Science.gov

Sample records for online collection includes

  1. Online data collection from video game players: methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard T A; Griffiths, Mark D; Eatough, Virginia

    2004-10-01

    The paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet to collect data concerning both online and offline gamers. Drawing from experience of a number of studies carried out online by the authors and by reviewing the available literature, the authors discuss the main issues concerning data collected from video game players. The paper examines a number of areas, including recruiting and utilizing participants, validity, suitable methods of data collection (i.e., questionnaire studies, online tests, participant observation, online interviews), and ethical issues. It is concluded that online research methods can be a useful way of examining the psychosocial aspects of video game playing.

  2. Online Data Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topp, Neal W.; Pawloski, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Describes the eventful history of online data collection and presents a review of current literature following by a list of pros and cons to be considered when stepping into online surveying. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  3. Which Online Resources Are Right for Your Collection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlmutter, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Discusses important considerations for library media specialists creating a virtual-resources-collection policy, including selecting the right resources, navigating licensing fees, and free, searchable online sources. A sidebar lists resources for evaluating Web sites and places that lead to recommended sites for students. (AEF)

  4. Documenting Collective Development in Online Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Chrystal; Silverman, Jason

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the authors explored the question of collective understanding in online mathematics education settings and presented a brief overview of traditional methods for documenting norms and collective mathematical practices. A method for documenting collective development was proposed that builds on existing methods and frameworks yet is…

  5. Online information system for data collection of cattle quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiharti, E.; Arifudin, R.; Putra, A. T.

    2018-03-01

    Innovation and development of the science and technology which proclaimed by the government through Ristekdikti need to be supported. On the other hand, the Department of Animal Husbandry and Fisheries began introducing the Cattle Card system that contains the identity of each farm animal. Therefore, UNNES especially the Department of Computer Science of FMIPA UNNES, need to give positive contribution in the field of Science and Technology to support the manual system of Cattle Card, through the preparation of prototype of the online information system of data collection of cattle in Semarang regency. The main problem is how to monitor the data of cattle quality through online information system in Semarang regency? The purpose of this research is to produce the prototype of an online information system for data collection of cattle quality in Semarang regency. Main activities: (1) Prepare the flowchart of an online system for data collection of cattle quality. (2) Collecting data to obtain data on identity descriptions of each cattle, owners, mutation records, and health records of livestock cattle. (3) Creation of the prototype of an online information system for data collection of cattle quality in Semarang Regency. The results, (1) had been produced the prototype of an online information system for data collection of cattle in the region of Semarang regency. (2) Socialization of the online information system for cattle quality data collection and exploring input from various related stakeholders. (3) There had been a limited trial of prototypes of the system in Pabelan district in the working area of the Department of Animal Husbandry and Fisheries of Semarang regency and succeeded well.

  6. 76 FR 62096 - Revision of Information Collection: OPM Online Form 1417

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Revision of Information Collection: OPM Online Form 1417 AGENCY... request for clearance to revise an information collection. OPM Online Form 1417, the Combined Federal... received no comments. We estimate 208 Online OPM Forms 1417 are completed annually. Each form takes...

  7. Social Operational Information, Competence, and Participation in Online Collective Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antin, Judd David

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in interactive web technologies, combined with widespread broadband and mobile device adoption, have made online collective action commonplace. Millions of individuals work together to aggregate, annotate, and share digital text, audio, images, and video. Given the prevalence and importance of online collective action systems,…

  8. 77 FR 20010 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Online Customer Relationship Management (CRM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Minority Business Development Agency Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Online Customer Relationship Management (CRM)/Performance Databases, the Online Phoenix... of program goals via the Online CRM/Performance Databases. The data collected through the Online CRM...

  9. Predicting durations of online collective actions based on Peaks' heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng; Nie, Shizhao; Wang, Zheng; Jing, Ziwei; Yang, Jianwu; Qi, Zhongxiang; Pujia, Wangmo

    2018-02-01

    Capturing the whole process of collective actions, the peak model contains four stages, including Prepare, Outbreak, Peak, and Vanish. Based on the peak model, one of the key variables, factors and parameters are further investigated in this paper, which is the rate between peaks and spans. Although the durations or spans and peaks' heights are highly diversified, it seems that the ratio between them is quite stable. If the rate's regularity is discovered, we can predict how long the collective action lasts and when it ends based on the peak's height. In this work, we combined mathematical simulations and empirical big data of 148 cases to explore the regularity of ratio's distribution. It is indicated by results of simulations that the rate has some regularities of distribution, which is not normal distribution. The big data has been collected from the 148 online collective actions and the whole processes of participation are recorded. The outcomes of empirical big data indicate that the rate seems to be closer to being log-normally distributed. This rule holds true for both the total cases and subgroups of 148 online collective actions. The Q-Q plot is applied to check the normal distribution of the rate's logarithm, and the rate's logarithm does follow the normal distribution.

  10. Online Discussion and the Moral Pathway to Identity Politicization and Collective Action

    PubMed Central

    Alberici, Augusta Isabella; Milesi, Patrizia

    2018-01-01

    Research on the mobilizing potential of the Internet has produced some controversy between optimistic vs. skeptical perspectives. Although some attention has been paid to the effects of online discussions on collective participation, very little is known about how people’s experience of online interactions affects the key psychosocial predictors of collective action. The present research investigated whether use of the Internet as a channel for deliberation influenced the moral pathway to collective mobilization by shaping users’ politicized identity, thereby indirectly influencing collective action. Results showed that when people perceived online discussions as a constructive communication context, their politicized identity was imbued with the meaning of responding to a moral obligation, and willingness to participate in collective action was sustained. However, when participants perceived that online discussions were not constructive, their identification with the movement did not refer to moral obligation, and intention to participate in collective action was not sustained. Our discussion focuses on the need to deepen investigation of how people experience the particularities of interacting online, and on how this can affect psychosocial processes leading to collective action.

  11. Illegal captive lemurs in Madagascar: Comparing the use of online and in-person data collection methods.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kim E; Schaefer, Melissa S

    2017-11-01

    Although it is illegal to capture, sell, and trade lemurs, the live capture of lemurs in Madagascar is ongoing and may have impacted over 28,000 lemurs between 2010 and 2013. Only one study has examined this trade and did so using in-person interviews in northern Madagascar. The current study sought to expand this existing dataset and examine the comparability of online surveys to more traditional on-location data collection methods. In this study, we collected data through a web-based survey resulting in 302 sightings of 685 captive lemurs. We also collected data from 171 hotel and 43 restaurant websites and social media profiles. Survey submissions included sightings of 30 species from 10 genera, nearly twice as many species as identified via the in-person interviews. Lemur catta, Varecia variegata, and Eulemur fulvus were the most common species sighted in captivity. Captive lemurs were reported in 19 of Madagascar's 22 administrative regions and most were seen in urban areas near their habitat ranges. This represents a wider geographic distribution of captive lemurs than previously found through in-person interviews. The online survey results were broadly similar to those of the in-person surveys though greater in species and geographic diversity demonstrating advantages to the use of online surveys. The online research methods were low in cost (USD $100) compared to on-location data collection (USD $12,000). Identified disadvantages included sample bias; most of the respondents to the online survey were researchers and many captive sightings were near study sites. The results illustrate the benefits of incorporating a social science approach using online surveys as a complement to traditional fieldwork. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22541, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 78 FR 42537 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...-NEW] Agency Information Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New... Information Collection: New information collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Online Survey of Web... sector. It is necessary that USCIS obtains data on the E-Verify Program Web Services. Gaining an...

  13. 78 FR 60303 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ...-NEW] Agency Information Collection Activities: Online Survey of Web Services Employers; New... Web site at http://www.Regulations.gov under e-Docket ID number USCIS-2013- 0003. When submitting... information collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Online Survey of Web Services Employers. (3) Agency...

  14. 76 FR 9637 - Proposed Information Collection (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Collection (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Titles a. Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513: b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c. Veterans Primary Care Provider Online...

  15. 76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys) Under OMB Review AGENCY... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Titles a. Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513. b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c. Veterans Primary Care Provider Online...

  16. 77 FR 4574 - Agency Information Collection Activities: USCIS Case Status Online; Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... Collection Activities: USCIS Case Status Online; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: USCIS Case Status Online. The... following information collection request for review and clearance in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction...

  17. 77 FR 22333 - Agency Information Collection Activities: USCIS Case Status Online, Extension of a Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Collection Activities: USCIS Case Status Online, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 30-Day notice of information collection under review: USCIS case status online... the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review...

  18. The Use of Online Methodologies in Data Collection for Gambling and Gaming Addictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The paper outlines the advantages, disadvantages, and other implications of using the Internet to collect data from gaming addicts. Drawing from experience of numerous addiction studies carried out online by the author, and by reviewing the methodological literature examining online data collection among both gambling addicts and video game…

  19. A simple generative model of collective online behavior.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, James P; Cellai, Davide; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Porter, Mason A; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2014-07-22

    Human activities increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviors to population-level outcomes. In this paper, we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behavior of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct mechanisms: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behavior that is consistent with data, the only models that reproduce the observed temporal dynamics are those that strongly emphasize the recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity. This demonstrates--even when using purely observational data without experimental design--that temporal data-driven modeling can effectively distinguish between competing microscopic mechanisms, allowing us to uncover previously unidentified aspects of collective online behavior.

  20. A simple generative model of collective online behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, James P.; Cellai, Davide; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Porter, Mason A.; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Human activities increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviors to population-level outcomes. In this paper, we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behavior of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct mechanisms: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behavior that is consistent with data, the only models that reproduce the observed temporal dynamics are those that strongly emphasize the recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity. This demonstrates—even when using purely observational data without experimental design—that temporal data-driven modeling can effectively distinguish between competing microscopic mechanisms, allowing us to uncover previously unidentified aspects of collective online behavior. PMID:25002470

  1. Payment Services for Global Online Systems Including Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seebeck, Bill; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A panel of four conference presenters address issues related to paying for services provided through online systems. Discussion includes the following topics: metering devices; electronic/digital cash; working within existing banking/credit card structures; provision of payment mechanisms in countries without extensive credit card usage; and…

  2. On-line data collection platform for national dose surveys in diagnostic and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Simeonov, F; Avramova-Cholakova, S

    2015-07-01

    According to the Bulgarian regulation for radiation protection at medical exposure, the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection (NCRRP) is responsible for performing national dose surveys in diagnostic and interventional radiology and nuclear medicine and for establishing of national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The next national dose survey is under preparation to be performed in the period of 2015-16, with the aim to cover conventional radiography, mammography, conventional fluoroscopy, interventional and fluoroscopy guided procedures and CT. It will be performed electronically using centralised on-line data collection platform established by the NCRRP. The aim is to increase the response rate and to improve the accuracy by reducing human errors. The concept of the on-line dose data collection platform is presented. Radiological facilities are provided with a tool to determine local typical patient doses, and the NCRRP to establish national DRLs. Future work will include automatic retrieval of dose data from hospital picture archival and communicating system. The on-line data collection platform is expected to facilitate the process of dose audit and optimisation of radiological procedures in Bulgarian hospitals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A Collection of Economic and Social Data from Glitch, a Massively Multiplayer Online Game

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-05

    A Collection of Economic and Social Data from Glitch, a Massively Multiplayer Online Game Peter M. Landwehr March 5, 2013 CMU-ISR-13...massively multiplayer online games (MMOG) - social and cultural model embedding technologies. Additional support was provided by CASOS — the center for...SUBTITLE A Collection of Economic and Social Data from Glitch, a Massively Multiplayer Online Game 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Collective iteration behavior for online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Li, Ren-De; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the patterns of collective behavior in online social network (OSNs) is critical to expanding the knowledge of human behavior and tie relationship. In this paper, we investigate a specific pattern called social signature in Facebook and Wiki users' online communication behaviors, capturing the distribution of frequency of interactions between different alters over time in the ego network. The empirical results show that there are robust social signatures of interactions no matter how friends change over time, which indicates that a stable commutation pattern exists in online communication. By comparing a random null model, we find the that commutation pattern is heterogeneous between ego and alters. Furthermore, in order to regenerate the pattern of the social signature, we present a preferential interaction model, which assumes that new users intend to look for the old users with strong ties while old users have tendency to interact with new friends. The experimental results show that the presented model can reproduce the heterogeneity of social signature by adjusting 2 parameters, the number of communicating targets m and the max number of interactions n, for Facebook users, m = n = 5, for Wiki users, m = 2 and n = 8. This work helps in deeply understanding the regularity of social signature.

  5. Including the online feedback site, Patient Opinion, in the nursing curriculum: Exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ray; Young, Kim; Munro, James; Miller, Heather; Brelsford, Stephanie; Aronsson, Jennie; Goodman, Benny; Peters, Jane

    2017-10-01

    Globally, universities aim to involve people who use health services to enrich the nursing curriculum for students, but there can be barriers to this involvement. Many also want students to contribute to local communities. Online communication can help connect students to service users to achieve these aims. The online British patient feedback site, Patient Opinion, gathers comments from service users about services and encourages service responses to the comments. To explore the feasibility and acceptability of five ways of including Patient Opinion in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Five case studies using mixed data collection methods. British University with nursing students across two campuses, accustomed to using webinars, video presentations and social media. Students from different years participated in the five approaches of making use of Patient Opinion in the curriculum; 18 students took part in an online forum to discuss Patient Opinion in the curriculum. We trialled timetabled webinars, video-linked lectures, optional enhanced access for self-study, optional audit of service user comments for two local hospitals, and optional Twitter and Tweetchat. Students discussed the aims and approaches in an online forum. Of the five approaches trialled, webinars seemed effective in ensuring that all nursing students engaged with the topic. Video-linked lectures provided an alternative when timetabling did not allow webinars, but were less interactive. The three optional approaches (Tweetchats, audit exercise, self-directed study) provided opportunities for some students to enhance their learning but students needed guidance. Sending a summary of student reviews of patients' feedback to local hospitals illustrated how students might be agents of change in local health services. Experience from these case studies suggests that webinars followed by use of Patient Opinion preparing for placements may be a sustainable way of embedding feedback sites in the

  6. Pricing and sales tax collection policies for e-cigarette starter kits and disposable products sold online.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Miner, Angela; Mackey, Tim K

    2015-10-23

    Previous studies have examined marketing characteristics of e-cigarettes sold online and others have examined e-cigarettes pricing in retail (non-Internet) settings. This study expands on these findings by examining pricing and marketing characteristics of interest among e-cigarette online vendors. Structured web searches were conducted from August-September 2014 to identify popular e-cigarette Internet vendors. We then collected pricing data (e-cigarette starter kits and disposables), sales tax collection policies and other vendor marketing characteristics. Average price for each product category was then compared with marketing characteristics using linear regression for continuous variables and independent t-tests for binary variables. Our searches yielded 44 e-cigarette Internet vendors of which 77% (n = 34) sold a total of 238 starter kit offerings (Mprice = $55.89). Half (n = 22) sold disposable types of e-cigarettes (Mprice = $7.17 p/e-cigarette) at a price lower than reported elsewhere in retail settings. Average disposable e-cigarette prices were also significantly higher for vendors displaying more health warning notices (P = 0.001). Only 46% disclosed sales tax collection policies and only 39% collected sales tax in their state of business. This study expands on current understanding of e-cigarette pricing and availability online and finds variation in e-cigarette pricing may be influenced by type of product, use of online health warnings and vendor sales tax collection policies. It also finds that e-cigarette online access and availability may be impacted by a combination of pricing and marketing strategies uniquely different from e-cigarette retail settings that requires further study and targeted policy-making. [Cuomo RE, Miner A, Mackey TK. Pricing and sales tax collection policies for e-cigarette starter kits and disposable products sold online. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and

  7. The use of online methodologies in studying paraphilias - A review.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Mark D

    2012-12-01

    Aims The paper outlines the advantages, disadvantages, and other implications of using the Internet to collect data from those people displaying sexually paraphilic behavior. Method Using empirical and clinical studies published in the paraphilia literature, the main issues concerning online paraphilic data collection are reviewed and discussed. Results The specific online data collection methods examined included the collection of paraphilic data via (i) online questionnaires, (ii) online forums, (iii) online interviews, and (iv) online participant observation. Conclusions It is concluded that there are many useful and practical advantages of using online research methodologies to examine sexually paraphilic behavior.

  8. 78 FR 19312 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...) Type of Information Collection: Extension of a currently approved collection to include online... brief abstract: Primary: Business or other for-profit. Other: Not-for-profit; State, local, and tribal...,395 0.2833 17 2,379 Form 486--Export (Online)....... 25 434 0.1333 8 58 Form 486--Export Return 189 5...

  9. People's Collection Wales: Online Access to the Heritage of Wales from Museums, Archives and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedd, Lucy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The People's Collection Wales aims to collect, interpret, distribute and discuss Wales' cultural heritage in an online environment. Individual users or local history societies are able to create their own digital collections, contribute relevant content, as well as access digital resources from heritage institutions. This paper aims to…

  10. Big data prediction of durations for online collective actions based on peak's timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shizhao; Wang, Zheng; Pujia, Wangmo; Nie, Yuan; Lu, Peng

    2018-02-01

    Peak Model states that each collective action has a life circle, which contains four periods of "prepare", "outbreak", "peak", and "vanish"; and the peak determines the max energy and the whole process. The peak model's re-simulation indicates that there seems to be a stable ratio between the peak's timing (TP) and the total span (T) or duration of collective actions, which needs further validations through empirical data of collective actions. Therefore, the daily big data of online collective actions is applied to validate the model; and the key is to check the ratio between peak's timing and the total span. The big data is obtained from online data recording & mining of websites. It is verified by the empirical big data that there is a stable ratio between TP and T; furthermore, it seems to be normally distributed. This rule holds for both the general cases and the sub-types of collective actions. Given the distribution of the ratio, estimated probability density function can be obtained, and therefore the span can be predicted via the peak's timing. Under the scenario of big data, the instant span (how long the collective action lasts or when it ends) will be monitored and predicted in real-time. With denser data (Big Data), the estimation of the ratio's distribution gets more robust, and the prediction of collective actions' spans or durations will be more accurate.

  11. The 2018 Nucleic Acids Research database issue and the online molecular biology database collection.

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J; Fernández, Xosé M

    2018-01-04

    The 2018 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue contains 181 papers spanning molecular biology. Among them, 82 are new and 84 are updates describing resources that appeared in the Issue previously. The remaining 15 cover databases most recently published elsewhere. Databases in the area of nucleic acids include 3DIV for visualisation of data on genome 3D structure and RNArchitecture, a hierarchical classification of RNA families. Protein databases include the established SMART, ELM and MEROPS while GPCRdb and the newcomer STCRDab cover families of biomedical interest. In the area of metabolism, HMDB and Reactome both report new features while PULDB appears in NAR for the first time. This issue also contains reports on genomics resources including Ensembl, the UCSC Genome Browser and ENCODE. Update papers from the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology and DrugBank are highlights of the drug and drug target section while a number of proteomics databases including proteomicsDB are also covered. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (https://academic.oup.com/nar). The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection has been updated, reviewing 138 entries, adding 88 new resources and eliminating 47 discontinued URLs, bringing the current total to 1737 databases. It is available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Participatory Learning through Behavioral and Cognitive Engagements in an Online Collective Information Searching Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationships between college students' behavioral and cognitive engagements while performing an online collective information searching (CIS) activity. The activity aimed to assist the students in utilizing a social bookmarking application to exploit the Internet in a collective manner. A group of 101 college…

  13. The Online Bioinformatics Resources Collection at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System--a one-stop gateway to online bioinformatics databases and software tools.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Bu; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bergen, Phillip; Gadd, Cynthia; Tannery, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    To bridge the gap between the rising information needs of biological and medical researchers and the rapidly growing number of online bioinformatics resources, we have created the Online Bioinformatics Resources Collection (OBRC) at the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) at the University of Pittsburgh. The OBRC, containing 1542 major online bioinformatics databases and software tools, was constructed using the HSLS content management system built on the Zope Web application server. To enhance the output of search results, we further implemented the Vivísimo Clustering Engine, which automatically organizes the search results into categories created dynamically based on the textual information of the retrieved records. As the largest online collection of its kind and the only one with advanced search results clustering, OBRC is aimed at becoming a one-stop guided information gateway to the major bioinformatics databases and software tools on the Web. OBRC is available at the University of Pittsburgh's HSLS Web site (http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/guides/genetics/obrc).

  14. The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and an updated NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Rigden, Daniel J; Galperin, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI's MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/).

  15. Collective Emotions Online and Their Influence on Community Life

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Anna; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Thelwall, Mike; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Kappas, Arvid; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2011-01-01

    Background E-communities, social groups interacting online, have recently become an object of interdisciplinary research. As with face-to-face meetings, Internet exchanges may not only include factual information but also emotional information – how participants feel about the subject discussed or other group members. Emotions in turn are known to be important in affecting interaction partners in offline communication in many ways. Could emotions in Internet exchanges affect others and systematically influence quantitative and qualitative aspects of the trajectory of e-communities? The development of automatic sentiment analysis has made large scale emotion detection and analysis possible using text messages collected from the web. However, it is not clear if emotions in e-communities primarily derive from individual group members' personalities or if they result from intra-group interactions, and whether they influence group activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, for the first time, we show the collective character of affective phenomena on a large scale as observed in four million posts downloaded from Blogs, Digg and BBC forums. To test whether the emotions of a community member may influence the emotions of others, posts were grouped into clusters of messages with similar emotional valences. The frequency of long clusters was much higher than it would be if emotions occurred at random. Distributions for cluster lengths can be explained by preferential processes because conditional probabilities for consecutive messages grow as a power law with cluster length. For BBC forum threads, average discussion lengths were higher for larger values of absolute average emotional valence in the first ten comments and the average amount of emotion in messages fell during discussions. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results prove that collective emotional states can be created and modulated via Internet communication and that emotional expressiveness is the

  16. Content of a novel online collection of traditional east African food habits (1930s-1960s): data collected by the Max-Planck-Nutrition Research Unit, Bumbuli, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Verena; Oltersdorf, Ulrich; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Cheema, Birinder Sb; Kouris-Blazos, Antigone

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of traditional African foods and food habits has been, and continues to be, systematically extirpated. With the primary intent of collating data for our online collection documenting traditional African foods and food habits (available at: www.healthyeatingclub.com/Africa/), we reviewed the Oltersdorf Collection, 75 observational investigations conducted throughout East Africa (i.e. Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda) between the 1930s and 1960s as compiled by the Max Planck Nutrition Research Unit, formerly located in Bumbuli, Tanzania. Data were categorized as follows: (1) food availability, (2) chemical composition, (3) staple foods (i.e. native crops, cereals, legumes, roots and tubers, vegetables, fruits, spices, oils and fats, beverages, and animal foods), (4) food preparation and culture, and (5) nutrient intake and health status indicators. Many of the traditional foods identified, including millet, sorghum, various legumes, root and tubers, green leafy vegetables, plant oils and wild meats have known health benefits. Food preparatory practices during this period, including boiling and occasional roasting are superior to current practices which favor frying and deep-frying. Overall, our review and data extraction provide reason to believe that a diversified diet was possible for the people of East Africa during this period (1930s-1960s). There is a wealth of knowledge pertaining to traditional East African foods and food habits within the Oltersdorf Collection. These data are currently available via our online collection. Future efforts should contribute to collating and honing knowledge of traditional foods and food habits within this region, and indeed throughout the rest of Africa. Preserving and disseminating this knowledge may be crucial for abating projected trends for non-communicable diseases and malnutrition in Africa and abroad.

  17. Journals Online News: Dispersing Collection Management Information on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Anne; And Others

    Journals Online News (JON) is a World Wide Web site created and maintained by the Collection Development Team at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) Libraries in order to speak with the UTK community about journals-related issues. Its primary function at present is to provide UTK faculty and other interested parties with the latest…

  18. Evaluating the feasibility of using online software to collect patient information in a chiropractic practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Kania-Richmond, Ania; Weeks, Laura; Scholten, Jeffrey; Reney, Mikaël

    2016-03-01

    Practice based research networks (PBRNs) are increasingly used as a tool for evidence based practice. We developed and tested the feasibility of using software to enable online collection of patient data within a chiropractic PBRN to support clinical decision making and research in participating clinics. To assess the feasibility of using online software to collect quality patient information. The study consisted of two phases: 1) Assessment of the quality of information provided, using a standardized form; and 2) Exploration of patients' perspectives and experiences regarding online information provision through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was descriptive. Forty-five new patients were recruited. Thirty-six completed online forms, which were submitted by an appropriate person 100% of the time, with an error rate of less than 1%, and submitted in a timely manner 83% of the time. Twenty-one participants were interviewed. Overall, online forms were preferred given perceived security, ease of use, and enabling provision of more accurate information. Use of online software is feasible, provides high quality information, and is preferred by most participants. A pen-and-paper format should be available for patients with this preference and in case of technical difficulties.

  19. GeoDash: Assisting Visual Image Interpretation in Collect Earth Online by Leveraging Big Data on Google Earth Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, Kel; Ashmall, William; Johnson, Gary; Saah, David; Mollicone, Danilo; Diaz, Alfonso Sanchez-Paus; Anderson, Eric; Flores, Africa; Griffin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Collect Earth Online (CEO) is a free and open online implementation of the FAO Collect Earth system for collaboratively collecting environmental data through the visual interpretation of Earth observation imagery. The primary collection mechanism in CEO is human interpretation of land surface characteristics in imagery served via Web Map Services (WMS). However, interpreters may not have enough contextual information to classify samples by only viewing the imagery served via WMS, be they high resolution or otherwise. To assist in the interpretation and collection processes in CEO, SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID initiative that brings Earth observations to improve environmental decision making in developing countries, developed the GeoDash system, an embedded and critical component of CEO. GeoDash leverages Google Earth Engine (GEE) by allowing users to set up custom browser-based widgets that pull from GEE's massive public data catalog. These widgets can be quick looks of other satellite imagery, time series graphs of environmental variables, and statistics panels of the same. Users can customize widgets with any of GEE's image collections, such as the historical Landsat collection with data available since the 1970s, select date ranges, image stretch parameters, graph characteristics, and create custom layouts, all on-the-fly to support plot interpretation in CEO. This presentation focuses on the implementation and potential applications, including the back-end links to GEE and the user interface with custom widget building. GeoDash takes large data volumes and condenses them into meaningful, relevant information for interpreters. While designed initially with national and global forest resource assessments in mind, the system will complement disaster assessments, agriculture management, project monitoring and evaluation, and more.

  20. GeoDash: Assisting Visual Image Interpretation in Collect Earth Online by Leveraging Big Data on Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, K. N.; Ashmall, W.; Johnson, G.; Saah, D. S.; Anderson, E.; Flores Cordova, A. I.; Díaz, A. S. P.; Mollicone, D.; Griffin, R.

    2017-12-01

    Collect Earth Online (CEO) is a free and open online implementation of the FAO Collect Earth system for collaboratively collecting environmental data through the visual interpretation of Earth observation imagery. The primary collection mechanism in CEO is human interpretation of land surface characteristics in imagery served via Web Map Services (WMS). However, interpreters may not have enough contextual information to classify samples by only viewing the imagery served via WMS, be they high resolution or otherwise. To assist in the interpretation and collection processes in CEO, SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID initiative that brings Earth observations to improve environmental decision making in developing countries, developed the GeoDash system, an embedded and critical component of CEO. GeoDash leverages Google Earth Engine (GEE) by allowing users to set up custom browser-based widgets that pull from GEE's massive public data catalog. These widgets can be quick looks of other satellite imagery, time series graphs of environmental variables, and statistics panels of the same. Users can customize widgets with any of GEE's image collections, such as the historical Landsat collection with data available since the 1970s, select date ranges, image stretch parameters, graph characteristics, and create custom layouts, all on-the-fly to support plot interpretation in CEO. This presentation focuses on the implementation and potential applications, including the back-end links to GEE and the user interface with custom widget building. GeoDash takes large data volumes and condenses them into meaningful, relevant information for interpreters. While designed initially with national and global forest resource assessments in mind, the system will complement disaster assessments, agriculture management, project monitoring and evaluation, and more.

  1. Online use statistics.

    PubMed

    Tannery, Nancy Hrinya; Silverman, Deborah L; Epstein, Barbara A

    2002-01-01

    Online use statistics can provide libraries with a tool to be used when developing an online collection of resources. Statistics can provide information on overall use of a collection, individual print and electronic journal use, and collection use by specific user populations. They can also be used to determine the number of user licenses to purchase. This paper focuses on the issue of use statistics made available for one collection of online resources.

  2. 76 FR 16850 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Agency Form DS-4127, NEA/PI Online Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Form DS- 4127, NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS), OMB Control Number 1405-0183. ACTION... Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS). OMB Control Number: 1405-0183. Type of Request: Renewal. Originating Office: NEA/PI. Form Number: DS-4127. Respondents: Recipients of NEA/PI grants...

  3. Evaluating the feasibility of using online software to collect patient information in a chiropractic practice-based research network

    PubMed Central

    Kania-Richmond, Ania; Weeks, Laura; Scholten, Jeffrey; Reney, Mikaël

    2016-01-01

    Background: Practice based research networks (PBRNs) are increasingly used as a tool for evidence based practice. We developed and tested the feasibility of using software to enable online collection of patient data within a chiropractic PBRN to support clinical decision making and research in participating clinics. Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using online software to collect quality patient information. Methods: The study consisted of two phases: 1) Assessment of the quality of information provided, using a standardized form; and 2) Exploration of patients’ perspectives and experiences regarding online information provision through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was descriptive. Results: Forty-five new patients were recruited. Thirty-six completed online forms, which were submitted by an appropriate person 100% of the time, with an error rate of less than 1%, and submitted in a timely manner 83% of the time. Twenty-one participants were interviewed. Overall, online forms were preferred given perceived security, ease of use, and enabling provision of more accurate information. Conclusions: Use of online software is feasible, provides high quality information, and is preferred by most participants. A pen-and-paper format should be available for patients with this preference and in case of technical difficulties. PMID:27069272

  4. Online Meta-data Collection and Monitoring Framework for the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, D.; Lauret, J.; Betts, W.; Van Buren, G.

    2012-12-01

    The STAR Experiment further exploits scalable message-oriented model principles to achieve a high level of control over online data streams. In this paper we present an AMQP-powered Message Interface and Reliable Architecture framework (MIRA), which allows STAR to orchestrate the activities of Meta-data Collection, Monitoring, Online QA and several Run-Time and Data Acquisition system components in a very efficient manner. The very nature of the reliable message bus suggests parallel usage of multiple independent storage mechanisms for our meta-data. We describe our experience with a robust data-taking setup employing MySQL- and HyperTable-based archivers for meta-data processing. In addition, MIRA has an AJAX-enabled web GUI, which allows real-time visualisation of online process flow and detector subsystem states, and doubles as a sophisticated alarm system when combined with complex event processing engines like Esper, Borealis or Cayuga. The performance data and our planned path forward are based on our experience during the 2011-2012 running of STAR.

  5. Modelling Influence and Opinion Evolution in Online Collective Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gend, Pascal; Rentfrow, Peter J.; Hendrickx, Julien M.; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion evolution and judgment revision are mediated through social influence. Based on a large crowdsourced in vitro experiment (n = 861), it is shown how a consensus model can be used to predict opinion evolution in online collective behaviour. It is the first time the predictive power of a quantitative model of opinion dynamics is tested against a real dataset. Unlike previous research on the topic, the model was validated on data which did not serve to calibrate it. This avoids to favor more complex models over more simple ones and prevents overfitting. The model is parametrized by the influenceability of each individual, a factor representing to what extent individuals incorporate external judgments. The prediction accuracy depends on prior knowledge on the participants’ past behaviour. Several situations reflecting data availability are compared. When the data is scarce, the data from previous participants is used to predict how a new participant will behave. Judgment revision includes unpredictable variations which limit the potential for prediction. A first measure of unpredictability is proposed. The measure is based on a specific control experiment. More than two thirds of the prediction errors are found to occur due to unpredictability of the human judgment revision process rather than to model imperfection. PMID:27336834

  6. Online survey software as a data collection tool for medical education: A case study on lesson plan assessment.

    PubMed

    Kimiafar, Khalil; Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are no general strategies or tools to evaluate daily lesson plans; however, assessments conducted using traditional methods usually include course plans. This study aimed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of online survey software in collecting data on education in medical fields and the application of such softwares to evaluate students' views and modification of lesson plans. Methods: After investigating the available online survey software, esurveypro was selected for assessing daily lesson plans. After using the software for one semester, a questionnaire was prepared to assess the advantages and disadvantages of this method and students' views in a cross-sectional study. Results: The majority of the students (51.7%) rated the evaluation of classes per session (lesson plans) using the online survey as useful or very useful. About 51% (n=36) of the students considered this method effective in improving the management of each session, 67.1% (n=47) considered it effective in improving the management of sessions for the next semester, and 51.4% (n=36) said it had a high impact on improving the educational content of subsequent sessions. Finally, 61.4% (n=43) students expressed high and very high levels of satisfaction with using an online survey at each session. Conclusion: The use of online surveys may be appropriate to improve lesson plans and educational planning at different levels. This method can be used for other evaluations and for assessing people's opinions at different levels of an educational system.

  7. Online survey software as a data collection tool for medical education: A case study on lesson plan assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kimiafar, Khalil; Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are no general strategies or tools to evaluate daily lesson plans; however, assessments conducted using traditional methods usually include course plans. This study aimed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of online survey software in collecting data on education in medical fields and the application of such softwares to evaluate students' views and modification of lesson plans. Methods: After investigating the available online survey software, esurveypro was selected for assessing daily lesson plans. After using the software for one semester, a questionnaire was prepared to assess the advantages and disadvantages of this method and students’ views in a cross-sectional study. Results: The majority of the students (51.7%) rated the evaluation of classes per session (lesson plans) using the online survey as useful or very useful. About 51% (n=36) of the students considered this method effective in improving the management of each session, 67.1% (n=47) considered it effective in improving the management of sessions for the next semester, and 51.4% (n=36) said it had a high impact on improving the educational content of subsequent sessions. Finally, 61.4% (n=43) students expressed high and very high levels of satisfaction with using an online survey at each session. Conclusion: The use of online surveys may be appropriate to improve lesson plans and educational planning at different levels. This method can be used for other evaluations and for assessing people’s opinions at different levels of an educational system. PMID:28491839

  8. 76 FR 34122 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7499] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: NEA/PI... of 1995. Title of Information Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS). OMB Control Number: 1405-0183. Type of Request: Renewal. Originating Office: NEA/PI. Form Number: DS-4127...

  9. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  10. Human Service Administrator Perceptions of Online MSW Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Laura; Sanchez Mayers, Ray; Fulghum, Fontaine

    2017-01-01

    Online programs have proliferated rapidly in higher education, and this reality holds true for social work education as well. Employing a mixed methods design, this study looked at employer perceptions of online degrees compared to traditional degrees. Data was collected through an online survey that included Likert type and open-ended questions…

  11. DOT Online Database

    Science.gov Websites

    site requires that JavaScript is enabled in order to function properly. Online Digital Special Collections Welcome to Online Digital Special Collections of interest to Department of Transportation (DOT

  12. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF MARSICAL WORKS CONDENSERS INCLUDING QUICKSILVER COLLECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF MARSICAL WORKS CONDENSERS INCLUDING QUICKSILVER COLLECTION CHANNEL AND COLLECTION BOX, CENTER FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH, SOUTHEAST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  13. A Structured Educational Curriculum Including Online Training Positively Impacts American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination Scores.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Dympna M; London, Daniel A; Siperstein, Allan; Fung, John J; Walsh, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of a structured postgraduate year 1 educational curriculum, including online surgical training, on American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) scores. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study was performed in an academic surgical residency program in a tertiary care hospital, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. The participants were 140 surgical postgraduate year 1 residents from 2000 to 2009. Interns from 2000 to 2004 were grouped together and completed a self-directed learning curriculum. Interns from 2005 to 2009 participated in a structured educational curriculum that included lectures and the use of an online program. Lectures were based on the American College of Surgeons curriculum. The online program consisted of 8 to 12 hours of assigned tutorials and quizzes that corresponded to the lectures and 3 multiple-choice (MC) examinations. Use of a structured educational curriculum led to improved ABSITE scores (66 ± 9%) compared with that of those who had no curriculum (55 ± 10%, p < 0.001). Several variables positively correlated with the ABSITE score: United States Medical Licensing Examination step 1 score (p < 0.001), monthly quiz scores (p = 0.003), average MC examination scores (p = 0.005), lecture attendance (p = 0.02), and time spent online (p = 0.04). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the step 1 United States Medical Licensing Examination score, time spent online, and MC examination score are predictive of total the ABSITE score. When ABSITE subscores (basic science and clinical science) were compared, the online curriculum had a greater effect on basic science subscores, whereas lectures had a greater effect on clinical science subscores. Providing surgery residents a structured curriculum with lectures and an online component positively impacts ABSITE scores. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 73233 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... Application for Nonimmigrant Visa AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of request for public comment...: Title of Information Collection: Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa OMB Control Number: 1405-0182...: DS-160 Respondents: All Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants Estimated Number of Respondents: 11,100,276...

  15. Online Education and Marketing: A Joint Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, J. M.; O'Donovan, K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a cooperative study between a university library and department of library and information studies in which the library collected topics from clients as the basis for students' online search exercises. The discussion includes the benefits of client feedback to students and of publicity for its online service to the library. (Author/CLB)

  16. ScriptingRT: A Software Library for Collecting Response Latencies in Online Studies of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Thomas W.; Murteira, Carla; Collins, Elizabeth C.; Lopes, Diniz

    2013-01-01

    ScriptingRT is a new open source tool to collect response latencies in online studies of human cognition. ScriptingRT studies run as Flash applets in enabled browsers. ScriptingRT provides the building blocks of response latency studies, which are then combined with generic Apache Flex programming. Six studies evaluate the performance of ScriptingRT empirically. Studies 1–3 use specialized hardware to measure variance of response time measurement and stimulus presentation timing. Studies 4–6 implement a Stroop paradigm and run it both online and in the laboratory, comparing ScriptingRT to other response latency software. Altogether, the studies show that Flash programs developed in ScriptingRT show a small lag and an increased variance in response latencies. However, this did not significantly influence measured effects: The Stroop effect was reliably replicated in all studies, and the found effects did not depend on the software used. We conclude that ScriptingRT can be used to test response latency effects online. PMID:23805326

  17. STAR Online Framework: from Metadata Collection to Event Analysis and System Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, D.; Lauret, J.

    2015-05-01

    In preparation for the new era of RHIC running (RHIC-II upgrades and possibly, the eRHIC era), the STAR experiment is expanding its modular Message Interface and Reliable Architecture framework (MIRA). MIRA allowed STAR to integrate meta-data collection, monitoring, and online QA components in a very agile and efficient manner using a messaging infrastructure approach. In this paper, we briefly summarize our past achievements, provide an overview of the recent development activities focused on messaging patterns and describe our experience with the complex event processor (CEP) recently integrated into the MIRA framework. CEP was used in the recent RHIC Run 14, which provided practical use cases. Finally, we present our requirements and expectations for the planned expansion of our systems, which will allow our framework to acquire features typically associated with Detector Control Systems. Special attention is given to aspects related to latency, scalability and interoperability within heterogeneous set of services, various data and meta-data acquisition components coexisting in STAR online domain.

  18. Exploring the Effects of Including Students' Ideas and Concerns on Their Participation in Online Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyini, Ahmed Bawa

    2011-01-01

    As higher education institutions progressively deliver many more courses through online mode, student retention in courses and ensuring participation in tasks and activities are becoming more a concern to teachers and educational institutions. This pilot study--an action learning project--explored the effect of including students' identified…

  19. Online Support Service Quality, Online Learning Acceptance, and Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung-Wan

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines potential differences between Korean and American students in terms of their perception levels regarding online education support service quality, online learning acceptance, and satisfaction. Eight hundred and seventy-two samples, which were collected from students in online classes in the United States and Korea, were…

  20. An information spreading model based on online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; He, Juanjuan; Wang, Xiaoxia

    2018-01-01

    Online social platforms are very popular in recent years. In addition to spreading information, users could review or collect information on online social platforms. According to the information spreading rules of online social network, a new information spreading model, namely IRCSS model, is proposed in this paper. It includes sharing mechanism, reviewing mechanism, collecting mechanism and stifling mechanism. Mean-field equations are derived to describe the dynamics of the IRCSS model. Moreover, the steady states of reviewers, collectors and stiflers and the effects of parameters on the peak values of reviewers, collectors and sharers are analyzed. Finally, numerical simulations are performed on different networks. Results show that collecting mechanism and reviewing mechanism, as well as the connectivity of the network, make information travel wider and faster, and compared to WS network and ER network, the speed of reviewing, sharing and collecting information is fastest on BA network.

  1. An Intervention Including an Online Game to Improve Grade 6 Students' Performance in Early Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolovou, Angeliki; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Koller, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether an intervention including an online game contributed to 236 Grade 6 students' performance in early algebra, that is, solving problems with covarying quantities. An exploratory quasi-experimental study was conducted with a pretest-posttest-control-group design. Students in the experimental group were asked to solve…

  2. 76 FR 7874 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment on the Online Innovation Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Information Collection for Public Comment on the Online Innovation Submission Form for the Innovation of the... submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the Paperwork Reduction... Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Innovation of the Day Project. OMB...

  3. Gratifications, collective self-esteem, online emotional openness, and traitlike communication apprehension as predictors of Facebook uses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Tang, Leo Shing-Tung; Leung, Louis

    2011-12-01

    This study explores whether and how gratifications and psychological traits impact people's Facebook use. First, a factor analysis of an online survey (N= 437) outlined a unique set of gratifications obtained from the use of Facebook. Six aspects of gratifications (i.e., social surveillance, entertainment, recognition, emotional support, network extension, and maintenance) were identified. Results from regression analyses showed that psychological traits (i.e., collective self-esteem, online emotional openness, and traitlike communication apprehension) were strong predictors of most Facebook gratifications. Additionally, gratifications and, to a lesser extent, psychological traits significantly predicted Facebook usage, both in perceived importance and different indicators in the level of Facebook use.

  4. 75 FR 54690 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-160, Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Collection: DS-160, Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa ACTION: Notice of request for public comments... Nonimmigrant Visa. OMB Control Number: 1405-0182. Type of Request: Revision. Originating Office: Bureau of Consular Affairs, Visa Services (CA/VO). Form Number: DS-160. Respondents: All nonimmigrant visa applicants...

  5. Do online pharmacies fit European internal markets?

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Mia Maria; Rautava, Päivi Tuire; Forsström, Jari Johannes

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the suitability of online pharmacies into European internal market area. This required considering the models of present online pharmacies in respect to the existing legislation. Data on online pharmacy settings was collected by looking some online pharmacies, which were found by using Goggle search machine with term "online pharmacy" and by studying websites of some well-known online pharmacies. European legislation and policy were studied from European Union's official website. Online drug markets seem to be increasing in popularity for reasons related to their ready availability and cost benefits. Few online pharmacies are based in Europe, yet online markets are worldwide. Community legislation does not stipulate on the legality of online pharmacies on European internal markets. Instead Community legislation offers framework for electronic commerce that could also include online pharmacy practise. National legislation, however, may rule them out either directly or indirectly. Regardless of European internal markets online pharmacies' cross-border operations are particularly complicated. Preliminary ruling from the European Court of Justice concerning one European online pharmacy's cross-border practise is awaited 2003-2004 and will offer some aspects for future.

  6. Reading the Mind in the Eyes or Reading between the Lines? Theory of Mind Predicts Collective Intelligence Equally Well Online and Face-To-Face

    PubMed Central

    Engel, David; Woolley, Anita Williams; Jing, Lisa X.; Chabris, Christopher F.; Malone, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research with face-to-face groups found that a measure of general group effectiveness (called “collective intelligence”) predicted a group’s performance on a wide range of different tasks. The same research also found that collective intelligence was correlated with the individual group members’ ability to reason about the mental states of others (an ability called “Theory of Mind” or “ToM”). Since ToM was measured in this work by a test that requires participants to “read” the mental states of others from looking at their eyes (the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” test), it is uncertain whether the same results would emerge in online groups where these visual cues are not available. Here we find that: (1) a collective intelligence factor characterizes group performance approximately as well for online groups as for face-to-face groups; and (2) surprisingly, the ToM measure is equally predictive of collective intelligence in both face-to-face and online groups, even though the online groups communicate only via text and never see each other at all. This provides strong evidence that ToM abilities are just as important to group performance in online environments with limited nonverbal cues as they are face-to-face. It also suggests that the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test measures a deeper, domain-independent aspect of social reasoning, not merely the ability to recognize facial expressions of mental states. PMID:25514387

  7. Reading the Mind in the Eyes or reading between the lines? Theory of Mind predicts collective intelligence equally well online and face-to-face.

