preparation and ongoing support of teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing has always been a difficult and controversial task. Changes in student demographic characteristics and educational settings, combined with the rapidly diminishing number and diversity of deaf education teacher preparation (DETP) programs,…

  5. Assessing the Impact of Ongoing National Terror: Social Workers in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between social workers' personal and professional exposure to national terror in Israel and their professional and personal distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. Data were collected from 406 social workers from Israel who worked in agencies that provide help to victims of…

  6. Latest Job Benefit--Ongoing Learning: School System in Missouri Offers Professional Development for All Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Parkway School District in Chesterfield, Mo., creates a system in which all their employees have opportunities to experience ongoing professional learning. District leadership believes that all employees, whether or not they interact with students, contribute to the school district's success. The Parkway support staff development is building a…

  7. 15 CFR 921.40 - Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves. 921.40 Section 921.40 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  8. EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES THE SEVERITY OF AN ONGOING INFLUENZA INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants including diesel exhaust (DE), alter host defense responses to decrease resistance to respiratory infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in ...

  9. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  10. Adolescents' Mental Health Outcomes According to Different Types of Exposure to Ongoing Terror Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verte, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of several types of exposure to terror attacks on adolescents' psychological outcomes in the context of ongoing terror. A total of 913 adolescents (51 girls) aged 12 to 18 years (12-13.6 = 33%; 13.7-15.6 = 38%; 15.7-18 = 28%) took part in the study. Detailed data were collected concerning objective, subjective…

  11. Aftershocks of Chile's Earthquake for an Ongoing, Large-Scale Experimental Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Lorenzo; Trevino, Ernesto; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Mendive, Susana; Reyes, Joaquin; Godoy, Felipe; Del Rio, Francisca; Snow, Catherine; Leyva, Diana; Barata, Clara; Arbour, MaryCatherine; Rolla, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation designs for social programs are developed assuming minimal or no disruption from external shocks, such as natural disasters. This is because extremely rare shocks may not make it worthwhile to account for them in the design. Among extreme shocks is the 2010 Chile earthquake. Un Buen Comienzo (UBC), an ongoing early childhood program in…

  12. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  13. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  14. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  15. A Kenyan Cloud School. Massive Open Online & Ongoing Courses for Blended and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, William

    2013-01-01

    This research describes the predicted outcomes of a Kenyan Cloud School (KCS), which is a MOOC that contains all courses taught at the secondary school level in Kenya. This MOOC will consist of online, ongoing subjects in both English and Kiswahili. The KCS subjects offer self-testing and peer assessment to maximize scalability, and digital badges…

  16. A Sample of Ongoing Career Education Curriculum Development Activities of Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towne, Douglas C.

    The report surveys curriculum development projects ongoing in 1972 in seven Federal agencies relating to vocational/technical, manpower, adult, and career education. It describes a variety of ways (ranging from personal visitation to utilization of existing publications) in which data can be obtained without undue requests for assistance from the…

  17. Factors contributing to ongoing intimate partner abuse: childhood betrayal trauma and dependence on one's perpetrator.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Rebecca L; Deprince, Anne P

    2013-05-01

    Identifying the factors that contribute to ongoing intimate partner abuse (IPA) among survivors of childhood abuse is essential to developing appropriate interventions. The current study assessed prospectively whether childhood betrayal trauma (BT) history and women's potential dependence on their perpetrators (unemployment, number of children below 13) increased women's risk of ongoing victimization, while controlling for trauma-related symptoms (PTSD, depression, dissociation). Women survivors of IPA (N = 190) from an urban U.S. city were recruited based on an IPA incident reported to the police. At the initial interview, women reported on childhood betrayal trauma experiences, their employment status, number of children, and current trauma-related symptoms. Women returned 6 months later and reported on ongoing events of victimization (physical, sexual, psychological aggression, and injury) in their relationships with the initial IPA perpetrator. Results showed that higher levels of childhood BT were associated with ongoing victimization over the course of 6 months. Women's unemployment status predicted greater physical and sexual aggression and injuries. Higher levels of depression and lower levels of PTSD symptoms were also associated with increases in physical, sexual, and psychological aggression, and bodily injury. The findings have important implications for interventions by demonstrating the need to process women's betrayal trauma experiences, target depression symptoms, and increase women's economic opportunities to prevent further victimization. PMID:23266993

  18. Assessing ongoing sources of dissolved-phase polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Dang, Viet D; Walters, David M; Lee, Cindy M