    PubMed

    Engel, David; Woolley, Anita Williams; Jing, Lisa X; Chabris, Christopher F; Malone, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Recent research with face-to-face groups found that a measure of general group effectiveness (called "collective intelligence") predicted a group's performance on a wide range of different tasks. The same research also found that collective intelligence was correlated with the individual group members' ability to reason about the mental states of others (an ability called "Theory of Mind" or "ToM"). Since ToM was measured in this work by a test that requires participants to "read" the mental states of others from looking at their eyes (the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test), it is uncertain whether the same results would emerge in online groups where these visual cues are not available. Here we find that: (1) a collective intelligence factor characterizes group performance approximately as well for online groups as for face-to-face groups; and (2) surprisingly, the ToM measure is equally predictive of collective intelligence in both face-to-face and online groups, even though the online groups communicate only via text and never see each other at all. This provides strong evidence that ToM abilities are just as important to group performance in online environments with limited nonverbal cues as they are face-to-face. It also suggests that the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test measures a deeper, domain-independent aspect of social reasoning, not merely the ability to recognize facial expressions of mental states.

  8. A collective theory of happiness: words related to the word "happiness" in Swedish online newspapers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Danilo; Sikström, Sverker

    2013-06-01

    It may be suggested that the representation of happiness in online media is collective in nature because it is a picture of happiness communicated by relatively few individuals to the masses. The present study is based on articles published in Swedish daily online newspapers in 2010; the data corpus comprises 1.5 million words. We investigated which words were most (un)common in articles containing the word "happiness" as compared with articles not containing this word. The results show that words related to people (by use of all relevant pronouns: you/me and us/them); important others (e.g., grandmother, mother); the Swedish royal wedding (e.g., Prince Daniel, Princess Victoria); and the FIFA World Cup (e.g., Zlatan, Argentina, Drogba) were highly recurrent in articles containing the word happiness. In contrast, words related to objects, such as money (e.g., millions, billions), bestselling gadgets (e.g., iPad, iPhone), and companies (e.g., Google, Windows), were predictive of contexts not recurrent with the word happiness. The results presented here are in accordance with findings in the happiness literature showing that relationships, not material things, are what make people happy. We suggest that our findings mirror a collective theory of happiness, that is, a shared picture or agreement, among members of a community, concerning what makes people happy. The fact that this representation is made public on such a large scale makes it collective in nature.

  9. 78 FR 76153 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Extension of an Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Notice of Information Collection for review; Electronic Bonds Online (eBonds) Access; OMB Control No... submitting the following information collection request for review and clearance in accordance [[Page 76154... information collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Electronic Bonds Online (eBonds) Access. (3) Agency...

  10. Online Data Collection in Women’s Health Research: A Study of Perimenopausal Women with Migraines

    PubMed Central

    MOLONEY, MARGARET F.; STRICKLAND, ORA L.; DIETRICH, ALEXA; MYERBURG, STUART

    2008-01-01

    An estimated 17 to 18 percent of all women, and six percent of men, experience migraines. Hormonal shifts may cause migraines to recur, worsen, or even begin during the perimenopause and are a significant cause of discomfort and disability. However, very little research has explored the experience of migraines in this population. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of perimenopausal women with migraines, via online questionnaires and discussion boards, and to evaluate the feasibility of collecting women’s health data via the Internet. In an earlier study, we found that midlife women had difficulty attending focus groups due to other time commitments. This study was designed to increase accessibility to the research via the Internet. Of the 43 women recruited into the study, 21 were also interviewed in “real-time” qualitative interviews; all received passwords to complete online questionnaires and participate in three- to four-week discussion boards on the study Web site. Quantitative data were imported into SPSS; narrative qualitative data from discussion boards were transferred to a software package for analysis. Online questionnaires and discussion boards were found to be feasible methods for data collection for this population. Qualitative data analysis revealed themes related to women’s efforts to predict and control their headaches, the relationship of headaches to women’s menses and menopausal symptoms, and the effects of migraines on their lives. In this paper we describe the process of using the Internet, feminist issues related to this innovative methodology, and also discuss the results of a major study theme, the experience of headaches in relationship to the menstrual cycle. PMID:20209041

  11. Scientists do not Need More Communities, They Need Collectives; and Collectives need Community to Build Teamwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Nearly a decade ago I was on a team that was exploring a new online network platform for ocean scientists—one of those "Facebook for X" forays that never took off. During the research phase I learned that online groups exhibited a wide range of "stickiness," a description for member engagement. In general, engagement could be plotted on the usual power law curve; a handful of really engaged members on one side, and hundreds or thousands of mostly un-engaged members in the "long-tail" end of the curve.One genre of online groups completely broke this curve. These were the most engaged groups online, and by a long ways. Their entire membership regularly contributed content. The problem was that these groups were made of individuals who had been diagnosed with terminal or incurable chronic physical diseases. Their members sought answers beyond the ken of their individual medical advisors, and they collectively shouldered the news when one of their members inevitably passed on.This leads me back to science (including data science) and to the online engagement of scientists in social networks. From a series of cases and anecdotes collected from other community managers who have attempted to "engage" scientists online, it is clear that science effects its "victims" (scientists) much like an incurable (intellectual) disease. Scientists commonly spend sixty or more hours a week chasing unknowns in their labs, gathering field data, or tracking down software bugs. They share a fever for knowledge and their own common foe: the specific unknown that stands between the state-of-the-science in their specialty and a better understanding of the object of their study; the peculiar intellectual challenge (disease) they have chosen as their quest and their foe.Scientists don't need to join online communities to do science. What scientists need are online collectives that can accelerate their own research, and reward their contributions to new knowledge in their chosen specialty

  12. Men's and Women's Use and Creation of Online Sexually Explicit Materials Including Fandom-Related Works.

    PubMed

    Anisimowicz, Yvonne; O'Sullivan, Lucia F

    2017-04-01

    The Internet and mobile computing have been highly influential in shaping the modern technological era and subsequently the production of and access to online sexually explicit materials (SEM). Fandom-the realm of fans sharing a common interest-has also adapted to the Internet, which has changed how fans access and distribute fanworks (i.e., material created by fans such as stories and art), many of which contain SEM. The current study examined gender differences in the use and creation of online SEM by surveying 468 men and 347 women (ages 18 or older; mean age = 33.8 years) residing in North America. Participants completed anonymous measures assessing demographic information, experiences using and creating online SEM, and measures of related sexual attitudes. Use of online SEM was widely reported by participants, with men (87.8 %) indicating more use than with women (67.4 %). As expected, few participants reported creating online SEM (3.6 % of men, 4.9 % of women). Men and women reported similar levels of preferred sexual explicitness in the online SEM that they used. There were no significant gender differences in the use of fanworks reported by men (14.3 %) and women (14.7 %) or in the creation of fanworks (1.5 % of men, 3.2 % of women). Fandom-related online SEM use was predicted only by more permissive sexual attitudes (one of eight predictors). Although there were many similarities between men's and women's use of online SEM, some gender differences were found in their motives for online SEM use. Findings are discussed in terms of the context in which men and women experience online SEM.

  13. Ostracism Online: A social media ostracism paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Wouter; Levordashka, Ana; Ruff, Johanna R; Kraaijeveld, Steven; Lueckmann, Jan-Matthis; Williams, Kipling D

    2015-06-01

    We describe Ostracism Online, a novel, social media-based ostracism paradigm designed to (1) keep social interaction experimentally controlled, (2) provide researchers with the flexibility to manipulate the properties of the social situation to fit their research purposes, (3) be suitable for online data collection, (4) be convenient for studying subsequent within-group behavior, and (5) be ecologically valid. After collecting data online, we compared the Ostracism Online paradigm with the Cyberball paradigm (Williams & Jarvis Behavior Research Methods, 38, 174-180, 2006) on need-threat and mood questionnaire scores (van Beest & Williams Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 91, 918-928, 2006). We also examined whether ostracized targets of either paradigm would be more likely to conform to their group members than if they had been included. Using a Bayesian analysis of variance to examine the individual effects of the different paradigms and to compare these effects across paradigms, we found analogous effects on need-threat and mood. Perhaps because we examined conformity to the ostracizers (rather than neutral sources), neither paradigm showed effects of ostracism on conformity. We conclude that Ostracism Online is a cost-effective, easy to use, and ecologically valid research tool for studying the psychological and behavioral effects of ostracism.

  14. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  15. Using a participatory evaluation design to create an online data collection and monitoring system for New Mexico's Community Health Councils.

    PubMed

    Andrews, M L; Sánchez, V; Carrillo, C; Allen-Ananins, B; Cruz, Y B

    2014-02-01

    We present the collaborative development of a web-based data collection and monitoring plan for thirty-two county councils within New Mexico's health council system. The monitoring plan, a key component in our multiyear participatory statewide evaluation process, was co-developed with the end users: representatives of the health councils. Guided by the Institute of Medicine's Community, Health Improvement Process framework, we first developed a logic model that delineated processes and intermediate systems-level outcomes in council development, planning, and community action. Through the online system, health councils reported data on intermediate outcomes, including policy changes and funds leveraged. The system captured data that were common across the health council system, yet was also flexible so that councils could report their unique accomplishments at the county level. A main benefit of the online system was that it provided the ability to assess intermediate, outcomes across the health council system. Developing the system was not without challenges, including creating processes to ensure participation across a large rural state; creating shared understanding of intermediate outcomes and indicators; and overcoming technological issues. Even through the challenges, however, the benefits of committing to using participatory processes far outweighed the challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Students' Perceptions of Online Courses: The Effect of Online Course Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Rhonda R.; Waid-Lindberg, Courtney A.; del Carmen, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    While online learning is nothing new, research regarding student perceptions of online courses is limited and has generally focused on those who have taken online courses. Data were collected from 180 students taking criminal justice courses on campus at a large 4-year university in the Southwest and 100 students taking criminal justice courses in…

  17. Online and unsupervised face recognition for continuous video stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Hongwen; Feng, Jufu

    2009-10-01

    We present a novel online face recognition approach for video stream in this paper. Our method includes two stages: pre-training and online training. In the pre-training phase, our method observes interactions, collects batches of input data, and attempts to estimate their distributions (Box-Cox transformation is adopted here to normalize rough estimates). In the online training phase, our method incrementally improves classifiers' knowledge of the face space and updates it continuously with incremental eigenspace analysis. The performance achieved by our method shows its great potential in video stream processing.

  18. HeinOnline: An Online Archive of Law Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marisa, Richard J.

    Law is grounded in the past, in the decisions and reasoning of generations of lawyers, judges, juries, and professors. Ready access to this history is vital to solid legal research, and yet, until 2000, much of it was buried in vast collections of aging paper journals. HeinOnline is a new online archive of law journals. Development of HeinOnline…

  19. Extension of the ADC Charge-Collection Model to Include Multiple Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    The ADC model is a charge-collection model derived for simple p-n junction silicon diodes having a single reverse-biased p-n junction at one end and an ideal substrate contact at the other end. The present paper extends the model to include multiple junctions, and the goal is to estimate how collected charge is shared by the different junctions.

  20. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lenards, Nishele, E-mail: lenards.nish@uwlax.ed

    2011-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled studentsmore » in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.« less

  1. Challenging the reported disadvantages of e-questionnaires and addressing methodological issues of online data collection.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Louise

    2012-01-01

    To review the advantages and disadvantages of e-questionnaires, and question whether or not reported disadvantages remain valid or can be limited or circumvented. The internet is likely to become the dominant medium for survey distribution, yet nurses and midwives have been slow to use online technology for research involving questionnaires. Relatively little is known about optimal methods of harnessing the internet's potential in health studies. A small e-questionnaire of health workers. The Medline and Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for articles containing the words 'web', 'online', or 'internet' and 'survey' or 'questionnaire'. The search was restricted to articles in English published since 2000. The reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched. Reported disadvantages of online data collection, such as sample bias, psychometric distortions, 'technophobia' and lower response rates are discussed and challenged. The author reports her experience of conducting a survey with an e-questionnaire to contribute to the limited body of knowledge in this area, and suggests how to maximise the quantity and quality of responses to e-questionnaires. E-questionnaires offer the researcher an inexpensive, quick and convenient way to collect data. Many of the reported disadvantages of the medium are no longer valid. The science of conducting the perfect e-survey is emerging. However, the lessons learned in the author's study, together with other research, seem to suggest that satisfactory response rates and data quality can be achieved in a relatively short time if certain tactics are used. To get the best results from e-questionnaires, it is suggested that the questionnaire recipients should be targeted carefully and that the value of their potential contribution to the project should be emphasised. E-questionnaires should be convenient, quick and easy to access, and be set out in a way that encourages full and complete responses.

  2. Comparing Safari Tech Books Online and Books24x7 E-Book Collections: A Case Study from the University of British Columbia Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsky, Eugene; Schattman, Lisa; Greenwood, Aleteia

    2009-01-01

    Most academic libraries are seeking to provide electronic access to the very dynamic and changing field of technology related material. "Safari Tech Books Online" and "Books24x7" are the major e-book collections in this area. We compared the "Safari Tech Books Online" and "Books24x7" e-book packages as to…

  3. Researching the Size and Scope of Online Usage in the Vocational Education and Training Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robyn; Malone, Peter; Markham, Selby; Sharma, Renu; Sheard, Judithe; Young, Graeme

    The size and scope of online usage in Australia's vocational education and training sector were examined in a four-stage study that included the numerous data collection activities, including the following: a literature review; interviews with 85 institutes; interviews with 10 training organizations and 20 organizations using online learning;…

  4. Suicidality, psychopathology, and the internet: Online time vs. online behaviors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Keith M; Starcevic, Vladan; Ma, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated whether several psychopathology variables, including suicidality, could predict the time people spend using the internet (hours online). Next, we examined a specific at-risk population (suicidal individuals) by their online behaviors, comparing suicidal individuals who went online for suicide-related purposes with suicidal individuals who did not go online for suicide-related purposes. An anonymous online sample of 713 (aged 18-71) reported hours online, psychiatric histories, and completed several standardized scales. After accounting for age and education, hierarchical regression modeling showed that the assessed psychopathology variables, including suicidality, did not explain significant variance in hours online. Hours online were better predicted by younger age, greater willingness to develop online relationships, higher perceived social support, higher curiosity, and lower extraversion. Suicidal participants, who did or did not go online for suicide-related purposes, did not differ on hours online. Multiple regression modeling showed that those who went online for suicide-related purposes were likely to be younger, more suicidal, and more willing to seek help from online mental health professionals. These findings revealed that hours online are not a valid indicator of psychopathology. However, studying online behaviors of specific at-risk groups could be informative and useful, including for suicide prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Literacy Agents Online: E-Discussion Forums for Advancing Adults' Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetti, Barbara J.; Foley, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how adults used a self-selected online forum to advance their own and others' literacy practices. The study was a discourse-centered online ethnography using triangulated methods, including analysis of list archives, semi-structured and informal interviews, and document collection. These data were analyzed by discourse…

  6. 76 FR 72210 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Electronic Bonds Online (eBonds) Access. The Department of... collection request for review and clearance in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The...) Title of the Form/Collection: Electronic Bonds Online (eBonds) Access; OMB Control No. 1653-0046. (3...

  7. Children's Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    2000-01-01

    The first federal Internet privacy law (the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act) provides safeguards for children by regulating collection of their personal information. Unfortunately, teens are not protected. Legislation is pending to protect children from online marketers such as ZapMe! Interactive technologies require constant vigilance.…

  8. TOXLINE (TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION ONLINE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOXLINE? (TOXicology information onLINE) are the National Library of Medicines extensive collection of online bibliographic information covering the pharmacological, biochemical, physiological, and toxicological effects of drugs and other chemicals. TOXLINE and TOXLINE65 together...

  9. Constructing Disability in Online Worlds: Conceptualising Disability in Online Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the online construction of disability is investigated and the implications for educators working in virtual worlds are considered. Based on the analysis of data collected through interviews with deaf residents of "Second Life", it is argued that research into online identity, disability and education needs to allow room for…

  10. The Evolution of the School Library Collection: Implications for Effective Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debowski, Shelda

    1999-01-01

    Explores some of the collection and service-related issues which should be considered by those developing an electronic collection in a school library. Highlights include principles of electronic collection management; selection of electronic resources; technological infrastructure; user training; online subscriptions; marketing; and technical…

  11. Online Database Coverage of Pharmaceutical Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Bonnie

    1984-01-01

    Describes compilation of data concerning pharmaceutical journal coverage in online databases which aid information providers in collection development and database selection. Methodology, results (a core collection, overlap, timeliness, geographic scope), and implications are discussed. Eight references and a list of 337 journals indexed online in…

  12. The Experience of Teaching Online in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Online education has become a key instructional delivery method in nursing education; however, limited understanding exists about what it is like to teach online. The aim of this study was to uncover the experience of teaching online in nursing education. The sample for this phenomenological study included 14 nursing faculty who completed at least 50% of their teaching workload assignment in fully online courses in baccalaureate, master's, or doctoral nursing programs. Data were collected through the use of a demographic questionnaire and personal interviews. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) Looking at a Lot of Moving Parts, (b) Always Learning New Things, (c) Going Back and Forth, and (d) Time Is a Blessing and a Curse. Online teaching in nursing education differs from traditional classroom teaching in a variety of ways. Policies and guidelines that govern faculty teaching should encompass the identified intricacies of online teaching. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(6):343-349.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Utilizing a language model to improve online dynamic data collection in P300 spellers.

    PubMed

    Mainsah, Boyla O; Colwell, Kenneth A; Collins, Leslie M; Throckmorton, Chandra S

    2014-07-01

    P300 spellers provide a means of communication for individuals with severe physical limitations, especially those with locked-in syndrome, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, P300 speller use is still limited by relatively low communication rates due to the multiple data measurements that are required to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of event-related potentials for increased accuracy. Therefore, the amount of data collection has competing effects on accuracy and spelling speed. Adaptively varying the amount of data collection prior to character selection has been shown to improve spelling accuracy and speed. The goal of this study was to optimize a previously developed dynamic stopping algorithm that uses a Bayesian approach to control data collection by incorporating a priori knowledge via a language model. Participants ( n = 17) completed online spelling tasks using the dynamic stopping algorithm, with and without a language model. The addition of the language model resulted in improved participant performance from a mean theoretical bit rate of 46.12 bits/min at 88.89% accuracy to 54.42 bits/min ( ) at 90.36% accuracy.

  14. What is included with your online e-cigarette order? An analysis of e-cigarette shipping, product and packaging features

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Amanda Y; Derrick, Jason C; Abrantes, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Background The electronic cigarette industry is growing, with youth using e-cigarettes at higher rates than they are using cigarettes, and retail and online sales projected to reach $10 billion in 2017. Minimal regulation of the production and marketing of e-cigarettes exists to date, which has allowed companies to promote unsupported claims. We assessed the shipping, product features and packaging of a wide variety of e-cigarettes purchased online by adults and youth. Methods The most popular internet e-cigarette vendors were identified from a larger study of internet tobacco vendors. Between August 2013 and June 2014, adults made 56 purchase attempts from online vendors, and youth made 98 attempts. Packages received were assessed for exterior and internal packaging features, including product information, health warnings and additional materials. Results We analysed a total of 125 orders featuring 86 unique brands of e-cigarettes. The contents were rarely indicated on package exteriors. Product information came with just 60% of orders and just 38.4% included an instruction manual. Only 44.6% of products included a health warning, and some had unsupported claims, such as lack of secondhand smoke exposure. Additionally, some products were leaking e-liquid and battery fluid on arrival. Conclusions A large variety of e-cigarette products are manufactured and marketed to consumers. Many products do not include instructions for use, and unsupported claims are being presented to consumers. Effective federal regulation of the manufacturing, packaging, product information and health claims surrounding e-cigarettes is necessary to ensure consumers are presented with accurate e-cigarette use information. PMID:27357936

  15. Online Patron Records and Privacy: Service vs. Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouty, Kathleen G.

    1993-01-01

    Examines issues regarding the privacy of information contained in patron databases that have resulted from online circulation systems. Topics discussed include library policies to protect information in patron records; ensuring compliance with policies; limiting the data collected; security authorizations; and creating and modifying patron…

  16. The Transition from Distance to Online Education: Perspectives from the Educational Management Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderstrom, Tor; From, Jorgen; Lovqvist, Jeanette; Tornquist, Anette

    2012-01-01

    In Sweden, higher education has moved away from distance education, including physical meetings, to online education with no physical meetings at all. This article focuses on the shift from distance to online education using an educational management perspective that is based on economic, staff, and student data collected between 1994 and 2010…

  17. Using internet-based approaches to collect qualitative data from vulnerable groups: reflections from the field.

    PubMed

    Neville, Stephen; Adams, Jeffery; Cook, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    Undertaking qualitative research with vulnerable populations is a complex and challenging process for researchers. Traditional and common modes of collecting qualitative data with these groups have been via face-to-face recorded interviews. This article reports on three internet-based data collection methods; email and synchronous online interviews, as well as online qualitative survey. The key characteristics of using email, sychronous online interviews and an online qualitative survey including the strengths and limitations of each are presented. Reflections and insights on the use of these internet-based data collection methods are provided to encourage researchers to embrace technology and move away from using traditional face-to-face interviews when researching with vulnerable populations. Using the internet to collect qualitative data offers additional ways to gather qualitative data over traditional data collection methods. The use of alternative interview methods may encourage participation of vulnerable participants.

  18. The Relationship between Searches Performed in Online Databases and the Number of Full-Text Articles Accessed: Measuring the Interaction between Database and E-Journal Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamothe, Alain R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a quantitative analysis exploring the interaction and relationship between the online database and electronic journal collections at the J. N. Desmarais Library of Laurentian University. A very strong relationship exists between the number of searches and the size of the online database…

  19. Including Online-Recruited Seeds: A Respondent-Driven Sample of Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Lachowsky, Nathan John; Lal, Allan; Forrest, Jamie I; Card, Kiffer George; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Rich, Ashleigh; Raymond, Henry Fisher; Roth, Eric A; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S

    2016-03-15

    Technology has changed the way men who have sex with men (MSM) seek sex and socialize, which may impact the implementation of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) among this population. Initial participants (also known as seeds) are a critical consideration in RDS because they begin the recruitment chains. However, little information is available on how the online-recruited seeds may effect RDS implementation. The objectives of this study were to compare (1) online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds and (2) subsequent recruitment chains of online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds. Between 2012 and 2014, we recruited MSM using RDS in Vancouver, Canada. RDS weights were used with logistic regression to address each objective. A total of 119 seeds were used, 85 of whom were online-recruited seeds, to recruit an additional 600 MSM. Compared with offline-recruited seeds, online-recruited seeds were less likely to be HIV-positive (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.88), to have attended a gay community group (AOR 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.90), and to feel gay community involvement was "very important" (AOR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.93). Online-recruited seeds were more likely to ask a sexual partner's HIV status always versus <50% of the time (AOR 5.21, 95% CI 1.17-23.23), to have watched the Pride parade (AOR 6.30, 95% CI 1.69-23.45), and to have sought sex online (AOR 4.29, 95% CI 1.53-12-12.05). Further, compared with recruitment chains started by offline-recruited seeds, recruits from chains started by online-recruited seeds (283/600, 47.2%) were less likely to be HIV-positive (AOR 0.25, 95% CI 0.16-0.40), to report "versatile" versus "bottom" sexual position preference (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.88), and to be in a relationship lasting >1 year (AOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.06-2.56). Recruits of online seeds were more likely to be out as gay for longer (eg, 11-21 vs 1-4 years, AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.27-3.88) and have fewer Facebook friends (eg, 201-500 vs >500, AOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02-2.80). Online

  20. Including Online-Recruited Seeds: A Respondent-Driven Sample of Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Lachowsky, Nathan John; Lal, Allan; Forrest, Jamie I; Card, Kiffer George; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Rich, Ashleigh; Raymond, Henry Fisher; Roth, Eric A; Moore, David M

    2016-01-01

    Background Technology has changed the way men who have sex with men (MSM) seek sex and socialize, which may impact the implementation of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) among this population. Initial participants (also known as seeds) are a critical consideration in RDS because they begin the recruitment chains. However, little information is available on how the online-recruited seeds may effect RDS implementation. Objective The objectives of this study were to compare (1) online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds and (2) subsequent recruitment chains of online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds. Methods Between 2012 and 2014, we recruited MSM using RDS in Vancouver, Canada. RDS weights were used with logistic regression to address each objective. Results A total of 119 seeds were used, 85 of whom were online-recruited seeds, to recruit an additional 600 MSM. Compared with offline-recruited seeds, online-recruited seeds were less likely to be HIV-positive (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.88), to have attended a gay community group (AOR 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.90), and to feel gay community involvement was “very important” (AOR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.93). Online-recruited seeds were more likely to ask a sexual partner’s HIV status always versus <50% of the time (AOR 5.21, 95% CI 1.17-23.23), to have watched the Pride parade (AOR 6.30, 95% CI 1.69-23.45), and to have sought sex online (AOR 4.29, 95% CI 1.53-12-12.05). Further, compared with recruitment chains started by offline-recruited seeds, recruits from chains started by online-recruited seeds (283/600, 47.2%) were less likely to be HIV-positive (AOR 0.25, 95% CI 0.16-0.40), to report “versatile” versus “bottom” sexual position preference (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.88), and to be in a relationship lasting >1 year (AOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.06-2.56). Recruits of online seeds were more likely to be out as gay for longer (eg, 11-21 vs 1-4 years, AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.27-3.88) and have fewer Facebook friends (eg

  1. Conducting spoken word recognition research online: Validation and a new timing method.

    PubMed

    Slote, Joseph; Strand, Julia F

    2016-06-01

    Models of spoken word recognition typically make predictions that are then tested in the laboratory against the word recognition scores of human subjects (e.g., Luce & Pisoni Ear and Hearing, 19, 1-36, 1998). Unfortunately, laboratory collection of large sets of word recognition data can be costly and time-consuming. Due to the numerous advantages of online research in speed, cost, and participant diversity, some labs have begun to explore the use of online platforms such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) to source participation and collect data (Buhrmester, Kwang, & Gosling Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 3-5, 2011). Many classic findings in cognitive psychology have been successfully replicated online, including the Stroop effect, task-switching costs, and Simon and flanker interference (Crump, McDonnell, & Gureckis PLoS ONE, 8, e57410, 2013). However, tasks requiring auditory stimulus delivery have not typically made use of AMT. In the present study, we evaluated the use of AMT for collecting spoken word identification and auditory lexical decision data. Although online users were faster and less accurate than participants in the lab, the results revealed strong correlations between the online and laboratory measures for both word identification accuracy and lexical decision speed. In addition, the scores obtained in the lab and online were equivalently correlated with factors that have been well established to predict word recognition, including word frequency and phonological neighborhood density. We also present and analyze a method for precise auditory reaction timing that is novel to behavioral research. Taken together, these findings suggest that AMT can be a viable alternative to the traditional laboratory setting as a source of participation for some spoken word recognition research.

  2. An online learning course in Ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi; Jermias-Cohen, Tali; Josman, Naomi

    2004-01-01

    For the past two years, the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Haifa has offered an online course to third year occupational therapists on the topic of Ergonomics for Health Care Professionals. The development and implementation of this course was funded by the Israeli Ministry of Education. Unique teaching materials, developed and uploaded to the University's server via "High Learn", included interactive and self-directed documents containing graphics, animations, and video clips. Extensive use was made of the discussion forum and survey tools, and students submitted all assignments online. For the final topic, an expert in ergonomics from Boston University delivered a lecture via two-way videoconferencing. The course site included comprehensive library listings in which all bibliographic materials were made available online. Students accessed course materials at the University in a computer classroom and at home via modem. In an accompanying research study, the frequency of student usage of the various online tools was tracked and extensive data were collected via questionnaires documenting students' demographic background, preferred learning style, prior usage of technology, satisfaction with the course and academic achievement. This paper focuses on the results of the research study that examined how the students responded to and coped with teaching material presented and accessed in this format.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women Who Submit Self-collected Vaginal Swabs After Internet Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik J; Hughes, John; Oakes, J Michael; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Pankow, James S; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2015-06-01

    Submission of vaginal samples collected at home could remove barriers that women face in getting screened for cervical cancer. From December 2013 to January 2014, women aged 21-30 years were recruited online to participate in either (1) self-collected testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and an online survey, or (2) an online survey regarding their perceptions of self-collected testing for HPV infection. Demographics, risk factors, testing perceptions, and satisfaction with self-collected testing were assessed with online questionnaires. Women who performed self-collection were sent a home sampling kit by US mail, which was returned via US mail for HPV testing. A total of 197 women were enrolled, with 130 completing the online survey and 67 participating in both the survey and self-collection. Of the 67 women who were sent kits, 62 (92.5%) were returned for testing. Sixty kits contained a sample sufficient for testing. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 17.8%, however 6 women (9.7%) were infected with >1 type of HPV. Women who self-collected a sample reported more favorable attributes of self-collection compared to women who only participated in the online survey, including ease of sampling (87.1 vs. 18.9%), no pain during sampling (72.6 vs. 5.6%), and lack of embarrassment (67.7 vs. 12.9%). A high prevalence of HPV infection was demonstrated among women recruited via the internet. Online recruitment and at home screening methods have the potential to engage women in screening by offering an approach that might be more acceptable to women of different backgrounds.

  4. 76 FR 53930 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Information Collection for Review; Electronic Bonds Online (eBonds) Access; OMB Control No. 1653-0046. The... following information collection request for review and clearance in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction... Online (eBonds) Access. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the Department of...

  5. Predictors of unwanted exposure to online pornography and online sexual solicitation of youth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fong-Ching; Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Miao, Nae-Fang; Chen, Ping-Hung; Lee, Ching-Mei; Chiang, Jeng-Tung

    2016-06-01

    This study examined factors associated with the unwanted exposure to online pornography and unwanted online sexual solicitation victimization and perpetration of youth in Taiwan. A total of 2315 students from 26 high schools were assessed in the 10th grade, with follow-up performed in the 11th grade. Self-administered questionnaires were collected. Multivariate analysis results indicated that higher levels of online game use, pornography media exposure, Internet risk behaviors, depression, and cyberbullying experiences predicted online sexual solicitation victimization, while higher levels of Internet chat room use, pornography media exposure, Internet risk behaviors, cyberbullying experiences, and offline sexual harassment predicted online sexual solicitation perpetration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Library Services Online: Introducing Library Services for Online MBA Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a librarian at Lincoln Memorial University creates library services for an MBA program offered entirely online that is in the early stages of development. The library services include a subject guide and 4 tutorials that will be added to the MBA online orientation. Other services include offering online office hours and…

  7. The dynamics of emotions in online interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, Arvid; Küster, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We study the changes in emotional states induced by reading and participating in online discussions, empirically testing a computational model of online emotional interaction. Using principles of dynamical systems, we quantify changes in valence and arousal through subjective reports, as recorded in three independent studies including 207 participants (110 female). In the context of online discussions, the dynamics of valence and arousal is composed of two forces: an internal relaxation towards baseline values independent of the emotional charge of the discussion and a driving force of emotional states that depends on the content of the discussion. The dynamics of valence show the existence of positive and negative tendencies, while arousal increases when reading emotional content regardless of its polarity. The tendency of participants to take part in the discussion increases with positive arousal. When participating in an online discussion, the content of participants' expression depends on their valence, and their arousal significantly decreases afterwards as a regulation mechanism. We illustrate how these results allow the design of agent-based models to reproduce and analyse emotions in online communities. Our work empirically validates the microdynamics of a model of online collective emotions, bridging online data analysis with research in the laboratory. PMID:27853586

  8. Tritium monitor and collection system

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

    1992-01-14

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.

  9. What is included with your online e-cigarette order? An analysis of e-cigarette shipping, product and packaging features.

    PubMed

    Kong, Amanda Y; Derrick, Jason C; Abrantes, Anthony S; Williams, Rebecca S

    2016-06-29

    The electronic cigarette industry is growing, with youth using e-cigarettes at higher rates than they are using cigarettes, and retail and online sales projected to reach $10 billion in 2017. Minimal regulation of the production and marketing of e-cigarettes exists to date, which has allowed companies to promote unsupported claims. We assessed the shipping, product features and packaging of a wide variety of e-cigarettes purchased online by adults and youth. The most popular internet e-cigarette vendors were identified from a larger study of internet tobacco vendors. Between August 2013 and June 2014, adults made 56 purchase attempts from online vendors, and youth made 98 attempts. Packages received were assessed for exterior and internal packaging features, including product information, health warnings and additional materials. We analysed a total of 125 orders featuring 86 unique brands of e-cigarettes. The contents were rarely indicated on package exteriors. Product information came with just 60% of orders and just 38.4% included an instruction manual. Only 44.6% of products included a health warning, and some had unsupported claims, such as lack of secondhand smoke exposure. Additionally, some products were leaking e-liquid and battery fluid on arrival. A large variety of e-cigarette products are manufactured and marketed to consumers. Many products do not include instructions for use, and unsupported claims are being presented to consumers. Effective federal regulation of the manufacturing, packaging, product information and health claims surrounding e-cigarettes is necessary to ensure consumers are presented with accurate e-cigarette use information. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Using Online Role-Play to Promote Collaborative Argument and Collective Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr-Stevens, Candance; Beach, Richard; Boeser, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how students use online role-play to collaborate and change real school policy. Playing different characters in an online role-play, students explore controversial aspects of Internet filtering and adopt a plan to change their school's policy. Through engaging in collaborative argumentation during their role-play, students…

  11. 78 FR 70584 - ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI...., Billing and Collections Department had their wages reported through a separate unemployment insurance (UI... this certification to include workers of the subject firm whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages are...

  12. Collective Information Literacy in Massively Multiplayer Online Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Crystle; Steinkuehler, Constance

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the forms of information literacy that arise in commercial entertainment games like "World of Warcraft." Using examples culled from eight months of online ethnographic data, the authors detail the forms of information literacy that arise as a regular part of in-game social interaction, emphasizing (ironically) the…

  13. The Cytoscape app article collection

    PubMed Central

    Pico, Alexander R; Bader, Gary D; Demchak, Barry; Guitart Pla, Oriol; Hull, Timothy; Longabaugh, William; Lopes, Christian; Lotia, Samad; Molenaar, Piet; Montojo, Jason; Morris, John H; Ono, Keiichiro; Schwikowski, Benno; Welker, David; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    As a network visualization and analysis platform, Cytoscape relies on apps to provide domain-specific features and functions. There are many resources available to support Cytoscape app development and distribution, including the Cytoscape App Store and an online “cookbook” for app developers. This article collection is another resource to help researchers find out more about relevant Cytoscape apps and to provide app developers with useful implementation tips. The collection will grow over time as new Cytoscape apps are developed and published. PMID:25580224

  14. Investigating online harassment and offline violence among young people in Thailand: Methodological approaches, lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Ojanen, Timo T.; Boonmongkon, Pimpawun; Samakkeekarom, Ronnapoom; Samoh, Nattharat; Cholratana, Mudjalin; Payakkakom, Anusorn; Guadamuz, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Violence in the physical (offline) world is a well-documented health and social issue among young people worldwide. In Southeast Asia, online harassment (defined as intentional behaviours to harm others through the Internet or through mobile devices) is less well documented. In this paper, we describe and critically discuss the mixed-methods data collection approach we used to build a contextualised understanding of offline violence and online harassment among 15-24 year-old students and out-of-school youth in Central Thailand. We mapped linkages between offline violence and online harassment, and with their possible correlates including gender, sexuality, and mobile media or Internet use. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and a custom-built, self-administered computerised survey. Using mixed methods enabled us to collect holistic qualitative/quantitative data from both students and out-of-school youth. In our discussion, we focus on gender, sexuality, class and ethnicity issues in recruiting out-of-school youth; definition and measurement issues; technical issues in using a computerised survey; ethical issues surrounding data collection from minors as well as privacy and confidentiality concerns in collecting data in both in-school and out-of-school settings; and the general implications of using mixed methods. PMID:25010363

  15. Investigating online harassment and offline violence among young people in Thailand: methodological approaches, lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Timo T; Boonmongkon, Pimpawun; Samakkeekarom, Ronnapoom; Samoh, Nattharat; Cholratana, Mudjalin; Payakkakom, Anusorn; Guadamuz, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Violence in the physical (offline) world is a well-documented health and social issue among young people worldwide. In Southeast Asia, online harassment (defined as intentional behaviours to harm others through the Internet or through mobile devices) is less well documented. In this paper, we describe and critically discuss the mixed-methods data collection approach we used to build a contextualised understanding of offline violence and online harassment among 15- to 24-year-old students and out-of-school youth in Central Thailand. We mapped linkages between offline violence and online harassment, and with their possible correlates including gender, sexuality, and mobile media or Internet use. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and a custom-built, self-administered computerised survey. Using mixed methods enabled us to collect holistic qualitative/quantitative data from both students and out-of-school youth. In our discussion, we focus on gender, sexuality, class and ethnicity issues in recruiting out-of-school youth; definition and measurement issues; technical issues in using a computerised survey; ethical issues surrounding data collection from minors as well as privacy and confidentiality concerns in collecting data in both in-school and out-of-school settings; and the general implications of using mixed methods.

  16. Document Delivery from Full-Text Online Files: A Pilot Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillikin, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Electronic Journal Retrieval Project (EJRP) developed at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Libraries, to provide full-text journal articles from online systems. Highlights include costs of various search strategies; implications for library services; collection development and interlibrary loan considerations; and suggestions…

  17. Evaluation of an online continuing education program from the perspective of new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Selcuk; Kucuk, Sevda; Aydemir, Melike

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the online continuing education program from the perspectives of new graduate nurses. An evaluation framework includes five factors (program and course structure, course materials, technology, support services and assessment). In this study, descriptive research methods were used. Participants of the study included 2.365 registered nurses enrolled in the first online nursing bachelor completion degree program in the country. Data were collected by survey. The findings indicated that students were mostly satisfied with this program. The results of this study suggest that well designed asynchronous online education methods can be effective and appropriate for registered nurses. However, the provision of effective support and technological infrastructure is as vital as the quality of teaching for online learners. © 2013.

  18. Me and My Shadow: Vendors as the Third Hand in Collection Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alessi, Dana L.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the vendor's role in the library collection evaluation process. Vendor services are described, including catalogs, bibliographies, periodicals, and announcement services; the process required to produce a vendor publication is explained; and new online and CD-ROM collection assessment tools are described. (LRW)

  19. Analysis of on-line clinical laboratory manuals and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Bruce; Schwartz, Robert; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2004-04-01

    On-line clinical laboratory manuals are a valuable resource for medical professionals. To our knowledge, no recommendations currently exist for their content or design. To analyze publicly accessible on-line clinical laboratory manuals and to propose guidelines for their content. We conducted an Internet search for clinical laboratory manuals written in English with individual test listings. Four individual test listings in each manual were evaluated for 16 data elements, including sample requirements, test methodology, units of measure, reference range, and critical values. Web sites were also evaluated for supplementary information and search functions. We identified 48 on-line laboratory manuals, including 24 academic or community hospital laboratories and 24 commercial or reference laboratories. All manuals had search engines and/or test indices. No single manual contained all 16 data elements evaluated. An average of 8.9 (56%) elements were present (range, 4-14). Basic sample requirements (specimen and volume needed) were the elements most commonly present (98% of manuals). The frequency of the remaining data elements varied from 10% to 90%. On-line clinical laboratory manuals originate from both hospital and commercial laboratories. While most manuals were user-friendly and contained adequate specimen-collection information, other important elements, such as reference ranges, were frequently absent. To ensure that clinical laboratory manuals are of maximal utility, we propose the following 13 data elements be included in individual test listings: test name, synonyms, test description, test methodology, sample requirements, volume requirements, collection guidelines, transport guidelines, units of measure, reference range, critical values, test availability, and date of latest revision.

  20. The Online Mineral Library at the University of Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Burdette, E.; Clayton, M.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Minnesota maintains a world-class mineral collection comprising over 7000 specimens, many of which are museum quality. Prof. Newton H. Winchell started the collection in the 1850s shortly after the founding of the University itself. Many of the specimens come from pioneering mineralogists such as Winchell, George F. Kunz, and Tibor Zoltai. A small fraction of the most eye-catching samples are on public display within the Department of Earth Sciences, but until recently the vast majority of the collection was housed in locked metal cabinets, which meant that the collection received very little use by students and researchers. To improve the visibility and accessibility of our mineral collection we created an elegant, database-driven website (http://mineral.esci.umn.edu/). This dynamic website is one of the more extensive of its kind and allows the collection to be used as a tool for teaching and research. The searchable, online database contains high-resolution photographs of the University's mineral collection and provides access to the complete collection. Administrators can link numerous specimens to create online "collections" that emphasize particular themes, e.g., economic mineralogy, common mineral donors, or common geographic origin. The online database has already been interwoven into courses for Earth Science majors and non-majors. Researchers are able to explore the library for mineral standards for instrument calibration or more involved experimental research. Further, the online library allows graduate students and faculty to "check out" certain mineral specimens for research, which for the first time allows us to accurately track the use of the collection. The electronic framework for the Online Mineral Library was constructed using the Drupal open source content management system. Undergraduate interns are in the process of systematically photographing each of the mineral specimens for inclusion in the Online Library. Additionally

  1. Students' Views About Potentially Offering Physics Courses Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan E.

    2016-06-01

    Nationally, many public universities have started to move into the online course and program market that is most often associated with for-profit institutions of higher education. Administrators in public universities make statements regarding benefits to students' desire for flexibility and profit margins related to online courses. But do students attending a large public university want to take courses online especially science courses perceived to be difficult such as freshmen-level physics courses? This study took place at a large, public, Midwestern university and involved students enrolled in the first semester of a face-to-face, flipped physics course for engineering technology majors. Statements were collected from comments about online courses made by the university's administration and students in the course. Twenty students sorted 45 statements. Two student views emerged with one rejecting online courses in general and the other primarily rejecting online math, science, and technology courses, including physics. Students' descriptions of their previous online course experiences were used to inform the analyses and to assist in describing the two views that emerged in conjunction with the distinguishing statements. Consensus among the two views is also discussed. Overall, the results indicate a potential divergence between student views and what university administrators believe students want.

  2. Online versus offline: The Web as a medium for response time data collection.

    PubMed

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Upravitelev, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Internet provides a convenient environment for data collection in psychology. Modern Web programming languages, such as JavaScript or Flash (ActionScript), facilitate complex experiments without the necessity of experimenter presence. Yet there is always a question of how much noise is added due to the differences between the setups used by participants and whether it is compensated for by increased ecological validity and larger sample sizes. This is especially a problem for experiments that measure response times (RTs), because they are more sensitive (and hence more susceptible to noise) than, for example, choices per se. We used a simple visual search task with different set sizes to compare laboratory performance with Web performance. The results suggest that although the locations (means) of RT distributions are different, other distribution parameters are not. Furthermore, the effect of experiment setting does not depend on set size, suggesting that task difficulty is not important in the choice of a data collection method. We also collected an additional online sample to investigate the effects of hardware and software diversity on the accuracy of RT data. We found that the high diversity of browsers, operating systems, and CPU performance may have a detrimental effect, though it can partly be compensated for by increased sample sizes and trial numbers. In sum, the findings show that Web-based experiments are an acceptable source of RT data, comparable to a common keyboard-based setup in the laboratory.

  3. Online social support as a buffer against online and offline peer and sexual victimization among U.S. LGBT and non-LGBT youth.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Michele L; Mitchell, Kimberly J; Palmer, Neal A; Reisner, Sari L

    2015-01-01

    In today's technology-infused world, we need to better understand relationships youth form with friends online, how they compare to relationships formed in-person, and whether these online relationships confer protective benefits. This is particularly important from the perspective of peer victimization, given that social support in-person appears to reduce the odds of victimization in-person. To address this literature gap, data from a sample of 5,542 U.S. adolescents, collected online between August 2010 and January 2011, were analyzed. The main variables of interest were: online and in-person peer victimization (including generalized and bullying forms) and online and in-person sexual victimization (including generalized and sexual harassment forms). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth were more likely than non-LGBT youth to have online friends and to appraise these friends as better than their in-person friends at providing emotional support. Peer victimization and unwanted sexual experiences were more commonly reported by LGBT than non-LGBT youth. Perceived quality of social support, either online or in-person, did little to attenuate the relative odds of victimization for LGBT youth. For all youth, in-person social support was associated with reduced odds of bully victimization (online and in-person) and sexual harassment (in-person), but was unrelated to the other outcomes of interest. Online social support did not reduce the odds of any type of victimization assessed. Together, these findings suggest that online friends can be an important source of social support, particularly for LGBT youth. Nonetheless, in-person social support appears to be more protective against victimization, suggesting that one is not a replacement for the other. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Online Surveys to Promote and Assess Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Laura; Doehler, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the use of online survey software to collect data from students during class to efficiently use class time. Several example activities for an introductory statistics classroom are considered. We also discuss utilization of online survey software for other purposes such as collecting assessment information and student…

  5. Analysis the Effectiveness of Three Online Vocabulary Flashcard Websites on L2 Learners' Level of Lexical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This study compared and contrasted 64 Taiwanese college freshmen's perceptions of and attitudes toward three online vocabulary flashcard websites, Quizlet, Study Stack, and Flashcard Exchange. Four types of data were collected in two freshmen English classes in a university in Taiwan from February to April 2013. Data included online flashcard…

  6. Evolution properties of online user preference diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Ji, Lei; Liu, Jian-Guo; Han, Jingti

    2017-02-01

    Detecting the evolution properties of online user preference diversity is of significance for deeply understanding online collective behaviors. In this paper, we empirically explore the evolution patterns of online user rating preference, where the preference diversity is measured by the variation coefficient of the user rating sequence. The statistical results for four real systems show that, for movies and reviews, the user rating preference would become diverse and then get centralized finally. By introducing the empirical variation coefficient, we present a Markov model, which could regenerate the evolution properties of two online systems regarding to the stable variation coefficients. In addition, we investigate the evolution of the correlation between the user ratings and the object qualities, and find that the correlation would keep increasing as the user degree increases. This work could be helpful for understanding the anchoring bias and memory effects of the online user collective behaviors.

  7. Adolescents' Online Social Networking Following the Death of a Peer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda L.; Merten, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how online social networking facilitates adolescent grieving following the sudden death of a peer. Researchers reviewed 20 profiles authored by adolescents who had died between 2005 and 2007 collecting information from commentary posted to the profiles posthumously. Observed themes included adolescent…

  8. Self-Direction in On-Line Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappel, L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents design based research on the role of self-direction in online learning by exploring elements of both individual and collective engagement as significant aspects of learning. By making the claim that online instruction draws on autonomous and social aspects of learning, this paper examines how online teaching environments are…

  9. Are we there yet? An examination of online tailored health communication.

    PubMed

    Suggs, L Suzanne; McIntyre, Chris

    2009-04-01

    Increasingly, the Internet is playing an important role in consumer health and patient-provider communication. Seventy-three percent of American adults are now online, and 79% have searched for health information on the Internet. This study provides a baseline understanding of the extent to which health consumers are able to find tailored communication online. It describes the current behavioral focus, the channels being used to deliver the tailored content, and the level of tailoring in online-tailored communication. A content analysis of 497 health Web sites found few examples of personalized, targeted, or tailored health sites freely available online. Tailored content was provided in 13 Web sites, although 15 collected individual data. More health risk assessment (HRA) sites included tailored feedback than other topics. The patterns that emerged from the analysis demonstrate that online health users can access a number of Web sites with communication tailored to their needs.

  10. Narratives of empowerment and compliance: studies of communication in online patient support groups.

    PubMed

    Wentzer, Helle S; Bygholm, Ann

    2013-12-01

    New technologies enable new forms of patient participation in health care. The article discusses whether communication in online patient support groups is a source of individual as well as collective empowerment or to be understood within the tradition of compliance. The discussion is based on a qualitative analysis of patient communication in two online groups on the Danish portal sundhed.dk, one for lung patients and one for women with fertility problems. The object of study is the total sum of postings during a specific period of time - a total of 4301 posts are included. The textmaterial was analyzed according to the textual paradigm of Paul Ricoeur, and the three steps of critical interpretation. Thus, the analysis moves from describing communicative characteristics of the site to a thorough semantic analysis of its narrative structure of construing meaning, interaction and collective identity, and finally as a source of collective action. The meta-narratives of the two groups confirm online patient support groups for individual empowerment, for collective group identity, but not for collective empowerment. The collective identities of patienthood on the two sites are created by the users (patients) through specific styles of communication and interaction, referred to as 'multi-logical narratives'. In spite of the potential of online communities of opening up health care to the critical voice of the public, the analysis points to a synthesis of the otherwise opposite positions of empowerment and compliance in patient care. On a collective level, the site is empowering the individual users to comply with 'doctor's recommendations' as a group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Online or not? A comparison of students' experiences of an online and an on-campus class.

    PubMed

    Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-03-18

    Educational discourse has long portrayed online, or e-based, learning and all non-campus-based learning options as second best to traditional face-to-face options. Critically much of the research and debate in this area of study has focused on evidence relating to student performance, attrition and retention with little consideration of the total learning experience, which values both the traditional learning outcome measures side-by-side with student-centered factors, such as students' satisfaction with their learning experience. The objective of this study was to present a synchronous head-to-head comparison between online and campus-based students' experiences of an undergraduate course. This paper reports on a qualitative comparative cross-sectional study, which used multiple data collection approaches to assess student learning and student satisfaction of 61 students who completed a semester of an undergraduate course. Of the 61 students, 34 were enrolled purely as online students, whilst the remaining 27 students studied the same material entirely through the traditional face-to-face medium. Methods included a standardised student satisfaction survey and an 'achievement of learning outcomes' measurement tool. Students on the online cohort performed better in areas where 'self-direction' in learning was indicated, for example self-directed problem-based tasks within the course. Online students gave less positive self-assessments of their perceived content mastery than their campus-based counterparts, despite performing just as well in both summative and formative assignments. A multi-factorial comparison shows online students to have comparable educational success and that, in terms of student satisfaction, online learners reported more satisfaction with their learning experience than their campus-based counterparts.

  12. Introducing Online Bibliographic Service to its Users: The Online Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Nancy B.; Pilachowski, David M.

    1978-01-01

    A description of techniques for introducing online services to new user groups includes discussion of terms and their definitions, evolution of online searching, advantages and disadvantages of online searching, production of the data bases, search strategies, Boolean logic, costs and charges, "do's and don'ts," and a user search questionnaire. (J…

  13. SCOPE - Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harenberg, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) has been established to be the primary North American archive for the collections of astronomical photographic plates. Located at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) in Rosman, NC, the archive contains hundreds of thousands stellar spectra, many of which have never before been classified. To help classify the vast number of stars, the public is invited to participate in a distributed computing online environment called Stellar Classification Online - Public Exploration (SCOPE). Through a website, the participants will have a tutorial on stellar spectra and practice classifying. After practice, the participants classify spectra on photographic plates uploaded online from APDA. These classifications will be recorded in a database where the results from many users will be statistically analyzed. Stars with known spectral types will be included to test the reliability of classifications. The process of building the database of stars from APDA, which the citizen scientist will be able to classify, includes: scanning the photographic plates, orienting the plate to correct for the change in right ascension/declination using Aladin, stellar HD catalog identification using Simbad, marking the boundaries for each spectrum, and setting up the image for use on the website. We will describe the details of this process.

  14. 76 FR 64382 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Collection Under Review: Office for Victims of Crime Trafficking Information Management System (TIMS). The... following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and... Trafficking Information Management System (TIMS) Online. [[Page 64383

  15. Online Learning Self-Efficacy in Students with and without Online Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Whitney Alicia; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    2016-01-01

    A need was identified for an instrument to measure online learning self-efficacy, which encompassed the wide variety of tasks required of successful online students. The Online Learning Self-Efficacy Scale (OLSES) was designed to include tasks required of students enrolled in paced online courses at one university. In the present study, the…

  16. Effects of Online Note Taking Formats and Self-Monitoring Prompts on Learning from Online Text: Using Technology to Enhance Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng; Yang, Ya-Shu

    2011-01-01

    This study explored conditions under which note taking methods and self-monitoring prompts are most effective for facilitating information collection and achievement in an online learning environment. In experiment 1 30 students collected notes from a website using an online conventional, outline, or matrix note taking tool. In experiment 2 119…

  17. Government documents and the online catalog.

    PubMed

    Lynch, F H; Lasater, M C

    1990-01-01

    Prior to planning for implementing the NOTIS system, the Vanderbilt Medical Center Library had not fully cataloged its government publications, and records for these materials were not in machine-readable format. A decision was made that patrons should need to look in only one place for all library materials, including the Health and Human Services Department publications received each year from the central library's Government Documents Unit. Beginning in 1985, these publications were added to the library's database, and the entire 7,200-piece collection is now in the online catalog. Working with these publications has taught the library much about the advantages and disadvantages of cataloging government documents in an online environment. It was found that OCLC cataloging copy is eventually available for most titles, although only about 10% of the records have MeSH headings. Staff time is the major expenditure; problems are caused by documents' irregular nature, frequent format changes, and difficult authority work. Since their addition to the online catalog, documents are used more and the library has better control.

  18. Government documents and the online catalog.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, F H; Lasater, M C

    1990-01-01

    Prior to planning for implementing the NOTIS system, the Vanderbilt Medical Center Library had not fully cataloged its government publications, and records for these materials were not in machine-readable format. A decision was made that patrons should need to look in only one place for all library materials, including the Health and Human Services Department publications received each year from the central library's Government Documents Unit. Beginning in 1985, these publications were added to the library's database, and the entire 7,200-piece collection is now in the online catalog. Working with these publications has taught the library much about the advantages and disadvantages of cataloging government documents in an online environment. It was found that OCLC cataloging copy is eventually available for most titles, although only about 10% of the records have MeSH headings. Staff time is the major expenditure; problems are caused by documents' irregular nature, frequent format changes, and difficult authority work. Since their addition to the online catalog, documents are used more and the library has better control. PMID:2295010

  19. Online Instructors as Thinking Advisors: A Model for Online Learner Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedetti, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the characteristics and challenges of online instruction and presents a model for improving learner adaptation in an online classroom. Instruction in an online classroom presents many challenges, including learner individualization. Individual differences in learning styles and preferences are often not considered in the…

  20. 76 FR 50498 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Pharmacies DEA Forms 224, 224a, 224b, 224c ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review. The...; Affidavit for Chain Renewal; Application for Modification of Registration for Online Pharmacies. (3) Agency... substances must register with the DEA under the Controlled Substances Act. Pharmacies wishing to be online...

  1. 76 FR 64380 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Pharmacies, DEA Forms 224, 224a, 224b, 224c ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review. The...; Affidavit for Chain Renewal; Application for Modification of Registration for Online Pharmacies. (3) Agency... register with the DEA under the Controlled Substances Act. Pharmacies wishing to be online pharmacies must...

  2. 77 FR 47095 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Pharmacies DEA Forms 224, 224a, 224b, 224c ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review. The...; Affidavit for Chain Renewal; Application for Modification of Registration for Online Pharmacies. (3) Agency... register with the DEA under the Controlled Substances Act. Pharmacies wishing to be online pharmacies must...

  3. Can an online clinical data management service help in improving data collection and data quality in a developing country setting?

    PubMed

    Wildeman, Maarten A; Zandbergen, Jeroen; Vincent, Andrew; Herdini, Camelia; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Fles, Renske; Dalesio, Otilia; van der Donk, Emile; Tan, I Bing

    2011-08-08

    Data collection by electronic medical record (EMR) systems have been proven to be helpful in data collection for scientific research and in improving healthcare. For a multi-centre trial in Indonesia and the Netherlands a web based system was selected to enable all participating centres to easily access data. This study assesses whether the introduction of a clinical trial data management service (CTDMS) composed of electronic case report forms (eCRF) can result in effective data collection and treatment monitoring. Data items entered were checked for inconsistencies automatically when submitted online. The data were divided into primary and secondary data items. We analysed both the total number of errors and the change in error rate, for both primary and secondary items, over the first five month of the trial. In the first five months 51 patients were entered. The primary data error rate was 1.6%, whilst that for secondary data was 2.7% against acceptable error rates for analysis of 1% and 2.5% respectively. The presented analysis shows that after five months since the introduction of the CTDMS the primary and secondary data error rates reflect acceptable levels of data quality. Furthermore, these error rates were decreasing over time. The digital nature of the CTDMS, as well as the online availability of that data, gives fast and easy insight in adherence to treatment protocols. As such, the CTDMS can serve as a tool to train and educate medical doctors and can improve treatment protocols.

  4. Characterizing popularity dynamics of online videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Liao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Online popularity has a major impact on videos, music, news and other contexts in online systems. Characterizing online popularity dynamics is nature to explain the observed properties in terms of the already acquired popularity of each individual. In this paper, we provide a quantitative, large scale, temporal analysis of the popularity dynamics in two online video-provided websites, namely MovieLens and Netflix. The two collected data sets contain over 100 million records and even span a decade. We characterize that the popularity dynamics of online videos evolve over time, and find that the dynamics of the online video popularity can be characterized by the burst behaviors, typically occurring in the early life span of a video, and later restricting to the classic preferential popularity increase mechanism.

  5. Systematic review with meta-analysis: online psychological interventions for mental and physical health outcomes in gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, I; Hewitt, C; Bell, K; Phillips, A; Mikocka-Walus, A

    2018-06-14

    Online psychotherapy has been successfully used as supportive treatment in many chronic illnesses. However, there is a lack of evidence on its role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. To examine whether online psychological interventions improve mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. We searched CINAHL Plus, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Management Information Consortium, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, a specialised register of the IBD/FBD Cochrane Group, MEDLINE (PubMed) WHO International Clinical Trial Registry, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of all papers included in the review. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess internal validity. Where possible, data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 11 publications (encompassing nine studies) meeting inclusion criteria. One study had a high risk of selection bias (allocation concealment), all studies had a high risk of performance and detection bias. Eight studies were included in the meta-analyses (6 on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] and two on inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). Online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was shown to significantly improve gastrointestinal symptom-specific anxiety (MD: -8.51, 95% CI -12.99 to -4.04, P = 0.0002) and lessen symptom-induced disability (MD: -2.78, 95% CI -5.43 to -0.12, P = 0.04) in IBS post intervention. There was no significant effect of online CBT on any other outcomes in IBS. No significant effect of online psychotherapy was demonstrated in IBD. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of online CBT to manage mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Library Online Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folda, Linda; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Issues related to library online systems are discussed in six articles. Topics covered include staff education through vendor demonstrations, evaluation of online public access catalogs, the impact of integrated online systems on cataloging operations, the merits of smart and dumb barcodes, and points to consider in planning for the next online…

  7. A Case Study of Online Degree Course Design and Performance of Online Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demand of learners in online higher education courses currently presents a challenge to online course designs in increasing the performance of learners. The online course design process involves many challenges, including a new delivery system, understanding online drivers for success, and an emerging profession of online…

  8. Confused about Fusion? Weed Your Science Collection with a Pro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Charli

    1998-01-01

    Provides guidelines on weeding science collections in junior high/high school libraries. Highlights include checking copyright dates, online sources, 13 science subject areas that deserve special consideration (plate tectonics, fission, fusion, radioactive dating, weather/climate, astronomy/space science, elements, integrated science,…

  9. Association between volume and momentum of online searches and real-world collective unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Johnson, Daniela; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Neil F.

    A fundamental idea from physics is that macroscopic transitions can occur as a result of an escalation in the correlated activity of a many-body system's constituent particles. Here we apply this idea in an interdisciplinary setting, whereby the particles are individuals, their correlated activity involves online search activity surrounding the topics of social unrest, and the macroscopic phenomenon being measured are real-world protests. Our empirical study covers countries in Latin America during 2011-2014 using datasets assembled from multiple sources by subject matter experts. We find specifically that the volume and momentum of searches on Google Trends surrounding mass protest language, can detect - and may even pre-empt - the macroscopic on-street activity. Not only can this simple open-source solution prove an invaluable aid for monitoring civil order, our study serves to strengthen the increasing literature in the physics community aimed at understanding the collective dynamics of interacting populations of living objects across the life sciences.

  10. Technical College Instructors' Perceptions of the Impact of Online Readiness and of Student Support Services on Student Success in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how Wisconsin Technical College (WTCS) administrators and online instructors perceive the impact of online learner readiness and student support services to be on student success in online courses. The study used a modified three-round Delphi technique to determine to collect data. The results indicated…

  11. The Online Underworld.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrogan, Len

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some of the misuses of telecommunicating using school computers, including online piracy, hacking, phreaking, online crime, and destruction boards. Suggests ways that schools can deal with these problems. (TW)

  12. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  13. Teaching about the Earth Online: Faculty-Sourced Guidance from InTeGrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Bralower, T. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Leinbach, A.

    2017-12-01

    Teaching online is growing in acceptance within the higher education community and its accessibility creates an opportunity to reach students from diverse backgrounds with geoscience content. There is a need to develop best practices for teaching about Earth online as new technologies, pedagogical approaches, and teaching materials that incorporate societal issues and data emerge. In response to this need, the InTeGrate: Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future project convened a workshop of interdisciplinary faculty who teach about the Earth online, in a variety of contexts, to develop consensus best-practices, collect online resources, and develop teaching materials to share with the rest of the community. Workshop participants generated five broad categories of guidance for faculty teaching online: develop communication and a sense of community among class participants, stimulate student engagement, develop activity frameworks that scale with class size, include information literacy in the curriculum explicitly, and employ effective management and assessment techniques. Many of the best practices highlighted by the group are not unique to teaching online, but teaching online rather than face-to-face affects how they are or can be implemented. The suite of webpages developed from this work showcase specific strategies in each area, underpinned by examples drawn from the experiences of the participants. This resource can provide a wealth of advice for faculty seeking help for teaching online. Faculty can also provide feedback on the strategies and add their own experiences to the collection. Participants also worked together in teams to develop new or revise existing teaching resources to make available via the InTeGrate website. In addition, they shared insights about online resources they use in their teaching and class management and developed plans for an online repository for next-generation, interactive educational materials and tools for creating them

  14. Non-Markovian character in human mobility: Online and offline.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Lu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of human mobility characterizes the trajectories that humans follow during their daily activities and is the foundation of processes from epidemic spreading to traffic prediction and information recommendation. In this paper, we investigate a massive data set of human activity, including both online behavior of browsing websites and offline one of visiting towers based mobile terminations. The non-Markovian character observed from both online and offline cases is suggested by the scaling law in the distribution of dwelling time at individual and collective levels, respectively. Furthermore, we argue that the lower entropy and higher predictability in human mobility for both online and offline cases may originate from this non-Markovian character. However, the distributions of individual entropy and predictability show the different degrees of non-Markovian character between online and offline cases. To account for non-Markovian character in human mobility, we apply a protype model with three basic ingredients, namely, preferential return, inertial effect, and exploration to reproduce the dynamic process of online and offline human mobilities. The simulations show that the model has an ability to obtain characters much closer to empirical observations.

  15. Types of Online Hierarchical Repository Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Azran, Ronit; Hardof-Jaffe, Sharon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an empirical investigation of online hierarchical repositories of items presented to university students in Web-supported course websites, using Web mining methods. To this end, data from 1747 courses were collected, and the use of online repositories of content items in these courses was examined. At a later stage, courses…

  16. 76 FR 61739 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request for Information Collection; Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Collection; Information Collection Plan for Benefits.gov Online; Extension Without Change AGENCY: Office of...-free number) or e-mail to [email protected]gov . Send comments regarding this proposed collection of... Benefits.gov Web site. The Benefits.gov Web site assists citizens by providing information and eligibility...

  17. Belonging Online: Students' Perceptions of the Value and Efficacy of an Online Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Loralee; Reisetter, Marcy

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation of online course designs has changed the learning environments for many students and professors. Recommendations for best practice in online course design frequently include maximizing students' online peer connections, with the intention of building a viable, if virtual, online learning community. However, students' responses to…

  18. The material of practice: the Canadian Nursing History Collection.

    PubMed

    Bates, Christina

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Nursing History Collection is a special holding of over 1500 artifacts at the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the Canadian War Museum. The most significant of its kind, the collection includes uniforms, pins, diaries, instrument kits, and military medals. Researchers and the public will access the collection through an on-line catalogue, a major exhibition, and a book. The material culture of nursing represented by this collection provides nursing historians with a whole new body of evidence for insights into nursing history. The sample of hospital uniforms, from 1900 to the present, for example, raises new and theoretical approaches.

  19. Measuring use patterns of online journals and databases

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Sandra L.; Dorsch, Josephine L.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This research sought to determine use of online biomedical journals and databases and to assess current user characteristics associated with the use of online resources in an academic health sciences center. Setting: The Library of the Health Sciences–Peoria is a regional site of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library with 350 print journals, more than 4,000 online journals, and multiple online databases. Methodology: A survey was designed to assess online journal use, print journal use, database use, computer literacy levels, and other library user characteristics. A survey was sent through campus mail to all (471) UIC Peoria faculty, residents, and students. Results: Forty-one percent (188) of the surveys were returned. Ninety-eight percent of the students, faculty, and residents reported having convenient access to a computer connected to the Internet. While 53% of the users indicated they searched MEDLINE at least once a week, other databases showed much lower usage. Overall, 71% of respondents indicated a preference for online over print journals when possible. Conclusions: Users prefer online resources to print, and many choose to access these online resources remotely. Convenience and full-text availability appear to play roles in selecting online resources. The findings of this study suggest that databases without links to full text and online journal collections without links from bibliographic databases will have lower use. These findings have implications for collection development, promotion of library resources, and end-user training. PMID:12883574

  20. Massive Open Online Course Completion Rates Revisited: Assessment, Length and Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Katy

    2015-01-01

    This analysis is based upon enrolment and completion data collected for a total of 221 Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). It extends previously reported work (Jordan, 2014) with an expanded dataset; the original work is extended to include a multiple regression analysis of factors that affect completion rates and analysis of attrition rates…

  1. Web-accessible molecular modeling with Rosetta: The Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE).

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Lyskov, Sergey; Das, Rhiju; Meiler, Jens; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2018-01-01

    The Rosetta molecular modeling software package provides a large number of experimentally validated tools for modeling and designing proteins, nucleic acids, and other biopolymers, with new protocols being added continually. While freely available to academic users, external usage is limited by the need for expertise in the Unix command line environment. To make Rosetta protocols available to a wider audience, we previously created a web server called Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE), which provides a common environment for hosting web-accessible Rosetta protocols. Here we describe a simplification of the ROSIE protocol specification format, one that permits easier implementation of Rosetta protocols. Whereas the previous format required creating multiple separate files in different locations, the new format allows specification of the protocol in a single file. This new, simplified protocol specification has more than doubled the number of Rosetta protocols available under ROSIE. These new applications include pK a determination, lipid accessibility calculation, ribonucleic acid redesign, protein-protein docking, protein-small molecule docking, symmetric docking, antibody docking, cyclic toxin docking, critical binding peptide determination, and mapping small molecule binding sites. ROSIE is freely available to academic users at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  2. Guide to the design and application of online questionnaire surveys.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pramod R; Waithaka, Elizabeth; Paudyal, Anjana; Simkhada, Padam; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2016-12-01

    Collecting research data through traditional approaches (face-to-face, postal or telephone survey) can be costly and time consuming. The emerging data collection approach based on internet/e-based technologies (e.g. online platforms and email), is a relatively cost effective survey alternative. These novel data collection strategies can collect large amounts of data from participants in a short time frame. Similarly, they also seem to be feasible and effective in collecting data on sensitive issues or with samples they are generally hard to reach, for example, men who have sex with men (MSM) or migrants. As a significant proportion of the population currently in the world are digitally connected, the shift from postal (paper-pencil) or telephone towards online survey use in research is in the interests of researchers in academia as well as in the commercial world. However, compared to designing and executing paper version of the questionnaire, there is limited literature to help a starting researcher with the design and a use of online questionnaires. This short paper highlights issues around: a) methodological aspect of online questionnaire survey; b) online survey planning and management; and c) ethical concerns that may arise while using this option. We believe that this paper will be useful for researchers who want to gain knowledge or apply this approach in their research.

  3. Examining the role of technology in learning: an evaluation of online clinical conferencing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cathy; Taft, Lois B; Thelen, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of instructional technology requires faculty openness to new teaching and learning situations. This study compared two instructional methods of conducting clinical conferences for baccalaureate nursing students: online versus face-to-face. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 77 students in 10 clinical sections of a senior capstone nursing course. Mean scores for all 11 items on the clinical evaluation tool were higher for students who had conferences online than those in face-to-face conferences. Four of the 11 items were statistically significant, reflecting greater participation and convenience for online participants. Online students also reported greater opportunities to reflect on ethical issues. There were no significant differences in quiz scores between the groups when students were tested on content covered in their clinical conferences. Students identified advantages including opportunities for flexibility and equal participation. Barriers included unfamiliarity with technology and lack of face-to-face-contact. The findings suggest that students can successfully achieve the intended purpose of clinical conferences through an online instructional technique. Ongoing research in the use of technology is necessary to meet student needs, enhance student learning, and support evidence-based practice in nursing education.

  4. Performance optimization of an online retailer by a unique online resilience engineering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadeh, A.; Salehi, V.; Salehi, R.; Hassani, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Online shopping has become more attractive and competitive in electronic markets. Resilience engineering (RE) can help such systems divert to the normal state in case of encountering unexpected events. This study presents a unique online resilience engineering (ORE) approach for online shopping systems and customer service performance. Moreover, this study presents a new ORE algorithm for the performance optimisation of an actual online shopping system. The data are collected by standard questionnaires from both expert employees and customers. The problem is then formulated mathematically using data envelopment analysis (DEA). The results show that the design process which is based on ORE is more efficient than the conventional design approach. Moreover, on-time delivery is the most important factor from the personnel's perspective. In addition, according to customers' view, trust, security and good quality assurance are the most effective factors during transactions. This is the first study that introduces ORE for electronic markets. Second, it investigates impact of RE on online shopping through DEA and statistical methods. Third, a practical approach is employed in this study and it may be used for similar online shops. Fourth, the results are verified and validated through complete sensitivity analysis.

  5. Transforming Monograph Collections with a Model of Collections as a Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Financial pressures, changes in scholarly communications, the rise of online content, and the ability to easily share materials have provided libraries the opportunity to rethink their collections practices. This article provides an overview of these changes and outlines a framework for viewing collections as a service. It describes how libraries…

  6. Factors Influencing Consumers Intention for Online Grocery Shopping - A Proposed Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, SFF; Thoo, AC; Tan, LC; Muharam, FM; Talib, NA

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, Internet is one of the most popular platforms for people to do online shopping including grocery items. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the determinants of customer intentions for online grocery shopping. Till now, there is no consensus on what are the factors that actually influencing people to shop grocery items through Internet. This paper aims to explore the factors such as social influences, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivations, perceived risk and perceived trust that influence the consumer intention to purchase grocery online. Questionnaires will be the main instrument of the study and they will be distributed to target respondents using Internet survey. Respondents of the study will be selected using convenience sampling. After data collection, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) will be employed for data analysis. Overall, the result of the study is important to retailers to identify the important factors in increasing their customers’ intention to purchase grocery online.

  7. Letting Go: How One Librarian Weeded a Children's Magazine Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromann, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Describes the weeding process for children's magazines in a public library. Highlights include circulation statistics; cost effectiveness; online availability; shelving magazines by subject to try and increase their use; and a chart that lists reasons to keep and reasons to cancel subscriptions when weeding a periodical collection. (LRW)

  8. Teaching Astronomy Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnofsky, Mary L.; Bobrowsky, Matthew

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the practical, pedagogical, and philosophical considerations in designing a Web-based astronomy course, and to demonstrate the educational benefits that such online courses can afford students. Because online students need to take more responsibility for their learning, faculty must make course expectations extremely clear. Online education allows for increased student participation and equal access to college by such groups as the military, the handicapped, full-time employees, and rural and senior citizens. Teaching the sciences online--especially astronomy--gives students more time to think critically about new information. This article also includes tools, checklists, and resources helpful for introducing faculty to online course development in astronomy.

  9. Lessons Learned Designing and Using an Online Discussion Forum for Care Coordinators in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Jeanne M; Friedman, Asia; Shaw, Eric K; Howard, Jenna; Cohen, Deborah J; Shahidi, Laleh

    2015-10-18

    While an increasing number of researchers are using online discussion forums for qualitative research, few authors have documented their experiences and lessons learned to demonstrate this method's viability and validity in health services research. We comprehensively describe our experiences, from start to finish, of designing and using an asynchronous online discussion forum for collecting and analyzing information elicited from care coordinators in Patient-Centered Medical Homes across the United States. Our lessons learned from each phase, including planning, designing, implementing, using, and ending this private online discussion forum, provide some recommendations for other health services researchers considering this method. An asynchronous online discussion forum is a feasible, efficient, and effective method to conduct a qualitative study, particularly when subjects are health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Lessons Learned Designing and Using an Online Discussion Forum for Care Coordinators in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Jeanne M.; Friedman, Asia; Shaw, Eric K.; Howard, Jenna; Cohen, Deborah J.; Shahidi, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    While an increasing number of researchers are using online discussion forums for qualitative research, few authors have documented their experiences and lessons learned to demonstrate this method’s viability and validity in health services research. We comprehensively describe our experiences, from start to finish, of designing and using an asynchronous online discussion forum for collecting and analyzing information elicited from care coordinators in Patient-Centered Medical Homes across the United States. Our lessons learned from each phase, including planning, designing, implementing, using, and ending this private online discussion forum, provide some recommendations for other health services researchers considering this method. An asynchronous online discussion forum is a feasible, efficient, and effective method to conduct a qualitative study, particularly when subjects are health professionals. PMID:26481942

  11. 75 FR 29553 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... through 2013. Additionally, data will be collected from viewers of the State videos using an online survey... will be collected from those who voluntarily decide to complete a short survey after seeing the video... descriptive picture of the initiative and indicate how the videos have been received, as well as some factors...

  12. Purchase Recommendations for Globalizing Online Collections at Community College Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Annie Kadala

    2016-01-01

    Focused on community colleges in North Carolina participating in the Scholars of Global Distinction initiative, the goal of this article is to assist librarians in their efforts to thoughtfully increase global and area studies online resources available at their libraries. Through this article, the author hopes to increase global library resources…

  13. Online Activities and Writing Practices of Urban Malaysian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kok Eng; Ng, Melissa L. Y.; Saw, Kim Guan

    2010-01-01

    Among a number of urban adolescents in Malaysia, going online is a much valued practice. They are regularly drawn to the Internet to engage in activities across school, nonschool, mainstream and alternative domains. The aim of this study is to know more about what these adolescents do online. Data on the online activities were collected from 535…

  14. Advanced Chemistry Collection, 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Software requirements are given in Table 3. Some programs have additional special requirements. Please see the individual program abstracts at JCE Online or the documentation included on the CD-ROM for more specific information. Table 3. General software requirements for the Advanced Chemistry Collection.

    ComputerSystemOther Software(Required by one or more programs)
    Mac OS compatibleSystem 7.6.1 or higherAcrobat Reader (included)Mathcad; Mathematica;MacMolecule2; QuickTime 4; HyperCard Player
    Windows CompatibleWindows 2000, 98, 95, NT 4Acrobat Reader (included)Mathcad; Mathematica;PCMolecule2; QuickTime 4;HyperChem; Excel

    Literature Cited

    1. General Chemistry Collection, 5th ed.; J. Chem. Educ. Software, 2001, SP16.
    2. Advanced Chemistry Collection; J. Chem. Educ. Software, 2001, SP28.

  15. 76 FR 50499 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Office for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Information Management System (TIMS) ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review. The... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in...: Trafficking Information Management System (TIMS) Online. (3) The Agency form number, if any, and the...

  16. Scaffolding Online Historical Inquiry Tasks: A Case Study of Two Secondary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Dong Dong; Lim, Cher Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the different dimensions of scaffolding for online historical inquiry based on a case study of two secondary-two history classes from a neighborhood school in Singapore. The data collected for the study include video and screen captures, focus group interview, digital artifacts, and students' survey. Using sample transcripts…

  17. Exploring Factors Related to Completion of an Online Undergraduate-Level Introductory Statistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Whitney Alicia; Johnson, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Data were collected from 353 online undergraduate introductory statistics students at the beginning of a semester using the Goals and Outcomes Associated with Learning Statistics (GOALS) instrument and an abbreviated form of the Statistics Anxiety Rating Scale (STARS). Data included a survey of expected grade, expected time commitment, and the…

  18. Online access to doctors' notes: patient concerns about privacy.

    PubMed

    Vodicka, Elisabeth; Mejilla, Roanne; Leveille, Suzanne G; Ralston, James D; Darer, Jonathan D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2013-09-26

    Offering patients online access to medical records, including doctors' visit notes, holds considerable potential to improve care. However, patients may worry about loss of privacy when accessing personal health information through Internet-based patient portals. The OpenNotes study provided patients at three US health care institutions with online access to their primary care doctors' notes and then collected survey data about their experiences, including their concerns about privacy before and after participation in the intervention. To identify patients' attitudes toward privacy when given electronic access to their medical records, including visit notes. The design used a nested cohort study of patients surveyed at baseline and after a 1-year period during which they were invited to read their visit notes through secure patient portals. Participants consisted of 3874 primary care patients from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA), Geisinger Health System (Danville, PA), and Harborview Medical Center (Seattle, WA) who completed surveys before and after the OpenNotes intervention. The measures were patient-reported levels of concern regarding privacy associated with online access to visit notes. 32.91% of patients (1275/3874 respondents) reported concerns about privacy at baseline versus 36.63% (1419/3874 respondents) post-intervention. Baseline concerns were associated with non-white race/ethnicity and lower confidence in communicating with doctors, but were not associated with choosing to read notes or desire for continued online access post-intervention (nearly all patients with notes available chose to read them and wanted continued access). While the level of concern among most participants did not change during the intervention, 15.54% (602/3874 respondents, excluding participants who responded "don't know") reported more concern post-intervention, and 12.73% (493/3874 respondents, excluding participants who responded "don't know") reported less

  19. Computational Models of Consumer Confidence from Large-Scale Online Attention Data: Crowd-Sourcing Econometrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting. PMID:25826692

  20. Computational models of consumer confidence from large-scale online attention data: crowd-sourcing econometrics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xianlei; Bollen, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting.

  1. In-Service Physical Educators' Experiences of Online Adapted Physical Education Endorsement Courses.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Haegele, Justin A; Foot, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in-service physical education (PE) teachers' experiences during online adapted physical education (APE) graduate courses. Based on andragogy theory (adult learning theory) we employed a descriptive qualitative methodology using an explanatory case study design. The participants (6 female and 3 male) were in-service PE teachers enrolled in an online graduate APE endorsement program. Data collection included journal reflection reports and face-to-face interviews. A constant comparative method was used to interpret the data. Three interrelated themes emerged from the participants' narratives. The first theme, instructor communication, exposes the advantages and disadvantages the participants perceived regarding communication while enrolled in the online APE graduate courses. The second theme, bulletin board discussion experiences, described participants' perceptions of the use of the bulletin board discussion forum. Lastly, the final theme, assessment experiences, described how the participants learned knowledge and skills through online courses related to assessment and evaluation.

  2. Dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and Online Gaming Addiction in Adolescence: The Indirect Effects of Two Facets of Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Che, Dexin; Hu, Jianping; Zhen, Shuangju; Yu, Chengfu; Li, Bin; Chang, Xi; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This study tested a parallel two-mediator model in which the relationship between dimensions of emotional intelligence and online gaming addiction are mediated by perceived helplessness and perceived self-efficacy, respectively. The sample included 931 male adolescents (mean age = 16.18 years, SD = 0.95) from southern China. Data on emotional intelligence (four dimensions, including self-management of emotion, social skills, empathy and utilization of emotions), perceived stress (two facets, including perceived self-efficacy and perceived helplessness) and online gaming addiction were collected, and bootstrap methods were used to test this parallel two-mediator model. Our findings revealed that perceived self-efficacy mediated the relationship between three dimensions of emotional intelligence (i.e., self-management, social skills, and empathy) and online gaming addiction, and perceived helplessness mediated the relationship between two dimensions of emotional intelligence (i.e., self-management and emotion utilization) and online gaming addiction. These findings underscore the importance of separating the four dimensions of emotional intelligence and two facets of perceived stress to understand the complex relationship between these factors and online gaming addiction. PMID:28751876

  3. Dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and Online Gaming Addiction in Adolescence: The Indirect Effects of Two Facets of Perceived Stress.

    PubMed

    Che, Dexin; Hu, Jianping; Zhen, Shuangju; Yu, Chengfu; Li, Bin; Chang, Xi; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This study tested a parallel two-mediator model in which the relationship between dimensions of emotional intelligence and online gaming addiction are mediated by perceived helplessness and perceived self-efficacy, respectively. The sample included 931 male adolescents (mean age = 16.18 years, SD = 0.95) from southern China. Data on emotional intelligence (four dimensions, including self-management of emotion, social skills, empathy and utilization of emotions), perceived stress (two facets, including perceived self-efficacy and perceived helplessness) and online gaming addiction were collected, and bootstrap methods were used to test this parallel two-mediator model. Our findings revealed that perceived self-efficacy mediated the relationship between three dimensions of emotional intelligence (i.e., self-management, social skills, and empathy) and online gaming addiction, and perceived helplessness mediated the relationship between two dimensions of emotional intelligence (i.e., self-management and emotion utilization) and online gaming addiction. These findings underscore the importance of separating the four dimensions of emotional intelligence and two facets of perceived stress to understand the complex relationship between these factors and online gaming addiction.

  4. Online Self-Organizing Social Systems: The Decentralized Future of Online Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David A.; Edwards, Erin K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an online self-organizing social system (OSOSS) which allows large numbers of individuals to self-organize in a highly decentralized manner to solve problems and accomplish other goals. Topics include scalability and bandwidth in online learning; self-organization; learning objects; instructional design underlying OSOSS, including…

  5. Online versus Paper Evaluations: Differences in Both Quantitative and Qualitative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, William B.; Civitano, Adele; Steiner-Grossman, Penny

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine if differences exist in the quantitative and qualitative data collected with paper and online versions of a medical school clerkship evaluation form. Data from six-and-a-half years of clerkship evaluations were used, some collected before and some after the conversion from a paper to an online evaluation system. The…

  6. Community Management That Works: How to Build and Sustain a Thriving Online Health Community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals, patients, caregivers, family, friends, and other supporters are increasingly joining online health communities to share information and find support. But social Web (Web 2.0) technology alone does not create a successful online community. Building and sustaining a successful community requires an enabler and strategic community management. Community management is more than moderation. The developmental life cycle of a community has four stages: inception, establishment, maturity, and mitosis. Each stage presents distinct characteristics and management needs. This paper describes the community management strategies, resources, and expertise needed to build and maintain a thriving online health community; introduces some of the challenges; and provides a guide for health organizations considering this undertaking. The paper draws on insights from an ongoing study and observation of online communities as well as experience managing and consulting a variety of online health communities. Discussion includes effective community building practices relevant to each stage, such as outreach and relationship building, data collection, content creation, and other proven techniques that ensure the survival and steady growth of an online health community. PMID:23759312

  7. Primal-dual techniques for online algorithms and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaghat, Vahid

    techniques for solving a fundamental linear optimization problem, namely, the stochastic generalized assignment problem (GAP). This packing problem generalizes various problems such as online matching, ad allocation, bin packing, etc. We furthermore show applications of such results in the mechanism design by introducing Prophet Secretary, a novel Bayesian model for online auctions. In the second part of the thesis, we focus on the covering problems. We develop the framework of "Disk Painting" for a general class of network design problems that can be characterized by proper functions. This class generalizes the node-weighted and edge-weighted variants of several well-known Steiner connectivity problems. We furthermore design a generic technique for solving the prize-collecting variants of these problems when there exists a dual analysis for the non-prize-collecting counterparts. Hence, we solve the online prize-collecting variants of several network design problems for the first time. Finally we focus on designing techniques for online problems with mixed packing/covering constraints. We initiate the study of degree-bounded graph optimization problems in the online setting by designing an online algorithm with a tight competitive ratio for the degree-bounded Steiner forest problem. We hope these techniques establishes a starting point for the analysis of the important class of online degree-bounded optimization on graphs.

  8. New taxonomy and old collections: integrating DNA barcoding into the collection curation process.

    PubMed

    Puillandre, N; Bouchet, P; Boisselier-Dubayle, M-C; Brisset, J; Buge, B; Castelin, M; Chagnoux, S; Christophe, T; Corbari, L; Lambourdière, J; Lozouet, P; Marani, G; Rivasseau, A; Silva, N; Terryn, Y; Tillier, S; Utge, J; Samadi, S

    2012-05-01

    Because they house large biodiversity collections and are also research centres with sequencing facilities, natural history museums are well placed to develop DNA barcoding best practices. The main difficulty is generally the vouchering system: it must ensure that all data produced remain attached to the corresponding specimen, from the field to publication in articles and online databases. The Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris is one of the leading laboratories in the Marine Barcode of Life (MarBOL) project, which was used as a pilot programme to include barcode collections for marine molluscs and crustaceans. The system is based on two relational databases. The first one classically records the data (locality and identification) attached to the specimens. In the second one, tissue-clippings, DNA extractions (both preserved in 2D barcode tubes) and PCR data (including primers) are linked to the corresponding specimen. All the steps of the process [sampling event, specimen identification, molecular processing, data submission to Barcode Of Life Database (BOLD) and GenBank] are thus linked together. Furthermore, we have developed several web-based tools to automatically upload data into the system, control the quality of the sequences produced and facilitate the submission to online databases. This work is the result of a joint effort from several teams in the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN), but also from a collaborative network of taxonomists and molecular systematists outside the museum, resulting in the vouchering so far of ∼41,000 sequences and the production of ∼11,000 COI sequences. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. College Students' Choice Modeling of Taking On-Line International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    To understand students' choice behavior of taking on-line international business courses, a survey study is conducted to collect information regarding students' actual choices of taking on-line courses and potential factors that may have impacts on students' choices of online learning. Potential factors such as enrollment status, demographic…

  10. Adolescent online cyberbullying in Greece: the impact of parental online security practices, bonding, and online impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    Floros, Georgios D; Siomos, Konstantinos E; Fisoun, Virginia; Dafouli, Evaggelia; Geroukalis, Dimitrios

    2013-06-01

    The introduction of new technological media worldwide has had a number of unfortunate side effects for some adolescents, including cases of bullying others through the new media (cyberbullying) and over-involvement to the point of addiction. We examine the epidemiology of cyberbullying in a Greek setting, compare it with earlier data, determine the impact of any related psychosocial factors, and propose measures to combat the phenomenon. A cross-sectional study of the entire adolescent high-school student population of the island of Kos examined the relationship between their experiences of Internet cyberbullying and respective parental characteristics, including aspects of psychological bonding and online security measures. The sample consisted of 2017 students (51.8% boys, 48.2% girls). Comparisons are made with results obtained from an earlier survey in the same setting, 2 years earlier. There was a significant rise in reported experiences of Internet cyberbullying over the 2-year period. Security practices exercised by parents had a protective role with regards to whether a child had been cyberbullied, yet failed to prevent the perpetration of online victimization. A regression model indicated that impulsive use of the Internet and related online activities were predictive of whether an adolescent victimized others online. Cyberbullying frequency with regards to both victims and victimizers was high and associated with online impulsiveness, pointing to the possible existence of some commonalities. Further research is necessary to ascertain common underlying psychological factors and neurobiology. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  11. Establishing a Link Between Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Online Pharmacies: Analysis of Twitter Data.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Takeo; Mackey, Tim Ken; Cuomo, Raphael

    2015-12-16

    Youth and adolescent non-medical use of prescription medications (NUPM) has become a national epidemic. However, little is known about the association between promotion of NUPM behavior and access via the popular social media microblogging site, Twitter, which is currently used by a third of all teens. In order to better assess NUPM behavior online, this study conducts surveillance and analysis of Twitter data to characterize the frequency of NUPM-related tweets and also identifies illegal access to drugs of abuse via online pharmacies. Tweets were collected over a 2-week period from April 1-14, 2015, by applying NUPM keyword filters for both generic/chemical and street names associated with drugs of abuse using the Twitter public streaming application programming interface. Tweets were then analyzed for relevance to NUPM and whether they promoted illegal online access to prescription drugs using a protocol of content coding and supervised machine learning. A total of 2,417,662 tweets were collected and analyzed for this study. Tweets filtered for generic drugs names comprised 232,108 tweets, including 22,174 unique associated uniform resource locators (URLs), and 2,185,554 tweets (376,304 unique URLs) filtered for street names. Applying an iterative process of manual content coding and supervised machine learning, 81.72% of the generic and 12.28% of the street NUPM datasets were predicted as having content relevant to NUPM respectively. By examining hyperlinks associated with NUPM relevant content for the generic Twitter dataset, we discovered that 75.72% of the tweets with URLs included a hyperlink to an online marketing affiliate that directly linked to an illicit online pharmacy advertising the sale of Valium without a prescription. This study examined the association between Twitter content, NUPM behavior promotion, and online access to drugs using a broad set of prescription drug keywords. Initial results are concerning, as our study found over 45,000 tweets

  12. Establishing a Link Between Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Online Pharmacies: Analysis of Twitter Data

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Background Youth and adolescent non-medical use of prescription medications (NUPM) has become a national epidemic. However, little is known about the association between promotion of NUPM behavior and access via the popular social media microblogging site, Twitter, which is currently used by a third of all teens. Objective In order to better assess NUPM behavior online, this study conducts surveillance and analysis of Twitter data to characterize the frequency of NUPM-related tweets and also identifies illegal access to drugs of abuse via online pharmacies. Methods Tweets were collected over a 2-week period from April 1-14, 2015, by applying NUPM keyword filters for both generic/chemical and street names associated with drugs of abuse using the Twitter public streaming application programming interface. Tweets were then analyzed for relevance to NUPM and whether they promoted illegal online access to prescription drugs using a protocol of content coding and supervised machine learning. Results A total of 2,417,662 tweets were collected and analyzed for this study. Tweets filtered for generic drugs names comprised 232,108 tweets, including 22,174 unique associated uniform resource locators (URLs), and 2,185,554 tweets (376,304 unique URLs) filtered for street names. Applying an iterative process of manual content coding and supervised machine learning, 81.72% of the generic and 12.28% of the street NUPM datasets were predicted as having content relevant to NUPM respectively. By examining hyperlinks associated with NUPM relevant content for the generic Twitter dataset, we discovered that 75.72% of the tweets with URLs included a hyperlink to an online marketing affiliate that directly linked to an illicit online pharmacy advertising the sale of Valium without a prescription. Conclusions This study examined the association between Twitter content, NUPM behavior promotion, and online access to drugs using a broad set of prescription drug keywords. Initial results are

  13. 75 FR 82416 - Proposed Information Collection Renewals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...--Online Registration Form. OMB Control Number: 0420-0541. Type of Review: Regular--extension, without... and Budget (OMB) review; comment request. SUMMARY: The Peace Corps has submitted the following three... of three information collections: World Wise Schools Conference Online Registration Form (OMB 0420...