    2013-03-01

    Few studies assess the potential of ongoing sources of "fresh" polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to aquatic systems when direct discharge to the environment has been eliminated. In the present study, the authors used single-layered, low-density polyethylene samplers (PEs) to measure total PCB concentrations, congener profiles, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) in a contaminated stream and to provide multiple lines of evidence for assessing ongoing inputs of PCB. Concentrations were well above background levels that have been monitored for years. Concentrations significantly increased with distance, the farthest downstream PE concentrations being almost five times greater than those at 79 m downstream of a historical point source. The PCBs in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the contamination source were dominated by low K(OW) congeners, similar to those in the mixture of Aroclors 1016 and 1254 (4:1 v/v) historically released from the former capacitor manufacturer. The only two chiral congeners detected in the PEs downstream were PCBs 91 and 95. The EF values were nonracemic for PCB 91, while the values were either racemic or near racemic for PCB 95. Increased PCB concentrations with distance and a congener composition of predominantly low-weight congeners in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the plant site suggested an ongoing PCB source from the plant site. Chiral signatures suggested aerobic biotransformation of dissolved PCBs but did not shed any light on possible ongoing PCB inputs. PMID:23258773

  19. The Impact of Direct-Acting Antivirals in the Hepatitis C-Sustained Viral Response in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With Ongoing Barriers to Care

    PubMed Central

    Cachay, Edward R.; Wyles, David; Hill, Lucas; Ballard, Craig; Torriani, Francesca; Colwell, Bradford; Kuo, Alexander; Schooley, Robert; Mathews, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Access to hepatitis C virus (HCV) medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with ongoing barriers to care is restricted by healthcare payers in the absence of HCV treatment outcomes data in the era of direct-acting antivirals (DAA). Methods. Retrospective analysis of HCV treatment outcomes using interferon (IFN)-free DAA regimens and an inclusive treatment protocol in an urban HIV clinic where ongoing barriers to care (drug or alcohol use, psychiatric disease, and/or unstable housing) are common. Then, using logistic regression analysis, we compared the proportion of HIV-infected patients who achieved HCV sustained viral response (SVR) in the pegylated-IFN plus ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV, 2008–2011), pegylated-IFN plus ribavirin and telaprevir (PEG-IFN/RBV/PI, 2011–2013), and IFN-free DAA therapy eras (2014). Results are displayed using forest plots. Results. The proportion of patients who achieved HCV SVR in the PEG-IFN/RBV, PEG-IFN/RBV/PI, and IFN-free DAA therapy eras increased from 38.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.2–53.7) and 48% (95% CI, 28.4–67.6) to 83.3% (95% CI, 70.0–96.7), respectively. Similar proportions of patients with ongoing barriers to care were treated during the PEG-IFN/RBV (25 of 39 [64%]), PEG-IFN/RBV/PI (14 of 25 [56%]), and IFN-free DAA (16 of 30 [53%]) eras. Hepatitis C virus SVR among patients with ongoing barriers to care improved from 40% (95% CI, 21–59) to 76.5% (95% CI, 56–97) in the PEG-IFN/RBV and IFN-free DAA eras, respectively. After stratification for factors associated with HCV SVR such as HCV genotype and cirrhosis, HCV SVR were similar in patients regardless of the presence of ongoing barriers to care. Conclusions. Using IFN-free DAA and an inclusive HCV treatment protocol, 76.5% of HIV/HCV-treated patients with ongoing barriers to care achieved HCV SVR. PMID:26697509

  20. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis . Updated July 23, 2014. Available at: kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/vascularaccess/index.aspx. Accessed: February 9, 2015. ...

  1. Behavioral and neurochemical analysis of ongoing bone cancer pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Remeniuk, Bethany; Sukhtankar, Devki; Okun, Alec; Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain is described as dull, aching ongoing pain. Ongoing bone cancer pain was characterized after intratibial injection of breast cancer cells in rats. Cancer produced time-dependent bone remodeling and tactile hypersensitivity but no spontaneous flinching. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and enhanced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell was observed after peripheral nerve block (PNB) selectively in tumor-bearing rats revealing nociceptive-driven ongoing pain. Oral diclofenac reversed tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity but did not block PNB-induced CPP or NAc DA release. Tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity, and PNB-induced CPP and NAc DA release, was blocked by prior subcutaneous implantation of a morphine pellet. In sham rats, morphine produced a modest but sustained increase in NAc DA release. In contrast, morphine produced a transient 5-fold higher NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats compared with sham morphine rats. The possibility that this increased NAc DA release reflected the reward of pain relief was tested by irreversible blockade of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) μ-opioid receptors (MORs). The rACC MOR blockade prevented the morphine-induced transient increased NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats but did not affect morphine-induced effects in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical experience, ongoing cancer pain was controlled by morphine but not by a dose of diclofenac that reversed evoked hypersensitivity. Additionally, the intrinsic reward of morphine can be dissociated from the reward of relief of cancer pain by blockade of rACC MOR. This approach allows mechanistic and therapeutic assessment of ongoing cancer pain with likely translation relevance. PMID:25955964