  14. Avoiding Pitfalls and Realising Opportunities: Reflecting on Issues of Sampling and Recruitment for Online Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Boydell, Nicola; Fergie, Gillian; McDaid, Lisa; Hilton, Shona

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prominence of the Internet in everyday life has prompted methodological innovations in qualitative research, particularly the adaptation of established methods of data collection for use online. The alternative online context brings with it both opportunities and challenges. To date the literature on online focus groups has focused mainly on the suitability of the method for qualitative data collection, and the development of approaches to facilitation that maximise interaction. By reflecting on our experiences of designing and attempting to recruit participants to online focus groups for two exploratory research projects, we aim to contribute some novel reflections around the less articulated issues of sampling and recruitment for online focus groups. In particular, we highlight potentially problematic issues around offline recruitment for an online method of data collection; the potential of using social media for recruitment; and the uncertainties around offering incentives in online recruitment, issues which have received little attention in the growing literature around online focus groups. More broadly, we recommend continued examination of online social practices and the social media environment to develop appropriate and timely online recruitment strategies and suggest further areas for future research and innovation. PMID:28127272

  15. Avoiding Pitfalls and Realising Opportunities: Reflecting on Issues of Sampling and Recruitment for Online Focus Groups.

    PubMed

    Boydell, Nicola; Fergie, Gillian; McDaid, Lisa; Hilton, Shona

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prominence of the Internet in everyday life has prompted methodological innovations in qualitative research, particularly the adaptation of established methods of data collection for use online. The alternative online context brings with it both opportunities and challenges. To date the literature on online focus groups has focused mainly on the suitability of the method for qualitative data collection, and the development of approaches to facilitation that maximise interaction. By reflecting on our experiences of designing and attempting to recruit participants to online focus groups for two exploratory research projects, we aim to contribute some novel reflections around the less articulated issues of sampling and recruitment for online focus groups. In particular, we highlight potentially problematic issues around offline recruitment for an online method of data collection; the potential of using social media for recruitment; and the uncertainties around offering incentives in online recruitment, issues which have received little attention in the growing literature around online focus groups. More broadly, we recommend continued examination of online social practices and the social media environment to develop appropriate and timely online recruitment strategies and suggest further areas for future research and innovation.

  16. Religion and spirituality in online suicide bereavement: an analysis of online memorials.

    PubMed

    Krysinska, Karolina; Andriessen, Karl; Corveleyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Religion and spirituality can be valuable resources in coping with bereavement. There is a paucity of studies focusing specifically on their role in suicide bereavement, although there are indications that religion/spirituality can be helpful for suicide survivors. The study explores the role of religion and/or spirituality in suicide bereavement by analyzing this theme in online memorials dedicated to suicide victims. We randomly selected 250 memorials in two online cemeteries: Faces of Suicide and Gone too Soon. Interpretative and deductive thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the collected material, including the theme of religion/spirituality. References to religion/spirituality were found in 14% of memorials. These memorials were written by family members, friends, and (ex-)partners of the deceased and were dedicated mostly to young adult males. Religion/spirituality was mentioned in the context of God's will, peace wish, continuation of the spirit, afterlife, reunion, gratitude, description of the deceased, and grief reactions of suicide survivors. Some suicide survivors spontaneously mention the role of religious/spiritual beliefs in coping with their loss. Future studies could explore which subgroups of the bereaved are likely to turn to these resources, and whether they can contribute to the well-being of the suicide survivors.

  17. The Effects of Online Teaching Experience and Institution Type on Faculty Perceptions of Teaching Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windes, Deborah L.; Lesht, Faye L.

    2014-01-01

    In light of the recent growth of online education and its disruptive impact on higher education, this study compared faculty attitudes toward teaching online across institution type, including community colleges and four-year public and private institutions, as well as across faculty with and without online teaching experience. While the data…

  18. Using online social media for recruitment of human immunodeficiency virus-positive participants: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Patrick; Bare, Michael G; Johnson, Mallory O; Saberi, Parya

    2014-05-01

    There are many challenges in recruiting and engaging participants when conducting research, especially with HIV-positive individuals. Some of these challenges include geographical barriers, insufficient time and financial resources, and perceived HIV-related stigma. This paper describes the methodology of a recruitment approach that capitalized on existing online social media venues and other Internet resources in an attempt to overcome some of these barriers to research recruitment and retention. From May through August 2013, a campaign approach using a combination of online social media, non-financial incentives, and Web-based survey software was implemented to advertise, recruit, and retain participants, and collect data for a survey study with a limited budget. Approximately US $5,000 was spent with a research staff designated at 20% of full-time effort, yielding 2034 survey clicks, 1404 of which met the inclusion criteria and initiated the survey, for an average cost of US $3.56 per survey initiation. A total of 1221 individuals completed the survey, yielding 86.97% retention. These data indicate that online recruitment is a feasible and efficient tool that can be further enhanced by sophisticated online data collection software and the addition of non-financial incentives.

  19. 76 FR 60004 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Data Collection and Verification for the Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Data Collection and Verification for the Marine Protected Areas Inventory AGENCY... developing a national system of marine protected areas (MPAs). These departments are working closely with... Administration (NOAA) and DOI have created the Marine Protected Areas Inventory, an online spatial database that...

  20. Management and Operations of Online Programs: Ensuring Quality and Accountability. Promising Practices in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

    2009-01-01

    Online learning is growing rapidly as states and districts are creating new online schools, and existing programs are adding new courses and students. The growth reflects the spreading understanding that online courses and programs can serve a wide variety of students and needs. These include: (1) Creating opportunities for small and rural school…

  1. A Dialogic Action Perspective on Open Collective Inquiry in Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Yusun

    2012-01-01

    In today's networked environment, online forums emerge as a popular form of social structures that have greater opportunities for learning in various organizational contexts. A plethora of studies have investigated the phenomenon to identify antecedent of its success, such as individual characteristics and organizational structure. However,…

  2. Inventing an Online Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Melinda

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the issues, debates, and decisions that helped to shape "The Washington Post's" online service, Digital Ink. Highlights include: differences between online and print versions of the newspaper, structure of the user interface, organization of information, content, searching and navigation, and advertising. (JKP)

  3. Looking Tasks Online: Utilizing Webcams to Collect Video Data from Home

    PubMed Central

    Semmelmann, Kilian; Hönekopp, Astrid; Weigelt, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Online experimentation is emerging as a new methodology within classical data acquisition in psychology. It allows for easy, fast, broad, and cheap data conduction from the comfort of people’s homes. To add another method to the array of available tools, here we used recent developments in web technology to investigate the technical feasibility of online HyperText Markup Language-5/JavaScript-based video data recording. We employed a preferential looking task with children between 4 and 24 months. Parents and their children participated from home through a three-stage process: First, interested adults registered and took pictures through a webcam-based photo application. In the second step, we edited the pictures and integrated them into the design. Lastly, participants returned to the website and the video data acquisition took place through their webcam. In sum, we were able to create and employ the video recording application with participants as young as 4 months old. Quality-wise, no participant had to be removed due to the framerate or quality of videos and only 7% of data was excluded due to behavioral factors (lack of concentration). Results-wise, interrater reliability of rated looking side (left/right) showed a high agreement between raters, Fleiss’ Kappa, κ = 0.97, which can be translated to sufficient data quality for further analyses. With regard to on-/off-screen attention attribution, we found that children lost interest after about 10 s after trial onset using a static image presentation or 60 s total experimental time. Taken together, we were able to show that online video data recording is possible and viable for developmental psychology and beyond. PMID:28955284

  4. Looking Tasks Online: Utilizing Webcams to Collect Video Data from Home.

    PubMed

    Semmelmann, Kilian; Hönekopp, Astrid; Weigelt, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Online experimentation is emerging as a new methodology within classical data acquisition in psychology. It allows for easy, fast, broad, and cheap data conduction from the comfort of people's homes. To add another method to the array of available tools, here we used recent developments in web technology to investigate the technical feasibility of online HyperText Markup Language-5/JavaScript-based video data recording. We employed a preferential looking task with children between 4 and 24 months. Parents and their children participated from home through a three-stage process: First, interested adults registered and took pictures through a webcam-based photo application. In the second step, we edited the pictures and integrated them into the design. Lastly, participants returned to the website and the video data acquisition took place through their webcam. In sum, we were able to create and employ the video recording application with participants as young as 4 months old. Quality-wise, no participant had to be removed due to the framerate or quality of videos and only 7% of data was excluded due to behavioral factors (lack of concentration). Results-wise, interrater reliability of rated looking side (left/right) showed a high agreement between raters, Fleiss' Kappa, κ = 0.97, which can be translated to sufficient data quality for further analyses. With regard to on-/off-screen attention attribution, we found that children lost interest after about 10 s after trial onset using a static image presentation or 60 s total experimental time. Taken together, we were able to show that online video data recording is possible and viable for developmental psychology and beyond.

  5. Using Mobile Phones to Collect Patient Data: Lessons Learned From the SIMPle Study

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Meera; Murphy, Andrew W; Vellinga, Akke

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobile phones offer new opportunities to efficiently and interactively collect real-time data from patients with acute illnesses, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). One of the main benefits of using mobile data collection methods is automated data upload, which can reduce the chance of data loss, an issue when using other data collection methods such as paper-based surveys. Objective The aim was to explore differences in collecting data from patients with UTI using text messaging, a mobile phone app (UTI diary), and an online survey. This paper provides lessons learned from integrating mobile data collection into a randomized controlled trial. Methods Participants included UTI patients consulting in general practices that were participating in the Supporting the Improvement and Management of UTI (SIMPle) study. SIMPle was designed to improve prescribing antimicrobial therapies for UTI in the community. Patients were invited to reply to questions regarding their UTI either via a prospective text message survey, a mobile phone app (UTI diary), or a retrospective online survey. Data were collected from 329 patients who opted in to the text message survey, 71 UTI patients through the mobile phone UTI symptom diary app, and 91 online survey participants. Results The age profile of UTI diary app users was younger than that of the text message and online survey users. The largest dropout for both the text message survey respondents and UTI diary app users was after the initial opt-in message; once the participants completed question 1 of the text message survey or day 2 in the UTI diary app, they were more likely to respond to the remaining questions/days. Conclusions This feasibility study highlights the potential of using mobile data collection methods to capture patient data. As well as improving the efficiency of data collection, these novel approaches highlight the advantage of collecting data in real time across multiple time points. There was

  6. 77 FR 17488 - Amendment to Proposed Collection: Comment Request Post-Award Reporting Requirements Including New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Amendment to Proposed Collection: Comment Request Post-Award Reporting Requirements Including New Research Performance Progress... Ellis, Director, Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration, Office of Extramural Research...

  7. Systematic Review of the Use of Online Questionnaires among the Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Remillard, Meegan L.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Cutrona, Sarah L.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Tjia, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The use of internet-based questionnaires to collect information from older adults is not well established. This systematic literature review of studies using online questionnaires in older adult populations aims to 1. describe methodologic approaches to population targeting and sampling and 2. summarize limitations of Internet-based questionnaires in geriatric populations. Design, Setting, Participants We identified English language articles using search terms for geriatric, age 65 and over, Internet survey, online survey, Internet questionnaire, and online questionnaire in PubMed and EBSCO host between 1984 and July 2012. Inclusion criteria were: study population mean age ≥65 years old and use of an online questionnaire for research. Review of 336 abstracts yielded 14 articles for full review by 2 investigators; 11 articles met inclusion criteria. Measurements Articles were extracted for study design and setting, patient characteristics, recruitment strategy, country, and study limitations. Results Eleven (11) articles were published after 2001. Studies had populations with a mean age of 65 to 78 years, included descriptive and analytical designs, and were conducted in the United States, Australia, and Japan. Recruiting methods varied widely from paper fliers and personal emails to use of consumer marketing panels. Investigator-reported study limitations included the use of small convenience samples and limited generalizability. Conclusion Online questionnaires are a feasible method of surveying older adults in some geographic regions and for some subsets of older adults, but limited Internet access constrains recruiting methods and often limits study generalizability. PMID:24635138

  8. User-centred design of neogeography: the impact of volunteered geographic information on users' perceptions of online map 'mashups'.

    PubMed

    Parker, Christopher J; May, Andrew; Mitchell, Val

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of presenting volunteered and professionally created geographic information to 101 wheelchair users through an interactive website that included information collected by wheelchair-using volunteers. The aim of this experiment was to understand the influence that (1) knowing a map-based website contains volunteered information and (2) actually including volunteered information within an online interactive map (a mashup) have on the perceived trust of the user, described in terms of quality and authority. Analysis using Kruskal-Wallis showed that judgements of currency were influenced by including geo-information from untrained volunteers (volunteered geographic information) within the mashup, but not influenced by the participant being told that the online map contained volunteered information. The participants appeared to make judgements based on what information they saw, rather than what they were told about the source of the information. Since 2004, information services have combined crowdsourced (volunteered) alongside professional information within online interactive maps. An online experiment presented both of these information types to wheelchair users within a travel context. Including volunteered information was shown to increase the perceptions of how up-to-date the maps were.

  9. Online Access to Doctors' Notes: Patient Concerns About Privacy

    PubMed Central

    Mejilla, Roanne; Leveille, Suzanne G; Ralston, James D; Darer, Jonathan D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2013-01-01

    Background Offering patients online access to medical records, including doctors’ visit notes, holds considerable potential to improve care. However, patients may worry about loss of privacy when accessing personal health information through Internet-based patient portals. The OpenNotes study provided patients at three US health care institutions with online access to their primary care doctors’ notes and then collected survey data about their experiences, including their concerns about privacy before and after participation in the intervention. Objective To identify patients’ attitudes toward privacy when given electronic access to their medical records, including visit notes. Methods The design used a nested cohort study of patients surveyed at baseline and after a 1-year period during which they were invited to read their visit notes through secure patient portals. Participants consisted of 3874 primary care patients from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA), Geisinger Health System (Danville, PA), and Harborview Medical Center (Seattle, WA) who completed surveys before and after the OpenNotes intervention. The measures were patient-reported levels of concern regarding privacy associated with online access to visit notes. Results 32.91% of patients (1275/3874 respondents) reported concerns about privacy at baseline versus 36.63% (1419/3874 respondents) post-intervention. Baseline concerns were associated with non-white race/ethnicity and lower confidence in communicating with doctors, but were not associated with choosing to read notes or desire for continued online access post-intervention (nearly all patients with notes available chose to read them and wanted continued access). While the level of concern among most participants did not change during the intervention, 15.54% (602/3874 respondents, excluding participants who responded “don’t know”) reported more concern post-intervention, and 12.73% (493/3874 respondents, excluding

  10. Student Directed Learning: An Online Exhibition for a Historic Costume Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Beck, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the structure, procedures, and outcomes of a course organized using a student-directed learning approach to develop an online exhibition website as an outcome for a client. The teaching strategy required students to work in teams and carefully plan assignments to build on the development of the exhibition. Students said…

  11. Development of Trust in an Online Breast Cancer Forum: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Background Online health forums provide peer support for a range of medical conditions including life-threatening and terminal illnesses. Trust is an important component of peer-to-peer support, although relatively little is known about how trust forms within online health forums. Objective The aim of this paper is to examine how trust develops and influences sharing among users of an online breast cancer forum. Methods An interpretive qualitative approach was adopted. Data were collected from forum posts from 135 threads on 9 boards on the UK charity, Breast Cancer Care (BCC). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 BCC forum users. Both datasets were analyzed thematically using Braun and Clarke’s approach and combined to triangulate analysis. Results Trust operates in 3 dimensions, structural, relational, and temporal, and these intersect with each other and do not operate in isolation. The structural dimension relates to how the affordances and formal rules of the site affected trust. The relational dimension refers to how trust was necessarily experienced in interactions with other forum users: it emerged within relationships and was a social phenomenon. The temporal dimension relates to how trust changed over time and was influenced by the length of time users spent on the forum. Conclusions Trust is a process that changes over time and which is influenced by structural features of the forum, as well as informal but collectively understood relational interactions among forum users. The study provides a better understanding of how the intersecting structural, relational, and temporal aspects that support the development of trust facilitate sharing in online environments. These findings will help organizations developing online health forums. PMID:28536093

  12. Assessing the Validity of Automated Webcrawlers as Data Collection Tools to Investigate Online Child Sexual Exploitation.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Bryce; Bouchard, Martin; Frank, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of child sexual exploitation (CE) material has been aided by the growth of the Internet. The graphic nature and prevalence of the material has made researching and combating difficult. Although used to study online CE distribution, automated data collection tools (e.g., webcrawlers) have yet to be shown effective at targeting only relevant data. Using CE-related image and keyword criteria, we compare networks starting from CE websites to those from similar non-CE sexuality websites and dissimilar sports websites. Our results provide evidence that (a) webcrawlers have the potential to provide valid CE data, if the appropriate criterion is selected; (b) CE distribution is still heavily image-based suggesting images as an effective criterion; (c) CE-seeded networks are more hub-based and differ from non-CE-seeded networks on several website characteristics. Recommendations for improvements to reliable criteria selection are discussed.

  13. An Analysis of Learners in Introductory Astronomy Massive Open Online Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Formanek, Martin; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    We describe learners enrolled in three iterations of introductory astronomy massive open online courses (MOOCs). These courses are offered through commercial providers and facilitated by an instructional team at the University of Arizona. We describe an ongoing study of those who enroll, engage in, and complete these courses. The course has undergone several revisions, including integrating pedagogical techniques, found to be effective for in-person courses, to increase engagement including peer review, online discussions, and the use of cohorts. In its current version, learners enroll on a continual basis and complete 11 weeks of course content; they watch videos, complete content quizzes, submit writing assignments, complete peer review of other students’ work, and complete online citizen science projects. Tens of thousands of students has signed up for these courses but completion rates are much lower, around 10%. We have collected survey data from over 8,500 of these learners to assess their basic science knowledge, attitudes towards science and technology, motivations for taking the courses, and information about other ways they engage in science related activities. We present information about these learners, including their demographics, motivations, how they use the courses, and what factors lead to increased engagement and completion. Additionally, we present how survey data from these learners compare to 26 years of data we have collected from parallel group of undergraduate non-science major students enrolled in astronomy courses at the University of Arizona. Overall, we find that learners who enroll in the MOOCs have more interest in science and higher basic science knowledge that undergraduates who pay tuition for a similar course. Our work is helping us understand how to better serve learners in MOOCs and bridge more traditional courses with these types of courses.

  14. Identifying online user reputation in terms of user preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lu; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Identifying online user reputation is significant for online social systems. In this paper, taking into account the preference physics of online user collective behaviors, we present an improved group-based rating method for ranking online user reputation based on the user preference (PGR). All the ratings given by each specific user are mapped to the same rating criteria. By grouping users according to their mapped ratings, the online user reputation is calculated based on the corresponding group sizes. Results for MovieLens and Netflix data sets show that the AUC values of the PGR method can reach 0.9842 (0.9493) and 0.9995 (0.9987) for malicious (random) spammers, respectively, outperforming the results generated by the traditional group-based method, which indicates that the online preference plays an important role for measuring user reputation.

  15. Marketing Online Services: Product, Market and Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudell, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Describes characteristics of the online marketplace. Topics discussed include technology barriers; data ownership; markets for online services, including libraries and end users; marketing and promotion tactics, including exhibits and conferences, advertising, direct mail, and user groups; international marketing and service; strategic marketing…

  16. The Sexunzipped trial: young people's views of participating in an online randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Angela; Bailey, Julia V; Stevenson, Fiona; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-12-12

    Incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among young people in the United Kingdom is increasing. The Internet can be a suitable medium for delivery of sexual health information and sexual health promotion, given its high usage among young people, its potential for creating a sense of anonymity, and ease of access. Online randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly being used to evaluate online interventions, but while there are many advantages to online methodologies, they can be associated with a number of problems, including poor engagement with online interventions, poor trial retention, and concerns about the validity of data collected through self-report online. We conducted an online feasibility trial that tested the effects of the Sexunzipped website for sexual health compared to an information-only website. This study reports on a qualitative evaluation of the trial procedures, describing participants' experiences and views of the Sexunzipped online trial including methods of recruitment, incentives, methods of contact, and sexual health outcome measurement. Our goal was to determine participants' views of the acceptability and validity of the online trial methodology used in the pilot RCT of the Sexunzipped intervention. We used three qualitative data sources to assess the acceptability and validity of the online pilot RCT methodology: (1) individual interviews with 22 participants from the pilot RCT, (2) 133 emails received by the trial coordinator from trial participants, and (3) 217 free-text comments from the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. An iterative, thematic analysis of all three data sources was conducted to identify common themes related to the acceptability and feasibility of the online trial methodology. Interview participants found the trial design, including online recruitment via Facebook, online registration, email communication with the researchers, and

  17. Predicting Dropout Student: An Application of Data Mining Methods in an Online Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yukselturk, Erman; Ozekes, Serhat; Turel, Yalin Kilic

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of dropouts through data mining approaches in an online program. The subject of the study was selected from a total of 189 students who registered to the online Information Technologies Certificate Program in 2007-2009. The data was collected through online questionnaires (Demographic Survey, Online Technologies…

  18. Online Learning Trends in Private-Sector Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    For the past eight years, the Babson Survey Research Group has conducted surveys of higher education institutions on their attitudes, beliefs, and practices concerning online education. This current report is a new analysis of this collection of data, focusing on the role of online education among private-sector colleges and universities. For the…

  19. Caught in the Web: How Online Advertising Exploits Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasnik, Shelley

    1997-01-01

    Principals should be aware of Internet advertising targeted at children. According to a recent Center for Media Education study, many companies design online sites for children as a way to bypass adult authority and prey on children's vulnerabilities. Some companies use their online sites to develop brand loyalties or collect market-segment data…

  20. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  1. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  2. Taking It Online, and Making It Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online & CD-ROM Review, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses taking content online and payment models online based on sessions at the 1996 Internet World International conference in London (England). Highlights include publishers' decisions to reproduce materials on the World Wide Web; designing Web sites; guidelines for online content; online pricing; and the pros and cons of charging online…

  3. Online professionalism: A synthetic review.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G

    2015-04-01

    The rise of social media has increased connectivity and blurred personal and professional boundaries, bringing new challenges for medical professionalism. Whether traditional professionalism principles apply to the online social media space remains unknown. The purpose of this synthetic literature review was to characterize the original peer-reviewed research studies published between 1 January 2000-1 November 2014 on online professionalism, to assess methodologies and approaches used, and to provide insights to guide future studies in this area. The investigators searched three databases and performed manual searches of bibliographies to identify the 32 studies included. Most studies originated in the USA. Cross-sectional surveys and analyses of publicly available online content were the most common methodologies employed. Studies covered the general areas of use and privacy, assessment of unprofessional online behaviours, consensus-gathering of what constitutes unprofessional or inappropriate online behaviours, and education and policies. Studies were of variable quality; only around half of survey studies had response rates of 50% or greater. Medical trainees were the most common population studied. Future directions for research include public perspectives of online professionalism, impact on patient trust, and how to use social media productively as medical professionals.

  4. Ethics in Online Publications.

    PubMed

    Vervaart, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Journals have been publishing the results of scientific investigations since the founding of Philosophical Transactions in 1665. Since then we have witnessed a massive expansion in the number of journals to the point that there are now approximately 28,000 active, peer reviewed journals collectively publishing more than 1.8 million articles per year. Before the mid-1990s, these journals were only available on paper but by the end of the 20th century, most journals had moved to online platforms. Online publication has also served as the impetus for the move to 'open-access' to the information contained in journals. The fact that a publication is 'on-line' and 'open-access' does not negate the responsibility of the author and the publisher to publish in an ethical way. [1] The document produced by the IFCC Ethics Task Force (TF-E) on publication ethics states that 'Ethics in Science at its broadest level encompasses research ethics, medical ethics, publication ethics, conflicts of interest, ethical responsibilities as educator, plus many other areas.' Thus publication ethics is a continuum from the first step of research design through to the information being read by the reader. In general terms 'publication ethics' includes the ethical behaviour of the authors in writing and submitting a scientific manuscript to a publisher for the purpose of publication, thus any discussion of publication ethics must include the role of the authors, referees, publisher and reader and the issues of authorship (and the use of 'ghosts'), plagiarism, duplicate publication (including in different languages), image manipulation (particularly in the era of digitisation), and conflict of interest [2]. To aid the authors, and others involved in the process of publication, a number of resources are now available particularly those from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) [3] and the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) [4]. More recently the issue of 'publisher ethics' has

  5. 78 FR 26756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... in to a golf course or online when a tee-time is scheduled online. There are no forms that have been... daily business transactions difficult at the golf courses. Affected Public: Individuals or households... Collection Respondents are golf patrons who provide business to the Air Force Golf Courses. The information...

  6. 75 FR 61785 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Review of a Revised Information Collection: (OMB Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Review of a Revised... Management and Budget (OMB) a request for review of a revised information collection. This information...) System'' (OMB Control No. 3206-0201), and the Open Season Web site, Open Season Online, are used by...

  7. Serving the Online Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettcher, Judith V.

    2007-01-01

    Systems and services for recruiting, advising, and support of online students have seldom been at the top of the list when planning online and distance learning programs. That is now changing: Forces pushing advising and support services into the foreground include recognition of the student learner as "customer" and the increasing…

  8. An empirical examination of client attitudes towards online counseling.

    PubMed

    Young, Kimberly S

    2005-04-01

    Trends over the past decade have shown that online counseling has grown in terms of popularity among consumers and clinicians alike; however, little, if any empirical evidence exists that examines client attitudes towards online counseling as alternative to traditional face-to-face therapy. Therefore, this study investigated client attitudes towards online counseling. Data was collected from 48 e-clients who received online counseling at the Center for Online Addiction. Variables such as client perceptions and concerns about using online counseling, clients' reasons for seeking online counseling over in-office treatment, and demographic profiles of e-clients were assessed. Results suggested that Caucasian, middle-aged males, with at least a four-year bachelors degree were most likely to use online counseling and anonymity, convenience, and counselor credentials were the most cited reasons they sought online counseling over in-office treatment. The lack of perceived privacy and security during online chat sessions and the fear of being caught while conducting online sessions were the main concerns reported by e-clients. A better understanding of client motives and perceptions towards online counseling helps to guide treatment in using the Internet as a clinical tool, especially as the Internet becomes increasingly more available in previously remote markets and the field of online counseling continues to grow.

  9. Precision IORT - Image guided intraoperative radiation therapy (igIORT) using online treatment planning including tissue heterogeneity correction.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Frank; Bludau, Frederic; Clausen, Sven; Fleckenstein, Jens; Obertacke, Udo; Wenz, Frederik

    2017-05-01

    To the present date, IORT has been eye and hand guided without treatment planning and tissue heterogeneity correction. This limits the precision of the application and the precise documentation of the location and the deposited dose in the tissue. Here we present a set-up where we use image guidance by intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for precise online Monte Carlo treatment planning including tissue heterogeneity correction. An IORT was performed during balloon kyphoplasty using a dedicated Needle Applicator. An intraoperative CBCT was registered with a pre-op CT. Treatment planning was performed in Radiance using a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm simulating dose in homogeneous (MCwater) and heterogeneous medium (MChet). Dose distributions on CBCT and pre-op CT were compared with each other. Spinal cord and the metastasis doses were evaluated. The MCwater calculations showed a spherical dose distribution as expected. The minimum target dose for the MChet simulations on pre-op CT was increased by 40% while the maximum spinal cord dose was decreased by 35%. Due to the artefacts on the CBCT the comparison between MChet simulations on CBCT and pre-op CT showed differences up to 50% in dose. igIORT and online treatment planning improves the accuracy of IORT. However, the current set-up is limited by CT artefacts. Fusing an intraoperative CBCT with a pre-op CT allows the combination of an accurate dose calculation with the knowledge of the correct source/applicator position. This method can be also used for pre-operative treatment planning followed by image guided surgery. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Supporting Online Faculty Holistically: Developing a Support Website Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Eric; Anthony, Peter John

    2014-01-01

    Current trends in post-secondary education enrollment indicate that colleges and universities are likely to experience an increase in the number of online students. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the type of resources and support features online faculty need, desire, and expect in a support website. The method used to collect research…

  11. Online requests for sexual pictures from youth: risk factors and incident characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and characteristics of youth who receive requests to make and send sexual pictures of themselves over the Internet. Data were collected as part of the Second Youth Internet Safety Survey, a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,500 youth Internet users, ages 10-17 years, in the United States. Among Internet-using youth 4% reported an online request to send a sexual picture of themselves during the previous year. Only one youth of 65 sample case subjects actually complied. Being female, being of Black ethnicity, having a close online relationship, engaging in sexual behavior online, and experiencing physical or sexual abuse offline were risk factors for receiving a request for a sexual picture. Incidents that involved requests for sexual pictures were more likely to occur when youth were in the presence of friends, communicating with an adult, someone they met online, who had sent a sexual picture to the youth, and who attempted or made some form of offline contact with the youth. The findings from this study provide support for including requests for sexual pictures in the spectrum of online experiences about which pediatric and adolescent health professionals need to be knowledgeable. These findings also provide information about populations that need targeted prevention education about online dangers, namely vulnerable (e.g., abused boys and girls) and female Black youth.

  12. Web-based Factors Affecting Online Purchasing Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Sze Yan, Ng; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad; Jusoh, Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    The growing use of internet and online purchasing among young consumers in Malaysia provides a huge prospect in e-commerce market, specifically for B2C segment. In this market, if E-marketers know the web-based factors affecting online buyers' behaviour, and the effect of these factors on behaviour of online consumers, then they can develop their marketing strategies to convert potential customers into active one, while retaining existing online customers. Review of previous studies related to the online purchasing behaviour in B2C market has point out that the conceptualization and empirical validation of the online purchasing behaviour of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literate users, or ICT professional, in Malaysia has not been clearly addressed. This paper focuses on (i) web-based factors which online buyers (ICT professional) keep in mind while shopping online; and (ii) the effect of web-based factors on online purchasing behaviour. Based on the extensive literature review, a conceptual framework of 24 items of five factors was constructed to determine web-based factors affecting online purchasing behaviour of ICT professional. Analysis of data was performed based on the 310 questionnaires, which were collected using a stratified random sampling method, from ICT undergraduate students in a public university in Malaysia. The Exploratory factor analysis performed showed that five factors affecting online purchase behaviour are Information Quality, Fulfilment/Reliability/Customer Service, Website Design, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security. The result of Multiple Regression Analysis indicated that Information Quality, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security affect positively online purchase behaviour. The results provide a usable model for measuring web-based factors affecting buyers' online purchase behaviour in B2C market, as well as for online shopping companies to focus on the factors that will increase customers' online purchase.

  13. Variability in Predictions from Online Tools: A Demonstration Using Internet-Based Melanoma Predictors.

    PubMed

    Zabor, Emily C; Coit, Daniel; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; McMasters, Kelly M; Michaelson, James S; Stromberg, Arnold J; Panageas, Katherine S

    2018-02-22

    Prognostic models are increasingly being made available online, where they can be publicly accessed by both patients and clinicians. These online tools are an important resource for patients to better understand their prognosis and for clinicians to make informed decisions about treatment and follow-up. The goal of this analysis was to highlight the possible variability in multiple online prognostic tools in a single disease. To demonstrate the variability in survival predictions across online prognostic tools, we applied a single validation dataset to three online melanoma prognostic tools. Data on melanoma patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively collected. Calibration was assessed using calibration plots and discrimination was assessed using the C-index. In this demonstration project, we found important differences across the three models that led to variability in individual patients' predicted survival across the tools, especially in the lower range of predictions. In a validation test using a single-institution data set, calibration and discrimination varied across the three models. This study underscores the potential variability both within and across online tools, and highlights the importance of using methodological rigor when developing a prognostic model that will be made publicly available online. The results also reinforce that careful development and thoughtful interpretation, including understanding a given tool's limitations, are required in order for online prognostic tools that provide survival predictions to be a useful resource for both patients and clinicians.

  14. Pricing and Marketing Online Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Sheila Anne Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the pricing of online information in the broader context of marketing. Highlights include changes in the marketing context and issues of value relating to price; other reviews of online pricing; trends affecting price, including public sector involvement and the Internet; promotional pricing; price discrimination; and price aggregation…

  15. Predictors of Student Success in Online Courses: Quantitative versus Qualitative Subject Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine whether the predictors of success for students in an online quantitative course are different than those for an online qualitative course. Data were collected from students taking online courses offered by an AACSB accredited College of Business at a medium sized state university (total student population 7,000) in…

  16. Environmental scan and evaluation of best practices for online systematic review resources

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robin M. N.; Boulos, Leah M.; Visintini, Sarah; Ritchie, Krista; Hayden, Jill

    2018-01-01

    Objective Online training for systematic review methodology is an attractive option due to flexibility and limited availability of in-person instruction. Librarians often direct new reviewers to these online resources, so they should be knowledgeable about the variety of available resources. The objective for this project was to conduct an environmental scan of online systematic review training resources and evaluate those identified resources. Methods The authors systematically searched for electronic learning resources pertaining to systematic review methods. After screening for inclusion, we collected data about characteristics of training resources and assigned scores in the domains of (1) content, (2) design, (3) interactivity, and (4) usability by applying a previously published evaluation rubric for online instruction modules. We described the characteristics and scores for each training resource and compared performance across the domains. Results Twenty training resources were evaluated. Average overall score of online instructional resources was 61%. Online courses (n=7) averaged 73%, web modules (n=5) 64%, and videos (n=8) 48%. The top 5 highest scoring resources were in course or web module format, featured high interactivity, and required a longer (>5hrs) time commitment from users. Conclusion This study revealed that resources include appropriate content but are less likely to adhere to principles of online training design and interactivity. Awareness of these resources will allow librarians to make informed recommendations for training based on patrons’ needs. Future online systematic review training resources should use established best practices for e-learning to provide high-quality resources, regardless of format or user time commitment. PMID:29632443

  17. Environmental scan and evaluation of best practices for online systematic review resources.

    PubMed

    Parker, Robin M N; Boulos, Leah M; Visintini, Sarah; Ritchie, Krista; Hayden, Jill

    2018-04-01

    Online training for systematic review methodology is an attractive option due to flexibility and limited availability of in-person instruction. Librarians often direct new reviewers to these online resources, so they should be knowledgeable about the variety of available resources. The objective for this project was to conduct an environmental scan of online systematic review training resources and evaluate those identified resources. The authors systematically searched for electronic learning resources pertaining to systematic review methods. After screening for inclusion, we collected data about characteristics of training resources and assigned scores in the domains of (1) content, (2) design, (3) interactivity, and (4) usability by applying a previously published evaluation rubric for online instruction modules. We described the characteristics and scores for each training resource and compared performance across the domains. Twenty training resources were evaluated. Average overall score of online instructional resources was 61%. Online courses (n=7) averaged 73%, web modules (n=5) 64%, and videos (n=8) 48%. The top 5 highest scoring resources were in course or web module format, featured high interactivity, and required a longer (>5hrs) time commitment from users. This study revealed that resources include appropriate content but are less likely to adhere to principles of online training design and interactivity. Awareness of these resources will allow librarians to make informed recommendations for training based on patrons' needs. Future online systematic review training resources should use established best practices for e-learning to provide high-quality resources, regardless of format or user time commitment.

  18. Using Online Social Media for Recruitment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Participants: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Patrick; Bare, Michael G; Johnson, Mallory O

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many challenges in recruiting and engaging participants when conducting research, especially with HIV-positive individuals. Some of these challenges include geographical barriers, insufficient time and financial resources, and perceived HIV-related stigma. Objective This paper describes the methodology of a recruitment approach that capitalized on existing online social media venues and other Internet resources in an attempt to overcome some of these barriers to research recruitment and retention. Methods From May through August 2013, a campaign approach using a combination of online social media, non-financial incentives, and Web-based survey software was implemented to advertise, recruit, and retain participants, and collect data for a survey study with a limited budget. Results Approximately US $5,000 was spent with a research staff designated at 20% of full-time effort, yielding 2034 survey clicks, 1404 of which met the inclusion criteria and initiated the survey, for an average cost of US $3.56 per survey initiation. A total of 1221 individuals completed the survey, yielding 86.97% retention. Conclusions These data indicate that online recruitment is a feasible and efficient tool that can be further enhanced by sophisticated online data collection software and the addition of non-financial incentives. PMID:24784982

  19. Online peer support interventions for chronic conditions: a scoping review protocol.

    PubMed

    Munce, Sarah Elizabeth Patricia; Shepherd, John; Perrier, Laure; Allin, Sonya; Sweet, Shane N; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Nelson, Michelle L A; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hossain, Saima; Jaglal, Susan

    2017-09-24

    Peer support is receiving increasing attention as both an effective and cost-effective intervention method to support the self-management of chronic health conditions. Given that an increasing proportion of Canadians have internet access and the increasing implementation of web-based interventions, online peer support interventions are a promising option to address the burden of chronic diseases. Thus, the specific research question of this scoping review is the following: What is known from the existing literature about the key characteristics of online peer support interventions for adults with chronic conditions? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use the methodological frameworks used by Arksey and O'Malley as well as Levac and colleagues for the current scoping review. To be eligible for inclusion, studies must report on adults (≥18 years of age) with one of the Public Health Agency of Canada chronic conditions or HIV/AIDS. We will limit our review to peer support interventions delivered through online formats. All study designs will be included. Only studies published from 2012 onwards will be included to ensure relevance to the current healthcare context and feasibility. Furthermore, only English language studies will be included. Studies will be identified by searching a variety of databases. Two reviewers will independently screen the titles and abstracts identified by the literature search for inclusion (ie, level 1 screening), the full text articles (ie, level 2 screening) and then perform data abstraction. Abstracted data will include study characteristics, participant population, key characteristics of the intervention and outcomes collected. This review will identify the key features of online peer support interventions and could assist in the future development of other online peer support programmes so that effective and sustainable programmes can be developed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  20. Supporting Wellness in Adult Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jacklyn J.; Porto, Stella C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Online education cannot continue to grow at the current pace while ignoring a crucial component of campus support, wellness for adult online learners. This paper brings awareness to the concept of wellness as an important student support service in adult online education. It includes a summarized review of relevant literature and identifies…

  1. Nurses' perceptions of online continuing education

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is increasing attention to online learning as a convenient way of getting professional training. The number and popularity of online nursing continuing education programs are increasing rapidly in many countries. Understanding these may contribute to designing these programs to maximize success. Also, knowing the perceptions and preferences in online learning aids development and orientation of online programs. The aims of this study are to show nurses' perceptions of online continuing education and to determine perceptions of various groups; area groups, working companies, frequency of computer usage and age. Methods The survey method was used in this quantitative study to reveal perception levels and relationship with related variables. Data were collected through an online instrument from a convenience sample of 1041 Registered Nurses (RNs) at an online bachelor's degree program. Descriptive and inferential analysis techniques were performed. Results Nurses generally have positive perceptions about online learning (X = 3.86; SD = 0.48). A significant difference was seen between nurses who used computers least and those with the highest computer usage [F (3, 1033) = 3.040; P < .05]. Neither nurses' ages nor lengths of working experience are significantly related to perceptions of online programs (r = -.013; P > .05 and r = -.036; P > .05, respectively). Nurses' perceptions are significantly different depending on the settings where they work [F (3,989) = 3.193; P < .05]. The difference between perceptions of nurses living in urban areas (X = 3.82; SD = .51) and those living in rural areas (X = 3.88; SD = .47) was not significant [t (994) = -1.570, P > .05]. Conclusions We found that nurses regard online learning opportunities as suitable for their working conditions and needs. Nurses should be provided with continued training through online learning alternatives, regardless of age, working experience or area of residence. PMID:22013974

  2. The Dynamics of Online User Behavior and IS Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Keehyung

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation, which comprises three independent essays, explores the dynamics of online user behavior and provides IS policy implications across three different applications. The first essay employs an econometric empirical analysis to examine the role of IT interventions on online users' gambling behavior, based on field data collected over…

  3. An Analysis of Higher Order Thinking in Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoughlin, D.; Mynard, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a study of online discussion forums as tools for promoting higher-order thinking. The study was carried out in a women's university in the United Arab Emirates. Data, in the form of online discussion forum transcripts, were collected over a 20-week semester and were analysed according to a model developed by Garrison,…

  4. A Study on the Impact of Collective Feedback in the Online Technical and Professional Communication Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation study seeks to determine whether feedback in the online Technical and Professional Communication classroom impacts student performance. This dissertation proposes that online Technical and Professional Communication instructors consider adopt such a feedback methodology in order to engage students with writing practices that…

  5. Questions for Online Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The primary function of an evaluation is often to assess the degree of success of a program or to collect information that may be used to improve a program, product, or service. To meet an evaluation's goals and objectives by using an online survey, it is imperative that the questionnaire contain valid and reliable items asked about specific…

  6. Online database for documenting clinical pathology resident education.

    PubMed

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Chou, David; Astion, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Training of clinical pathologists is evolving and must now address the 6 core competencies described by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which include patient care. A substantial portion of the patient care performed by the clinical pathology resident takes place while the resident is on call for the laboratory, a practice that provides the resident with clinical experience and assists the laboratory in providing quality service to clinicians in the hospital and surrounding community. Documenting the educational value of these on-call experiences and providing evidence of competence is difficult for residency directors. An online database of these calls, entered by residents and reviewed by faculty, would provide a mechanism for documenting and improving the education of clinical pathology residents. With Microsoft Access we developed an online database that uses active server pages and secure sockets layer encryption to document calls to the clinical pathology resident. Using the data collected, we evaluated the efficacy of 3 interventions aimed at improving resident education. The database facilitated the documentation of more than 4 700 calls in the first 21 months it was online, provided archived resident-generated data to assist in serving clients, and demonstrated that 2 interventions aimed at improving resident education were successful. We have developed a secure online database, accessible from any computer with Internet access, that can be used to easily document clinical pathology resident education and competency.

  7. Teaching pathology via online digital microscopy: positive learning outcomes for rurally based medical students.

    PubMed

    Sivamalai, Sundram; Murthy, Shashidhar Venkatesh; Gupta, Tarun Sen; Woolley, Torres

    2011-02-01

    Technology has revolutionised teaching. Teaching pathology via digital microscopy (DM) is needed to overcome increasing student numbers, a shortage of pathology academics in regional medical schools, and difficulties with teaching students on rural clinical placement. To identify whether an online DM approach, combining digital pathology software, Web-based slides and classroom management software, delivers effective, practical pathology teaching sessions to medical students located both on campus and on rural placement. An online survey collected feedback from fourth and fifth year undergraduate James Cook University medical students on the importance of 16 listed benefits and challenges of using online DM to teach pathology, via a structured five-point Likert survey. Fifty-three students returned the survey (response rate = 33%). Benefits of online DM to teach pathology rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: higher quality images; faster learning; more convenient; better technology; everyone sees the same image; greater accessibility; helpful annotations on slides; cost savings; and more opportunity for self-paced learning out-of-hours and for collaborative learning in class. Challenges of online DM rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: Internet availability in more remote locations and potential problems using online technology during class. Nearly all medical students welcomed learning pathology via online digital technology. DM should improve the quantity, quality, cost and accessibility of pathology teaching by regional medical schools, and has significant implications for the growing emphasis in Australia for decentralised medical education and rural clinical placements. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Using Mobile Phones to Collect Patient Data: Lessons Learned From the SIMPle Study.