  2. Behavioral and neurochemical analysis of ongoing bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Remeniuk, Bethany; Sukhtankar, Devki; Okun, Alec; Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y.; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer-induced bone pain is described as dull, aching ongoing pain. Ongoing bone cancer pain was characterized after intratibial injection of breast cancer cells in rats. Cancer produced time-dependent bone remodeling and tactile hypersensitivity but no spontaneous flinching. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and enhanced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell was observed after peripheral nerve block (PNB) selectively in tumor-bearing rats revealing nociceptive-driven ongoing pain. Oral diclofenac reversed tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity but did not block PNB-induced CPP or NAc DA release. Tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity, and PNB-induced CPP and NAc DA release, was blocked by prior subcutaneous implantation of a morphine pellet. In sham rats, morphine produced a modest but sustained increase in NAc DA release. In contrast, morphine produced a transient 5-fold higher NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats compared with sham morphine rats. The possibility that this increased NAc DA release reflected the reward of pain relief was tested by irreversible blockade of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) μ-opioid receptors (MORs). The rACC MOR blockade prevented the morphine-induced transient increased NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats but did not affect morphine-induced effects in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical experience, ongoing cancer pain was controlled by morphine but not by a dose of diclofenac that reversed evoked hypersensitivity. Additionally, the intrinsic reward of morphine can be dissociated from the reward of relief of cancer pain by blockade of rACC MOR. This approach allows mechanistic and therapeutic assessment of ongoing cancer pain with likely translation relevance. PMID:25955964

  3. Model system of ongoing care for native Americans--a 5-year followup.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, A J; Olson, A L

    1986-01-01

    In 1979, continuing care from a personal physician was identified as a priority at the Indian Health Service site in Zuni, NM, a rural hospital and ambulatory care center serving 7,000 Zuni people. To encourage such care, a system was established that assigned each patient to a regular physician and organized physicians into teams. Three teams, each consisting of three clinicians and other support personnel, served specific geographic regions of the village. Five years later, the ongoing care provided for active randomly selected prenatal, diabetic, and general clinic patients was evaluated. The physician staff of the site had gone through a complete turnover during the previous five years. Based on a chart review for the year prior to patient identification, patients saw their regular physician from 48 to 61 percent of the time in all their visits, and their regular physician or his or her team colleague from 71 to 82 percent of the time in all their visits. Ongoing care from a personal physician or close colleague can be achieved in the Indian Health Service. Organization of physicians into teams appeared to be the critical element in promoting ongoing care at this site where physician turnover is high. Team physicians seldom all leave at once, and ongoing care as a priority is passed on by the attitude of other team physicians, by transfer of specific patients, and by patient expectation. Given the established benefits, ongoing care from a personal provider should be encouraged in the Indian Health Service as in other primary care settings. PMID:3083473

  4. Restricting Access to Health Care to Immigrants in Barcelona: A Mixed-Methods Study With Immigrants Who Have Experienced an Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Castano, Jenny; Ospina, Jesús E; Caylà, Joan A; Greer, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Austerity policies implemented in Spain in response to the ongoing economic crisis may have detrimental consequences for the health of immigrant populations and for public health in general. A mixed-methods study by the Public Health Agency of Barcelona and the University of Michigan indicates that the Real Decreto-ley 16/2012 (RDL) threatens the health of individuals and the population, especially in the case of infectious diseases. The study sought to determine the percentage of foreign-born persons with an infectious disease who had an Individual Health Card (IHC) prior to the RDL and to determine whether foreign-born persons with an infectious disease in Barcelona encountered problems accessing health care after the RDL. Results indicate that immigrants used the IHC to seek medical attention for infectious diseases and chronic conditions. Results also show that 66% of respondents, including 54% of unemployed respondents, 3% of respondents working without contracts, and those in informal employment (9%), may be at risk of losing at least part of their health coverage. Universal health care access in Spain has been crucial for the control of communicable diseases among immigrant populations. Reducing access to a significant percentage of the total population may have deleterious effects on public health. PMID:27076652