    PubMed

    Duane, Sinead; Tandan, Meera; Murphy, Andrew W; Vellinga, Akke

    2017-04-25

    Mobile phones offer new opportunities to efficiently and interactively collect real-time data from patients with acute illnesses, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). One of the main benefits of using mobile data collection methods is automated data upload, which can reduce the chance of data loss, an issue when using other data collection methods such as paper-based surveys. The aim was to explore differences in collecting data from patients with UTI using text messaging, a mobile phone app (UTI diary), and an online survey. This paper provides lessons learned from integrating mobile data collection into a randomized controlled trial. Participants included UTI patients consulting in general practices that were participating in the Supporting the Improvement and Management of UTI (SIMPle) study. SIMPle was designed to improve prescribing antimicrobial therapies for UTI in the community. Patients were invited to reply to questions regarding their UTI either via a prospective text message survey, a mobile phone app (UTI diary), or a retrospective online survey. Data were collected from 329 patients who opted in to the text message survey, 71 UTI patients through the mobile phone UTI symptom diary app, and 91 online survey participants. The age profile of UTI diary app users was younger than that of the text message and online survey users. The largest dropout for both the text message survey respondents and UTI diary app users was after the initial opt-in message; once the participants completed question 1 of the text message survey or day 2 in the UTI diary app, they were more likely to respond to the remaining questions/days. This feasibility study highlights the potential of using mobile data collection methods to capture patient data. As well as improving the efficiency of data collection, these novel approaches highlight the advantage of collecting data in real time across multiple time points. There was little variation in the number of patients responding

  9. Development of Trust in an Online Breast Cancer Forum: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Lovatt, Melanie; Bath, Peter A; Ellis, Julie

    2017-05-23

    Online health forums provide peer support for a range of medical conditions including life-threatening and terminal illnesses. Trust is an important component of peer-to-peer support, although relatively little is known about how trust forms within online health forums. The aim of this paper is to examine how trust develops and influences sharing among users of an online breast cancer forum. An interpretive qualitative approach was adopted. Data were collected from forum posts from 135 threads on 9 boards on the UK charity, Breast Cancer Care (BCC). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 BCC forum users. Both datasets were analyzed thematically using Braun and Clarke's approach and combined to triangulate analysis. Trust operates in 3 dimensions, structural, relational, and temporal, and these intersect with each other and do not operate in isolation. The structural dimension relates to how the affordances and formal rules of the site affected trust. The relational dimension refers to how trust was necessarily experienced in interactions with other forum users: it emerged within relationships and was a social phenomenon. The temporal dimension relates to how trust changed over time and was influenced by the length of time users spent on the forum. Trust is a process that changes over time and which is influenced by structural features of the forum, as well as informal but collectively understood relational interactions among forum users. The study provides a better understanding of how the intersecting structural, relational, and temporal aspects that support the development of trust facilitate sharing in online environments. These findings will help organizations developing online health forums. ©Melanie Lovatt, Peter A Bath, Julie Ellis. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 23.05.2017.

  10. The Effects of Need Satisfaction on EFL Online Learner Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Po-Hsuan; Adesope, Olusola

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) on English as a foreign language (EFL) online learner satisfaction and validated the Chinese versions of the need satisfaction scale (NSS) and online learner satisfaction scale (OLSS). We collected data from a questionnaire administered to 199 EFL students…

  11. Social and Psychological Determinants of Levels of Engagement with an Online Breast Cancer Support Group: Posters, Lurkers, and Non-Users

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong Yeob; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Yoon, Hye Jin; Shim, Minsun; McTavish, Fiona M.; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the benefits and growing availability of online cancer support groups, many breast cancer patients still do not actively participate in the support groups. To better understand cancer patients’ online information and support seeking behaviors, this study explores how various social and psychological characteristics predict different levels of engagement with an online breast cancer support group: posters, lurkers, and non-users. The study sample included 231 recently diagnosed breast cancer patients. Data included baseline survey scores of demographic, disease-related, and psychosocial factors and automatically collected discussion group use data over the 4-month intervention. Patterns of engagement with the cancer support group differed according to the patients’ characteristics, suggesting that (1) cancer patients have very different orientations to and engagement with an online support group, and (2) ‘deficits’ in social and psychological resources may not be barriers to participation in a cancer support group, but rather motivators to interact with other patients. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:22085215

  12. Moving from answer finding to sensemaking: Supporting middle school students' online inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meilan

    Online inquiry, use of the Web as an information source to conduct inquiry for a scientific question, has become increasingly common in middle schools in recent years. However, while valuable Web resources provide unprecedented learning opportunities, easy access to information does not guarantee learning. Previous research has found that middle school students tend to use the Web in a superficial manner. To address the challenges that students face in online inquiry, this study explored several supporting strategies implemented in Digital IdeaKeeper, a scaffolded software tool to help students move from passively finding a ready-made answer to actively making sense of the information they encounter through support for inquiry planning, information search, analysis, and synthesis. This study examined the differences and similarities between regular online inquiry and supported online inquiry performed by several sixth-graders in real classroom settings. Four pairs from a sixth grade class used IdeaKeeper for their online inquiry project, and another four pairs from a different sixth grade class taught by the same teacher used regular online search engines only. Both groups worked on the same science topic-water, and the entire project lasted about four weeks. During that time, students in both groups used computers for about 10-14 days to conduct online research. Multiple sources of data were collected, including video recordings of students' computer activities and conversations, students' artifacts, log files and student final writings. Several themes emerged from the data analysis. First, the findings refer to the importance of providing a structure for students' online inquiry, to promote a more integrated, efficient, continuous, metacognitive and engaging online inquiry. In addition, guidance is important to promote more careful, thorough, and purposeful online reading, Overall, the results suggest that middle school students' online inquiry needs to be

  13. Serverification of Molecular Modeling Applications: The Rosetta Online Server That Includes Everyone (ROSIE)

    PubMed Central

    Conchúir, Shane Ó.; Der, Bryan S.; Drew, Kevin; Kuroda, Daisuke; Xu, Jianqing; Weitzner, Brian D.; Renfrew, P. Douglas; Sripakdeevong, Parin; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J.; Kuhlman, Brian; Kortemme, Tanja; Bonneau, Richard; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Das, Rhiju

    2013-01-01

    The Rosetta molecular modeling software package provides experimentally tested and rapidly evolving tools for the 3D structure prediction and high-resolution design of proteins, nucleic acids, and a growing number of non-natural polymers. Despite its free availability to academic users and improving documentation, use of Rosetta has largely remained confined to developers and their immediate collaborators due to the code’s difficulty of use, the requirement for large computational resources, and the unavailability of servers for most of the Rosetta applications. Here, we present a unified web framework for Rosetta applications called ROSIE (Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone). ROSIE provides (a) a common user interface for Rosetta protocols, (b) a stable application programming interface for developers to add additional protocols, (c) a flexible back-end to allow leveraging of computer cluster resources shared by RosettaCommons member institutions, and (d) centralized administration by the RosettaCommons to ensure continuous maintenance. This paper describes the ROSIE server infrastructure, a step-by-step ‘serverification’ protocol for use by Rosetta developers, and the deployment of the first nine ROSIE applications by six separate developer teams: Docking, RNA de novo, ERRASER, Antibody, Sequence Tolerance, Supercharge, Beta peptide design, NCBB design, and VIP redesign. As illustrated by the number and diversity of these applications, ROSIE offers a general and speedy paradigm for serverification of Rosetta applications that incurs negligible cost to developers and lowers barriers to Rosetta use for the broader biological community. ROSIE is available at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. PMID:23717507

  14. Women's Studies Collections: A Checklist Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Brooke A.

    2009-01-01

    A checklist evaluation on thirty-seven Women's Studies programs conducted using the individual institutions' online public access catalogs (OPACs) is presented. Although Women's Studies collections are very difficult to build, an evaluation of existing programs shows that collections, for the most part, have managed substantial coverage of the…

  15. Is Online Learning Suitable for All English Language Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuama, Settha; Intharaksa, Usa

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine online language learning strategies (OLLS) used and affection in online learning of successful and unsuccessful online language students and investigate the relationships between OLLS use, affection in online learning and online English learning outcomes. The participants included 346 university students completing a…

  16. STAR Online Meta-Data Collection Framework: Integration with the Pre-existing Controls Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, D.; Lauret, J.

    2017-10-01

    One of the STAR experiment’s modular Messaging Interface and Reliable Architecture framework (MIRA) integration goals is to provide seamless and automatic connections with the existing control systems. After an initial proof of concept and operation of the MIRA system as a parallel data collection system for online use and real-time monitoring, the STAR Software and Computing group is now working on the integration of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) with MIRA’s interfaces. This integration goals are to allow functional interoperability and, later on, to replace the existing/legacy Detector Control System components at the service level. In this report, we describe the evolutionary integration process and, as an example, will discuss the EPICS Alarm Handler conversion. We review the complete upgrade procedure starting with the integration of EPICS-originated alarm signals propagation into MIRA, followed by the replacement of the existing operator interface based on Motif Editor and Display Manager (MEDM) with modern portable web-based Alarm Handler interface. To achieve this aim, we have built an EPICS-to-MQTT [8] bridging service, and recreated the functionality of the original Alarm Handler using low-latency web messaging technologies. The integration of EPICS alarm handling into our messaging framework allowed STAR to improve the DCS alarm awareness of existing STAR DAQ and RTS services, which use MIRA as a primary source of experiment control information.

  17. The State of Online Retailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamimi, Nabil; Rajan, Murli; Sebastianelli, Rose

    2003-01-01

    Benchmarks online retailing transactions against critical factors that impact online retailing. Findings suggest several areas that e-retailers should target for improvement, including the speed of home page loading, ability to translate into multiple languages, capabilities of search engines, security policies display, payment options, minimum…

  18. Using Learning Analytics to Assess Student Learning in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Ndoye, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics can be used to enhance student engagement and performance in online courses. Using learning analytics, instructors can collect and analyze data about students and improve the design and delivery of instruction to make it more meaningful for them. In this paper, the authors review different categories of online assessments and…

  19. Student Satisfaction with Using Online Discussion Forums at Saudi Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzahrani, Majed Gharmallah

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate student satisfaction with using online discussion forums (ODFs). It also aims to examine the relationships between student satisfaction with using ODFs and student demographics as well as with their experience with ICT and online education. Data are collected from 2171 students from four leading universities at Saudi…

  20. Are online gamblers more at risk than offline gamblers?

    PubMed

    Kairouz, Sylvia; Paradis, Catherine; Nadeau, Louise

    2012-03-01

    To characterize and compare sociodemographic profiles, game-play patterns, and level of addictive behaviors among adults who gamble online and those who do not, and to examine if, at the population level, online gambling is associated with more risky behaviors than offline gambling. Respondents were 8,456 offline gamblers and 111 online gamblers who participated in a population-based survey conducted in the province of Québec, in 2009. The study sample is representative of adult general population. There is an unequal distribution of online gambling in the population. A disproportionate number of men, young people, and students say they participate in online gambling. Poker players are overrepresented among online gamblers and gambling behaviors tend to be more excessive on the Internet. Compared with offline gamblers, online gamblers report more co-occurring risky behaviors, namely alcohol and cannabis use. Those who gamble online appear to be more at risk for gambling-related problems, but the present findings alone cannot be used as evidence for that conclusion. Future research designs could combine longitudinal data collection and multilevel analyses to provide more insight into the causal mechanisms associated with online gambling.

  1. Online Searching in PBL Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan M.; Botelho, Michael G.; Chan, Lap Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore how online searching plays a role during PBL tutorials in two undergraduate health sciences curricula, Medicine and Dentistry. Utilizing Interactional Ethnography (IE) as an organizing framework for data collection and analysis, and drawing on a critical theory of technology as an explanatory lens, enabled a textured…

  2. OReFiL: an online resource finder for life sciences.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2007-08-06

    Many online resources for the life sciences have been developed and introduced in peer-reviewed papers recently, ranging from databases and web applications to data-analysis software. Some have been introduced in special journal issues or websites with a search function, but others remain scattered throughout the Internet and in the published literature. The searchable resources on these sites are collected and maintained manually and are therefore of higher quality than automatically updated sites, but also require more time and effort. We developed an online resource search system called OReFiL to address these issues. We developed a crawler to gather all of the web pages whose URLs appear in MEDLINE abstracts and full-text papers on the BioMed Central open-access journals. The URLs were extracted using regular expressions and rules based on our heuristic knowledge. We then indexed the online resources to facilitate their retrieval and comparison by researchers. Because every online resource has at least one PubMed ID, we can easily acquire its summary with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and confirm its credibility through reference to the corresponding PubMed entry. In addition, because OReFiL automatically extracts URLs and updates the index, minimal time and effort is needed to maintain the system. We developed OReFiL, a search system for online life science resources, which is freely available. The system's distinctive features include the ability to return up-to-date query-relevant online resources introduced in peer-reviewed papers; the ability to search using free words, MeSH terms, or author names; easy verification of each hit following links to the corresponding PubMed entry or to papers citing the URL through the search systems of BioMed Central, Scirus, HighWire Press, or Google Scholar; and quick confirmation of the existence of an online resource web page.

  3. ClearedLeavesDB: an online database of cleared plant leaf images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leaf vein networks are critical to both the structure and function of leaves. A growing body of recent work has linked leaf vein network structure to the physiology, ecology and evolution of land plants. In the process, multiple institutions and individual researchers have assembled collections of cleared leaf specimens in which vascular bundles (veins) are rendered visible. In an effort to facilitate analysis and digitally preserve these specimens, high-resolution images are usually created, either of entire leaves or of magnified leaf subsections. In a few cases, collections of digital images of cleared leaves are available for use online. However, these collections do not share a common platform nor is there a means to digitally archive cleared leaf images held by individual researchers (in addition to those held by institutions). Hence, there is a growing need for a digital archive that enables online viewing, sharing and disseminating of cleared leaf image collections held by both institutions and individual researchers. Description The Cleared Leaf Image Database (ClearedLeavesDB), is an online web-based resource for a community of researchers to contribute, access and share cleared leaf images. ClearedLeavesDB leverages resources of large-scale, curated collections while enabling the aggregation of small-scale collections within the same online platform. ClearedLeavesDB is built on Drupal, an open source content management platform. It allows plant biologists to store leaf images online with corresponding meta-data, share image collections with a user community and discuss images and collections via a common forum. We provide tools to upload processed images and results to the database via a web services client application that can be downloaded from the database. Conclusions We developed ClearedLeavesDB, a database focusing on cleared leaf images that combines interactions between users and data via an intuitive web interface. The web interface

  4. ClearedLeavesDB: an online database of cleared plant leaf images.

    PubMed

    Das, Abhiram; Bucksch, Alexander; Price, Charles A; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-03-28

    Leaf vein networks are critical to both the structure and function of leaves. A growing body of recent work has linked leaf vein network structure to the physiology, ecology and evolution of land plants. In the process, multiple institutions and individual researchers have assembled collections of cleared leaf specimens in which vascular bundles (veins) are rendered visible. In an effort to facilitate analysis and digitally preserve these specimens, high-resolution images are usually created, either of entire leaves or of magnified leaf subsections. In a few cases, collections of digital images of cleared leaves are available for use online. However, these collections do not share a common platform nor is there a means to digitally archive cleared leaf images held by individual researchers (in addition to those held by institutions). Hence, there is a growing need for a digital archive that enables online viewing, sharing and disseminating of cleared leaf image collections held by both institutions and individual researchers. The Cleared Leaf Image Database (ClearedLeavesDB), is an online web-based resource for a community of researchers to contribute, access and share cleared leaf images. ClearedLeavesDB leverages resources of large-scale, curated collections while enabling the aggregation of small-scale collections within the same online platform. ClearedLeavesDB is built on Drupal, an open source content management platform. It allows plant biologists to store leaf images online with corresponding meta-data, share image collections with a user community and discuss images and collections via a common forum. We provide tools to upload processed images and results to the database via a web services client application that can be downloaded from the database. We developed ClearedLeavesDB, a database focusing on cleared leaf images that combines interactions between users and data via an intuitive web interface. The web interface allows storage of large collections

  5. Factors Driving Learner Success in Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Phu; Cao, Vien; Vu, Lan; Cepero, Jude

    2014-01-01

    This study examined factors that contributed to the success of online learners in an online professional development course. Research instruments included an online survey and learners' activity logs in an online professional development course for 512 in-service teachers. The findings showed that there were several factors affecting online…

  6. Social and Virtual Networks: Evaluating Synchronous Online Interviewing Using Instant Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchcliffe, Vanessa; Gavin, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of the quality and utility of synchronous online interviewing for data collection in social network research. Synchronous online interviews facilitated by Instant Messenger as the communication medium, were undertaken with ten final year university students. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of…

  7. An Investigation of the Fundamental Characteristics in Quality Online Spanish Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Don, Margaret Rose

    2005-01-01

    This article presents research findings investigating the fundamental characteristics in online Spanish instruction (at the university level in the United States) designed to maximize learning outcomes. The researcher collected data to develop a rubric of the fundamental characteristic in online Spanish instruction and then to determine whether…

  8. Resolving embarrassing medical conditions with online health information.

    PubMed

    Redston, Sarah; de Botte, Sharon; Smith, Carl

    2018-06-01

    Reliance on online health information is proliferating and the Internet has the potential to revolutionize the provision of public health information. The anonymity of online health information may be particularly appealing to people seeking advice on 'embarrassing' health problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether data generated by the embarrassingproblems.com health information site showed any temporal patterns in problem resolution, and (2) whether successful resolution of a medical problem using online information varied with the type of medical problem. We analyzed the responses of visitors to the embarrassingproblems.com website on the resolution of their problems. The dataset comprised 100,561 responses to information provided on 77 different embarrassing problems grouped into 9 classes of medical problem over an 82-month period. Data were analyzed with a Bernoulli Generalized Linear Model using Bayesian inference. We detected a statistically important interaction between embarrassing problem type and the time period in which data were collected, with an improvement in problem resolution over time for all of the classes of medical problem on the website but with a lower rate of increase in resolution for urinary health problems and medical problems associated with the mouth and face. As far as we are aware, this is the first analysis of data of this nature. Findings support the growing recognition that online health information can contribute to the resolution of embarrassing medical problems, but demonstrate that outcomes may vary with medical problem type. The results indicate that building data collection into online information provision can help to refine and focus health information for online users. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Online Identities and Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswaran, Muthucumaru; Ali, Bader; Ozguven, Hatice; Lord, Julien

    Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between online identities and social networking. Online social networks (OSNs) are growing at a rapid pace and has millions of members in them. While the recent trend is to create explicit OSNs such as Facebook and MySpace, we also have implicit OSNs such as interaction graphs created by email and instant messaging services. Explicit OSNs allow users to create profiles and use them to project their identities on the web. There are many interesting identity related issues in the context of social networking including how OSNs help and hinder the definition of online identities.

  10. An Evaluation of Online Help for the NOTIS OPAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of online help systems in online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a study that evaluated the online help system for the NOTIS (Northwestern Online Total Integrated System) OPAC. Features of the system reviewed include online functions; training features; general interface features; access points; and message content and display…

  11. Qualitative assessment of study materials and communication strategies used in studies that include DNA collection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Mary M; Reed-Gross, Erika; Barfield, Wanda D; Prue, Christine E; Gallagher, Margaret L; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Honein, Margaret A

    2011-11-01

    To understand motivations and barriers to participation in studies that include DNA collection, focus group discussions were held with mothers who had participated in a case-control study of birth defects. Recruited mothers had completed an interview and had received a mailed kit containing cytobrushes to collect buccal cells for DNA from herself, her infant, and her infant's father. Six moderator-led focus groups were attended by a total of 38 women residing in Atlanta, Georgia. Focus groups were segmented by DNA collection status (biologics participants or nonparticipants), infant case-control status, infant birthweight, and maternal race and ethnicity. This report assesses maternal attitudes toward study materials and communication strategies. Across groups, respondents expressed concern about how their contact information was obtained. Study materials were described as clear and professional by most women, although some respondents reported confusion about disclosure of individual genetic results. Respondents generally reported that monetary incentives were not a motivation to participate, but increased perceived study legitimacy. Biologics nonparticipants expressed concerns about kit component sterility; government involvement; and DNA sample use, storage, and disposal. Respondents suggested that investigators provide feedback on whether sample collection was performed correctly and provide materials targeted to fathers to help alleviate paternal skepticism. Participation in DNA collection might be improved by strengthening study materials and communication strategies. Published 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. An online forum as a qualitative research method: practical issues.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik

    2006-01-01

    Despite the positive aspects of online forums as a qualitative research method, very little is known on the practical issues involved in using online forums for data collection, especially for a qualitative research project. The aim of this study was to describe the practical issues encountered in implementing an online forum as a qualitative component of a larger study on cancer pain experience. Throughout the study process, the research staff recorded issues ranging from minor technical problems to serious ethical dilemmas as they arose and wrote memos about them. The memos and written records of the discussions were reviewed and analyzed using content analysis. Two practical issues related to credibility were identified: (a) a high response and retention rate and (b) automatic transcripts. An issue related to dependability was the participants' forgetfulness. The issues related to confirmability were difficulties in theoretical saturation and unstandardized computer and Internet jargon. A security issue related to hacking attempts was noted as well. The analysis of these issues suggests several implications for future researchers who want to use online forums as a qualitative data collection method.

  13. Exploring Dispositions toward Online Reading: Analyzing the Survey of Online Reading Attitudes and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Internet is having a profound impact on the literacy practices of today's students. Acknowledging the complex processes associated with reading online, the Survey of Online Reading Attitudes and Behaviors (SORAB) was created to further our understandings in this area. A factor analysis revealed the instrument included five factors that…

  14. Understanding the Self-Directed Online Learning Preferences, Goals, Achievements, and Challenges of MIT OpenCourseWare Subscribers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Curtis J.; Lee, Mimi Miyoung; Kou, Xiaojing; Xu, Shuya; Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2015-01-01

    This research targeted the learning preferences, goals and motivations, achievements, challenges, and possibilities for life change of self-directed online learners who subscribed to the monthly OpenCourseWare (OCW) e-newsletter from MIT. Data collection included a 25-item survey of 1,429 newsletter subscribers; 613 of whom also completed an…

  15. 77 FR 10751 - Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request Proposed Projects: Data Collection for some of the Children's... Collection. Description: The Performance Measurement On-Line Tool (PMOTOOL) was designed by the Children's...

  16. Appropriate uses and considerations for online surveying in human dimensions research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Miller, Holly M.; Dietsch, Alia M.

    2011-01-01

    Online surveying has gained attention in recent years for its applicability to human dimensions research as an efficient and inexpensive data-collection method; however, online surveying is not a panacea. In this article, we provide some guidelines for alleviating or avoiding the criticisms and pitfalls suggested of online survey methods and explore two case studies demonstrating different approaches to online surveying. The first was a mixed-mode study of visitors to 52 participating National Wildlife Refuges. The response rate was 72%, with over half of respondents completing the survey online, resulting in cost-savings and efficiencies that would not have otherwise been realized. The second highlighted an online-only approach targeting specialized users of satellite imagery. Through branching and skipping, the online mode allowed flexibilities in administration impractical in a mail survey. The response rate of 53% was higher than typical for online surveys. Both case studies provide examples of appropriate uses of online surveying.

  17. Setting-up a European Cross-Provider Data Collection on Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalz, Marco; Kreijns, Karel; Walhout, Jaap; Castaño-Munoz, Jonatan; Espasa, Anna; Tovar, Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    While MOOCS have emerged as a new form of open online education around the world, research is stilling lagging behind to come up with a sound theoretical basis that can cover the impact of socio-economic background variables, ICT competences, prior experiences and lifelong learning profile, variance in intentions, environmental influences, outcome…

  18. Graphic Interfaces and Online Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, J. Mark

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of the use of Graphic User Interfaces (GUIs) with microcomputers and online services. Highlights include the development of graphics interfacing with microcomputers; CD-ROM databases; an evaluation of HyperCard as a potential interface to electronic mail and online commercial databases; and future possibilities.…

  19. Trust Discovery in Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piorkowski, John

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to discover interpersonal trust in online communities. Two novel trust models are built to explain interpersonal trust in online communities drawing theories and models from multiple relevant areas, including organizational trust models, trust in virtual settings, speech act theory, identity theory, and common bond theory. In…

  20. Historical Inquiry in an Informal Fan Community: Online Source Usage and the TV Show "The Tudors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Jolie Christine

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an informal online community dedicated to "The Tudors," a historical television show, and the ways in which its members engaged with a variety of sources in their discussions of the drama's real-life past. Data were collected over a 5-month period. The analysis included the types of sources used in conversation;…

  1. The Gift Horse Collection Development Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2008-01-01

    In the present climate of fascination with online this and digital that, it is easy to lose sight of the importance of the monographic collection in the evaluation of any library's ability to serve its clientele. Within realistic budgetary constraints, this collection should be maintained in a fashion as recent, relevant, accessible, and…

  2. 77 FR 25185 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0013] Agency Information Collection... request for comment. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) invites the general public to... formation of online communities. All users are required to authenticate prior to entering the site. In...

  3. 78 FR 66036 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2013-0028] Agency Information Collection... request for comment. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) invites the general public to... formation of online communities. All users are required to authenticate prior to entering the site. In...

  4. 76 FR 34232 - Agency Information Collection Activities, Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0042] Agency Information Collection... request for comment. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) invites the general public to... formation of online communities. All users are required to authenticate prior to entering the site. In...

  5. Statistics Online Computational Resource for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Christou, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    The Statistics Online Computational Resource (http://www.SOCR.ucla.edu) provides one of the largest collections of free Internet-based resources for probability and statistics education. SOCR develops, validates and disseminates two core types of materials--instructional resources and computational libraries. (Contains 2 figures.)

  6. Adolescents' and Emerging Adults' Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Elizabeth; Richards, Lacey

    2011-01-01

    More than half of all online American adolescents and emerging adults have created personal profiles for social networking on the Internet. Does homophily in their offline friendships extend online? Drawing mainly on research of face-to-face friendship, we collected data from the public spaces, called "walls," of 129 young Americans ages 16 to 19…

  7. Online Education in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the tremendous growth in the use of the Internet to deliver distance education at community colleges. The author examines various definitions of online education, including the types of courses, programs, and degrees available and the types of community colleges that offer greater amounts of online programming. Considerations…

  8. The fun culture in seniors' online communities.

    PubMed

    Nimrod, Galit

    2011-04-01

    Previous research found that "fun on line" is the most dominant content in seniors' online communities. The present study aimed to further explore the fun culture in these communities and to discover its unique qualities. The study applied an online ethnography (netnography) approach, utilizing a full year's data from 6 leading seniors' online communities. The final database included about 50,000 posts. The majority of posts were part of online social games, including cognitive, associative, and creative games. The main subjects in all contents were sex, gender differences, aging, grandparenting, politics, faith, and alcohol. Main participatory behaviors were selective timing, using expressive style, and personalization of the online character. Although most participants were "lurkers," the active participants nurtured community norms and relationships, as reflected in the written dialogues. In a reality of limited alternatives for digital games that meet older adults' needs and interests, seniors found an independent system to satisfy their need for play. Seniors' online communities provided a unique form of casual leisure, whose nature varied among different groups of participants. The fun culture seemed to offer participants many desired benefits, including meaningful play, liminality and communitas, opportunity to practice and demonstrate their abilities, and means for coping with aging. Therefore, it may have positive impact on seniors' well-being and successful aging.

  9. Online Course Evaluations Response Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guder, Faruk; Malliaris, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the reasons for low response rates in online evaluations. Survey data are collected from the students to understand factors that might affect student participation in the course evaluation process. When course evaluations were opened to the student body, an email announcement was sent to all students, and a reminder email was…

  10. Mobile Microblogging: Using Twitter and Mobile Devices in an Online Course to Promote Learning in Authentic Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-Chang; Ching, Yu-Hui

    2012-01-01

    This research applied a mixed-method design to explore how best to promote learning in authentic contexts in an online graduate course in instructional message design. The students used Twitter apps on their mobile devices to collect, share, and comment on authentic design examples found in their daily lives. The data sources included tweets…

  11. The Use of Online Surveys to Measure Satisfaction in Job Training and Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steve; Strachota, Elaine; Conceicao, Simone

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines two empirical studies that used online surveys to collect data to measure satisfaction in job training and workforce development. A description of each study, findings related to response rate, the processes used in online survey development and implementation, as well as recommendations for the future use of online surveys…

  12. The Hawaiian Algal Database: a laboratory LIMS and online resource for biodiversity data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Norman; Sherwood, Alison R; Kurihara, Akira; Conklin, Kimberly Y; Sauvage, Thomas; Presting, Gernot G

    2009-01-01

    Background Organization and presentation of biodiversity data is greatly facilitated by databases that are specially designed to allow easy data entry and organized data display. Such databases also have the capacity to serve as Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). The Hawaiian Algal Database was designed to showcase specimens collected from the Hawaiian Archipelago, enabling users around the world to compare their specimens with our photographs and DNA sequence data, and to provide lab personnel with an organizational tool for storing various biodiversity data types. Description We describe the Hawaiian Algal Database, a comprehensive and searchable database containing photographs and micrographs, geo-referenced collecting information, taxonomic checklists and standardized DNA sequence data. All data for individual samples are linked through unique accession numbers. Users can search online for sample information by accession number, numerous levels of taxonomy, or collection site. At the present time the database contains data representing over 2,000 samples of marine, freshwater and terrestrial algae from the Hawaiian Archipelago. These samples are primarily red algae, although other taxa are being added. Conclusion The Hawaiian Algal Database is a digital repository for Hawaiian algal samples and acts as a LIMS for the laboratory. Users can make use of the online search tool to view and download specimen photographs and micrographs, DNA sequences and relevant habitat data, including georeferenced collecting locations. It is publicly available at . PMID:19728892

  13. The "Prometeo" study: online collection of clinical data and outcome of Italian patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Del Piano, Mario; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Cipolletta, Livio; Zambelli, Alessandro; Chilovi, Fausto; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Pagliarulo, Michela; Ballarè, Marco; Rotondano, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    To implement an online, prospective collection of clinical data and outcome of patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in Italy ("Prometeo" study). Epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of nonvariceal UGIB are mainly known by retrospective studies and are probably changing. Data were collected by 13 Gastrointestinal Units in Italy from June 2006 to June 2007 (phase 1) and from December 2008 to December 2009 (phase 2): an interim analysis of data was performed between the 2 phases to optimize the online database. All the patients consecutively admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB were enrolled. Demographic and clinical data were collected, a diagnostic endoscopy performed, with endoscopic hemostasis if indicated. One thousand four hundred thirteen patients (M=932, mean age±SD=66.5±15.8; F=481, mean age±SD=74.2±14.6) were enrolled. Comorbidities were present in 83%. 52.4% were treated with acetyl salicylic acid or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): only 13.9% had an effective gastroprotection. Previous episodes of UGIB were present in 13.3%. Transfusion were needed in 43.9%. Shock was present in 9.3%. Endoscopic diagnosis was made in 93.2%: peptic lesions were the main cause of bleeding (duodenal ulcer 36.2%, gastric ulcer 29.6%, gastric/duodenal erosions 10.9%). At endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori was searched in 37.2%, and found positive in 51.3% of tested cases. Early rebleeding was observed in 5.4%: surgery was required in 14.3% of them. Bleeding-related death occurred in 4.0%: at multivariate analysis, the risk of death was correlated with female sex [odds ratio (OR=2.19, P=0.0089)], presence of neoplasia (OR=2.70, P=0.0057) or multiple comorbidities (OR=5.04, P=0.0280), shock at admission (OR=4.55, P=0.0001), and early rebleeding (OR=1.47, P=0.004). Prometeo database has provided an up-to-date picture of acute nonvariceal UGIB in Italy: patients are elderly, predominantly males, and with important

  14. Online discussion boards in dental education: potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    Linjawi, A I; Walmsley, A D; Hill, K B

    2012-02-01

    Online discussion boards may enhance critical analysis and reflection, and promote the acquisition of knowledge. To assess the effectiveness of online discussion board as a pedagogical tool in augmenting face-to-face teaching in dental education. Data were collected from a discussion archive offered through the E-course website of the School of Dentistry, University of Birmingham, UK in 2008. A multi-component metric included; participation, social learning, cognitive processing, role of instructors, and quality of discussion. Messages were coded for 14 variables to evaluate these dimensions. Data were analyzed using content analysis methodology and a complete message was uses as the unit of analysis. There were no significant difference in participation between students and instructors (P<0.05). Social interaction with peers appeared only through students posting messages with open questions (27/135 messages). The discussion board was mainly used by students to understand concepts (27/102 messages) and apply procedural knowledge (17/102 messages). Instructors were mainly replying to students' messages with (49/120 messages) or without (54/120 messages) proposing another action. Online discussion boards were found to be successful pedagogical tools in dental education. Further development of instructor-led discussion approach is needed to promote higher level learning and collaborative thinking. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Decentralized Online Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anwitaman; Buchegger, Sonja; Vu, Le-Hung; Strufe, Thorsten; Rzadca, Krzysztof

    Current Online social networks (OSN) are web services run on logically centralized infrastructure. Large OSN sites use content distribution networks and thus distribute some of the load by caching for performance reasons, nevertheless there is a central repository for user and application data. This centralized nature of OSNs has several drawbacks including scalability, privacy, dependence on a provider, need for being online for every transaction, and a lack of locality. There have thus been several efforts toward decentralizing OSNs while retaining the functionalities offered by centralized OSNs. A decentralized online social network (DOSN) is a distributed system for social networking with no or limited dependency on any dedicated central infrastructure. In this chapter we explore the various motivations of a decentralized approach to online social networking, discuss several concrete proposals and types of DOSN as well as challenges and opportunities associated with decentralization.

  16. 76 FR 10385 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Forms That Will be Included in the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation, DHS FORM 0700-01, DHS FORM 0700-02, DHS FORM 0700-03, DHS FORM 0700-04 AGENCY: Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition..., Acquisition Policy and Legislation Office, DHS will submit the following information collection request (ICR...

  17. 75 FR 69688 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will Be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Forms That Will Be Included in the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation, DHS Form 0700-01, DHS Form 0700-02, DHS Form 0700-03, DHS FORM 0700-04 AGENCY: Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition..., Acquisition Policy and Legislation Office, will submit the following Information Collection Request (ICR) to...

  18. Careers in Online: Want Ads in the Online Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Donna R.; Hoffman, Laura J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes sources of job listings in online industry including "New York Times,""Boston Globe,""Washington Post,""Los Angeles Times,""Wall Street Journal,""National Business Employment Weekly," and hints on methods for reading and responding to ads and placing them. Sample advertisements…

  19. Virtually Stress Free: Keeping Online Graduate Management Students Healthy from Afar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinak, M. Linda

    2012-01-01

    This article examines stress experienced by graduate management students in an online learning environment. I use qualitative methodology to examine data collected from 32 students in 2 sections of a graduate online course. Findings identify 6 categories of stressors experienced by the students as well as 6 categories of stress relief agents.…

  20. Information seeking and social support in online health communities: impact on patients' perceived empathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Many healthcare organizations (HCOs) including Kaiser Permanente, Johns Hopkins, Cleveland Medical Center, and MD Anderson Cancer Center, provide access to online health communities as part of their overall patient support services. The key objective in establishing and running these online health communities is to offer empathic support to patients. Patients' perceived empathy is considered to be critical in patient recovery, specifically, by enhancing patient's compliance with treatment protocols and the pace of healing. Most online health communities are characterized by two main functions: informational support and social support. This study examines the relative impact of these two distinct functions—that is, as an information seeking forum and as a social support forum—on patients' perceived empathy in online health communities. Design This study tests the impact of two variables that reflect the above functions of online health communities—information seeking effectiveness and perceived social support—on perceived empathy. The model also incorporates the potential moderating effect of homophily on these relationships. Measurements A web-based survey was used to collect data from members of the online health communities provided by three major healthcare centers. A regression technique was used to analyze the data to test the hypotheses. Results The study finds that it is the information seeking effectiveness rather than the social support which affects patient's perceived empathy in online health communities run by HCOs. The results indicate that HCOs that provide online health communities for their patients need to focus more on developing tools that will make information seeking more effective and efficient. PMID:21486888

  1. Applying Research Methods to a Gerontological Population: Matching Data Collection to Characteristics of Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    As Baby Boomers reach 65 years of age and methods of studying older populations are becoming increasingly varied (e.g., including mixed methods designs, on-line surveys, and video-based environments), there is renewed interest in evaluating methodologies used to collect data with older persons. The goal of this article is to examine…

  2. Student Perceptions of Effective Discussion in Online Forums: A Case Study of Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Alice; Faghih, Esmail; Dabir-Moghaddam, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on a mixed methods study which explored 32 Iranian pre-service teachers' perceptions of attending online asynchronous discussion forums during two seven-week online introductory courses in corpus linguistics. Data were collected through a questionnaire, discussion forum entries and online text-based semi-structured interviews.…

  3. Twitter-Based Detection of Illegal Online Sale of Prescription Opioid.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Kalyanam, Janani; Katsuki, Takeo; Lanckriet, Gert

    2017-12-01

    To deploy a methodology accurately identifying tweets marketing the illegal online sale of controlled substances. We first collected tweets from the Twitter public application program interface stream filtered for prescription opioid keywords. We then used unsupervised machine learning (specifically, topic modeling) to identify topics associated with illegal online marketing and sales. Finally, we conducted Web forensic analyses to characterize different types of online vendors. We analyzed 619 937 tweets containing the keywords codeine, Percocet, fentanyl, Vicodin, Oxycontin, oxycodone, and hydrocodone over a 5-month period from June to November 2015. A total of 1778 tweets (< 1%) were identified as marketing the sale of controlled substances online; 90% had imbedded hyperlinks, but only 46 were "live" at the time of the evaluation. Seven distinct URLs linked to Web sites marketing or illegally selling controlled substances online. Our methodology can identify illegal online sale of prescription opioids from large volumes of tweets. Our results indicate that controlled substances are trafficked online via different strategies and vendors. Public Health Implications. Our methodology can be used to identify illegal online sellers in criminal violation of the Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act.

  4. 78 FR 5171 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Online GEOINT Services (OGS) directorate of NGA announces a proposed public information collection and seeks public comment on the provisions thereof. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary...

  5. Educating Clergy Online: A Pedagogical Map to Guide and Assess Spiritual Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Tammy Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The disciplines of theological education, spiritual formation, and online learning are brought into conversation with one another in this qualitative study addressing whether and how online seminary courses attend to students' spiritual development. Primary data was collected through a series of interviews with faculty experienced in both…

  6. Are crimes by online predators different from crimes by sex offenders who know youth in-person?

    PubMed

    Wolak, Janis; Finkelhor, David

    2013-12-01

    We examined cases in which sex offenders arrested for Internet-related crimes used the Internet for sexual communications with minors, comparing crimes by offenders who met victims online to those by offenders who knew victims in-person prior to the offense. We collected data from a national sample of law enforcement agencies (n = 2,653) about arrests in 2009 for Internet-related sex crimes against minors, conducting detailed telephone interviews with investigators about individual cases. This paper examines a subset of arrest cases that included the use of online sexual communications (online-meeting offenders, n = 143; know-in-person/online offenders, n = 139). Compared with know-in-person/online offenders, online-meeting offenders were less likely to have criminal backgrounds and more likely to use online communications to deceive victims. However, deception was a factor in a minority of cases and was also used by some know-in-person/online offenders. The majority of cases in both groups involved statutory rape (i.e., nonforcible illegal sexual activity with underage youth) or noncontact offenses such as child pornography production or sexual solicitation of a minor. We conclude that crimes by online-meeting offenders should not be treated as different or more dangerous than those by know-in-person/online offenders who use online sexual communications. Rather, prevention efforts should educate about the nature of statutory rape and related noncontact offenses. The primary message should be that it is criminal for adults to make sexual overtures to minors, online or offline, no matter what their relationship to the youth. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing Relationship and Sexual Satisfaction in Adolescent Relationships Formed Online and Offline.

    PubMed

    Blunt-Vinti, Heather D; Wheldon, Christopher; McFarlane, Mary; Brogan, Natalie; Walsh-Buhi, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Using the Internet to meet new people is becoming more common; however, such behavior is often considered risky, particularly for adolescents. Nevertheless, adolescents are meeting people through online venues and some are forming romantic/sexual relationships. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship and sexual satisfaction reported by teens in online- and offline-initiated relationships. Data were collected from 273 13-19 year olds visiting a publicly funded clinic through 2010 and 2011. Questions included where respondents met the partner (online vs. offline), time between meeting and first sex, how well they knew the partner, and relationship and sexual (R&S) satisfaction. Analyses consisted of descriptive statistics, t tests, and path analysis, exploring R&S satisfaction in online- and offline-initiated relationships. R&S satisfaction scores were moderate for adolescents who reported meeting partners online and in person but were statistically higher in offline-initiated relationships. There was an inverse relationship between having an online partner and both relationship and sexual satisfaction. Additionally, knowing partners for a longer period of time and feeling more knowledgeable about partners before having sex were statistically significantly related to higher R&S satisfaction. Teens in this study reported more satisfying relationships with partners met offline compared with online. Results suggest that encouraging teens to wait longer and to get to know their partner(s) better before engaging in sex may improve satisfaction with, and quality of, those relationships. These findings provide an important contribution to sexual health promotion among young people, with whom technology use is ubiquitous. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  8. Challenges and Considerations When Conducting an Online Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leh, Amy Sheng Chieh; Som, Yahya Mat

    This paper reports challenges of and suggestions for conducting online courses, focusing on the following areas: (1) instructional format, including transferring classroom activities to online activities without affecting students' concentration, motivation, thought, mastery, and comprehension; (2) methods of instruction, including developing an…

  9. 78 FR 36578 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Office for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC...; Businesses or other for-profit. Abstract: The Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance... will deliver these forms to recipients of online training and technical assistance and, in some cases...

  10. Online Friendship, Romance, and Sex: Properties and Associations of the Online Relationship Initiation Scale.

    PubMed

    Harris, Keith M; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2016-08-01

    Online relationships are increasingly central to many people's lives. As a result, there is a growing need to scientifically examine their psychosocial implications. This study developed and tested the Online Relationship Initiation Scale (ORIS) through classical and item response theory analyses to address this need. An anonymous online survey included 713 adults, aged 18-71 years. The ORIS was tested on psychometric properties and examined for associations with gender and several standardized psychosocial measures. Results demonstrated unidimensionality of nine items, strong factor loadings, and high internal consistency (α = 0.90, ωt = 0.94). All items captured significant information on the latent trait and none showed differential item functioning by sex, age group, or ethnicity. General linear modeling confirmed hypotheses that men were more likely than women to initiate online relationships. Online relationship initiation was not strongly associated with perceived social support, but was positively related to financial distress, and willingness to engage in infidelity or unprotected sex. The ORIS was negatively associated with age and satisfaction with life and showed modest interactions with ethnicity and hours online. This study provided empirical evidence for an interpersonal relationship initiation construct. The ORIS was shown to be a psychometrically sound instrument for evaluating online interpersonal behaviors and their associations with psychosocial and demographic factors. Such psychometrically sound instruments can be useful in exploring online interpersonal behaviors and their significance.

  11. Heuristic and analytic processing in online sports betting.

    PubMed

    d'Astous, Alain; Di Gaspero, Marc

    2015-06-01

    This article presents the results of two studies that examine the occurrence of heuristic (i.e., intuitive and fast) and analytic (i.e., deliberate and slow) processes among people who engage in online sports betting on a regular basis. The first study was qualitative and was conducted with a convenience sample of 12 regular online sports gamblers who described the processes by which they arrive at a sports betting decision. The results of this study showed that betting online on sports events involves a mix of heuristic and analytic processes. The second study consisted in a survey of 161 online sports gamblers where performance in terms of monetary gains, experience in online sports betting, propensity to collect and analyze relevant information prior to betting, and use of bookmaker odds were measured. This study showed that heuristic and analytic processes act as mediators of the relationship between experience and performance. The findings stemming of these two studies give some insights into gamblers' modes of thinking and behaviors in an online sports betting context and show the value of the dual mediation process model for research that looks at gambling activities from a judgment and decision making perspective.

  12. A Retrospective Review of the Clinical Characteristics and Blood Glucose Data from Cellnovo System Users using Data Collected from the Cellnovo Online Platform.

    PubMed

    Hautier-Suply, Olivia; Friedmann, Yasmin; Shapley, Julian

    2018-04-01

    Technological advances have led to innovative insulin delivery systems for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In particular, the combination of miniature engineering and software algorithms contained in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) system pumps provide the user and the healthcare practitioner with an opportunity to review and adjust blood glucose (BG) levels according to system feedback, and to modify or programme their regimen according to their needs. While CSII pumps record a number of data parameters such as BG level, carbohydrate intake, activity and insulin delivered, these data are generally 'locked in' and can only be accessed by uploading to a cloud-based system, thus information is not contemporaneous. The Cellnovo Diabetes Management System (Cellnovo, Bridgend, UK) allows data to be transmitted securely and wirelessly in real time to a secure server, which is then retrieved by an online platform, the Cellnovo Online platform, enabling continuous access by the user and by clinicians. In this article, the authors describe a retrospective review of the patient data automatically uploaded to the Cellnovo Online platform. Baseline clinical and demographic characteristics collected at the start of pump therapy are shown for all patients, and BG data from a sub-cohort of patients who have been using the system for at least 6 months and who take and record an average of three BG level tests per day are presented to demonstrate glycaemic data over time.

  13. Online Teaching Best Practices to Better Engage Students with Quantitative Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strandberg, Alicia Graziosi; Campbell, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    It is well known engaged students perform better in any course (Nash, 2005, Angelino et. al 2007, Revere and Kovach 2011). However in the online classroom environment engaging students can be a challenge especially with quantitative material. With over 12 combined years of online teaching, the authors have collected useful data that help analyze…

  14. A Logistic Approach to Predicting Student Success in Online Database Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garman, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the affects of reading comprehension on the performance of online students in a beginning database management class. Reading comprehension is measured by the results of a Cloze Test administered online to the students during the first week of classes. Using data collected from 2002 through 2008, the significance of the Cloze…

  15. Plant Collections Online: Using Digital Herbaria in Biology Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2013-01-01

    Herbaria are collections of preserved plants specimens, some of which date back to the 16th century. They are essential to botanical research, especially in systematics. They can also be important historical documents. The collections of Lewis and Clark, Carolus Linnaeus, and Charles Darwin, to name a few, are primary sources for the study of…

  16. Online Sellers’ Website Quality Influencing Online Buyers’ Purchase Intention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea Lee, Tan; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Zakuan, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    The increase adoption of Internet among young users in Malaysia provides high prospect for online seller. Young users aged between 18 and 25 years old are important to online sellers because they are actively involved in online purchasing and this group of online buyers is expected to dominate future online market. Therefore, examining online sellers’ website quality and online buyers’ purchase intention is crucial. Based on the Theory of planned behavior (TPB), a conceptual model of online sellers’ website quality and purchase intention of online buyers was developed. E-tailQ instrument was adapted in this study which composed of website design, reliability/fulfillment, security, privacy & trust, and customer service. Using online questionnaire and convenience sampling procedure, primary data were obtained from 240 online buyers aged between 18 to 25 years old. It was discovered that website design, website reliability/fulfillment, website security, privacy & trust, and website customer service positively and significantly influence intention of online buyers to continuously purchase via online channels. This study concludes that online sellers’ website quality is important in predicting online buyers’ purchase intention. Recommendation and implication of this study were discussed focusing on how online sellers should improve their website quality to stay competitive in online business.

  17. Lessons learned using Web conference technology for online focus group interviews.

    PubMed

    Tuttas, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Researchers use Internet technology for data collection in qualitative studies. In the literature there are published accounts of synchronous (real-time) and more commonly, asynchronous (not-real-time) focus group data collection methods supported by Internet technology in the form of email correspondence, LISTSERVs, discussion boards, and chat rooms. Real-time audiovisual Web conference technology offers qualitative researchers a promising alternative means to carry out focus groups. In this methodological article I describe how I used Web conference technology to host online focus groups for a qualitative study about job integration experiences of travel nurses geographically dispersed across the United States. I describe lessons learned from the use of this innovative method for qualitative data collection, including a brief overview about the use of dictation software for transcription. This new knowledge is useful to researchers considering Web conference technology to carry out focus group data collection in qualitative research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Evaluation of Online Log Variables That Estimate Learners' Time Management in a Korean Online Learning Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Park, Yeonjeong; Yoon, Meehyun; Sung, Hanall

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the psychological variables and online behavioral patterns of students, collected through a learning management system (LMS). As the psychological variable, time and study environment management (TSEM), one of the sub-constructs of MSLQ, was chosen to verify a set of time-related…

  19. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  20. The Relationship between Motivation, Learning Strategies and Choice of Environment whether Traditional or Including an Online Component

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Karen; Blumberg, Fran; Auld, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how students' achievement goals, self-efficacy and learning strategies influenced their choice of an online, hybrid or traditional learning environment. One hundred thirty-two post-secondary students completed surveys soliciting their preferences for learning environments, reasons for their preference, their motivational…

  1. Massively Multiplayer Online Games as Living Laboratories: Opportunities and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducheneaut, Nicolas

    The digital nature of online games makes them particularly amenable to large-scale, automated data collection and analysis; so researchers have begun to use them as living laboratories to test or refine the existing theories of human behavior. On the basis of several years of intensive data collection in several massively multiplayer online games, this chapter addresses three problems concerning validity and generalizability that must be taken into account. First, each game has a set of laws that steer player behavior, thereby introducing confounding factors that have to be taken into account by the researcher. Second, games attract skewed samples of players, and players may adopt transformed personalities inside the game world, which puts into question the validity of extending findings from observations in the digital realm into the physical one. Third, the lack of a clear boundary defining the "game space," illustrated by the many websites and forums for popular games, raises the question of whether online games themselves capture the totality of the user's experience. The problematic mapping between "real-world" behaviors and those in online games presents research opportunities as well as pitfalls that need to be avoided.

  2. An Online Forum As a Qualitative Research Method: Practical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite positive aspects of online forums as a qualitative research method, very little is known about practical issues involved in using online forums for data collection, especially for a qualitative research project. Objectives The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical issues that the researchers encountered in implementing an online forum as a qualitative component of a larger study on cancer pain experience. Method Throughout the study process, the research staff recorded issues ranged from minor technical problems to serious ethical dilemmas as they arose and wrote memos about them. The memos and written records of discussions were reviewed and analyzed using the content analysis suggested by Weber. Results Two practical issues related to credibility were identified: a high response and retention rate and automatic transcripts. An issue related to dependability was the participants’ easy forgetfulness. The issues related to confirmability were difficulties in theoretical saturation and unstandardized computer and Internet jargon. A security issue related to hacking attempts was noted as well. Discussion The analysis of these issues suggests several implications for future researchers who want to use online forums as a qualitative data collection method. PMID:16849979

  3. 77 FR 132 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Information Collection Plan for GovBenefits Online ACTION: Notice... Collection Plan for GovBenefits Online,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and... response, and estimated total burden may be obtained from the RegInfo.gov Web site, http://www.reginfo.gov...

  4. Would you Find Thirty online? Website use in a Western Australian physical activity campaign.

    PubMed

    Leavy, J E; Rosenberg, M; Barnes, R; Bauman, A; Bull, F C

    2013-08-01

    Mass media campaigns have used a range of traditional media (television, radio and print) to communicate health messages. In the past decade the Internet has added to these traditional methods with Web 2.0, smart phone technology and interactive media. 'Find Thirty every day(®)', a Western Australia population-wide mass media campaign delivered over 2 years, used a combination of traditional mass media, a website, online resources and banner advertising. The aim of the present study is to describe the use of the Find Thirty every day(®) website during the campaign media activities of May 2008-June 2010. Cross-sectional self-reported survey data were collected from a random sample of adults using a computer-assisted telephone interview over the period February-March 2010. Objective online analytical measures of unique visits to the Find Thirty every day(®) website were collected between June 2008 and June 2010. Monthly visitors to the Find Thirty every day(®) website increased from 3193 in 2009 to 4374 in 2010. During the last two media waves (October 2009 and February 2010), site visits were 5388 and 5272 per month, respectively. The impact of the Find Thirty every day(®) website was a positive outcome, considering the minimal online presence. SO WHAT? Health communication campaign planners should maximise the potential synergy of traditional mass media and new social media in future campaigns. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary approach that includes communication researchers, experts in information systems and a creative team experienced in online environments will need to be the way forward.

  5. Database Search Strategies & Tips. Reprints from the Best of "ONLINE" [and]"DATABASE."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online, Inc., Weston, CT.

    Reprints of 17 articles presenting strategies and tips for searching databases online appear in this collection, which is one in a series of volumes of reprints from "ONLINE" and "DATABASE" magazines. Edited for information professionals who use electronically distributed databases, these articles address such topics as: (1)…

  6. USGS National Assessment of Oil and Gas Online (NOGA Online)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, L.H.

    2003-01-01

    The Central Energy Resources Team (CERT) of the U.S. Geological Survey is providing results of the USGS National Assessment of Oil and Gas online (NOGA Online). In addition to providing resource estimates and geologic reports, NOGA Online includes an internet map application that allows interactive viewing and analysis of assessment data and results. CERT is in the process of reassessing domestic oil and natural gas resources in a series of priority basins in the United States using a Total Petroleum System (TPS) approach where the assessment unit is the basic appraisal unit (rather than the oil and gas play used in the 1995 study). Assessments of undiscovered oil and gas resources in five such priority provinces were recently completed to meet the requirements of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 2000 (EPCA 2000). New assessment results are made available at this site on an ongoing basis.

  7. Understanding a Nonlinear Causal Relationship Between Rewards and Physicians' Contributions in Online Health Care Communities: Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jying-Nan; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Yu, Haiyan; Hsu, Yuan-Teng

    2017-12-21

    The online health care community is not just a place for the public to share physician reviews or medical knowledge, but also a physician-patient communication platform. The medical resources of developing countries are relatively inadequate, and the online health care community is a potential solution to alleviate the phenomenon of long hospital queues and the lack of medical resources in rural areas. However, the success of the online health care community depends on online contributions by physicians. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of incentive mechanisms on physician's online contribution behavior in the online health community. We addressed the following questions: (1) from which specialty area are physicians more likely to participate in online health care community activities, (2) what are the factors affecting physician online contributions, and (3) do incentive mechanisms, including psychological and material rewards, result in differences of physician online contributions? We designed a longitudinal study involving a data sample in three waves. All data were collected from the Good Doctor website, which is the largest online health care community in China. We first used descriptive statistics to investigate the physician online contribution behavior in its entirety. Then multiple linear and quadratic regression models were applied to verify the causal relationship between rewards and physician online contribution. Our sample included 40,300 physicians from 3607 different hospitals, 10 different major specialty areas, and 31 different provinces or municipalities. Based on the multiple quadratic regression model, we found that the coefficients of the control variables, past physician online contributions, doctor review rating, clinic title, hospital level, and city level, were .415, .189, -.099, -.106, and -.143, respectively. For the psychological (or material) rewards, the standardized coefficient of the main effect was 0.261 (or 0

  8. Understanding a Nonlinear Causal Relationship Between Rewards and Physicians’ Contributions in Online Health Care Communities: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The online health care community is not just a place for the public to share physician reviews or medical knowledge, but also a physician-patient communication platform. The medical resources of developing countries are relatively inadequate, and the online health care community is a potential solution to alleviate the phenomenon of long hospital queues and the lack of medical resources in rural areas. However, the success of the online health care community depends on online contributions by physicians. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the effect of incentive mechanisms on physician’s online contribution behavior in the online health community. We addressed the following questions: (1) from which specialty area are physicians more likely to participate in online health care community activities, (2) what are the factors affecting physician online contributions, and (3) do incentive mechanisms, including psychological and material rewards, result in differences of physician online contributions? Methods We designed a longitudinal study involving a data sample in three waves. All data were collected from the Good Doctor website, which is the largest online health care community in China. We first used descriptive statistics to investigate the physician online contribution behavior in its entirety. Then multiple linear and quadratic regression models were applied to verify the causal relationship between rewards and physician online contribution. Results Our sample included 40,300 physicians from 3607 different hospitals, 10 different major specialty areas, and 31 different provinces or municipalities. Based on the multiple quadratic regression model, we found that the coefficients of the control variables, past physician online contributions, doctor review rating, clinic title, hospital level, and city level, were .415, .189, –.099, –.106, and –.143, respectively. For the psychological (or material) rewards, the standardized

  9. Unpopular, overweight, and socially inept: reconsidering the stereotype of online gamers.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Rachel; Festl, Ruth; Quandt, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Online gaming has become an activity associated with a highly specific, caricatured, and often negative image. This "stereotype" has permeated the collective consciousness, as online gamers have become common caricatures in popular media. A lack of comprehensive demographic inquiries into the online gaming population has made it difficult to dispute these stereotypical characteristics and led to rising concerns about the validity of these stereotypes. The current study aims to clarify the basis of these negative characterizations, and determine whether online video game players display the social, physical, and psychological shortcomings stereotypically attributed them. Sampling and recruiting was conducted using a two-stage approach. First, a representative sample of 50,000 individuals aged 14 and older who were asked about their gaming behavior in an omnibus telephone survey. From this sample, 4,500 video game players were called for a second telephone interview, from which the current data were collected. Only those participants who completed all of the questions relating to video game play were retained for the current analysis (n=2,550). Between- and within-group analyses were enlisted to uncover differences between online, offline, and nongame playing communities across varying degrees of involvement. The results indicate that the stereotype of online gamers is not fully supported empirically. However, a majority of the stereotypical attributes was found to hold a stronger relationship with more involved online players than video game players as a whole, indicating an empirical foundation for the unique stereotypes that have emerged for this particular subgroup of video game players.

  10. Online Peer-to-Peer Communities in the Daily Lives of People With Chronic Illness: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kingod, Natasja; Cleal, Bryan; Wahlberg, Ayo; Husted, Gitte R

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative systematic review investigated how individuals with chronic illness experience online peer-to-peer support and how their experiences influence daily life with illness. Selected studies were appraised by quality criteria focused upon research questions and study design, participant selection, methods of data collection, and methods of analysis. Four themes were identified: (a) illness-associated identity work, (b) social support and connectivity, (c) experiential knowledge sharing, and (d) collective voice and mobilization. Findings indicate that online peer-to-peer communities provide a supportive space for daily self-care related to chronic illness. Online communities provided a valued space to strengthen social ties and exchange knowledge that supported offline ties and patient-doctor relationships. Individuals used online communities to exchange experiential knowledge about everyday life with illness. This type of knowledge was perceived as extending far beyond medical care. Online communities were also used to mobilize and raise collective awareness about illness-specific concerns. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Developing national on-line services to annotate and analyse underwater imagery in a research cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, R.; Langlois, T.; Friedman, A.; Davey, B.

    2017-12-01

    Fish image annotation data is currently collected by various research, management and academic institutions globally (+100,000's hours of deployments) with varying degrees of standardisation and limited formal collaboration or data synthesis. We present a case study of how national on-line services, developed within a domain-oriented research cloud, have been used to annotate habitat images and synthesise fish annotation data sets collected using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) and baited remote underwater stereo-video (stereo-BRUV). Two developing software tools have been brought together in the marine science cloud to provide marine biologists with a powerful service for image annotation. SQUIDLE+ is an online platform designed for exploration, management and annotation of georeferenced images & video data. It provides a flexible annotation framework allowing users to work with their preferred annotation schemes. We have used SQUIDLE+ to sample the habitat composition and complexity of images of the benthos collected using stereo-BRUV. GlobalArchive is designed to be a centralised repository of aquatic ecological survey data with design principles including ease of use, secure user access, flexible data import, and the collection of any sampling and image analysis information. To easily share and synthesise data we have implemented data sharing protocols, including Open Data and synthesis Collaborations, and a spatial map to explore global datasets and filter to create a synthesis. These tools in the science cloud, together with a virtual desktop analysis suite offering python and R environments offer an unprecedented capability to deliver marine biodiversity information of value to marine managers and scientists alike.

  12. Mental disorder recovery correlated with centralities and interactions on an online social network

    PubMed Central

    Sayama, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has established both a theoretical basis and strong empirical evidence that effective social behavior plays a beneficial role in the maintenance of physical and psychological well-being of people. To test whether social behavior and well-being are also associated in online communities, we studied the correlations between the recovery of patients with mental disorders and their behaviors in online social media. As the source of the data related to the social behavior and progress of mental recovery, we used PatientsLikeMe (PLM), the world’s first open-participation research platform for the development of patient-centered health outcome measures. We first constructed an online social network structure based on patient-to-patient ties among 200 patients obtained from PLM. We then characterized patients’ online social activities by measuring the numbers of “posts and views” and “helpful marks” each patient obtained. The patients’ recovery data were obtained from their self-reported status information that was also available on PLM. We found that some node properties (in-degree, eigenvector centrality and PageRank) and the two online social activity measures were significantly correlated with patients’ recovery. Furthermore, we re-collected the patients’ recovery data two months after the first data collection. We found significant correlations between the patients’ social behaviors and the second recovery data, which were collected two months apart. Our results indicated that social interactions in online communities such as PLM were significantly associated with the current and future recoveries of patients with mental disorders. PMID:26312174

  13. Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

  14. Suspect online sellers and contraceptive access.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim K; Lovett, Kimberly M

    2012-11-01

    Issues surrounding contraception access have been a national focus. During this debate, adolescent and adult women may seek these products online. Due to safety concerns, including potential counterfeit forms, we wished to assess whether online "no prescription" contraceptives were available. We assessed online availability of reversible, prescription contraceptive methods resulting in <10 undesired pregnancies/year, i.e., Depo-Provera shot; oral contraceptives; NuvaRing; Ortho Evra patch; Paragard and Mirena IUDs; and Implanon/Nexplanon implants. Using Google search "buy ITEM no prescription," we reviewed the first five result pages for "no prescription" vendors. Searches were conducted 1/3/2012-2/20/2012. All contraceptives were available as "no prescription" products. Furthermore, IUDs were advertised as "over-the-counter" and YouTube videos provided "how to" videos, including a cartoon version. We also found that illicit online pharmacy marketing is shifting from direct search engine access to social media (Facebook, Twitter, Slidehare, flickr). Online contraceptive sales represent patient safety risks and a parallel system of high-risk product access absent professional guidance. Providers should educate patients, while policy makers employ legal strategies to address these systemic risks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Social argumentation in online synchronous communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiono, Ivan

    In education, argumentation has an increasing importance because it can be used to foster learning in various fields including philosophy, history, sciences, and mathematics. Argumentation is also at the heart of scientific inquiry. Many educational technology researchers have been interested in finding out how technologies can be employed to improve students' learning of argumentation. Therefore, many computer-based tools or argumentation systems have been developed to assist students in their acquisition of argumentation skills. While the argumentation systems incorporating online debating tools present a good resource in formal settings, there is limited research revealing what argumentative skills students are portraying in informal online settings without the presence of a moderator. This dissertation investigates the nature of argumentative practices in a massively multiplayer online game where the system successfully incorporates the authentic use of online synchronous communication tools and the patterns that emerge from the interplay between a number of contextual variables including synchronicity, interest, authenticity, and topical knowledge.

  16. The protective effects of parental monitoring and internet restriction on adolescents' risk of online harassment.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Atika; Bleakley, Amy; Jordan, Amy B; Romer, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    With many adolescents using the internet to communicate with their peers, online harassment is on the rise among youth. The purpose of this study was to understand how parental monitoring and strategies parents use to regulate children's internet use (i.e., internet restriction) can help reduce online harassment among adolescents. Online survey data were collected from a nationally representative sample of parents and their 12-17 year old adolescents (n = 629; 49 % female). Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect effects of parental monitoring and internet restriction on being a victim of online harassment. Potential mediators included adolescents' frequency of use of social networking websites, time spent on computers outside of school, and internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. Age and gender differences were also explored. Adolescents' reports of parental monitoring and efforts to regulate specific forms of internet use were associated with reduced rates of online harassment. Specifically, the effect of parental monitoring was largely direct and 26 times greater than parental internet restriction. The latter was associated with lower rates of harassment only indirectly by limiting internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. These effects operated similarly for younger and older adolescents and for males and females. Adolescents' perceptions of parental monitoring and awareness can be protective against online harassment. Specific restriction strategies such as regulating internet time and content can also help reduce the risk of online harassment.

  17. Online discussions with pregnant and parenting adolescents: perspectives and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Valaitis, Ruta K; Sword, Wendy A

    2005-10-01

    The Internet is an innovative strategy to increase public participation. It is important to include pregnant and parenting teens' perspectives when planning programs to meet their needs. This qualitative study explored online discussions as a strategy to enhance participation by this population. Findings showed that online communication was preferred over face-to-face group discussions. Being anonymous online encouraged open and honest feedback. Participants experienced various forms of social support, however, there was an overall lack of teen involvement online. Strategies to engage adolescents in online discussions and reduce barriers are discussed. Strategies included the use of teen moderators, home computer access, technical support, and engagement in naturally flowing online discussions to meet social support needs. Blending researchers' with teens' needs for social support in an online environment is encouraged. With careful planning and design, online communications can result in mutual benefits for researchers, service providers, and pregnant and parenting adolescents.

  18. Robust Online Hamiltonian Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granade, Christopher; Ferrie, Christopher; Wiebe, Nathan; Cory, David

    2013-05-01

    In this talk, we introduce a machine-learning algorithm for the problem of inferring the dynamical parameters of a quantum system, and discuss this algorithm in the example of estimating the precession frequency of a single qubit in a static field. Our algorithm is designed with practicality in mind by including parameters that control trade-offs between the requirements on computational and experimental resources. The algorithm can be implemented online, during experimental data collection, or can be used as a tool for post-processing. Most importantly, our algorithm is capable of learning Hamiltonian parameters even when the parameters change from experiment-to-experiment, and also when additional noise processes are present and unknown. Finally, we discuss the performance of the our algorithm by appeal to the Cramer-Rao bound. This work was financially supported by the Canadian government through NSERC and CERC and by the United States government through DARPA. NW would like to acknowledge funding from USARO-DTO.

  19. Impact of Online Discussions on Web Based Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Loreen M.; Wimmer, Hayden; Kilgus, Lawrence; Force, Christina

    2017-01-01

    The practice of including online discussion posts to traditional courses is increasing. Online discussions allow for active learning to occur as students express their ideas and respond to others. The time and thought provided by online discussion posts allows students to utilize higher level cognitive skills. Web-based assessments are another…

  20. Accommodating Students' Sensory Learning Modalities in Online Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Barbara N.; Rehm, Marsha L.

    2016-01-01

    Online classes have become a popular and viable method of educating students in both K-12 settings and higher education, including in family and consumer sciences (FCS) programs. Online learning dramatically affects the way students learn. This article addresses how online learning can accommodate the sensory learning modalities (sight, hearing,…

  1. OReFiL: an online resource finder for life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2007-01-01

    Background Many online resources for the life sciences have been developed and introduced in peer-reviewed papers recently, ranging from databases and web applications to data-analysis software. Some have been introduced in special journal issues or websites with a search function, but others remain scattered throughout the Internet and in the published literature. The searchable resources on these sites are collected and maintained manually and are therefore of higher quality than automatically updated sites, but also require more time and effort. Description We developed an online resource search system called OReFiL to address these issues. We developed a crawler to gather all of the web pages whose URLs appear in MEDLINE abstracts and full-text papers on the BioMed Central open-access journals. The URLs were extracted using regular expressions and rules based on our heuristic knowledge. We then indexed the online resources to facilitate their retrieval and comparison by researchers. Because every online resource has at least one PubMed ID, we can easily acquire its summary with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and confirm its credibility through reference to the corresponding PubMed entry. In addition, because OReFiL automatically extracts URLs and updates the index, minimal time and effort is needed to maintain the system. Conclusion We developed OReFiL, a search system for online life science resources, which is freely available. The system's distinctive features include the ability to return up-to-date query-relevant online resources introduced in peer-reviewed papers; the ability to search using free words, MeSH terms, or author names; easy verification of each hit following links to the corresponding PubMed entry or to papers citing the URL through the search systems of BioMed Central, Scirus, HighWire Press, or Google Scholar; and quick confirmation of the existence of an online resource web page. PMID:17683589

  2. 76 FR 66715 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Monthly Progress...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you...-OARM-2011-0748, which is available for online viewing at http://www.regulations.gov , or in person... a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information, unless it displays a currently...

  3. Online Learners and Their Self-Disclosure Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doring, Anne; Hodge, Ashley; Heo, Misook

    2014-01-01

    To understand and identify information-sharing preferences among online students, a US survey collected data from university students. Specifically, this study analyzes students' information disclosure preferences and to what extent demographics influence a student's willingness to disclose personal information. This study also examines whether or…

  4. Library Instruction and Online Database Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercado, Heidi

    1999-01-01

    Reviews changes in online database searching in academic libraries. Topics include librarians conducting all searches; the advent of end-user searching and the need for user instruction; compact disk technology; online public catalogs; the Internet; full text databases; electronic information literacy; user education and the remote library user;…

  5. Who's Gonna Pay the Piper for Free Online Databases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new pricing models for some online services and considers the possibilities for the traditional online database market. Topics include multimedia music databases, including copyright implications; other retail-oriented databases; and paying for free databases with advertising. (LRW)

  6. The impact of asynchronous online course design for professional development on science-teacher self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Caryn L. Smith

    This dissertation examines how various designs of asynchronous online courses for teacher professional development may impact science-teacher self-efficacy. Mayer's studies, providing the cognitive theory of multimedia learning, targeted designs of asynchronous online learning and the point where contributions of written, auditory, and visual information on these sites could cause cognitive overload (Mayer, 2005). With increasing usage of online resources for educators to gain teaching credits, understanding how to construct these professional development offerings is critical. Teacher self-efficacy can affect how well information from these courses relays to students in their classroom. This research explored the connection between online asynchronous professional development design and teacher self-efficacy through analysis of a physics-based course in three distinct course-design offerings, while collecting content-acquisition data and self-efficacy effects before and after participation. Results from this research showed teacher self-efficacy had improved in all online treatments which included a text-only, text and audio and text, audio and animation version of the same physics content. Content knowledge was most effected by the text-only and text and audio treatments with significan growth occurring in the remember, apply, and analyze levels of bloom's taxonomy. Due to the small number of participants, it cannot be said that these results are conclusive.

  7. Students' Perceptions about Online Support Services: Institutional, Instructional, and Self-Care Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceição, Simone C.O.; Lehman, Rosemary M.

    2016-01-01

    As online education becomes wide spread among institutions of higher education in the U.S., student support services are often overlooked. This paper presents a study that investigated support strategies perceived as important by online students in higher education in the U.S. Data were collected by surveying 439 students. Using purposeful…

  8. Object-Oriented Control System Design Using On-Line Training of Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubaai, Ahmed

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with the object-oriented model development of a neuro-controller design for permanent magnet (PM) dc motor drives. The system under study is described as a collection of interacting objects. Each object module describes the object behaviors, called methods. The characteristics of the object are included in its variables. The knowledge of the object exists within its variables, and the performance is determined by its methods. This structure maps well to the real world objects that comprise the system being modeled. A dynamic learning architecture that possesses the capabilities of simultaneous on-line identification and control is incorporated to enforce constraints on connections and control the dynamics of the motor. The control action is implemented "on-line", in "real time" in such a way that the predicted trajectory follows a specified reference model. A design example of controlling a PM dc motor drive on-line shows the effectiveness of the design tool. This will therefore be very useful in aerospace applications. It is expected to provide an innovative and noval software model for the rocket engine numerical simulator executive.

  9. Ergonomics for Online Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Carol; Friend, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Describes factors to be considered in the design of ergonomically correct workstations for online searchers. Topics discussed include visual factors, including lighting; acoustical factors; radiation and visual display terminals (VDTs); screen image characteristics; static electricity; hardware and equipment; workstation configuration; chairs;…

  10. On-line measurement of diameter of hot-rolled steel tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueliang; Zhao, Huiying; Tian, Ailing; Li, Bin

    2015-02-01

    In order to design a online diameter measurement system for Hot-rolled seamless steel tube production line. On one hand, it can play a stimulate part in the domestic pipe measuring technique. On the other hand, it can also make our domestic hot rolled seamless steel tube enterprises gain a strong product competitiveness with low input. Through the analysis of various detection methods and techniques contrast, this paper choose a CCD camera-based online caliper system design. The system mainly includes the hardware measurement portion and the image processing section, combining with software control technology and image processing technology, which can complete online measurement of heat tube diameter. Taking into account the complexity of the actual job site situation, it can choose a relatively simple and reasonable layout. The image processing section mainly to solve the camera calibration and the application of a function in Matlab, to achieve the diameter size display directly through the algorithm to calculate the image. I build a simulation platform in the design last phase, successfully, collect images for processing, to prove the feasibility and rationality of the design and make error in less than 2%. The design successfully using photoelectric detection technology to solve real work problems

  11. HOPE: An On-Line Piloted Handling Qualities Experiment Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. B.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    2010-01-01

    A novel on-line database for capturing most of the information obtained during piloted handling qualities experiments (either flight or simulated) is described. The Hyperlinked Overview of Piloted Evaluations (HOPE) web application is based on an open-source object-oriented Web-based front end (Ruby-on-Rails) that can be used with a variety of back-end relational database engines. The hyperlinked, on-line data book approach allows an easily-traversed way of looking at a variety of collected data, including pilot ratings, pilot information, vehicle and configuration characteristics, test maneuvers, and individual flight test cards and repeat runs. It allows for on-line retrieval of pilot comments, both audio and transcribed, as well as time history data retrieval and video playback. Pilot questionnaires are recorded as are pilot biographies. Simple statistics are calculated for each selected group of pilot ratings, allowing multiple ways to aggregate the data set (by pilot, by task, or by vehicle configuration, for example). Any number of per-run or per-task metrics can be captured in the database. The entire run metrics dataset can be downloaded in comma-separated text for further analysis off-line. It is expected that this tool will be made available upon request

  12. Learning from e-Family History: A Model of Online Family Historian Research Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on doctoral research which investigated the online research behaviour of family historians, from the overall perspective of local studies collections and developing online services for family historians. Method: A hybrid (primarily ethnographic) study was employed using qualitative diaries and shadowing, to examine…

  13. Developing the online survey.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffry S; McNew, Ryan

    2008-12-01

    Institutions of higher education are now using Internet-based technology tools to conduct surveys for data collection. Research shows that the type and quality of responses one receives with online surveys are comparable with what one receives in paper-based surveys. Data collection can take place on Web-based surveys, e-mail-based surveys, and personal digital assistants/Smartphone devices. Web surveys can be subscription templates, software packages installed on one's own server, or created from scratch using Web programming development tools. All of these approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. The survey owner must make informed decisions as to the right technology to implement. The correct choice can save hours of work in sorting, organizing, and analyzing data.

  14. Opportunity through Online Learning: Experiences of First-in-Family Students in Online Open-Entry Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Cathy; O'Shea, Sarah; May, Josephine; Delahunty, Janine; Partington, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Online learning has an important place in widening access and participation in higher education for diverse student cohorts. One cohort taking up online study in increasing numbers is that of mature-age, first-in-family students. First-in-family is defined as those who are the first in their immediate family, including parents, siblings, partners…

  15. Increasing the Success of Online Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Ivan L., II

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of the Internet has dramatically changed the process of information transmission as well as practically every other aspect of American society, including the higher education system. Many colleges and universities have taken advantage of the utility of the Internet and instituted online courses and online degree and certificate…

  16. Beyond Performance Data: Improving Student Help Seeking by Collecting and Displaying Influential Data in an Online Middle-School Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Samantha G.; Hillaire, Garron; Sutherland, LeeAnn M.

    2016-01-01

    Technology makes possible abundant new opportunities to capture and display data in online learning environments. We describe here an example of using these opportunities to improve students' use of the rich supports available in online learning environments. We describe an example of a blended learning experience that uses an online inquiry-based…

  17. Visualizing Data and the Online FRED Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez-Carbajo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses a pedagogical strategy based on data visualization and analysis in the teaching of intermediate macroeconomics and financial economics. In these short projects, students collect and manipulate economic data from the online Federal Reserve Economic Database (FRED) in order to illustrate theoretical relationships discussed in…

  18. Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006. Midwestern Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, I. Elaine; Seaman, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    "Making the Grade: Online Education in the United States, 2006--Midwestern Edition" is based on data collected for the fourth annual report on the state of online education in U.S. Higher Education. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and based on responses from over 500 Midwestern colleges and universities, this year's study,…

  19. Analyzing Online Behaviors, Roles, and Learning Communities via Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Yu-Chu

    2010-01-01

    Online learning communities are an important means of sharing and creating knowledge. Online behaviors and online roles can reveal how online learning communities function. However, no study has elucidated the relationships among online behaviors, online roles, and online learning communities. In this study, 32 preservice teachers participated in…

  20. 76 FR 2727 - Proposed Collection of Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... attrition, as well as what information or education needs would increase the conversion ratio. An online... description of collection: To understand which factors are driving recruitment attrition, as well as what...

  1. Citation patterns of online and print journals in the digital ageEC

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Sandra L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The research assesses the impact of online journals on citation patterns by examining whether researchers were more likely to limit the resources they cited to those journals available online rather than those only in print. Setting: Publications from a large urban university with a medical college at an urban location and at a smaller regional location were examined. The number of online journals available to authors on either campus was the same. The number of print journals available on the large campus was much greater than the print journals available at the small campus. Methodology: Searches by author affiliation from 1996 to 2005 were performed in the Web of Science to find all articles written by affiliated members in the college of medicine at the selected institution. Cited references from randomly selected articles were recorded, and the cited journals were coded into five categories based on their availability at the study institution: print only, print and online, online only, not owned, and dropped. Results were analyzed using SPSS. The age of articles cited for selected years as well as for 2006 and 2007 was also examined. Results: The number of journals cited each year continued to increase. On the large urban campus, researchers were not more likely to cite journals available online or less likely to cite journals only in print. At the regional location, at which the number of print-only journals was minimal, use of print-only journals significantly decreased. Conclusion/discussion: The citation of print-only journals by researchers with access to a library with a large print and electronic collection appeared to continue, despite the availability of potential alternatives in the online collection. Journals available in electronic format were cited more frequently in publications from the campus whose library had a small print collection, and the citation of journals available in both print and electronic formats generally increased over

  2. Factors Affecting Retention in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berling, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand what is known regarding the factors that relate to successful completion of online, undergraduate college courses. It addressed 13 student factors available through archival data at Northern Kentucky University based on 1,493 students enrolled in fully online courses in fall 2008. It included programmatic…

  3. Online Group Work Design: Processes, Complexities, and Intricacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinsasser, Robert; Hong, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges of designing and implementing online group work. We are responsible for a seven-and-a-half week's online literacy and bi-literacy graduate course in a Bilingual/English as a Second Language (BLE/ESL) Master of Arts program. One of the tasks includes online literacy circle exchanges where students are encouraged…

  4. Global Standards for Enhancing Quality in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Polly, Drew; Jokiaho, Annika; May, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    The quality of online courses offered has been a topic of discussion in the recent years, and efforts have been taken to establish standards for developing online courses. In this study, the authors review 12 online learning standard documents and examine the standards included in each of these documents. The largest number of standards were in…

  5. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere on the Internet: Focused on New Media Literacy and Collectivity of Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jiwon

    2013-01-01

    Through the case of one online disputant, Minerva, this study intended to see the possibilities of online communities as the public sphere. Minerva's postings and comments were analyzed using discourse analysis and ground theory. It was found that the online community did act as the public sphere at that time, such as setting agenda and developing…

  6. Online Lectures in Undergraduate Medical Education: Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Brandon; Coret, Alon; Qureshi, Aatif; Barron, Henry; Ayala, Ana Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Background The adoption of the flipped classroom in undergraduate medical education calls on students to learn from various self-paced tools—including online lectures—before attending in-class sessions. Hence, the design of online lectures merits special attention, given that applying multimedia design principles has been shown to enhance learning outcomes. Objective The aim of this study was to understand how online lectures have been integrated into medical school curricula, and whether published literature employs well-accepted principles of multimedia design. Methods This scoping review followed the methodology outlined by Arksey and O'Malley (2005). Databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Education Source, FRANCIS, ERIC, and ProQuest, were searched to find articles from 2006 to 2016 related to online lecture use in undergraduate medical education. Results In total, 45 articles met our inclusion criteria. Online lectures were used in preclinical and clinical years, covering basic sciences, clinical medicine, and clinical skills. The use of multimedia design principles was seldom reported. Almost all studies described high student satisfaction and improvement on knowledge tests following online lecture use. Conclusions Integration of online lectures into undergraduate medical education is well-received by students and appears to improve learning outcomes. Future studies should apply established multimedia design principles to the development of online lectures to maximize their educational potential. PMID:29636322

  7. The Effects of Recorded Lectures on Passing Rates in Online Math Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fital-Akelbek, Sandra; Akelbek, Mahmud

    2018-01-01

    In this mixed method study we investigate the impact of recorded lectures on passing rates in an online math course. For three years, we collected data from approximately 380 students enrolled in a first-year undergraduate online course, College Algebra. The data was used to compare the amount of time students spent watching recorded lectures and…

  8. Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, I. Elaine; Seaman, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    "Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education" in the United States is the tenth annual report on the state of online learning in U.S. higher education. The survey is designed, administered and analyzed by the Babson Survey Research Group. Data collection is conducted in partnership with the College Board. This year's study, like those…

  9. Computerized Online Bibliographic Searching. SPEC Kit #154.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocker, Susan

    For this kit, 106 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) academic libraries were surveyed concerning: (1) current administration/organization; (2) evaluation; (3) patron relations; (4) services; and (5) the impact of online searching on collections. Responses were received from 83 libraries, many of which contributed sample materials. Analyses of…

  10. Online Detection of Driver Fatigue Using Steering Wheel Angles for Real Driving Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuojin; Li, Shengbo Eben; Li, Renjie; Cheng, Bo; Shi, Jinliang

    2017-03-02

    This paper presents a drowsiness on-line detection system for monitoring driver fatigue level under real driving conditions, based on the data of steering wheel angles (SWA) collected from sensors mounted on the steering lever. The proposed system firstly extracts approximate entropy (ApEn)featuresfromfixedslidingwindowsonreal-timesteeringwheelanglestimeseries. Afterthat, this system linearizes the ApEn features series through an adaptive piecewise linear fitting using a given deviation. Then, the detection system calculates the warping distance between the linear features series of the sample data. Finally, this system uses the warping distance to determine the drowsiness state of the driver according to a designed binary decision classifier. The experimental data were collected from 14.68 h driving under real road conditions, including two fatigue levels: "wake" and "drowsy". The results show that the proposed system is capable of working online with an average 78.01% accuracy, 29.35% false detections of the "awake" state, and 15.15% false detections of the "drowsy" state. The results also confirm that the proposed method based on SWA signal is valuable for applications in preventing traffic accidents caused by driver fatigue.

  11. What Makes Learners Share Feedback or Not in an Online Community for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budu, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Some higher education institutions create online communities to achieve engagement between teachers and learners. Unfortunately, some members seem to prefer sharing feedback via offline means instead of doing so in the online community. From qualitative data collected via flashcards, this article has found that this preference is largely due to…

  12. EFL Teachers' Perceptions about an Online CALL Training. A Case from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cengiz, Behice Ceyda; Seferoglu, Gölge; Kaçar, Isil Günseli

    2017-01-01

    This paper examined a group of Turkish EFL in-service teachers' perceptions about a four-week online CALL training they received on a voluntary basis. The data were collected via a background questionnaire, interviews and reflection reports written by the participating teachers. Findings demonstrated that online CALL training was beneficial for…

  13. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University.

    PubMed

    Benino, Diana; Girardi, Antonia; Czarniak, Petra

    2011-10-01

    To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University. The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.

  14. Virtual Voices: Online Teachers' Perceptions of Online Teaching Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robin Davidson

    2009-01-01

    Online teachers' perceptions of online teaching standards published in 2006 by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) and the National Education Association (NEA). Interviews with two teachers from each of the four online schools were studied following an online survey of 49 online teachers from these schools. Overall, participants reported…

  15. Curriculum Evaluation in Online Education: The Case of Teacher Candidates Preparing Online for Public Personnel Selection Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karacaoglu, Ömer Cem

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficiency of an online curriculum based on the views of lecturers and students enrolled in the program. The study is mainly based on survey method. In order to collect qualitative data, interviews forms developed by the researcher were used. The reliability and validity of the interview forms were…

  16. Online Collaborative Learning in a Project-Based Learning Environment in Taiwan: A Case Study on Undergraduate Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ke; Peng, Shiang Wuu; Hung, Jui-long

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigated undergraduate students' first experience in online collaborative learning in a project-based learning (PBL) environment in Taiwan. Data were collected through interviews of 48 students, instructor's field notes, researchers' online observations, students' online discourse, and group artifacts. The findings revealed…

  17. Communication Behaviors and Trust in Collaborative Online Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulu, Saniye Tugba; Yildirim, Zahide

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates preservice teachers' trust levels and collaborative communication behaviors namely leadership, feedback, social interaction, enthusiasm, task and technical uncertainties, and task-oriented interactions in online learning environment. A case study design involving qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis was…

  18. A summation of online recruiting practices for health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Kanak S

    2005-01-01

    Worker shortage is among the foremost challenges facing US health care today. Health care organizations are also confronted with rising costs of recruiting and compensating scarce workers in times of declining reimbursement. Many health care organizations are adopting online recruitment as a nontraditional, low-cost method for hiring staff. Online recruitment is the fastest growing method of recruitment today, and has advantages over traditional recruiting in terms of cost, reach, and time-saving. Several health care organizations have achieved great success in recruiting online. Yet awareness of online recruiting remains lower among health care managers than managers in other industries. Many health care organizations still search for job candidates within a 30-mile radius using traditional methods. This article describes the various aspects of online recruitment for health care organizations. It is meant to help health care managers currently recruiting online by answering frequently asked questions (eg, Should I be advertising on national job sites? Why is my Web site not attracting job seekers? Is my online ad effective?). It is also meant to educate health care managers not doing online recruiting so that they try recruiting online. The article discusses the salient aspects of online recruiting: (a) using commercial job boards; (b) building one's own career center; (c) building one's own job board; (d) collecting and storing resumes; (e) attracting job seekers to one's Web site; (f) creating online job ads; (g) screening and evaluating candidates online; and (h) building long-term relationships with candidates. Job seekers in health care are adopting the Internet faster than health care employers. To recruit successfully during the current labor shortage, it is imperative that employers adopt and expand online recruiting.

  19. Six Easy Steps to Online Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Against his better instincts, the author, an educator at West Texas A&M University, shares his school's recipe for developing a successful online learning program. He discusses six easy steps to online success. These include: (1) clean up one's act; (2) answers in 24 hours; (3) plenty of structure; (4) format phone conferences at midterm; (5) do…

  20. Open-Book, Open-Web Online Examinations: Developing Examination Practices to Support University Students' Learning and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myyry, Liisa; Joutsenvirta, Taina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate university students' experiences of open-book, open-web online examinations compared to traditional class examinations concerning preparing, responding, and learning. The data (N?=?110) were collected by an online survey from the university students who took an online examination. The students used…

  1. Online public health preparedness training programs: an evaluation of user experience with the technological environment.

    PubMed

    Nambisan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    Several public health education programs and government agencies across the country have started offering virtual or online training programs in emergency preparedness for people who are likely to be involved in managing or responding to different types of emergency situations such as natural disasters, epidemics, bioterrorism, etc. While such online training programs are more convenient and cost-effective than traditional classroom-based programs, their success depends to a great extent on the underlying technological environment. Specifically, in an online technological environment, different types of user experiences come in to play-users' utilitarian or pragmatic experience, their fun or hedonic experience, their social experience, and most importantly, their usability experience-and these different user experiences critically shape the program outcomes, including course completion rates. This study adopts a multi-disciplinary approach and draws on theories in human computer interaction, distance learning theories, usability research, and online consumer behavior to evaluate users' experience with the technological environment of an online emergency preparedness training program and discusses its implications for the design of effective online training programs. . Data was collected using a questionnaire from 377 subjects who had registered for and participated in online public health preparedness training courses offered by a large public university in the Northeast. Analysis of the data indicates that as predicted, participants had higher levels of pragmatic and usability experiences compared to their hedonic and sociability experiences. Results also indicate that people who experienced higher levels of pragmatic, hedonic, sociability and usability experiences were more likely to complete the course(s) they registered for compared to those who reported lower levels. The study findings hold important implications for the design of effective online emergency

  2. Increasing Special Library Collection Use in Very Computer Intensive Environments: Automatic Bibliographic Compilation and the Dissemination of Electronic Newsletters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, James Joseph

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an automatic bibliographic facility and an electronic newsletter created for a special collection of aerospace and mechanical engineering monographs and articles at the University of Arizona. The project included the development of an online catalog, increasing the depth of bibliographic…

  3. Collection development at the NOAA Central Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, Steve R.

    1994-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library collection, approximately one million volumes, incorporates the holdings of its predecessor agencies. Within the library, the collections are filed separately, based on their source and/or classification schemes. The NOAA Central Library provides a variety of services to users, ranging from quick reference and interlibrary loan to in-depth research and online data bases.