  5. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  6. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  7. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  8. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  9. Achieving Effective Universal Health Coverage And Diagonal Approaches To Care For Chronic Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Bhadelia, Afsan; Atun, Rifat; Frenk, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Health systems in low- and middle-income countries were designed to provide episodic care for acute conditions. However, the burden of disease has shifted to be overwhelmingly dominated by chronic conditions and illnesses that require health systems to function in an integrated manner across a spectrum of disease stages from prevention to palliation. Low- and middle-income countries are also aiming to ensure health care access for all through universal health coverage. This article proposes a framework of effective universal health coverage intended to meet the challenge of chronic illnesses. It outlines strategies to strengthen health systems through a "diagonal approach." We argue that the core challenge to health systems is chronicity of illness that requires ongoing and long-term health care. The example of breast cancer within the broader context of health system reform in Mexico is presented to illustrate effective universal health coverage along the chronic disease continuum and across health systems functions. The article concludes with recommendations to strengthen health systems in order to achieve effective universal health coverage. PMID:26355053

  10. Comprehensive C++ I/O libraries supporting image processing in a university research environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gash, Alfred G.; Appelman, Fernandus J. R.; Zuiderveld, Karel J.

    1992-07-01

    An on-going development effort to write a set of class-based libraries in C++ for image I/O and image processing is described. These new libraries will provide the following features to application programs based on them: derivable image classes, machine-architecture independence of data storage, fast, user-customizable image I/O, unlimited number of descriptive data items, arbitrary number of image dimensions, user-definable data types, optional automatic type conversion and compression, and support for accessing images using reference files and pipes. This highly-flexible and powerful capability is designed to meet the needs of workstation-based image processing and computer vision research in a multi- departmental university environment.

  11. Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Rose, Andresse; Hill, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges open the door to opportunity for millions of Americans who want to pursue higher education and secure their economic futures. As an organization founded on the basic principle of making college accessible to women, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been a leading voice for women in education and the…

  12. Leveraging Resources to Create Comprehensive Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boisvert, Pamela K.

    2007-01-01

    The Colleges of Worcester Consortium has created a broad array of statewide, higher education access services over several decades by leveraging federal, state, local, and foundation resources. The consortium comprises thirteen diverse colleges and universities in central Massachusetts and is a nonprofit regional association of these institutions:…

  13. Research Investigation of Information Access Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, John H.; Sharkey, Thomas W.; Lim, Jeen-Su

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the satisfaction of library users at Wayne State University who utilize alternative information access methods. The LibQUAL+[TM] desired and perceived that satisfaction ratings are used to determine the user's "superiority gap." By focusing limited library resources to address "superiority gap" issues identified by each…

  14. Making the Computer Laboratory Accessible to Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert

    Research literature shows that current uses of computers in public school education are not reaching minority populations, and that females and ethnic minority students are less likely to have access to a computer at home. In addition, a study of computer use in the Learning Skills Center (LSC) at the University of Alabama supported the research…

  15. Making Your Website More Accessible. Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnone, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Employing Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles, such as multiple means of representation (of content), multiple means of engagement (motivation) and multiple means of expression (sharing the results of research, for example), will put one on the right path toward increasing accessibility for all learners. In this article, the author…

  16. To Make Public Education Accessible to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vishnikina, Svetlana

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the origins and historical background of the "Decree on Measures Necessary to Provide Universally Accessible Primary Schooling in Moscow Guberbia" that was passed in April 1896. Explains that before the "Decree," there had been practically no primary schools in Russia. Provides some excerpts from the "Decree" for future reference. (CMK)

  17. Two-port access versus four-port access laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Kyu; Kim, Jang-Kew; Yang, Jung-Bo; Ko, Young-Bok; Nam, Sang-Lyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to compare the surgical outcomes between two-port access and four-port access laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy. Methods Four hundred and eighty nine patients who had received two-port access laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy (n=175) and four-port access laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy (n=314) in Chungnam National University Hospital from January 2009 to August 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The data were compared between the bilaterality of the cysts and cyst diameter of less than 6 cm and 6 cm or more. Results There were no significant differences in patient's age, parity, body weight, body mass index and history of previous surgery between the two-port and four-port access laparoscopy group. Bilaterality of ovarian cysts was more in fourport access laparoscopy group (13.7% vs. 32.5%, P=0.000). There were no significant differences in operation time, hemoglobin change, hospital stay, adhesiolysis, transfusion, and insertion of hemo-vac between the two-port and four-port access laparoscopy group for size matched compare. However additional analgesics were more in four-port access laparoscopy group for unilateral ovarian cystectomy. Conclusion Two-port access laparoscopic surgery was feasible and safe for unilateral and bilateral ovarian cystectomy compare with four-port access laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25264528

  18. Practices of Citizenship Rights among Minority Students at Chinese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Zhenzhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how Chinese minority students participate and defend citizenship rights on a university campus against the backdrop of ongoing social changes. Three rights are focused on: freedom of religion, freedom of association, and freedom to use an ethnic language. The data were collected at three universities. Research methods involved…

  19. VIEWCACHE: An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed databases. An experimental database management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a database access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed databases and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during database browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.

  20. Rocket University at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.