  4. Developing Online Trust in Electronic Commerce: A Generational Cohort Study in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Rivera, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Developing online trust is crucial for e-commerce vendors in order to attract consumers and develop long-term relationships with existing ones. We intended to investigate if consumers from different generational cohorts differ on how they develop online trust when utilizing e-commerce websites. Through the analysis of empirical data collected from…

  5. Information Parents Must Know about Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markell, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Presents four tips to help parents monitor whether website operators are complying with the 1988 Children's Online Privacy Protection Act: look for privacy policies on children's websites; determine if they ask for parental consent to collect personal information; regularly monitor information being sent to children; and determine if web operators…

  6. Learner Satisfaction with Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gameel, Bahaa G.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates factors that influence learners' satisfaction with massive open online courses (MOOCs). Framed by the theory of independent learning and teaching, the three types of interaction model, and the technology acceptance model, this study analyzed data collected from 1,786 learners enrolled in four MOOCs. Results show that the…

  7. Advancing from offline to online activity recognition with wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Ermes, Miikka; Parkka, Juha; Cluitmans, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Activity recognition with wearable sensors could motivate people to perform a variety of different sports and other physical exercises. We have earlier developed algorithms for offline analysis of activity data collected with wearable sensors. In this paper, we present our current progress in advancing the platform for the existing algorithms to an online version, onto a PDA. Acceleration data are obtained from wireless motion bands which send the 3D raw acceleration signals via a Bluetooth link to the PDA which then performs the data collection, feature extraction and activity classification. As a proof-of-concept, the online activity system was tested with three subjects. All of them performed at least 5 minutes of each of the following activities: lying, sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling with an exercise bike. The average second-by-second classification accuracies for the subjects were 99%, 97%, and 82 %. These results suggest that earlier developed offline analysis methods for the acceleration data obtained from wearable sensors can be successfully implemented in an online activity recognition application.

  8. Online Screening and Referral for Postpartum Depression: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Emily; Gustavson, Erica; Kinsey, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The fear and stigma associated with Postpartum Depression (PPD) is a major challenge in the treatment of this disease. Our goal is to develop innovative methods of screening women for the symptoms of PPD to facilitate referral and treatment. This study explores the efficacy of the Internet in reaching out to postpartum women in the convenience and privacy of their own homes, particularly those in rural and underserved areas. An exploratory study design was used to explore the feasibility and acceptability of online screening for PPD with postpartum women in the first 2–3 months after delivery (N=18). In the first phase, a focus group was conducted with a small group of postpartum women; the second phase consisted of individual interviews of postpartum women in their homes; and in phase three, 10 women participated in the on-line screening intervention. Postpartum depression was measured using an online version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) a well-established instrument with reported alpha reliabilities (0.81–0.88) across studies and concurrent validity demonstrated using the gold standard, DSM IV criteria for depression interview. Qualitative data collected from all the participants were also analyzed. The sample included women age 18–29; 70% White/Caucasian, 50% low income, and the majority living in rural areas. The EPDS scores ranged from 0–13 (mean 8.0; SD 4.76). Participants described the online PPD screening process as easy, straightforward and personalized and provided additional suggestions for improvement. PMID:23283485

  9. Online Information 96. Proceedings of the International Online Information Meeting (20th, London, England, UK, December 3-5, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raitt, David I., Ed.; Jeapes, Ben, Ed.

    This proceedings volume contains 68 papers. Subjects addressed include: access to information; the future of information managers/librarians; intelligent agents; changing roles of library users; disintermediation; Internet review sites; World Wide Web (WWW) search engines; Java; online searching; future of online education; integrated information…

  10. 78 FR 48681 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    .... Qualitative and quantitative data will be collected through progress reports, surveys, the health impact tracking tool, and interviews. Quantitative data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative... States (SOTS) online surveys, (3) Interviews, and (4) Online surveys related to the Regional Network...

  11. Online social networking in people with psychosis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    Online social networking might facilitate the establishment of social contacts for people with psychosis, who are often socially isolated by the symptoms and consequences of their disorder. We carried out a systematic review exploring available evidence on the use of online social networking in people with psychosis. The review was conducted following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Included studies examined the use of the online social networking by people with an a priori diagnosis of psychosis (inclusive of bipolar disorder). Data from included studies were extracted and narratively synthesised. A total of 11 studies, published between 2005 and 2013, reported data on online social networking in people with psychosis. People with psychosis seem to spend more time in chat rooms or playing online games than control groups. The use of other online tools, such as Facebook or communication through e-mail, is lower or the same than controls. Online social networking was used by patients with psychosis for establishing new relationships, maintaining relationships/reconnecting with people and online peer support. Online social networking, in the form of forums or online chats, could play a role in strategies aimed at enhancing social networks and reduce the risk of isolation in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. From Online Student to Online Instructor: Assistive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Jodi

    2012-01-01

    With the influx of online learning opportunities, online students and instructors are faced with a variety of challenges. Online students face the same challenges as do face-to-face learners, but by facing them in an online context, the interpretations of those challenges can lead to the success or failure of their overall educational experience.…

  13. On-line evaluation of multiloop digital controller performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to inform the Guidance and Control community of capabilities which were developed by the Aeroservoelasticity Branch to evaluate the performance of multivariable control laws, on-line, during wind-tunnel testing. The capabilities are generic enough to be useful for all kinds of on-line analyses involving multivariable control in experimental testing. Consequently, it was decided to present this material at this workshop even though it has been presented elsewhere. Topics covered include: essential on-line analysis requirements; on-line analysis capabilities; on-line analysis software; frequency domain procedures; controller performance evaluation frequency-domain flutter suppression; and plant determination.

  14. EBT Payment for Online Grocery Orders: a Mixed-Methods Study to Understand Its Uptake among SNAP Recipients and the Barriers to and Motivators for Its Use.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Olivia; Tagliaferro, Barbara; Rodriguez, Noemi; Athens, Jessica; Abrams, Courtney; Elbel, Brian

    2018-04-01

    To examine Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients' use of the first online supermarket accepting Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) payment. In this mixed-methods study, the authors collected EBT purchase data from an online grocer and attempted a randomized controlled trial in the South Bronx, New York City, followed by focus groups with SNAP beneficiaries aged ≥18 years. Participants were randomized to shop at their usual grocery store or an online supermarket for 3 months. Focus groups explored barriers and motivators to online EBT redemption. Few participants made online purchases, even when incentivized in the randomized controlled trial. Qualitative findings highlighted a lack of perceived control over the online food selection process as a key barrier to purchasing food online. Motivators included fast, free shipping and discounts. Electronic Benefit Transfer for online grocery purchases has the potential to increase food access among SNAP beneficiaries, but challenges exist to this new food buying option. Understanding online food shopping barriers and motivators is critical to the success of policies targeting the online expansion of SNAP benefits. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abanmy, Norah

    2017-09-01

    Online pharmacies sell medicine over the Internet and deliver them by mail. The main objective of this study is to explore the extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia which will be useful for the scientific community and regulators. An Arabic survey questionnaire was developed for this study. The questionnaire was distributed via email and social media. Four sections were created to cover the objectives: experience with online shopping in general, demographics, awareness of the existence and customer experiences of buying medicine online, and reasons for buying/not buying medicine online. A total of 633 responses were collected. Around 69% (437) of them were female and the majority (256, 40.4%) was in the age range 26-40. Only 23.1% (146) were aware of the existence of online pharmacies where 2.7% (17) of them had bought a medicine over the Internet and 15 (88.2%) respondents out of the 17 was satisfied with the process. Lack of awareness of the availability of such services was the main reason for not buying medicines online. Many respondents (263, 42.7%) were willing to try an online pharmacy, although majorities (243, 45.9%) were unable to differentiate between legal and illegal online pharmacies. The largest categories of products respondents were willing to buy them online were nonprescription medicines and cosmetics. The popularity of purchasing medicines over the Internet is still low in Saudi Arabia. However, because the majority of respondents are willing to purchase medicines online, efforts should be made by the Saudi FDA to set regulations and monitor this activity.

  16. Online counseling: An exploratory survey of Italian psychologists' attitudes towards new ways of interaction.

    PubMed

    Cipolletta, Sabrina; Mocellin, Damiano

    2017-01-09

    Online counseling may be defined as an interaction between users and mental health professionals that takes place through computer mediated communication technology. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of Italian psychologists towards different aspects of online counseling provided via email, chat, forums, and videoconference. An online questionnaire was administered to a sample of 289 licensed psychologists in the Veneto Region (Italy) in order to collect opinions, preferences, and intentions to use online modalities, along with prior knowledge and practice experiences. Only 18.3% of the respondents had previous experience with online counseling. Overall, the majority of psychologists (62.6%) were favorable towards online counseling, but they also had several reservations about the provision of online diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Results showed a consistent lack of clarity regarding ethical and penal issues concerning online modalities. More efforts must be directed to deepening the application of new technologies in the field of psychology in order to enable an ethical and professional practice of online counseling in Italy.

  17. Perceptions of Quality in an Online Learning Environment: A Faculty Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, April Michele

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the faculty perception of quality in online courses. The areas considered were media richness, interaction, synchronism, self-efficacy, online teaching experience, and education level. Participants included members of three online Yahoo groups that were designed for online faculty members. There were 510 total members…

  18. Looking for Collection 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Libraries are integrating Web 2.0 services into work practices, positioning themselves in online social environments, and deploying enhanced search and discovery tools. Collections conversely are not progressing to the same degree. Like many public services today, library budgets are stained. User-pay options are appearing in library systems,…

  19. Online Lectures in Undergraduate Medical Education: Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Brandon; Coret, Alon; Qureshi, Aatif; Barron, Henry; Ayala, Ana Patricia; Law, Marcus

    2018-04-10

    The adoption of the flipped classroom in undergraduate medical education calls on students to learn from various self-paced tools-including online lectures-before attending in-class sessions. Hence, the design of online lectures merits special attention, given that applying multimedia design principles has been shown to enhance learning outcomes. The aim of this study was to understand how online lectures have been integrated into medical school curricula, and whether published literature employs well-accepted principles of multimedia design. This scoping review followed the methodology outlined by Arksey and O'Malley (2005). Databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Education Source, FRANCIS, ERIC, and ProQuest, were searched to find articles from 2006 to 2016 related to online lecture use in undergraduate medical education. In total, 45 articles met our inclusion criteria. Online lectures were used in preclinical and clinical years, covering basic sciences, clinical medicine, and clinical skills. The use of multimedia design principles was seldom reported. Almost all studies described high student satisfaction and improvement on knowledge tests following online lecture use. Integration of online lectures into undergraduate medical education is well-received by students and appears to improve learning outcomes. Future studies should apply established multimedia design principles to the development of online lectures to maximize their educational potential. ©Brandon Tang, Alon Coret, Aatif Qureshi, Henry Barron, Ana Patricia Ayala, Marcus Law. Originally published in JMIR Medical Education (http://mededu.jmir.org), 10.04.2018.

  20. Offline and online civic engagement among adolescents and young adults from three ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Jugert, Philipp; Eckstein, Katharina; Noack, Peter; Kuhn, Alexandra; Benbow, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Levels of civic engagement are assumed to vary according to numerous social and psychological characteristics, but not much is known about online civic engagement. This study aimed to investigate differences and similarities in young people's offline and online civic engagement and to clarify, based on Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (TPB), associations between motivation for civic engagement, peer and parental norms, collective efficacy, and civic engagement. The sample consisted of 755 youth (native German, ethnic German Diaspora, and Turkish migrants) from two age groups (16-18 and 19-26; mean age 20.5 years; 52 % female). Results showed that ethnic group membership and age moderated the frequency of engagement behavior, with Turkish migrants taking part more than native Germans, who were followed by ethnic German Diaspora migrants. Analyses based on TPB showed good fit for a model relating intention for offline and online civic engagement to motivation for civic engagement, peer and parental norms, and collective efficacy. Ethnic group moderated the findings for offline civic engagement and questioned the universality of some model parameters (e.g., peer and parental norms). This study showed the utility of the TPB framework for studying civic engagement but also reveals that the predictive utility of peer and parental norms seems to vary depending on the group and the behavior under study. This study highlights the importance of including minority samples in the study of civic engagement in order to identify between-group similarities and differences.

  1. The Role of Edited Collections in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micciche, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Describes general characteristics of edited collections and then offers a brief history of the genre in composition studies based in part on the existing data in CompPile, an online and ongoing bibliography. Explores several explanations for the proliferation of edited collections in the field. Makes note of what these explanations can say about…

  2. Determinants of Student Satisfaction in Online Tutorial: A Study of A Distance Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsasi, Meirani; Sutawijaya, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Education system nowadays tends to utilize online learning, including in higher education. Online learning system becomes a major requirement in implementing learning process, including in Indonesia. Universitas Terbuka has implemented online learning system known as online tutorials to support the distance learning system. One interesting issue…

  3. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University

    PubMed Central

    Benino, Diana; Girardi, Antonia; Czarniak, Petra

    Objective To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University. Methods The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Results Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. Conclusions This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically. PMID:24198864

  4. Factors Predicting Online University Students' Use of a Mobile Learning Management System (m-LMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Kim, Nari; Kim, Nam Hee

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the relationships among factors predicting online university students' actual usage of a mobile learning management system (m-LMS) through a structural model. Data from 222 students in a Korean online university were collected to investigate integrated relationships among their perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness,…

  5. Cost Effectiveness of On-Line Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donald W.; Neel, Peggy W.

    A recently developed cost-effectiveness model for on-line retrieval systems is discussed through use of an example utilizing performance results collected from several independent sources and cost data derived for a recently completed study for the American Psychological Association. One of the primary attributes of the model rests in its great…

  6. The I4 Online Query Tool for Earth Observations Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Vanderbloemen, Lisa A.; Lawrence, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) delivers an average of 22 terabytes per day of data collected by orbital and airborne sensor systems to end users through an integrated online search environment (the Reverb/ECHO system). Earth observations data collected by sensors on the International Space Station (ISS) are not currently included in the EOSDIS system, and are only accessible through various individual online locations. This increases the effort required by end users to query multiple datasets, and limits the opportunity for data discovery and innovations in analysis. The Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center has collaborated with the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University (ASU) to develop the ISS Instrument Integration Implementation (I4) data query tool to provide end users a clean, simple online interface for querying both current and historical ISS Earth Observations data. The I4 interface is based on the Lunaserv and Lunaserv Global Explorer (LGE) open-source software packages developed at ASU for query of lunar datasets. In order to avoid mirroring existing databases - and the need to continually sync/update those mirrors - our design philosophy is for the I4 tool to be a pure query engine only. Once an end user identifies a specific scene or scenes of interest, I4 transparently takes the user to the appropriate online location to download the data. The tool consists of two public-facing web interfaces. The Map Tool provides a graphic geobrowser environment where the end user can navigate to an area of interest and select single or multiple datasets to query. The Map Tool displays active image footprints for the selected datasets (Figure 1). Selecting a footprint will open a pop-up window that includes a browse image and a link to available image metadata, along with a link to the online location to order or

  7. Synthesis of cellulose functionalized with polyallylamine and its application to on-line collection/concentration and determination of phosphate by ICP/AES.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Takashi; Yamashita, Minoru; Okazaki, Yuka; Kawakita, Hirohisa; Fukutomi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    A novel cellulose-based resin functionalized with polyallylamine was synthesized. It was applied to the collection of phosphate in environmental water samples, followed by concentration determination using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES). The synthesized resin, cellulose-glycidylmethacrylate-polyallylamine (CGP), showed good adsorption behavior toward trace amounts of phosphate over a wide pH range. The adsorbed-analyte can be easily eluted using 0.5 M hydrochloric acid; its recoveries was found to be 80 - 100%. The CGP resin synthesized was packed in a mini-column, which was then installed in a computer-controlled auto-pretreatment system for on-line collection/concentration and determination of trace phosphate by ICP/AES. The limit of detection for phosphate was found to be 0.6 µg P l(-1). The sample volumes were only 5 ml and the total analysis time was about 4 min. The developed method with CGP resin was successfully applied to the determination of phosphate in river water and tap water samples with satisfactory results. The recovery test showed that common matrices that may exist in environmental waters did not interfere with the determination of phosphate.

  8. Big Data in the Service of Educator Learning: What Should Be Done with Collected Online Professional Learning Information?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    The concern over big data and ramifications of its use permeates many, if not all, aspects of life in the 21st century. With the advent of online learning, another area of concern, one that directly impacts the world of education, has been added: the use of data within online professional development settings. In this article, we examine the type…

  9. Online Networks and the Diffusion of Protests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Yamir

    2013-03-01

    Undoubtedly, online social networks have an enormous impact on opinions and cultural trends. Also, these platforms have revealed as a fundamental organizing mechanism in country-wide social movements. Recent events in the Middle East and North Africa (the wave of protests in the Arab world), across Europe (in the form of anti-cuts demonstrations or riots) and United States (the OWS movement) have generated much discussion on how digital media is connected to the diffusion of protests. In this talk, we investigate the mechanisms driving the emergence, development and stabilization of unrest movements in Spain and the USA by analyzing data from Twitter. Messages related to the protests are analyzed at both static and dynamic levels. We show that the online trace of the protests provides a unique opportunity to tackle central issues like recruitment patterns, information cascades and their spatiotemporal dynamics. Our findings shed light on the connection between online networks and social movements, and offer an empirical test to elusive sociological questions about collective action.

  10. Online health communication about human genetics: perceptions and preferences of internet users.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Jay M; McClain, Jacqueline; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2004-12-01

    Unprecedented advancements in human genetics research necessitate keeping the public abreast of new information, applications, and implications and the Internet represents an important method of communicating with the public. Our research used cross-sectional self-report survey data collected from a diverse convenience sample of 780 Internet users in two states. Multivariate regression analysis explored the relationships between experiences, perceptions, and preferences for online health and genetics communication. Online health information seeking was associated with previous genetic information seeking, comfort with online genetic communication, perceived risk for genetic abnormality, being female, and having more education. Comfort with online genetics communication was associated with a preference for online genetic information, previous online health and off-line genetics information seeking, having a healthy lifestyle, believing in the positive impact of human genetics research, and being female. Perceiving online health information to be accurate was associated with preferring the Internet for genetics communication, being older, less educated, and perceiving Internet use as anonymous. Preferring online genetics communication to other communication channels was associated with perceiving online health information as accurate, being comfortable receiving online genetics information, having lower intrinsic religiosity, and being male. The implications of findings for Web-based health message design are discussed.

  11. Common Molecules: Bringing Research and Teaching Together through an Online Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandvoss, Leah M.; Harwood, William S.; Korkmaz, Ali; Bollinger, John C.; Huffman, John C.; Huffman, John N.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of a Common Molecules collection that provides interactive tools for 3-D visualization of molecules. The organizational design provides not only structural information, but also historical and/or key information on the properties of the molecules in the collection. Describes student use of the collection and the role of…

  12. Usability of online psychoeducation for siblings of people with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sin, Jacqueline; Henderson, Claire; Norman, Ian

    2014-10-01

    The E Sibling Project aims to address the needs of siblings of individuals affected by psychosis through provision of a comprehensive online intervention. The online intervention comprises four core elements, including: information on psychosis; various coping and promoting well-being strategies; siblings' blogs and discussion forum with peers; and an "Ask the Experts" function. After the intervention-prototype was developed, we tested its feasibility, usability and acceptability by siblings. We evaluated the usability of the intervention-prototype using a non-randomised usability study with siblings of individuals diagnosed with psychosis. The usability study adapted Poulson et al's framework to collect subjective feedback from participants on ease of use, perceived usefulness and acceptability, together with objective usage data on the intervention. Twenty siblings were recruited to the usability test; 19 tried out the resource-prototype over a 4-week period and 17 completed the online evaluation after using the intervention. In total, 906 page-views were made by the participants and each spent about two hours using the resource. Participants evaluated the intervention as helpful, relevant and useful in terms of content, design and usability. Developments are needed to improve the navigation and intuitiveness of the resource. Using an internet-based information-giving and peer support intervention to promote wellbeing and coping is feasible and acceptable to siblings of people with psychosis.

  13. An Online Database Producer's Memoirs and Memories of an Online Pioneer and The Database Industry: Looking into the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollegger, James G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    In the first of three articles, the producer of Energyline, Energynet, and Tele/Scope recalls the development of the databases and database business strategies. The second describes the development of biomedical online databases, and the third discusses future developments, including full text databases, database producers as online host, and…

  14. Risky online behaviors among adolescents: Longitudinal relations among problematic Internet use, cyberbullying perpetration, and meeting strangers online.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Guadix, Manuel; Borrajo, Erika; Almendros, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Background and aims This study aims to analyze the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between three major risky online behaviors during adolescence: problematic Internet use, cyberbullying perpetration, and meeting strangers online. An additional objective was to study the role of impulsivity-irresponsibility as a possible explanatory variable of the relationships between these risky online behaviors. Methods The study sample was 888 adolescents that completed self-report measures at time 1 and time 2 with an interval of 6 months. Results The findings showed a significant cross-sectional relationship between the risky online behaviors analyzed. At the longitudinal level, problematic Internet use at time 1 predicted an increase in the perpetration of cyberbullying and meeting strangers online at time 2. Furthermore, meeting strangers online increased the likelihood of cyberbullying perpetration at time 2. Finally, when impulsivity-irresponsibility was included in the model as an explanatory variable, the relationships previously found remained significant. Discussion These results extend traditional problem behavior theory during adolescence, also supporting a relationship between different risky behaviors in cyberspace. In addition, findings highlighted the role of problematic Internet use, which increased the chances of developing cyberbullying perpetration and meeting strangers online over time. However, the results suggest a limited role of impulsivity-irresponsibility as an explicative mechanism. Conclusions The findings suggest that various online risk activities ought to be addressed together when planning assessment, prevention and intervention efforts.

  15. Why do young adults gamble online? A qualitative study of motivations to transition from social casino games to online gambling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun S; Wohl, Michael J A; Gupta, Rina; Derevensky, Jeffrey L

    2017-01-01

    The present research examined the mechanisms of initiating online gambling among young adults. Of particular interest was whether social casino gaming was noted as part of young adults' experience with online gambling. This is because there is growing concern that social casino gaming may be a 'gateway' to online gambling. Three focus groups ( N  = 21) were conducted with young adult online gamblers from two large Canadian Universities. Participants noted the role of peer influence as well as incentives (e.g., sign up bonuses) as important factors that motivated them to start engaging in online gambling. Participants also noted a link between social casino games and online gambling. Specifically, several young adults reported migrating to online gambling within a relatively short period after engaging with social casino games. Potential mechanisms that may lead to the migration from social casino games to online gambling included the role of advertisements and the inflated pay out rates on these free to play gambling like games. The results suggest initiatives to prevent the development of disordered gambling should understand the potential of social casino gaming to act as a gateway to online gambling, especially amongst this vulnerable population.

  16. Online Training: The Value of Capturing Trainee Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Lori K.; DuBois, Cathy Z.; Faley, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Despite years of advice from researchers that trainee reactions provide training evaluation information that is of very limited use, trainee reactions remain the most commonly used measure of training effectiveness. Because the technology that supports online training facilitates the collection of trainee reaction information during and…

  17. Literacy and Learning across Transnational Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Wan Shun Eva

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the emerging research literature on literacy in transnational migrant contexts and extends research in this area through an-depth study of how two immigrant teenagers navigated online media across countries to participate in a domain of interest, which included online forum discussion of philosophy and websites related to…

  18. Seniors' Online Communities: A Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimrod, Galit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the contents and characteristics of seniors' online communities and to explore their potential benefits to older adults. Design and Methods: Quantitative content analysis of a full year's data from 14 leading online communities using a novel computerized system. The overall database included 686,283 messages. Results: There was…

  19. On-line Education Initiatives to Galvanize Climate Mitigation in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) is supporting two different on-line education initiatives that teach about climate change while emphasizing informed and effective responses. The first is an on-line introductory level course for undergraduate students (http://c3.ssec.wisc.edu/) offered through the University of Wisconsin-Madison Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS) department. Along with a lighter carbon footprint and the convenience of web-based access, students interact via Drupal forums, Google hangouts and twitter. Activities include several pedagogical tools with sustainability-related content and a final project requiring a discussion of regionally relevant mitigation responses to achieve low emission scenarios for assigned locations. The other initiative is a MOOC (massive open online course) focusing on the changing weather and climate in the Great Lakes Region. This 4-week course is set to launch February 23 2015. One of the primary goals of this MOOC will be having participants change four habits, one per week. Each behavior change will provide a personal benefit to participating individuals while also helping to mitigate the collective impacts of climate change. This presentation will share strategies and insights from both projects.

  20. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) seeks to address 9 societal benefit areas for Earth observations to address: disasters, health, energy, climate, agriculture, ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and weather. As governments and their partners continue to monitor the face of the Earth, the collection, storage, analysis, and sharing of these observations remain fragmented, incomplete, or redundant. Major observational gaps also remain (particularly as we seek to look beneath the surface of the land and the water). As such, GEO's credo is that "decision makers need a global, coordinated, comprehensive, and sustained system of observing systems." Not surprisingly, one of the largest block of issues facing GEOSS is in the area of data: the access to data (including the building services to make the data more accessible), inadequate data integration and interoperability, error and uncertainty of observations, spatial and temporal gaps in observations, and the related issues of user involvement and capacity building. This is especially for people who stand to gain the most benefit from the datasets, but don't have the resources or knowledge to use them. Esri has millions of GIS and imagery users in hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world that work in the aforementioned 9 GEO societal benefit areas. Esri is therefore proud to have entered into a partnership with GEOSS, more specifically by way of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Esri and the Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Laboratory of Prof. Stefano Nativi at the CNR (National Research Council of Italy) Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research. Esri is working with the ESSI Lab to integrate ArcGIS Online by way of the ArcGIS Online API into the GEOSS Data Access Broker (DAB), resulting in the discoverability of all public content from ArcGIS Online through many of the search portals that participate in this network (e.g., DataOne, CEOS, CUAHSI, OneGeology, IOOS

  1. Social identity threat motivates science-discrediting online comments.

    PubMed

    Nauroth, Peter; Gollwitzer, Mario; Bender, Jens; Rothmund, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing social identity threat from scientific findings can lead people to cognitively devalue the respective findings. Three studies examined whether potentially threatening scientific findings motivate group members to take action against the respective findings by publicly discrediting them on the Web. Results show that strongly (vs. weakly) identified group members (i.e., people who identified as "gamers") were particularly likely to discredit social identity threatening findings publicly (i.e., studies that found an effect of playing violent video games on aggression). A content analytical evaluation of online comments revealed that social identification specifically predicted critiques of the methodology employed in potentially threatening, but not in non-threatening research (Study 2). Furthermore, when participants were collectively (vs. self-) affirmed, identification did no longer predict discrediting posting behavior (Study 3). These findings contribute to the understanding of the formation of online collective action and add to the burgeoning literature on the question why certain scientific findings sometimes face a broad public opposition.

  2. The Power of Online Community and Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Nuccitelli, D. A.; Winkler, B.; Cowtan, K.; Brimelow, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Internet offers innovative and creative means of disseminating content. But where the Internet comes into its own is in the non-linear power of community. Not only can communicators interact directly with their audience, more importantly, the audience can network with each other. This enables publishers to build communities rallied around common topics of interest. Online communities lead to exciting opportunities such as citizen science where communities crowd-source the collection or analysis of data. Skeptical Science is a case study in the development of a volunteer community that produces regular content developed within an internal review system that ensures a high level of accuracy and quality. The community also engages with the peer-reviewed literature, submitting responses to peer-reviewed papers, collecting meta-data used in other scientific research and conducting the largest ever survey of climate papers. Thus this online community both contributes to the outreach effort of climate communication and also seeks to add to the body of scientific knowledge.

  3. Social Identity Threat Motivates Science-Discrediting Online Comments

    PubMed Central

    Nauroth, Peter; Gollwitzer, Mario; Bender, Jens; Rothmund, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing social identity threat from scientific findings can lead people to cognitively devalue the respective findings. Three studies examined whether potentially threatening scientific findings motivate group members to take action against the respective findings by publicly discrediting them on the Web. Results show that strongly (vs. weakly) identified group members (i.e., people who identified as “gamers”) were particularly likely to discredit social identity threatening findings publicly (i.e., studies that found an effect of playing violent video games on aggression). A content analytical evaluation of online comments revealed that social identification specifically predicted critiques of the methodology employed in potentially threatening, but not in non-threatening research (Study 2). Furthermore, when participants were collectively (vs. self-) affirmed, identification did no longer predict discrediting posting behavior (Study 3). These findings contribute to the understanding of the formation of online collective action and add to the burgeoning literature on the question why certain scientific findings sometimes face a broad public opposition. PMID:25646725

  4. Novel and emerging strategies for longitudinal data collection.

    PubMed

    Udtha, Malini; Nomie, Krystle; Yu, Erica; Sanner, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    To describe novel and emerging strategies practiced globally in research to improve longitudinal data collection. In research studies, numerous strategies such as telephone interviews, postal mailing, online questionnaires, and electronic mail are traditionally utilized in longitudinal data collection. However, due to technological advances, novel and emerging strategies have been applied to longitudinal data collection, such as two-way short message service, smartphone applications (or "apps"), retrieval capabilities applied to the electronic medical record, and an adapted cloud interface. In this review, traditional longitudinal data collection strategies are briefly described, emerging and novel strategies are detailed and explored, and information regarding the impact of novel methods on participant response rates, the timeliness of participant responses, and cost is provided. We further discuss how these novel and emerging strategies affect longitudinal data collection and advance research, specifically nursing research. Evidence suggests that the novel and emerging longitudinal data collection strategies discussed in this review are valuable approaches to consider. These strategies facilitate collecting longitudinal research data to better understand a variety of health-related conditions. Future studies, including nursing research, should consider using novel and emerging strategies to advance longitudinal data collection. A better understanding of novel and emerging longitudinal data collection strategies will ultimately improve longitudinal data collection as well as foster research efforts. Nurse researchers, along with all researchers, must be aware of and consider implementing novel and emerging strategies to ensure future healthcare research success. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Online Versus Telephone Methods to Recruit and Interview Older Gay and Bisexual Men Treated for Prostate Cancer: Findings from the Restore Study.

    PubMed

    Rosser, B R Simon; Capistrant, Benjamin

    2016-07-19

    Recently, researchers have faced the challenge of conflicting recommendations for online versus traditional methods to recruit and interview older, sexual minority men. Older populations represent the cohort least likely to be online, necessitating the use of traditional research methods, such as telephone or in-person interviews. By contrast, gay and bisexual men represent a population of early adopters of new technology, both in general and for medical research. In a study of older gay and bisexual men with prostate cancer, we asked whether respondents preferred online versus offline methods for data collection. Given the paucity of research on how to recruit older gay and bisexual men in general, and older gay and bisexual men with prostate cancer in particular, we conducted an observational study to identify participant preferences when participating in research studies. To test online versus offline recruitment demographic data collection, and interview preferences of older gay and bisexual men with prostate cancer. Email blasts were sent from a website providing support services for gay and bisexual men with prostate cancer, supplemented with an email invitation from the web-host. All invitations provided information via the study website address and a toll-free telephone number. Study tasks included respondents being screened, giving informed consent, completing a short survey collecting demographic data, and a 60-75 minute telephone or Internet chat interview. All materials stressed that enrollees could participate in each task using either online methods or by telephone, whichever they preferred. A total of 74 men were screened into the study, and 30 were interviewed. The average age of the participants was 63 years (standard deviation 6.9, range 48-75 years), with most residing in 14 American states, and one temporarily located overseas. For screening, consent, and the collection of demographic data, 97% (29/30) of the participants completed these tasks

  6. Evaluation of the clinical implementation of a large-scale online e-learning program on venous blood specimen collection guideline practices.

    PubMed

    Willman, Britta; Grankvist, Kjell; Bölenius, Karin

    2018-05-11

    When performed erroneously, the venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) practice steps patient identification, test request management and test tube labeling are at high risk to jeopardize patient safety. VBSC educational programs with the intention to minimize risk of harm to patients are therefore needed. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of a large-scale online e-learning program on personnel's adherence to VBSC practices and their experience of the e-learning program. An interprofessional team transformed an implemented traditional VBSC education program to an online e-learning program developed to stimulate reflection with focus on the high-risk practice steps. We used questionnaires to evaluate the effect of the e-learning program on personnel's self-reported adherence to VBSC practices compared to questionnaire surveys before and after introduction of the traditional education program. We used content analysis to evaluate the participants free text experience of the VBSC e-learning program. Adherence to the VBSC guideline high-risk practice steps generally increased following the implementation of a traditional educational program followed by an e-learning program. We however found a negative trend over years regarding participation rates and the practice to always send/sign the request form following the introduction of an electronic request system. The participants were in general content with the VBSC e-learning program. Properly designed e-learning programs on VBSC practices supersedes traditional educational programs in usefulness and functionality. Inclusion of questionnaires in the e-learning program is necessary for follow-up of VBSC participant's practices and educational program efficiency.

  7. Tools for Scientist Engagement in E/PO: NASA SMD Community Workspace and Online Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, H.; Shipp, S. S.; Grier, J.; Gross, N. A.; Buxner, S.; Bartolone, L.; Peticolas, L. M.; Woroner, M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums are here to help you get involved in E/PO! The Forums have been developing several online resources to support scientists who are - or who are interested in becoming - involved in E/PO. These include NASA Wavelength, EarthSpace, and the SMD E/PO online community workspace. NASA Wavelength is the one-stop shop of all peer-reviewed NASA education resources to find materials you - or your audiences - can use. Browse by audience (pre-K through 12, higher education, and informal education) or topic, or choose to search for something specific by keyword and audience. http://nasawavelength.org. EarthSpace, an online clearinghouse of Earth and space materials for use in the higher education classroom, is driven by a powerful search engine that allows you to browse the collection of resources by science topic, audience, type of material or key terms. All materials are peer-reviewed before posting, and because all submissions receive a digital object identifier (doi), submitted materials can be listed as publications. http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace. The SMD E/PO online community workspace contains many resources for scientists. These include one-page guides on how to get involved, tips on how to make the most of your time spent on E/PO, and sample activities, as well as news on funding, policy, and what's happening in the E/PO community. The workspace also provides scientists and the public pathways to find opportunities for participation in E/PO, to learn about SMD E/PO projects and their impacts, to connect with SMD E/PO practitioners, and to explore resources to improve professional E/PO practice, including literature reviews, information about the Next Generation Science Standards, and best practices in evaluation and engaging diverse audiences. http://smdepo.org.

  8. 78 FR 71705 - Agency Requests for Renewal of a Previously Approved Information Collection(s): Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Register by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13. DATES: Written comments should be... . Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Fax: 1-202-493-2251 Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket... Property. Form Numbers: MA-1047. Type of Review: Renewal of a currently approved information collection...

  9. A Case Study of Using an Online Community of Practice for Teachers' Professional Development at a Secondary School in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiyun; Lu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    In this case study, an online community was designed at a secondary school in China for the teachers to prepare their lessons collectively, reflect on their teaching practices, collect comments from peers, and share resources. A survey was administered to the teachers to investigate their perceptions on the online community for their professional…

  10. Optimization of separation and online sample concentration of N,N-dimethyltryptamine and related compounds using MEKC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Juing; Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Hsu, Wei-Ya; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2009-02-01

    The optimal separation conditions and online sample concentration for N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and related compounds, including alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT), 5-methoxy-AMT (5-MeO-AMT), N,N-diethyltryptamine (DET), N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), N,N-dibutyltryptamine (DBT), N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (DiPT), 5-methoxy-DMT (5-MeO-DMT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-DiPT (5-MeO-DiPT), using micellar EKC (MEKC) with UV-absorbance detection are described. The LODs (S/N = 3) for MEKC ranged from 1.0 1.8 microg/mL. Use of online sample concentration methods, including sweeping-MEKC and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-MEKC (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) improved the LODs to 2.2 8.0 ng/mL and 1.3 2.7 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the order of migration of the nine tryptamines was investigated. A urine sample, obtained by spiking urine collected from a human volunteer with DMT, was also successfully examined.

  11. Student perceptions: Importance of and satisfaction with aspects of an online biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Sheila R.

    Research of student satisfaction with various facets of an online biology course, as well as the perceived importance of these aspects, was conducted during the summer and fall 2004 semesters within a course, History of Biology, at a university in the southeastern United States. This research is based on the theory of transactional distance, which involves dialogue between the teacher and student, the physical environments of both the student and teacher, and the emotional environments of each. Student ratings of importance and satisfaction regarding aspects of convenience, grade earned/knowledge learned, emotional health, communication, and student support were collected toward the end of each semester, via the online course, using the researcher-designed Student Perceptions Survey. Statistics with repeated measures ANOVA, using an alpha of 0.05, determined differences between importance and satisfaction ratings for each of these aspects. Students perceived grade earned/knowledge learned to be the most important aspect of learning online, although it is not an aspect unique to online courses. All of the aspects included in the study were found to be at least somewhat important. Convenience was the aspect with which students were most satisfied, with students at least somewhat satisfied with the other aspects. Although convenience is an inherent strength of the online course format, instructors should be aware of how important it is to design requirements of the online class to help students acquire knowledge while allowing them to do so at their own pace. Well-structured content, prompt feedback, encouragement of quality student-instructor communication, and student support are all parts of a positive online course experience. The Student Perceptions Survey, created specifically for this research, can have substantial value both in the creation of new online courses and in the evaluation of pre-existing courses. It can provide important information that can be

  12. The Marriage of Fax and Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Reva

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of fax transmissions. Highlights include searching by fax, including online service, print and electronic publishing, and database producers; customer service, including documentation updates, new product announcements, and marketing materials; document delivery; problems; and fax messaging. (four references) (LRW)

  13. Online cross-validation-based ensemble learning.

    PubMed

    Benkeser, David; Ju, Cheng; Lendle, Sam; van der Laan, Mark

    2018-01-30

    Online estimators update a current estimate with a new incoming batch of data without having to revisit past data thereby providing streaming estimates that are scalable to big data. We develop flexible, ensemble-based online estimators of an infinite-dimensional target parameter, such as a regression function, in the setting where data are generated sequentially by a common conditional data distribution given summary measures of the past. This setting encompasses a wide range of time-series models and, as special case, models for independent and identically distributed data. Our estimator considers a large library of candidate online estimators and uses online cross-validation to identify the algorithm with the best performance. We show that by basing estimates on the cross-validation-selected algorithm, we are asymptotically guaranteed to perform as well as the true, unknown best-performing algorithm. We provide extensions of this approach including online estimation of the optimal ensemble of candidate online estimators. We illustrate excellent performance of our methods using simulations and a real data example where we make streaming predictions of infectious disease incidence using data from a large database. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Online Cross-Validation-Based Ensemble Learning

    PubMed Central

    Benkeser, David; Ju, Cheng; Lendle, Sam; van der Laan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Online estimators update a current estimate with a new incoming batch of data without having to revisit past data thereby providing streaming estimates that are scalable to big data. We develop flexible, ensemble-based online estimators of an infinite-dimensional target parameter, such as a regression function, in the setting where data are generated sequentially by a common conditional data distribution given summary measures of the past. This setting encompasses a wide range of time-series models and as special case, models for independent and identically distributed data. Our estimator considers a large library of candidate online estimators and uses online cross-validation to identify the algorithm with the best performance. We show that by basing estimates on the cross-validation-selected algorithm, we are asymptotically guaranteed to perform as well as the true, unknown best-performing algorithm. We provide extensions of this approach including online estimation of the optimal ensemble of candidate online estimators. We illustrate excellent performance of our methods using simulations and a real data example where we make streaming predictions of infectious disease incidence using data from a large database. PMID:28474419

  15. The Relationship between Online Students' Use of Services and Their Feelings of Mattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Tracy L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this single case study was to examine the relationship between online students' use of support services and their feelings of mattering using a convergent parallel research design to collect quantitative and qualitative data. Students enrolled exclusively in online classes during the academic year 2015-2016 at the University of New…

  16. Research Infrastructure and Scientific Collections: The Supply and Demand of Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, E.; Schindel, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Research infrastructure is essential in both experimental and observational sciences and is commonly thought of as single-sited facilities. In contrast, object-based scientific collections are distributed in nearly every way, including by location, taxonomy, geologic epoch, discipline, collecting processes, benefits sharing rules, and many others. These diffused collections may have been amassed for a particular discipline, but their potential for use and impact in other fields needs to be explored. Through a series of cross-disciplinary activities, Scientific Collections International (SciColl) has explored and developed new ways in which the supply of scientific collections can meet the demand of researchers in unanticipated ways. From cross-cutting workshops on emerging infectious diseases and food security, to an online portal of collections, SciColl aims to illustrate the scope and value of object-based scientific research infrastructure. As distributed infrastructure, the full impact of scientific collections to the research community is a result of discovering, utilizing, and networking these resources. Examples and case studies from infectious disease research, food security topics, and digital connectivity will be explored.

  17. Demonstrating the use of web analytics and an online survey to understand user groups of a national network of river level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit; Braga, Joao; Arts, Koen; Ioris, Antonio; Han, Xiwu; Sripada, Yaji; van der Wal, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The number of local, national and international networks of online environmental sensors are rapidly increasing. Where environmental data are made available online for public consumption, there is a need to advance our understanding of the relationships between the supply of and the different demands for such information. Understanding how individuals and groups of users are using online information resources may provide valuable insights into their activities and decision making. As part of the 'dot.rural wikiRivers' project we investigated the potential of web analytics and an online survey to generate insights into the use of a national network of river level data from across Scotland. These sources of online information were collected alongside phone interviews with volunteers sampled from the online survey, and interviews with providers of online river level data; as part of a larger project that set out to help improve the communication of Scotland's online river data. Our web analytics analysis was based on over 100 online sensors which are maintained by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). Through use of Google Analytics data accessed via the R Ganalytics package we assessed: if the quality of data provided by Google Analytics free service is good enough for research purposes; if we could demonstrate what sensors were being used, when and where; how the nature and pattern of sensor data may affect web traffic; and whether we can identify and profile these users based on information from traffic sources. Web analytics data consists of a series of quantitative metrics which capture and summarize various dimensions of the traffic to a certain web page or set of pages. Examples of commonly used metrics include the number of total visits to a site and the number of total page views. Our analyses of the traffic sources from 2009 to 2011 identified several different major user groups. To improve our understanding of how the use of this national

  18. Accounting for User Diversity in Configuring Online Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolliams, Peter; Gee, David

    1992-01-01

    Discusses cultural diversity in human-computer interactions and in the design of online systems. Topics addressed include cognitive psychology; North American and European ethnocentricity; online systems and their organizational setting; models for organization culture; corporate culture; international systems and country-specific cultures; and…

  19. Consistency of Students' Pace in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the consistency of students' behavior regarding their pace of actions over sessions within an online course. Pace in a session is defined as the number of logged actions divided by session length (in minutes). Log files of 6,112 students were collected, and datasets were constructed for examining pace…

  20. Support Services for Remote Users of Online Public Access Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalin, Sally W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the needs of remote users of online public access catalogs (OPACs). User expectations are discussed; problems encountered by remote-access users are examined, including technical problems and searching problems; support services are described, including instruction, print guides, and online help; and differences from the needs of…

  1. Communities of Practice Transition Online - Lessons learned from NASA's EPO Online Workspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth Forum Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) community has long interacted to better their practice as a community as well as individually. Working together to share knowledge and grow, they function as a community of practice. In 2009, NASA designed and implemented an online workspace in hopes of promoting the communities continued interactions. This study examines the role of an online workspace component of a community in the work of a community of practice. Much has been studied revealing the importance of communities of practice to organizations, project success, and knowledge management and some of these same successes hold true for virtual communities of practice. Study participants were 75 Education and Public Outreach community members of NASA's Science Mission Directorate Earth Forum. In this mixed methods study, online workspace metrics were used to track participation and a survey completed by 21 members was used to quantify participation. For a more detailed analysis, 15 community members (five highly active users, five average users, and five infrequent users) selected based on survey responses, were interviewed. Finally, survey data was gathered from seven online facilitators to understand their role in the community. Data collected from these 21 community members and five facilitating members suggest that highly active users (logging into the workspace daily), were more likely to have transformative experiences, co-create knowledge, feel ownership of community knowledge, have extended opportunities for community exchange, and find new forms of evaluation. Average users shared some similar characteristics with both the highly active members and infrequent users, representing a group in transition as they become more engaged and active in the online workspace. Inactive users viewed the workspace as having little value, being difficult to navigate, being mainly for gaining basic information about events and community news, and as another demand

  2. 77 FR 62254 - Renewal of Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Donnie Shaw, at 202-912-7155. Persons who use a telecommunication device for the deaf... Mr. Shaw. You may also review the information collection request online at http://www.reginfo.gov...

  3. Ethics and Distance Education: Strategies for Minimizing Academic Dishonesty in Online Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olt, Melissa R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses ethics and student assessment in distance education, focusing on strategies for minimizing academic dishonesty in online student assessment. Topics include acknowledging the disadvantages of online assessment and overcoming them; designing an effective, cheat-proof online assessment; keeping online courses current; and providing students…

  4. On-line atomic data access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David R.; Nash, Jeffrey K.

    1996-07-01

    The need for atomic data is one which continues to expand in a wide variety of applications including fusion energy, astrophysics, laser-produced plasma research, and plasma processing. Modern computer database and communications technology enables this data to be placed on-line and obtained by users over the INTERNET. Presented here is a summary of the observations and conclusions regarding such on-line atomic data access derived from a forum held at the Tenth APS Topical Conference on Atomic Processes in Plasmas.

  5. "#discrimination": The Online Response to a Case of a Breastfeeding Mother Being Ejected from a UK Retail Premises.

    PubMed

    Grant, Aimee

    2016-02-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to breastfeeding. Internationally, mothers have reported stigma surrounding public breastfeeding. In the United Kingdom, the Equality Act 2010 gives women the right to breastfeed in public, including within private businesses. In April 2014, a woman who was breastfeeding in a UK sports shop was asked to leave, resulting in a localized protest by breastfeeding mothers. This resulted in the issue of public breastfeeding being highlighted in local, national, and social media. To examine online opinion regarding breastfeeding in public and protesting about the right to breastfeed in public within the context of a single case. Online user-generated content relating to the case of Wioletta Komar was downloaded from Twitter and the comments section of a UK online news source, Mail Online. Data comprised 884 comments and 1210 tweets, collected within 24 hours of the incident. Semiotic and thematic analysis was facilitated by NVivo 10. Comments from Twitter were supportive (76%) or neutral (22%) regarding the protesting women and public breastfeeding. Conversely, Mail Online comments were mostly negative (85%). Mail Online posters questioned the legality of public breastfeeding, while Twitter comments acknowledged and supported women's legal right to breastfeed publicly. Many Mail Online commenters stated that they found it uncomfortable to watch breastfeeding or thought it was unnecessary to breastfeed in public. If the UK government is serious about increasing breastfeeding, interventions to promote public support for public breastfeeding are urgently required. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Making Online Learning Personal: Evolution, Evidentiary Reasoning, and Self-Regulation in an Online Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsteller, Robert B.

    An online curriculum about biological evolution was designed according to the Promoting Evidentiary Reasoning and Self-regulation Online (PERSON) theoretical framework. PERSON is an attempt to develop online science instruction focused on supporting evidentiary reasoning and self-regulation. An efficacy study was conducted with 80 suburban high school biology students using a design-based research approach to develop a curriculum to promote biological evolution understandings, evidentiary reasoning, and self-regulation. Data sources and instruments included (1) the Biological Evolution Assessment Measurement (BEAM); (2) the modified Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ); (3) discussion forum posts; (4) formative assessments of evidence based reasoning; (5) Prediction, Monitoring, and Reflection forms (PMR); (6) the Online Instruction Questionnaire; and (7) field notes. Findings revealed that BEAM posttest scores were significantly greater than pretest scores for items designed to measure biological evolution content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. Students tracked in a lower level biology course showed improvement in biological evolution understandings and evidentiary reasoning. It was found that performance on daily evidentiary reasoning tasks strongly predicted BEAM posttest scores. However, findings revealed that students did not meet local standards for performance on items designed to measure evidentiary reasoning. Students expressed a variety of opinions about their learning experiences with the online curriculum. Some students expressed a definite preference for traditional learning environments, while others expressed a definite preference for online learning. Self-regulatory ability did not significantly predict BEAM gain scores. Further, self-regulatory ability was not demonstrably improved as a result of this intervention. Implications for designing science instruction in asynchronous online learning environments to support

  7. The Social Ties That Bind. Online Treasures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how, in the new world of the information age, libraries must seek to bring relevant services to their technically savvy patrons. This includes designing a library that can serve not only the geographic community, but also the virtual online community. Software used to create online communities is known as social software and…

  8. Online interprofessional education facilitation: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sherryn Maree; Ward, Catherine; Reeves, Scott

    2018-04-22

    The use of online media to deliver interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming more prevalent across health professions education settings. Facilitation of IPE activities is known to be critical to the effective delivery of IPE, however, specifics about the nature of online IPE facilitation remains unclear. To explore the health professions education literature to understand the extent, range and nature of research on online IPE facilitation. Scoping review methodology was used to guide a search of four electronic databases for relevant papers. Of the 2095 abstracts initially identified, after screening of both abstracts and full-text papers, 10 studies were selected for inclusion in this review. Following abstraction of key information from each study, a thematic analysis was undertaken. Three key themes emerged to describe the nature of the IPE facilitation literature: (1) types of online IPE facilitation contributions, (2) the experience of online IPE facilitation and (3) personal outcomes of online IPE facilitation. These IPE facilitation themes were particularly focused on facilitation of interprofessional student teams on an asynchronous basis. While the included studies provide some insight into the nature of online IPE facilitation, future research is needed to better understand facilitator contributions, and the facilitation experience and associated outcomes, both relating to synchronous and asynchronous online environments.

  9. Online weight training.

    PubMed

    McNamara, John M; Swalm, Ricky L; Stearne, David J; Covassin, Tracey M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a traditional weight training class compared to nontraditional classes that were heavily laden with technology. Could students learn resistance exercises by watching video demonstrations over the Internet? Three university weight training classes, each lasting 16 weeks, were compared. Each class had the same curriculum and workout requirements but different attendance requirements. The online group made extensive use of the Internet and was allowed to complete the workouts on their own at any gym that was convenient for them. Seventy-nine college-aged students were randomized into 3 groups: traditional (n = 27), hybrid (n = 25), and online (n = 27). They completed pretest and posttest measures on upper-body strength (i.e., bench press), lower-body strength (i.e., back squat), and knowledge (i.e., written exam). The results indicated that all 3 groups showed significant improvement in knowledge (p < 0.05). The online group did not require the students to attend class and may have resulted in significantly lower scores on the bench press (p < 0.05) and squats (p < 0.05). This study indicates that an online weight training course may improve knowledge but not strength. Possible reasons for a lack of improvement in the online group included lack of motivation, low accountability, and the possibility that the self-reported workouts were not accurate. These results suggest that there is a limit to how much technology can be used in a weight training class. If this limit is exceeded, some type of monitoring system appears necessary to ensure that students are actually completing their workouts.

  10. Quality Authorizing for Online and Blended-Learning Charter Schools. NACSA Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Rapp, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Online charter schools are one key subset of the K-12 online education landscape, which also includes state virtual schools, district-level online programs, private providers of both individual courses and entire schools, and others. As of late 2010, online and blended charter schools existed in more than 20 states, serving more than 100,000…

  11. Local Music Collections: Strategies for Digital Access, Presentation, and Preservation--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doi, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Music Collection (SMC) is a local music collection held at the University of Saskatchewan. This case study examines a project to digitize and present this unique special collection in the online environment. The project aims to facilitate access to the collection, preserve the collection and promote scholarship and interest in the…

  12. Pilot Test of the Online Public Access Catalog Project's User and Nonuser Questionnaires. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen

    This report describes the pilot data collections and post-questionnaire interview activities of the Council on Library Resources (CLR)/Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) Online Public Access Project. The background of the project is briefly described, the purpose and adminstration of the post-questionnaire interviews are outlined, and pilot…

  13. The Effects of Online Communities of Practice on Pre-Service Teachers' Critical Thinking Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2017-01-01

    This empirical study attempted to investigate the effect of using online communities of practice in teacher education on pre-service teachers' critical thinking dispositions. California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and the comments posted to the online community of practice were used as the data collection tools. Results showed that…

  14. Validation of online psychometric instruments for common mental health disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Ballegooijen, Wouter; Riper, Heleen; Cuijpers, Pim; van Oppen, Patricia; Smit, Johannes H

    2016-02-25

    Online questionnaires for measuring common mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety disorders are increasingly used. The psychometrics of several pen-and-paper questionnaires have been re-examined for online use and new online instruments have been developed and tested for validity as well. This study aims to review and synthesise the literature on this subject and provide a framework for future research. We searched Medline and PsycINFO for psychometric studies on online instruments for common mental health disorders and extracted the psychometric data. Studies were coded and assessed for quality by independent raters. We included 56 studies on 62 online instruments. For common instruments such as the CES-D, MADRS-S and HADS there is mounting evidence for adequate psychometric properties. Further results are scattered over different instruments and different psychometric characteristics. Few studies included patient populations. We found at least one online measure for each of the included mental health disorders and symptoms. A small number of online questionnaires have been studied thoroughly. This study provides an overview of online instruments to refer to when choosing an instrument for assessing common mental health disorders online, and can structure future psychometric research.

  15. Tracking Online Data with YouTube's Insight Tracking Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    YouTube users have access to the powerful data collection tool, Insight. Insight allows YouTube content producers to collect data about the number of online views, geographic location of viewers by country, the demographics of the viewers, how a video was discovered, and the attention span of the viewer while watching the video. This article…

  16. Risky online behaviors among adolescents: Longitudinal relations among problematic Internet use, cyberbullying perpetration, and meeting strangers online

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Guadix, Manuel; Borrajo, Erika; Almendros, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims This study aims to analyze the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between three major risky online behaviors during adolescence: problematic Internet use, cyberbullying perpetration, and meeting strangers online. An additional objective was to study the role of impulsivity–irresponsibility as a possible explanatory variable of the relationships between these risky online behaviors. Methods The study sample was 888 adolescents that completed self-report measures at time 1 and time 2 with an interval of 6 months. Results The findings showed a significant cross-sectional relationship between the risky online behaviors analyzed. At the longitudinal level, problematic Internet use at time 1 predicted an increase in the perpetration of cyberbullying and meeting strangers online at time 2. Furthermore, meeting strangers online increased the likelihood of cyberbullying perpetration at time 2. Finally, when impulsivity–irresponsibility was included in the model as an explanatory variable, the relationships previously found remained significant. Discussion These results extend traditional problem behavior theory during adolescence, also supporting a relationship between different risky behaviors in cyberspace. In addition, findings highlighted the role of problematic Internet use, which increased the chances of developing cyberbullying perpetration and meeting strangers online over time. However, the results suggest a limited role of impulsivity–irresponsibility as an explicative mechanism. Conclusions The findings suggest that various online risk activities ought to be addressed together when planning assessment, prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:28092196

  17. Teaching Domestic Violence Online: A Step Forward or a Step Backward?

    PubMed

    Danis, Fran S

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing number of courses and degree programs available online, faculty may be interested in developing an online course on domestic violence. This article analyzes the similarities and differences involved in teaching about domestic violence online versus face-to-face. Highlights of course activities and notable online resources are identified including YouTube videos, webinars, online training modules, and websites. The limitations and challenges of teaching domestic violence in an asynchronous online course and recommendations for future teaching are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Standing in the Middle of a Cyclone: Online Education Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeroff, Gene I.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses online learning and the possible impact on classroom-based courses. Highlights include profits and online courses; problems with classroom learning; hybrid courses; potential for interactivity; adult learners and online courses; policies regarding the implementation of online learning; and a sidebar on the nature of interaction. (LRW)

  19. 77 FR 33156 - Notice of Intent To Request New Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... proposed information collection. This is a new collection to provide state-level estimates of the prevalence and geographic distribution of School Food Authorities (SFAs) conducting Farm to School activities...://www.regulations.gov ), which provides online instructions for submitting comments electronically. FOR...

  20. Online Detection of Driver Fatigue Using Steering Wheel Angles for Real Driving Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuojin; Li, Shengbo Eben; Li, Renjie; Cheng, Bo; Shi, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a drowsiness on-line detection system for monitoring driver fatigue level under real driving conditions, based on the data of steering wheel angles (SWA) collected from sensors mounted on the steering lever. The proposed system firstly extracts approximate entropy (ApEn) features from fixed sliding windows on real-time steering wheel angles time series. After that, this system linearizes the ApEn features series through an adaptive piecewise linear fitting using a given deviation. Then, the detection system calculates the warping distance between the linear features series of the sample data. Finally, this system uses the warping distance to determine the drowsiness state of the driver according to a designed binary decision classifier. The experimental data were collected from 14.68 h driving under real road conditions, including two fatigue levels: “wake” and “drowsy”. The results show that the proposed system is capable of working online with an average 78.01% accuracy, 29.35% false detections of the “awake” state, and 15.15% false detections of the “drowsy” state. The results also confirm that the proposed method based on SWA signal is valuable for applications in preventing traffic accidents caused by driver fatigue. PMID:28257094

  1. An online semi-supervised brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenghui; Yu, Zhuliang; Shen, Zhifang; Li, Yuanqing

    2013-09-01

    Practical brain-computer interface (BCI) systems should require only low training effort for the user, and the algorithms used to classify the intent of the user should be computationally efficient. However, due to inter- and intra-subject variations in EEG signal, intermittent training/calibration is often unavoidable. In this paper, we present an online semi-supervised P300 BCI speller system. After a short initial training (around or less than 1 min in our experiments), the system is switched to a mode where the user can input characters through selective attention. In this mode, a self-training least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) classifier is gradually enhanced in back end with the unlabeled EEG data collected online after every character input. In this way, the classifier is gradually enhanced. Even though the user may experience some errors in input at the beginning due to the small initial training dataset, the accuracy approaches that of fully supervised method in a few minutes. The algorithm based on LS-SVM and its sequential update has low computational complexity; thus, it is suitable for online applications. The effectiveness of the algorithm has been validated through data analysis on BCI Competition III dataset II (P300 speller BCI data). The performance of the online system was evaluated through experimental results on eight healthy subjects, where all of them achieved the spelling accuracy of 85 % or above within an average online semi-supervised learning time of around 3 min.

  2. On-line hemodiafiltration. Gold standard or top therapy?

    PubMed

    Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Pohlmeier, Robert

    2002-01-01

    In summary, on-line HDF is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy with increased convective removal of uremic toxins as compared to the most frequently used low- or high-flux HD therapy. The clinical advantages of on-line HDF have shown to be dose dependent, which makes on-line HDF superior to other therapies with less convective solute removal. Among the therapies with high convective solute removal, i.e. on-line HDF, on-line HF and double high-flux dialysis, it is difficult to finally decide on the best therapy, as direct comparisons of these therapies are not performed. Theoretical considerations like the relative to on-line HDF lower achievable Kt/Vurea with on-line HF, allow to state that on-line HDF is the top therapy now available for patients with ESRD. A gold standard may be defined as something with which everything else is compared if one tries to establish it in the respective field. In order to declare on-line HDF as the gold standard in renal replacement therapy, we need more direct comparisons of on-line HDF with other therapies, including mortality as an outcome parameter. However, based on our current knowledge, it does not seem to be too speculative that high-quality clinical studies will establish on-line HDF in the next years as the new gold standard in renal replacement therapy.

  3. Social networking and online recruiting for HIV research: ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brenda L

    2014-02-01

    Social networking sites and online advertising organizations provide HIV/AIDS researchers access to target populations, often reaching difficult-to-reach populations. However, this benefit to researchers raises many issues for the protections of prospective research participants. Traditional recruitment procedures have involved straightforward transactions between the researchers and prospective participants; online recruitment is a more complex and indirect form of communication involving many parties engaged in the collecting, aggregating, and storing of research participant data. Thus, increased access to online data has challenged the adequacy of current and established procedures for participants' protections, such as informed consent and privacy/confidentiality. Internet-based HIV/AIDS research recruitment and its ethical challenges are described, and research participant safeguards and best practices are outlined.

  4. Social Networking and Online Recruiting for HIV Research: Ethical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    Social networking sites and online advertising organizations provide HIV/AIDS researchers access to target populations, often reaching difficult-to-reach populations. However, this benefit to researchers raises many issues for the protections of prospective research participants. Traditional recruitment procedures have involved straightforward transactions between the researchers and prospective participants; online recruitment is a more complex and indirect form of communication involving many parties engaged in the collecting, aggregating, and storing of research participant data. Thus, increased access to online data has challenged the adequacy of current and established procedures for participants’ protections, such as informed consent and privacy/confidentiality. Internet-based HIV/AIDS research recruitment and its ethical challenges are described, and research participant safeguards and best practices are outlined. PMID:24572084

  5. Team Building in an Online Organizational Behavior Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzeda, Maurice; Haq, Rana; LeBrasseur, Rolland

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and delivery of a team-building exercise in an online organizational behavior undergraduate course. Qualitative data of student perceptions, collected at the end of the course, revealed both positive and negative reactions to various aspects of the team-building exercise. Based on these reactions, the authors…

  6. Online social network data as sociometric markers.

    PubMed

    Binder, Jens F; Buglass, Sarah L; Betts, Lucy R; Underwood, Jean D M

    2017-10-01

    Data from online social networks carry enormous potential for psychological research, yet their use and the ethical implications thereof are currently hotly debated. The present work aims to outline in detail the unique information richness of this data type and, in doing so, to support researchers when deciding on ethically appropriate ways of collecting, storing, publishing, and sharing data from online sources. Focusing on the very nature of social networks, their structural characteristics, and depth of information, we provide a detailed and accessible account of the challenges associated with data management and data storage. In particular, the general nonanonymity of network data sets is discussed, and an approach is developed to quantify the level of uniqueness that a particular online network bestows upon the individual maintaining it. Using graph enumeration techniques, we show that comparatively sparse information on a network is suitable as a sociometric marker that allows for the identification of an individual from the global population of online users. The impossibility of anonymizing specific types of network data carries implications for ethical guidelines and research practice. At the same time, network uniqueness opens up opportunities for novel research in psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Cyberchondria: Parsing health anxiety from online behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doherty-Torstrick, E. R.; Walton, Kate E.; Fallon, Brian A.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Individuals with questions about their health often turn to the internet for information about their symptoms, but the degree to which health anxiety is related to online checking, and clinical variables, remains unclear. The clinical profiles of highly anxious internet checkers, and the relationship to checking behavior itself, have not previously been reported. In this paper, we test the hypothesis, derived from cognitive-behavioral models, that individuals with higher levels of illness anxiety would recall having experienced worsening anxiety after reassurance-seeking on the internet. Method Data from 731 volunteers who endorsed engaging in online symptom searching were collected using an online questionnaire. Severity of health anxiety was assessed with the Whiteley Index, functional impairment with the Sheehan Disability Scale, and distress recall during and after searching with a modified version of the Clinician's Global Impairment scale. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine variables contributing to distress during and after internet checking. Results Severity of illness anxiety on the Whiteley Index was the strongest predictor of increase in anxiety associated with, and consequent to, online symptom searching. Individuals with high illness anxiety recalled feeling worse after online symptom checking while those with low illness anxiety recalled relief. Longer duration online health-related use was associated with increased functional impairment, less education, and increased anxiety during and after checking. Conclusion Because individuals with moderate-high levels of illness anxiety recall experiencing more anxiety during and after searching, such searching may be detrimental to their health. If replicated in controlled experimental settings, this would suggest that individuals with illness anxiety should be advised to avoid using the internet for illness-related information. PMID:27044514

  8. Live lectures or online videos: students' resource choices in a first-year university mathematics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Emma; Meehan, Maria; Parnell, Andrew

    2018-05-01

    In Maths for Business, a mathematics module for non-mathematics specialists, students are given the choice of completing the module content via short online videos, live lectures or a combination of both. In this study, we identify students' specific usage patterns with both of these resources and discuss their reasons for the preferences they exhibit. In 2015-2016, we collected quantitative data on each student's resource usage (attendance at live lectures and access of online videos) for the entire class of 522 students and employed model-based clustering which identified four distinct resource usage patterns with lectures and/or videos. We also collected qualitative data on students' perceptions of resource usage through a survey administered at the end of the semester, to which 161 students responded. The 161 survey responses were linked to each cluster and analysed using thematic analysis. Perceived benefits of videos include flexibility of scheduling and pace, and avoidance of large, long lectures. In contrast, the main perceived advantages of lectures are the ability to engage in group tasks, to ask questions, and to learn 'gradually'. Students in the two clusters with high lecture attendance achieved, on average, higher marks in the module.

  9. Excessive Gambling and Online Gambling Communities.

    PubMed

    Sirola, Anu; Kaakinen, Markus; Oksanen, Atte

    2018-04-05

    The Internet provides an accessible context for online gambling and gambling-related online communities, such as discussion forums for gamblers. These communities may be particularly attractive to young gamblers who are active Internet users. The aim of this study was to examine the use of gambling-related online communities and their relevance to excessive gambling among 15-25-year-old Finnish Internet users (N = 1200). Excessive gambling was assessed by using the South Oaks Gambling Screen. Respondents were asked in a survey about their use of various kinds of gambling-related online communities, and sociodemographic and behavioral factors were adjusted. The results of the study revealed that over half (54.33%) of respondents who had visited gambling-related online communities were either at-risk gamblers or probable pathological gamblers. Discussion in these communities was mainly based on sharing gambling tips and experiences, and very few respondents said that they related to gambling problems and recovery. In three different regression models, visiting gambling-related online communities was a significant predictor for excessive gambling (with 95% confidence level) even after adjusting confounding factors. The association of visiting such sites was even stronger among probable pathological gamblers than among at-risk gamblers. Health professionals working with young people should be aware of the role of online communities in terms of development and persistence of excessive gambling. Monitoring the use of online gambling communities as well as utilizing recovery-oriented support both offline and online would be important in preventing further problems. Gambling platforms should also include warnings about excessive gambling and provide links to helpful sources.

  10. A Multidimensional Analysis Tool for Visualizing Online Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minjeong; Lee, Eunchul

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes and verifies the performance of an analysis tool for visualizing online interactions. A review of the most widely used methods for analyzing online interactions, including quantitative analysis, content analysis, and social network analysis methods, indicates these analysis methods have some limitations resulting from their…

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire Short-Form and Prevalence of Problematic Online Gaming in a National Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pápay, Orsolya; Urbán, Róbert; Griffiths, Mark D.; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Farkas, Judit; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Felvinczi, Katalin; Oláh, Attila; Elekes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The rise and growing popularity of online games has led to the appearance of excessive gaming that in some cases can lead to physical and psychological problems. Several measures have been developed to explore the nature and the scale of the phenomenon. However, few measures have been validated psychometrically. The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties of the 12-item Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire Short-Form (POGQ-SF) and to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming. Data collection was carried out to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming in a national representative adolescent sample by using an offline (pen and pencil) method. A total of 5,045 secondary school students were assessed (51% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years) of which 2,804 were gamers (65.4% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years). Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to test the measurement model of problematic online gaming, and latent profile analysis was used to identify the proportion of gamers whose online game use can be considered problematic. Results showed that the original six-factor model yielded appropriate fit to the data, and thus the POGQ-SF has appropriate psychometric properties. Latent profile analysis revealed that 4.6% of the adolescents belong to a high risk group and an additional 13.3% to a low risk group. Due to its satisfactory psychometric characteristics, the 12-item POGQ-SF appears to be an adequate tool for the assessment of problematic online gaming. PMID:23621688

  12. Psychometric properties of the problematic online gaming questionnaire short-form and prevalence of problematic online gaming in a national sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pápay, Orsolya; Urbán, Róbert; Griffiths, Mark D; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Farkas, Judit; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Felvinczi, Katalin; Oláh, Attila; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2013-05-01

    The rise and growing popularity of online games has led to the appearance of excessive gaming that in some cases can lead to physical and psychological problems. Several measures have been developed to explore the nature and the scale of the phenomenon. However, few measures have been validated psychometrically. The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties of the 12-item Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire Short-Form (POGQ-SF) and to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming. Data collection was carried out to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming in a national representative adolescent sample by using an offline (pen and pencil) method. A total of 5,045 secondary school students were assessed (51% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years) of which 2,804 were gamers (65.4% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years). Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to test the measurement model of problematic online gaming, and latent profile analysis was used to identify the proportion of gamers whose online game use can be considered problematic. Results showed that the original six-factor model yielded appropriate fit to the data, and thus the POGQ-SF has appropriate psychometric properties. Latent profile analysis revealed that 4.6% of the adolescents belong to a high risk group and an additional 13.3% to a low risk group. Due to its satisfactory psychometric characteristics, the 12-item POGQ-SF appears to be an adequate tool for the assessment of problematic online gaming.

  13. Evaluating Online Tutorials for University Faculty, Staff, and Students: The Contribution of Just-in-Time Online Resources to Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Jennifer; Park, Yeonjeong

    2011-01-01

    The effective integration of current technologies in teaching and research is a high priority for today's universities. To support the technology skills of university faculty, staff, and students, the subject university's office for faculty training and support, provides free, 24/7 access to a collection of online technology tutorials leased from…

  14. Assessment of online continuing dental education in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Francis, B; Mauriello, S M; Phillips, C; Englebardt, S; Grayden, S K

    2000-01-01

    Dental professionals are discovering the unique advantages of asynchronous lifelong learning through continuing dental education (CDE) opportunities offered online. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the process and outcomes of online CDE in North Carolina. The assessment was designed to provide a better understanding of practicing dental professionals experiences with online CDE and to determine the effectiveness of this learning strategy. Dental professionals from four North Carolina Area Health Education Centers regions evaluated two pilot online CDE modules in 1998. Thirty-one participants were recruited and subsequently enrolled with 23 completing at least one module. Each module included objectives, a multiple-choice pretest, interactive core material, and a post-test. Participants completed three online surveys measuring individual demographics and computer skill level, module design, and use and overall reaction to online learning. Most participants agreed that the modules were comprehensive, were pleasing in appearance, provided clear instructions, provided adequate feedback, and were easy to navigate. Most participants agreed that knowledge of the material increased. This was validated by a significant increase in mean pre- to post-test scores (p = .0001). Participants agreed that convenience was a definite advantage, and they would choose online courses again to meet their CDE needs. The least-liked aspects included technical and formatting issues. Participants were enthusiastic about online learning and learned effectively with this teaching strategy, but desired much more interactivity than existed in the current design.

  15. Butterfly Girls; promoting healthy diet and physical activity to young African American girls online: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debbe; Mahabir, Rory; Bhatt, Riddhi; Boutte, Cynthia; Cantu, Dora; Vazquez, Isabel; Callender, Chishinga; Cullen, Karen; Baranowski, Tom; Liu, Yan; Walker, Celeste; Buday, Richard

    2013-08-02

    Young African American girls have a high risk of obesity. Online behavior change programs promoting healthy diet and physical activity are convenient and may be effective for reducing disparities related to obesity. This report presents the protocol guiding the design and evaluation of a culturally and developmental appropriate online obesity prevention program for young African American girls. The Butterfly Girls and the Quest for Founder's Rock is an 8-episode online program delivered as an animated, interactive comic. The program promotes healthy diet and physical activity and is specifically designed for 8-10 year old African American girls. Girls, parents, and community representatives provided formative feedback on cultural relevance and developmental appropriateness. A three-group (treatment, comparison, wait-list control) randomized design (n=390 parent/child dyads) is employed, with child as the unit of assignment. Change in body mass index is the primary outcome; change in fruit and vegetable consumption, water, and physical activity are secondary outcomes. Data collection occurs at baseline, approximately 3 months after baseline (i.e., completion of the online program), and approximately three months later (i.e., maintenance assessment). Two dietary recalls are collected at each data collection period by trained interviewers using the Nutrient Data System for Research (NDSR 2012) system. Physical activity is objectively measured by seven days of accelerometry. Psychosocial and process data are also collected. Girls in the treatment and comparison groups will be interviewed at post 1 to obtain information on personal reactions to the program. This research will develop and evaluate the efficacy of an online program for reducing obesity risk among girls at risk of obesity and related diseases. Online programs offer the potential for wide dissemination, thus reducing disparities related to obesity. NCT01481948.

  16. Designing Online Education Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the main elements that characterize online course design. Topics include design constraints; analysis of learning needs; defining objectives; course prerequisites; content structuring; course flexibility; learning strategies; evaluation criteria; course activities; course structure; communication architecture; and design evaluation.…

  17. Development of new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Si Yeol; Ahn, Seung Do; Chung, Weon Kuu; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to collect and extract medical data in radiation oncology more efficiently. Materials and Methods The statistical program is a web-based program. The directory was placed in a sub-folder of the homepage of KOSRO and its web address is http://www.kosro.or.kr/asda. The operating systems server is Linux and the webserver is the Apache HTTP server. For database (DB) server, MySQL is adopted and dedicated scripting language is the PHP. Each ID and password are controlled independently and all screen pages for data input or analysis are made to be friendly to users. Scroll-down menu is actively used for the convenience of user and the consistence of data analysis. Results Year of data is one of top categories and main topics include human resource, equipment, clinical statistics, specialized treatment and research achievement. Each topic or category has several subcategorized topics. Real-time on-line report of analysis is produced immediately after entering each data and the administrator is able to monitor status of data input of each hospital. Backup of data as spread sheets can be accessed by the administrator and be used for academic works by any members of the KOSRO. Conclusion The new on-line statistical program was developed to collect data from nationwide departments of radiation oncology. Intuitive screen and consistent input structure are expected to promote entering data of member hospitals and annual statistics should be a cornerstone of advance in radiation oncology. PMID:26157684

  18. Development of new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Song, Si Yeol; Ahn, Seung Do; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-06-01

    To develop new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to collect and extract medical data in radiation oncology more efficiently. The statistical program is a web-based program. The directory was placed in a sub-folder of the homepage of KOSRO and its web address is http://www.kosro.or.kr/asda. The operating systems server is Linux and the webserver is the Apache HTTP server. For database (DB) server, MySQL is adopted and dedicated scripting language is the PHP. Each ID and password are controlled independently and all screen pages for data input or analysis are made to be friendly to users. Scroll-down menu is actively used for the convenience of user and the consistence of data analysis. Year of data is one of top categories and main topics include human resource, equipment, clinical statistics, specialized treatment and research achievement. Each topic or category has several subcategorized topics. Real-time on-line report of analysis is produced immediately after entering each data and the administrator is able to monitor status of data input of each hospital. Backup of data as spread sheets can be accessed by the administrator and be used for academic works by any members of the KOSRO. The new on-line statistical program was developed to collect data from nationwide departments of radiation oncology. Intuitive screen and consistent input structure are expected to promote entering data of member hospitals and annual statistics should be a cornerstone of advance in radiation oncology.

  19. Online and in-person networking among women in the Earth Sciences Women's Network at www.ESWNonline.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontak, R.; Adams, A. S.; De Boer, A. M.; Hastings, M. G.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers. Membership is free and has grown through "word of mouth," and includes upper-level undergraduates, graduate students, professionals in a range of environmental fields, scientists working in public and private institutions. Our mission is to promote career development, build community, provide informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. Since 2002 we have accomplished this trough online networking, including over email and a listserv, on facebook, in-person networking events, and professional development workshops. Now in our 10th year, ESWN is debuting a new web-center that creates an online space exclusively for women in any discipline of the Earth (including planetary) sciences. ESWN members can connect and create an online community of support and encouragement for themselves as women in a demanding career. Many women in Earth Science fields feel isolated and are often the only woman in their department or work environments. ESWN is a place to meet others, discuss issues faced in creating work-life balance and professional success and share best practices through peer mentoring. Now on ESWN's new web-center, members can create and personalize their profiles and search for others in their field, nearby, or with similar interests. Online discussions in the members-only area can also be searched. Members can create groups for discussion or collaboration, with document sharing and password protection. Publicly, we can share gained knowledge with a broader audience, like lessons learned at our professional development workshops and collected recommendations from members. The new web center allows for more connectivity among other online platforms used by our members, including linked-in, facebook, and twitter. Built in Wordpress with a Buddpress members-only section, the new

  20. COPPA (Children's Online Privacy Protection Act): The First Year--A Survey of Sites. A Report on Web Site Compliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Media Education, Washington, DC.

    The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) went into effect on April 21, 2000. The first Federal online privacy law, COPPA regulates the collection, use, and disclosure by commercial Web sites and online services of personally identifiable information from children under age 13. To mark the first anniversary of COPPA's implementation, a…

  1. Comparing face-to-face and online qualitative research with people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Synnot, Anneliese; Hill, Sophie; Summers, Michael; Taylor, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We compared face-to-face focus groups and an online forum in qualitative research with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and family members. Although the merits and challenges of online qualitative research have been considered by others, there is limited literature directly comparing these two data collection methods for people with disability or chronic illness. Twenty-seven people participated in one of four focus groups and 33 people took part in an online forum. Demographic and MS-related characteristics were similar between the two groups, with a slight nonsignificant trend toward nonmetropolitan residence in online forum participants. There was a high level of overlap in the themes generated between groups. Participant responses in the online forum were more succinct and on-topic, yet in the focus groups interaction was greater. Online qualitative research methods can facilitate research participation for people with chronic illness or disability, yielding generally comparable information to that gathered via face-to-face methods.

  2. Negotiating Femininities Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written about the potential for online learning (Fryer, 1997; www. ngfl.gov.uk/ngfl/index.html). However this literature typically emphasizes not online learning but online education. In this paper I focus on the potential for online learning, specifically learning about issues surrounding femininity in the presence of online peers,…

  3. 78 FR 3971 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ...The Commission amends the Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule (``COPPA Rule'' or ``Rule''), consistent with the requirements of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, to clarify the scope of the Rule and strengthen its protections for children's personal information, in light of changes in online technology since the Rule went into effect in April 2000. The final amended Rule includes modifications to the definitions of operator, personal information, and Web site or online service directed to children. The amended Rule also updates the requirements set forth in the notice, parental consent, confidentiality and security, and safe harbor provisions, and adds a new provision addressing data retention and deletion.

  4. Identifying online user reputation of user-object bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-02-01

    Identifying online user reputation based on the rating information of the user-object bipartite networks is important for understanding online user collective behaviors. Based on the Bayesian analysis, we present a parameter-free algorithm for ranking online user reputation, where the user reputation is calculated based on the probability that their ratings are consistent with the main part of all user opinions. The experimental results show that the AUC values of the presented algorithm could reach 0.8929 and 0.8483 for the MovieLens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the CR and IARR methods. Furthermore, the experimental results for different user groups indicate that the presented algorithm outperforms the iterative ranking methods in both ranking accuracy and computation complexity. Moreover, the results for the synthetic networks show that the computation complexity of the presented algorithm is a linear function of the network size, which suggests that the presented algorithm is very effective and efficient for the large scale dynamic online systems.

  5. Dimensions and dynamics of citizen observatories: The case of online amateur weather networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharesifard, Mohammad; Wehn, Uta; van der Zaag, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    Crowd-sourced environmental observations are being increasingly considered as having the potential to enhance the spatial and temporal resolution of current data streams from terrestrial and areal sensors. The rapid diffusion of ICTs during the past decades has facilitated the process of data collection and sharing by the general public (so-called citizen science) and has resulted in the formation of various online environmental citizen observatory networks. Online amateur weather networks are a particular example of such ICT-mediated citizen observatories as one of the oldest and most widely practiced citizen science activities. The objective of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework that enables a systematic review of different dimensions of these mushrooming/expanding networks. These dimensions include the geographic scope and types of network participants; the network's establishment mechanism, revenue stream(s) and existing communication paradigm; efforts required by citizens and support offered by platform providers; and issues such as data accessibility, availability and quality. An in-depth understanding of these dimensions helps to analyze various dynamics such as interactions between different stakeholders, motivations to run these networks, sustainability of the platforms, data ownership and level of transparency of each network. This framework is then utilized to perform a critical and normative review of six existing online amateur weather networks based on publicly available data. The main findings of this analysis suggest that: (1) There are several key stakeholders such as emergency services and local authorities that are not (yet) engaged in these networks. (2) The revenue stream(s) of online amateur weather networks is one of the least discussed but most important dimensions that is crucial for the sustainability of these networks. (3) Although all of the networks included in this study have one or more explicit pattern of two

  6. Exploring How Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Use Online Social Bookmarking to Envision Literacy in the Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie; Gregory, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    This study considers how pre-service teachers envision disciplinary literacy through an online social bookmarking project. Thirty secondary pre-service teachers participated in the project through an undergraduate literacy course. Online bookmarks and post-project reflections were collected and analyzed using a constant comparative approach to…

  7. The Transformation of Mathematics in On-Line Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borba, Marcelo C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents some research findings regarding the changes in the mathematics produced by mathematics teachers in on-line distance courses. Predicated on the belief that knowledge is generated by collectives of humans-with-media, and that different technologies modify the nature of the knowledge generated, we have sought to understand how…

  8. Online reputation management: the first steps.

    PubMed

    Gay, Susan; Pho, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Can patients reliably choose a good doctor online? Inevitably, some will. Many doctors are not comfortable being visible online. So if you do not have a blog or a social media profile, what shows up when a patient Googles you most likely will be something from an online rating site. This trend can have a profound impact on a medical practice. As one of authors (KP) noticed, patients are now saying that they found his practice through the Internet, in stark contrast to 10 years ago, when their information sources were the Yellow Pages or a newspaper ad, or from calling the local hospital. Below are five key reasons why determining your online reputation today can pay off in the future. This article will guide you in establishing your social media footprint and includes a personal story of one physician's reaction to conducting a Google search on herself.

  9. The Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the practical aspects of online counseling, including ethics, training, supervision, technology, and competency issues. The authors discuss online counseling's strengths and limitations and present guidelines for what types of clients and counseling psychologists may be appropriate for online counseling. To illustrate the…

  10. Online tables of contents for books: effect on usage.

    PubMed

    Morris, R C

    2001-01-01

    To explore whether the presence of online tables of contents (TOC) in an online catalog affects circulation (checkouts and inhouse usage). Two major questions were posed: (1) did the presence of online tables of contents for books increase use, and, (2) if it did, what factors might cause the increase? A randomized and stratified design was used in tracking usage of 3,957 book titles that were previously divided into two groups: one with TOC and one without TOC. Stratification was done for year of imprint, location, subject, previous use, circulating or non-circulating status, and presence of TOC. The use was tracked by the online catalog statistics in the InnoPac online catalog for fourteen months. The study found that tables of contents do increase usage. It also showed a correlation in the size of the effect based on the currency of the titles. In general, even after adjusting for all of the variables (publication date, location, circulation status, subject, and previous use), the odds of a title being used increased by 45% if the titles had online tables of contents, a statistically significant impact at the 0.05 level. This case-control study presents new information about the impact on circulation and inhouse use when tables of contents for books are added to the online catalog record. The study helps to establish the positive role of tables of contents in online catalogs. The research establishes TOC as a major parameter that can be successfully studied using quantitative methods. The study also provides information professionals with some guidance on when enhancement of TOC is likely to be most effective in increasing the use of existing collections.

  11. Perceptions and Expectations of Online Graduate Students Regarding Synchronous Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailie, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of the perceptions and expectations of a group of experienced online student participants regarding synchronous events in the higher learning setting. Areas of inquiry posed to online student panelists included whether they expected live events to be included in their classes, and…

  12. Using Learning Analytics to Enhance Student Learning in Online Courses Based on Quality Matters Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Ndoye, Abdou; Wilkins, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Quality Matters is recognized as a rigorous set of standards that guide the designer or instructor to design quality online courses. We explore how Quality Matters standards guide the identification and analysis of learning analytics data to monitor and improve online learning. Descriptive data were collected for frequency of use, time spent, and…

  13. The Impact of Self-Regulation Strategies on Student Success and Satisfaction in an Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Fethi; Yukselturk, Erman; Kurucay, Murat; Flores, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether students' self-regulation skills impact their success and satisfaction in an online learning environment. Data was collected from one hundred and fifty-five students taking an online introductory programming course offered as a part of certification curriculum in a public university in Turkey. The…

  14. Developing Collections With Get It Now: A Pilot Project for a Hybrid Collection.

    PubMed

    Hendler, Gail Y; Gudenas, Jean

    2016-01-01

    As health sciences libraries transition from print to online journal collections that require significant institutional funding, librarians are investigating the use of on demand services in order to meet customer need and contain costs. In 2014 a three-year pilot project to determine if unmediated access to the Copyright Clearance Center's Get It Now service would expand access to needed content and provide usage data to inform collections decision making. The service provides rapid, automated delivery of unsubscribed, high-quality journal articles directly to the customer. The three-year pilot project aims to compare the cost of Get It Now to the traditional subscription model to learn if the service is a cost-effective and sustainable alternative that improves customer satisfaction and that can transform collection development with a hybrid model for journal acquisitions.

  15. Online Health Communities and Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin; Royne, Marla B

    2017-03-01

    This research uses content analysis (N = 1,960) to examine the computer-mediated communication within online health communities for evidence of chronic disease self-management behaviors, including the perceived benefits and perceived barriers to participating in such behaviors. Online health communities act as informal self-management programs led by peers with the same chronic disease through the exchange of health information. Online health communities provide opportunities for health behavior change messages to educate and persuade regarding chronic disease self-management behaviors.

  16. Voices of the “99 Percent”: The Role of Online Narrative to Improve Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Beth; Meier, Stephanie J; Anderson, Michael; Booth, Kathleen E; Cooper, Lacey; Flock, Ellie; Payne, Jackelyn B; Hirway, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Context Communal blogs facilitate online narratives by providing opportunities for individuals to co-construct meaning and to engage in discussion about lived health experiences. Objective To examine the role of health as a connective narrative among individuals organizing collectively in an online community. The “We are the 99 percent” Tumblr blog emerged as a spontaneous community platform of the Occupy Wall Street movement in the US. Design Researchers conducted a qualitative content analysis of a total of 2003 blog posts. Main Outcome Measures Data analysis included a process of data reduction, display, and conclusion drawing and verification. Results Bloggers discussed medical crises and the role of injury and illness in maintaining financial solvency. The difficulty of obtaining health care and the lack of accessible quality care emerged as themes. In particular, unemployment and underemployment limited access to health insurance coverage. The bloggers expressed dissatisfaction with the health care system and the impact of financial status on health. These challenges were exacerbated for marginalized populations, such as women and veterans. Conclusion Findings offer implications for the value of online narrative to improve health care initiatives and to provide insight to integrated health care systems, including health care practitioners, nonprofit organizations, hospitals, and policy makers. Results suggest opportunities to address the health care gaps of marginalized populations and to develop public health policy. PMID:27455070

  17. 76 FR 33416 - Proposed Information Collection (Nonprofit Research and Education Corporations (NPCs) Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Collection (Nonprofit Research and Education Corporations (NPCs) Data Collection) Activity; Comment Request... comment period, comments may be viewed online through FDMS. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cynthia... information; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4...

  18. Relationship Among Dental Students' Class Lecture Attendance, Use of Online Resources, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Azab, Ehab; Saksena, Yun; Alghanem, Tofool; Midle, Jennifer Bassett; Molgaard, Kathleen; Albright, Susan; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship among dental students' attendance at class lectures, use of online lecture materials, and performance in didactic courses. The study was conducted with second-year predoctoral students at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine during the fall semester of 2014. Three basic science and three preclinical dental courses were selected for evaluation. Online usage for each participant was collected, and a survey with questions about attendance and online behavior was conducted. The final grade for each participant in each selected course was obtained and matched with his or her online usage and attendance. Out of a total 190 students, 146 (77%) participated. The results showed no significant relationship between students' grades and their class attendance or online usage except for a weak negative relationship between class attendance and online usage for the Epidemiology course (p<0.001) and the overall preclinical dental courses (p=0.03). Although the results did not show strong relationships among class attendance, online usage, and course grades, most of the students reported that having the online resources in addition to the lectures was helpful.

  19. psiTurk: An open-source framework for conducting replicable behavioral experiments online.

    PubMed

    Gureckis, Todd M; Martin, Jay; McDonnell, John; Rich, Alexander S; Markant, Doug; Coenen, Anna; Halpern, David; Hamrick, Jessica B; Chan, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Online data collection has begun to revolutionize the behavioral sciences. However, conducting carefully controlled behavioral experiments online introduces a number of new of technical and scientific challenges. The project described in this paper, psiTurk, is an open-source platform which helps researchers develop experiment designs which can be conducted over the Internet. The tool primarily interfaces with Amazon's Mechanical Turk, a popular crowd-sourcing labor market. This paper describes the basic architecture of the system and introduces new users to the overall goals. psiTurk aims to reduce the technical hurdles for researchers developing online experiments while improving the transparency and collaborative nature of the behavioral sciences.

  20. 76 FR 73640 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Request for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... digital and social media marketing, and efforts to avoid collection of data from youth under the legal... platforms such as social media, online video channels, and virtual worlds; and targeted marketing to the... increased its presence online. The comment identified one brand that advertises solely in social media and...